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eward

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Reply #90 on: November 14, 2018, 06:03:36 PM
from Gravrity's Rainbow if you want to reach into history there's The Recognitions--this keeps within the idea of running with the big-idea writers--

I've had The Recognitions on my Kindle for over a year now. One day, soon soon, I will finally get to it.
"Do you laugh at jealousy?"

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jenkins

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Reply #91 on: December 12, 2018, 09:35:25 PM


Guillermo Rosales
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Born in Havana, Rosales was a lifelong misfit diagnosed with schizophrenia.
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Rosales committed suicide in Miami in 1993, at the age of 47. Before doing so, he destroyed most of his work.

the book:
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It has been hailed for its precise, lapidary style
basically it's an easy read and he heavy-metal shreds the whole way through. it's like One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest but with only the cuckoos, and written by Knut Hamsun or etc great talent, also written by one of the cuckoos.

it's a short book and it's the best book recommendation i've ever offered. i found my way to the book by chance. but it's that feeling where i always belonged here. if you like tremendous books about troubled souls in troubled lives (lol who doesn't) this is a book you've been wanting to hear about.


jenkins

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Reply #92 on: December 13, 2018, 05:56:39 PM
he allows me to look at heavy stories in clear ways, with even some lightness, is why i think he's a general good idea for a reader


jenkins

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Reply #93 on: December 18, 2018, 03:29:33 AM


an intellectual version of The Halfway House, a sick man being taken care of, in this one it's literal sickness, tuberculosis, based on the author's own experience. sick and dying people tend to write good books. that's when they do all their best existential thinking, you know. it's a different type of reading because the writing is designed a different way. this one is like nightmare poetry prose.

i'm obsessed with this line in it
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Here in this hospital, will I end up like the pilgrim dreaming of riches who, upon waking, shows me his penniless hand, minus a finger or thumb?


jenkins

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Reply #94 on: December 20, 2018, 08:25:25 PM


it’s a Japanese classic about being human feeling impossible. he downward spirals. the writing genre is: I-Novel (私小説 Shishōsetsu, Watakushi shōsetsu) used to describe a type of confessional literature where the events in the story correspond to events in the author's life.

the writer and the woman he lived with drowned themselves in a river, he was 38.

this is how I feel less alone in the world. This calms me.


jenkins

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Reply #95 on: December 23, 2018, 01:20:11 AM
^he twice tries suicide, fails both times, the first time a woman successfully dies, he's sent to a mental hospital and leaves without being able to feel either happy or not happy



this book, somehow, introduced interior monologue to literature, le monologue intérieur, which had only been sampled from in larger pieces, or appeared as soliloquies, this is linked with stream of consciousness and subjective fiction, which influenced Joyce, who brought it to another level with Ulysses, he noticed what was happening, the only other person who noticed what was happening had been, of course, Mallarmé

it's fucking insane to me that interior monologue wasn't an established writing form until 1887


jenkins

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Reply #96 on: December 24, 2018, 01:22:41 PM
^i really enjoyed it. it inspired a major movement but it's considered minor work, since it's a common slice-of-life narrative, though frankly i felt lucky to be in that world at that time

now i am onto


which is a larger book that will take me longer to read. i'm not sure if there's a particularly alluring detail about it, i just want to read it


Robyn

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Reply #97 on: February 18, 2019, 05:37:52 PM
I am reading two different books by Roberto Bolano atm. Whores who kill (don't know the english title`?) and The Unknown University. I have cried several times during the last couple of days, he's my new favorite author, like he reminds me so much of other authors I enjoy, I have seen several things straight out lifted from this,  it's crazy that I haven't discovered this until now... i have read The Savage Detectives before btw.


Robyn

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Reply #98 on: February 18, 2019, 05:41:16 PM
Wait, what is this thread about? I was trying to found a book thread. I have written about 30 pages in my notebook tonight. Bolano inspires me.


Robyn

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Reply #99 on: February 18, 2019, 05:55:11 PM
No like really, Bruno K. Öijer has been my favorite author for the last 6 years... I borrowed my old teacher's  copy of Öijer's collected poems, and   carried it in my bag like a bible for three years, before he got really anxious about it and wanted it back, just so he could give me my own copy of it as a graduation present. Now I feel like I will carry Bolanos poems as a bible for at least the next three years.


WorldForgot

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Reply #100 on: May 09, 2019, 03:29:36 PM
Swift intro to the distro and attitude of subversive polti-lit
(and The Good Fight's latest szn comes to mind, like, how many P-Anonz are there? How many dimensions are taking form in the shadows of American discourse, on the net, in garages, at bookstores in maybe silent aggressions?)
from the BLACK OAK CLIQUE-- WE ARE ALL GOING TO DIE.
Theze Zinez surge in dozenz and not all as impassioned, but this is where we are.

A compendium of the discourse loop itself playing out, an autocritique:  collection of Queer Insurrection textz, from 06 and onward concerning Milwaukee's own fight against our existent social order and its relationship to Euro cellz.

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To cite queer insurrectional praxis and the ideas from these
texts in our own context, we originally set out to collect
words and stories from criminal queers, insurrectional transfemminists, and other uncontrollables on this side of the
water and to present them under the title "Queer
Insurectionalism in Europe". After much outreaching,
chasing ghosts and bullying our friends, we decided we
were doing something wrong. Some of the beauty contained
in Queer Insurrectional praxis in Europe lies in the fact that
it is so subversive, underground, and refuses to
communicate itself. It's not the actions aren't happening, or
that the people don't exist, but rather that many of us have
chosen to lurk in the shadows, to slip the noose of
identification, and to let those cops who keep assuming
"only men smash things" keep on assuming that- in the end
maybe it's what keeps us out of jail and able to act :-)
Further, we got this impression, that words somehow imply
death, that a chronology of actions or events would imply
something past and not something which occupies our
present. For this reason we opted instead to search out
recent and historical pictures of peoples actions, or
combative posturing and to display them throughout the
zine with a breif description of each and its context offered
in the last pages.



Their latest is particularly poetic: BE GAY, DO CRIME! . I feel that this one especially pushes past the group's self-described "Nihilism,"

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Both the gang-form known as Bash Back! and this publication were expressions of a milieu based in Riverwest, a discreet (and at times not so discreet) anarchist neighborhood since the end of World War II. After the war, the nascent bohemian anarchist subculture that had been developing in the war resister camps among writers and art freaks, and some christians, splintered in a diaspora that bore the newly freed mystics to New York and San Francisco. A small enclave ended up in Riverwest and stayed, joining the Galleanist anarchist lineage rooted in the city. The neighborhood remained a constant site of struggle, sometimes armed, with the forces of law and order. In the neighborhood one can find a certain crossroads at which a variety of struggles have intersected: queer struggles, struggles against racism and fascism, against the police, for the liberation of foodways, along with a dense layering of underground cultures. Distinct anarchist currents consistently cohabitated that neighborhood, debating positions and ways. Around the time of the Nardini Gang communiques, insurrectionaries, queers, race traitors, and eco-extremists came together under the roof of an anarchist space. This particular infoshop (the Cream City Collectives) was one of the many anarchist spaces that had stood at that exact intersection going back decades.

This is the place where we found ourselves when, a few months after the initial publication of “Toward the Queerest Insurrection,” emissaries from the future spoke through fires set across the seas. Insurrection broke out. Not in Milwaukee, but in Greece. Civilization died within the bounds of the nation-state mythologized as the epicenter of its birth. The police executed a teenage anarchist named Alexis Grigoropoulos in another long-term anarchist neighborhood, Exarcheia (ex-, out of; -archeia, rulership). Exarcheia is a place where anarchy, the Beautiful Idea, had never gone quiet, and so when a cop murdered a youth – an encounter so devastatingly routine in the US – there at the crossroads which is now Alexis’ hero-shrine, the whole world caught fire. The insurrection had come.


eward

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Reply #101 on: May 10, 2019, 12:00:16 PM
That is quite fascinating
"Do you laugh at jealousy?"

"No, I don't even laugh at seasickness! I happen to regard jealousy as the seasickness of passion."


Drenk

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Reply #102 on: June 04, 2019, 02:02:40 PM
Lucy Ellmann* has, like, a book coming in July, a 1000 pages sentence, the interior monologue of a woman with "the fact of" being the recurring chorus of the books. It's called Ducks, Newburyport. Here is an extract:

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… I dreamt last night about somebody complaining that he owned a “lesser Cézanne” while I was tearing heartshaped buttons off a shirt, and something about a ferret, the fact that my dreams have become more practical and less expansive, I think, since we got poorer, the fact that I should be swinging wild but instead my dreams are just about tidying the hen coop or unloading the dishwasher, or losing my address book, or I’m cooking noodles for everybody and Leo has a plane to catch in half an hour and there’s no taxi, or I find myself on a bicycle carrying a huge box, the fact that once I dreamt I ate one tiny piece of ham, and that was it, that was the whole dream, the fact that I dream all the wrong stuff and remember all the wrong stuff, what a goofball, “a genuine idiot,” the fact that why do I remember that Amish wool shop and not my mom, …

*Her father wrote the most well known biography of James Joyce called...Joyce.

She wrote this article about bookstores. It's fun.

https://books.substack.com/p/diary-lucy-ellmann-on-not-going-into

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A Waterstone’s bookshop in London—I did a reading there, and during the questions afterwards, a member of the audience asked me how I’d put the disparate elements of my novel together. Being incapable of giving a sensible explanation, and thinking of Schoenberg’s witty answer to a similar enquiry in Hollywood about his 12-tone scale, I said cheerily “That is none of your business”—for which I was thoroughly scolded later on by my editor. And, subsequently, by a friend of my editor. And maybe even a few other people too. I was just trying to be funny.

I'm so many people.