Author Topic: Tim Burton  (Read 21374 times)

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Fernando

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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #60 on: October 16, 2007, 04:56:20 PM »
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he was funny but i met him at NONE of them.  :yabbse-undecided:

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MacGuffin

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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #61 on: November 16, 2007, 12:12:46 PM »
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Burton, Disney team on 3D films
Director pairs with studio on duo
Source: Variety
 
Tim Burton is pairing up with Disney to direct two 3-D pics, "Alice in Wonderland" and "Frankenweenie."

Two-movie deal with Walt Disney Studios begins with "Alice in Wonderland," which will combine performance-capture imagery, currently seen in "Beowulf," with live-action footage.

Script by Linda Woolverton ("The Lion King," "Beauty and the Beast") is based on the Lewis Carroll classic.

Richard Zanuck, Joe Roth and Suzanne and Jennifer Todd will produce.

Burton, who is wrapping "Sweeney Todd" at Paramount and DreamWorks, will tackle "Alice in Wonderland" early next year, with production set to wrap by May.

After "Alice," Burton will helm and produce "Frankenweenie," based on his 1984 short film about a pet dog brought back to life by his loyal owner. Pic will be shot in stop-motion animation and shown in digital 3-D.

Movies are part of the Mouse House's efforts to ramp up its 3-D pic offerings, after starting with "Chicken Little" in 2005, followed by "Meet the Robinsons" and a re-release of "The Nightmare Before Christmas" in 3-D.

"When the script came to us from Joe Roth, there was one name on my list and it was Tim," said Oren Aviv, prexy of Walt Disney Motion Pictures Group. "It felt like a project that needed someone with a unique vision and voice to really give it that special look and memorable characters that only Tim Burton can do."

Burton had previously produced "Nightmare Before Christmas" and helmed "Ed Wood" at Disney.
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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #62 on: November 16, 2007, 12:20:15 PM »
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Burton, Disney team on 3D films
Director pairs with studio on duo
Source: Variety
 
Tim Burton is pairing up with Disney to direct two 3-D pics, "Alice in Wonderland" and "Frankenweenie."

Two-movie deal with Walt Disney Studios begins with "Alice in Wonderland," which will combine performance-capture imagery, currently seen in "Beowulf," with live-action footage.

Script by Linda Woolverton ("The Lion King," "Beauty and the Beast") is based on the Lewis Carroll classic.


First line:  Burton, direct, Frankenweenie.
Reaction:  Yes!

Second line:  Performance-capture imagery, currently seen in "Beowulf"
Reaction:  I, and this is sort of tacky I know, it was an impulse, but I booed, literally out loud went "Boooo" at the trailer for Beowulf when I saw Michael Clayton in Westwood.  I expected the audience to regard me with indifference or annoyance, but to my surprise there was scattered applause and expressions of agreement for my boo.  The consensus is clearly a 'wtf' as to this videogame looking bullshit.  It's the visual and filmic equal to Reader's Digest books.  It should have stayed limited to the Polar Express franchise.

Third line:  Script by person who does Disney scripts.
Reaction:  This film isn't even intended for me, my bad.

Then I stopped.
Raven haired Linda and her school mate Linnea are studying after school, when their desires take over and they kiss and strip off their clothes. They take turns fingering and licking one another's trimmed pussies on the desks, then fuck each other to intense orgasms with colorful vibrators.

MacGuffin

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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #63 on: December 10, 2007, 01:58:04 AM »
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Burton Stitches New Frankenweenie

Director Tim Burton told SCI FI Wire that he's eager to begin shooting a full-length version of Frankenweenie, the short film he made in 1984 while working for Disney. Burton will produce and direct Frankenweenie, the Frankenstein-inspired story of a boy who brings his beloved dog back from the dead, as a 3-D stop-motion-animation film.

"We're going to do that real low-budget," Burton said in an interview while promoting his latest film, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street. "The thing that excites me about it and that will make it different is that when I look at my original drawings, there are certain things that are in those that I couldn't get in the live action when I made the film. So I'm quite excited to try to get a certain emotion and other characters in the new version, and I want to make it a slightly bigger story."

The original Frankenweenie offers a glimpse of the filmmaker to come with its odd camera angles, warped sense of humor and horror, use of shadows and even specific images, Burton admitted. He went on to make movies including Batman, The Nightmare Before Christmas, Edward Scissorhands and Sleepy Hollow.

"I'm such a fan of old movies, and I think that just stays with you," Burton added. "It doesn't leave you. Those kinds of things, whether you think about them or not, they just are in your DNA, and they stay with you. Even if I was doing a romantic comedy I would probably stick a bunch of shadows in there or whatever." Frankenweenie will be released in 2009.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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72teeth

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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #64 on: December 10, 2007, 02:36:38 AM »
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i hope he keeps it in black and white... im sure a 3d black and white horror-ish film is somewhere on his agenda...
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MacGuffin

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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #65 on: January 09, 2008, 10:53:50 PM »
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“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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MacGuffin

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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #66 on: June 02, 2008, 08:48:55 PM »
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Dark Shadows Filmmaker Buzz
Chocolate Factory trio reteam for vampire soap.

The Charlie and the Chocolate Factory team of director Tim Burton, star Johnny Depp, and screenwriter John August are reportedly looking to re-team for a big screen version of the cult classic TV series Dark Shadows.

Director Pete Segal revealed to IESB over the weekend that his Shazam! screenwriter John August is also busy working on Burton's Dark Shadows. This was the first time that Burton and August's involvement with the Warners-based Shadows had surfaced.

It was announced last July that Depp would produce, via his Infinitum-Nihil production banner, a feature film version of Dark Shadows along with Graham King. It's also expected that Depp would play the lead role of vampire patriarch Barnabas Collins, played on the original 1966-71 series by Jonathan Frid and in a short-lived 1990s revival by Ben Cross.

In addition to Charlie, Burton and Depp have previously teamed for Edward Scissorhands, Corpse Bride, Sleepy Hollow, Sweeney Todd, and Ed Wood.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Alexandro

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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #67 on: June 02, 2008, 11:23:32 PM »
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i love the guy, but the more films he makes, the more ed wood grows as the best thing he will ever do. he keeps getting the obvious offers and material. ed wood is perfect for him, but it ain't obvious, and that's why it works so well i think.

MacGuffin

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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #68 on: August 07, 2008, 01:04:47 AM »
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Depp Confirmed for Alice
Mad Hatter rumor reportedly true.

Rumors swirled last week that Johnny Depp might reteam with director Tim Burton for the latter's 3-D retelling of Alice in Wonderland.

Now comes word that the dynamic duo -- who have previously teamed for Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Edward Scissorhands, Ed Wood, and Sleepy Hollow -- are indeed reuniting for the live action/performance-capture adaptation of the Lewis Carroll classic.

According to a source for Entertainment Weekly's Hollywood Insider blog, Alice "will be live action until Alice (played by Mia Wasikowska of HBO's In Treatment) jumps down the rabbit hole and meets the loopy tea party host. The big question is whether Depp himself will don a Hatter outfit, or lend his voice to the computer-generated version."

Alice in Wonderland is expected to begin filming early next year for a 2010 release. Linda Woolverton penned the script.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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tpfkabi

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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #69 on: August 12, 2008, 07:53:02 AM »
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3-D?
i was thinking they were going for what Linklater has been doing.
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MacGuffin

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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #70 on: December 04, 2008, 12:54:13 AM »
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Exclusive - Producer Richard D. Zanuck talks DARK SHADOWS
Source: Collider
 
Just a few hours ago I attended the press day for the upcoming Jim Carrey comedy “Yes Man”. After sitting in on the press conferences, I managed to get a one on one with producers Richard D. Zanuck and David Heyman. In case you don’t know who David is…he’s produced all the “Harry Potter” movies. And if you don’t know who Richard D. Zanuck is…he’s as close to Hollywood royalty as anyone in the business as his dad was Darryl F. Zanuck and he started 20th Century Fox back in the 1930’s!

So, as I said, Hollywood royalty.

In the coming days I’ll have the entire video interview with these two great producers, but I wanted to post what Richard said about “Dark Shadows” immediately.

As most of you know, Johnny Depp and Tim Burton have been rumored to be making a film adaptation of the popular 1960’s show for awhile now. But with the way it is in Hollywood, you never know if a project is ever going to come together. Add to that, we’re talking about two of the biggest people in Hollywood and since they have their picks of the best scripts and projects; you never know what they’ll do next.

But according to Mr. Zanuck, “Dark Shadows” is going to be Tim’s next project after “Alice in Wonderland” and they’ll be shooting it next summer in London!
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #71 on: June 10, 2009, 12:20:25 AM »
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Tim Burton exhibit at MoMA
Director's artwork to be featured at N.Y. museum
Source: Variety

Picasso, Monet ... Tim Burton?

The visually inventive filmmaker behind "Edward Scissorhands," "Batman" and "Sweeney Todd," among others, will be the subject of "Tim Burton," a major exhibition at Gotham's Museum of Modern Art beginning Nov. 22 and running through April 26.

The show will include more than 700 pieces: paintings, drawings, storyboards, maquettes, puppets and other work created or designed by Burton. MoMA will also screen a complete retrospective of the helmer's 14 films over the course of the show.

The exhibition follows Burton from childhood through his most recent work, which the director finds appropriate: "Everybody draws," Burton observed. "I just never stopped when the teachers told me to."

In addition, MoMA will present a series of films that influenced or inspired the helmer, including James Whale's 1931 "Frankenstein," Robert Wiene's silent 1920 horror film "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari" and Roger Corman's 1961 "The Pit and the Pendulum."

Cinephiles will also have a chance to view Burton's earliest nonpro films and student art, on display for the first time.

The exhibition is sponsored by the Sci Fi Channel and organized by MoMA's assistant curator, Ron Magliozzi; the department of film's curatorial assistant, Jenny He; and chief curator of film Rajendra Roy.

Burton confessed that when he first heard from museum reps, "I thought it was an elaborate joke of some sort." The helmer, working on a new version of "Alice in Wonderland" for Disney, said the exhibit's organizers excavated a huge collection of work, much of which even he had forgotten.

"It's easier for me to think things through visually instead of verbally, so it's like a diary in that way," Burton said of the show. "I have so many drawings. I never look at the stuff -- I just keep doing it."

"There is no other living filmmaker possessing Tim Burton's level of accomplishment and reputation whose full body of work has been so well hidden from public view," Maggliozi said.

Much of that unseen output was produced by Burton while he was working for Disney, ostensibly on "The Fox and the Hound" and "The Black Cauldron," but also on his own projects.

"I wasn't very good in the animation department, so they just let me sit there and draw things for a year, which was great," Burton recalled. "But at the end of it all, I realized they weren't going to use any of it."

Now, Burton's fans will get a rare look at some of that work, though the artist himself is anxious about the prospect.

"When you make a film, you feel exposed in a way, and this feels even more exposing," Burton confessed. "I feel like it's a real honor and all, but I'm a bit nervous about it, too."
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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MacGuffin

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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #72 on: September 21, 2009, 10:52:02 AM »
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Frankenweenie is coming: 5 things you need to know
Source: SciFi Wire

One of the last tasks of former Walt Disney Co. chairman Dick Cook was to announce the stop-motion-animated, feature-length remake of Tim Burton's first live-action short, Frankenweenie, at the D23 Fan Expo on Sept. 11, and several details were revealed about the much-anticipated project.

In the short, a boy re-animates his dead dog a la Frankenstein, only to see his beloved pet rejected and persecuted by an angry mob. Now that Burton has graduated to literary remakes and musicals, a feature-length Frankenweenie will be a nice throwback to classic Burton.

In a press conference and subsequent exclusive interview at D23, we got Frankenweenie producer Don Hahn to reveal several key details:

1) It's black and white. Burton's short was shot in black and white, like the original Frankenstein movies. Shooting a cartoon for wide release without color must have been a tougher sell. "It was and it wasn't," Hahn said. "I think now, with Tim working at the top of his craft, the top of his game, on movies like Alice in Wonderland, I think Dick Cook really felt like if you're going to take a risk on anybody, why can't it be Tim Burton? A Tim Burton movie in black and white based on Frankenstein, how cool is that? Dick was very supportive of it." [It's unclear Cook's abrupt departure on Friday will affect the movie.]

2) The new script has more Frankenstein and more dog. At 30 minutes long, the original Frankenweenie barely covered the re-animation and angry mob elements of the Frankenstein legends. Hahn told the press conference that the expanded script is complete. "It's Frankenstein mixed with a boy-and-his-dog story, very much like the original one," Hahn said in an exclusive interview after the conference. "What's great is Tim grew up in Southern California, in Burbank, and the movie itself kind of takes that California suburban look at a monster movie story. I think that's what we're trying to do."

3) The Frankenstein family tree is growing. With the expanded script come more characters. The original short starred Barret Oliver as Victor Frankenstein and Daniel Stern and Shelley Duvall as his parents, Ben and Susan. Paul Bartel, Sofia Coppola and Jason Hervey played some of the neighbors. "There are a lot of great new characters in it, really great new characters," Hahn said in our exclusive interview. "It's the ensemble. It's the Tim Burton ensemble." Most of the original actors are still with us and could reprise their roles, but Hahn said it's too early for voice casting. Could Johnny Depp make an appearance? "The neat thing about Tim is he can pretty much call up anybody he needs and they'll be happy to work with him," Hahn said.

4) Now Tim Burton can do what he wants. Burton actually got fired from Disney for making the original Frankenweenie. The studio thought it was too scary for children. Only after his success at Warner Brothers did Disney realize there was a market for his work. Now they're clamoring for Burton, who is directing and designing the stop-motion puppets. "Unlike Tim's recent stop-motion movies, he's designing the characters himself," Hahn said in our exclusive interview. "So you really get kind of the hand of the artist in it and get to see Tim's work itself. It's Tim Burton at his best. I think that's why he leapt at it, because when he started out making movies, it was his first choice for a live-action movie. I think he felt like, 'Gee, I wish I could've made a feature back then.' So now to come back and revisit the material is pretty fun for him, I think."

5) They've already started. Cook just announced a 2011 release for Frankenweenie. That's not much time to animate 90 minutes of film frame by frame, although they can get away with 70 or less. "I'm not sure it's a 90-minute film," Hahn said. Burton and his team have already built maquettes. "We're underway on it, and I think the most important thing is it has to be a good movie," Hahn said. "So if it's not ready for 2011, then we'll let it drift into the next year, but we're up and running already." Production is underway in London, where Burton did The Corpse Bride. "The primary reason to go there is Tim lives there, and there's a great group of talent over there also that is really into stop-motion animation," Hahn said.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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MacGuffin

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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #73 on: December 07, 2009, 12:06:23 PM »
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Confirmed: Johnny Depp's Dark Shadows to begin next year
Source: SciFi Wire

Forget Team Edward and Team Jacob. We've heard that director Tim Burton and star Johnny Depp are making a feature film version of the classic 1960s gothic TV soap opera Dark Shadows, and producer Graham King now confirms that the film will shoot in the fall, with Depp to play broody vampire Barnabas Collins.

"We're actually going to shoot that film next September/October with Tim Burton and Johnny," King said in a group interview Friday in Los Angeles, where he was promoting The Young Victoria.

Burton is still finishing post-production on Alice in Wonderland, which also stars Depp and opens March 5, 2010. King is already prepping production on Dark Shadows with screenwriters so that it is ready for Burton to shoot next fall.

"We've been working on the script a lot, even though he's working on Alice," King continued. "We've been given a script. John August wrote the first screenplay. We're making some changes, but the film's going to be in production, as I say, September or October of next year."

Dark Shadows was a daytime soap opera on ABC from 1966 to 1971 featuring Jonathan Frid as Collins. NBC tried a weekly prime-time series reboot in 1991. The original was famous for its gothic tone and setting.

King said the Dark Shadows film would have something to say in the post-Twilight world of emo vampires, but wouldn't spoil the new take. "This is going to be Tim Burton and Johnny doing a vampire movie, right?" King teased. Enough said.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Alexandro

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Re: Tim Burton
« Reply #74 on: December 07, 2009, 01:03:27 PM »
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 :sleeping:

 

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