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Stefen

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Reply #525 on: October 14, 2010, 01:08:58 PM
Slither is underrated.
Let's go to a motel. We don't have to do anything -- we could just swim.


modage

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Reply #526 on: October 14, 2010, 01:59:48 PM
Slither is underrated.

But does not belong in the company of those others.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.


Stefen

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Reply #527 on: October 14, 2010, 02:05:07 PM
True. Considering a few of those are overrated. Evil Dead II I'm looking at you!
Let's go to a motel. We don't have to do anything -- we could just swim.


modage

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Reply #528 on: October 14, 2010, 02:49:33 PM
No way!  That's a 10 Skull Masterpiece.   :elitist:
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.


Pubrick

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Reply #529 on: October 14, 2010, 03:24:50 PM
yeah evil dead 2 is probably the only evil dead that isn't overrated.
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ᾦɐļᵲʊʂ

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Reply #530 on: October 14, 2010, 03:36:39 PM
I just watched The Burning.



A shameless blend of Nightmare on Elm Street with Friday the 13th, so HOW you ask did this series not go on?  Personally, I'm not convinced it wasn't just a spoof that was shot straight.  In fact, as I'm reading what I've typed, I'm thinking this was that.  A young unbald Jason Alexander is in it and it's written and produced by the Weinsteins.

But seriously, a camp's janitor that is covered in burns because a prank goes wrong comes back to murder each camper a week later since he's a freak and hell bent on revenge?  I mean, each of the elements is pretty textbook, so to use all of them, you're not even writing a new movie anymore.  Ugh... I'm saddened.  So, so saddened.

Actually some cool kills in it, being a slasher and all.  

SPOILER ALERT

Although he carries around gardening shears, he never actually chops anything.  At one point dices off fingers with a slice, but no chopping.  Also pins someone to a wall with the shears in a creative way, but absolutely no chopping.

Like spinning plates


« Last Edit: October 15, 2010, 03:07:01 AM by // w l r s »
"As a matter of fact I only work with the feeling of something magical, something seemingly significant. And to keep it magical I don't want to know the story involved, I just want the hypnotic effect of it somehow seeming significant without knowing why." - Len Lye


modage

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Reply #531 on: October 14, 2010, 04:24:02 PM
Haha, looks like they blended Nightmare On Elm Street 3 years before it was released.  Just another shameless premake.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.


socketlevel

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Reply #532 on: October 14, 2010, 04:50:01 PM
True. Considering a few of those are overrated. Evil Dead II I'm looking at you!

they're not overrated, and slither doesn't have the test of time like the others do. but it's pretty great considering it's relatively recent and this kind of fun movie isn't made anymore. it is near the bottom of my list in a sheer point scheme, but it still gets on it.
the one last hit that spent you...


RegularKarate

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Reply #533 on: October 15, 2010, 12:17:39 PM
Slither stinks... it tried so hard to be like the others on that list and it's effort was so incredibly visible and unbearable.

Not funny, not scary... but boy did it try to be.


ElPandaRoyal

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Reply #534 on: October 15, 2010, 04:10:40 PM
Slither stinks... it tried so hard to be like the others on that list and it's effort was so incredibly visible and unbearable.

Not funny, not scary... but boy did it try to be.

I enjoyed quite a bit actually. Saw it at a horror film festival and I'm pretty sure most of the people in the audience liked it a lot too.
Si


modage

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Reply #535 on: October 16, 2010, 09:07:29 AM




I've never really been a fan of the Friday The 13th films, but I can still appreciate their legacy.  This documentary basically amounts to a special feature on a DVD but it is comprehensive.  They've gotten almost everybody (sans Kevin Bacon and Corey Feldman) ever involved with the series to come back and interview about their part in the series and everyone seems to have a good sense of humor about it.  Structurally it's a little all over the place, at one point it seems like they're just burning off fun interview footage but none of the conversations are really related to each other.  But if you are a fan of the Friday The 13th series, or horror films in general this is definitely worth seeing.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.


modage

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Reply #536 on: October 16, 2010, 09:17:35 AM




I can remember seeing images from Mark of the Vampire in old monster books I had when I was a kid.  The film, directed by Dracula's Tod Browning, and starring Bela Lugosi was released just 4 years after Dracula.  In the film Lugosi (who has almost no dialogue) looks almost exactly as he did in Dracula, except for an unexplained bullet wound on the side of his head.  (It's never explained.)  But it's Lionel Barrymore who has top billing, as the Van Helsing-esque character trying to track down the vampire.  The film basically moves along like a more comedic (and much more boring) version of Dracula until the film takes a switch about 3/4's of the way through. SPOILERS (BUT SERIOUSLY, DO YOU CARE?) It's revealed that there aren't vampires, everyone is an actor trying to get an actual murderer to try to re-create his crime through some bizarre hypnosis.  It's really a terribly thought out twist thats meant to pull the rug out from the audience in the cheapest way.  There are many scenes of characters reacting to the vampire with the supposed murderer nowhere near them, so why would they be doing this?  END SPOILERS I was wondering why I'd never seen this film and the two reasons are: it's MGM, not Universal who did all the major monster movies of the 30's, and that it's not very good.  Thankfully it's only 60 minutes long!
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.


Reelist

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Reply #537 on: October 16, 2010, 03:42:58 PM
Anyone see this yet?


it was pretty dope. A comprehensive look at the development of horror movies through the years/why we like them and how they have come to make their mark in our society at this point. I liked it because I always enjoyed that special on Bravo! "Scariest movie moments" but I watched all of them and was sick of hearing celebrities go on about how scary a movie was, and really blow smoke up the genre's ass. This one is more in-depth and showed a lot of clips from lesser known films that I really wanna see now!


modage

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Reply #538 on: October 17, 2010, 09:01:18 AM




Wes Craven's attempt at a different sort of film, it's not really horror, more of a voodoo mystery "inspired by true events".  Bill Pullman plays an anthropologist sent to Haiti looking for some powder that supposedly brings people back from the dead.  I was surprised at how good the film was (for about 2/3rds of it).  Craven was applying his skills to a different kind of film and the results were engaging and not as dated as you might expect.  But the last act of the film starts to unravel as it seems like the studio decided they didn't want a different kind of Wes Craven film and asked him to reshoot the ending like a horror movie.  It even looks like it was filmed on a set where the rest of the film looks like they were actually in Haiti.  Still, not a total waste.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.


modage

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Reply #539 on: October 17, 2010, 09:06:33 AM




This is another vampire I'd seen in one of my monster books when I was a kid that I finally got to check out thanks to Netflix streaming.  Set and released in 1970 the film is kind of like an American cousin to late period Hammer films (like Dracula A.D. 1972).  It's also got some very 70's auteur filmmaking flourishes, long walking and talking shots filmed from across the street, zooms, a non-steady cam.  It's an interesting hybrid of a completely outdated Dracula model (Halloween costume and all) with a modern 70's LA feel.  And it's not too bad either.  Altman/Allen regular Michael Murphy definitely lifts the film a few notches with his sarcasm and Udo Kier doppleganger Robert Quarry makes a good Dracula/Yorga.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.