Author Topic: Films with Great Cinematography  (Read 10158 times)

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wilder

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Re: Films with Great Cinematography
« Reply #30 on: June 04, 2014, 10:15:14 PM »
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Vittorio Storaro published a new book last April called The Art of Cinematography, with both English and Italian in one publication. Video interview with Storaro about the book below.

A rereading of the "seventh art" through the eyes of the most important cinematographers. The Art of Cinematography underscores the essential importance of the figure of the cinematographer in the history of world cinema. A full-blown review that stretches from 1910 to the present day, this volume is illustrated by stunning photographic images in double vision specially reworked by Oscar winner Vittorio Storaro and provides the reader with over 150 profiles of cinematographers in a whole century of cinema. The volume is accompanied by a DVD with images in motion dedicated to the artists included in the book.


wilder

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Mel

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Re: Films with Great Cinematography
« Reply #32 on: June 26, 2014, 07:01:09 AM »
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A collection of "back to the camera" shots (~4 minutes). The character stands center frame (most of the time), looking out at some epic landscape.
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samsong

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Re: Films with Great Cinematography
« Reply #33 on: June 27, 2014, 01:08:56 AM »
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A collection of "back to the camera" shots (~4 minutes). The character stands center frame (most of the time), looking out at some epic landscape.

how bela tarr and gus van sant got excluded from this is beyond me.

wilder

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Re: Films with Great Cinematography
« Reply #34 on: August 18, 2014, 07:32:11 PM »
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Michael Haneke's sometimes DP Christian Berger, who pioneered The Cine Reflect Lighting System (CRLS), a unique method of film lighting that focuses on deflection of light with his invention, the Panibeam.

First, a recent interview with Berger about his use of distance, and a few videos detailing the CRLS method, below.












wilder

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Re: Films with Great Cinematography
« Reply #35 on: November 03, 2014, 12:45:02 PM »
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Excerpts over at American Cinematographer from the forthcoming book Gordon Willis on Cinematography by Stephen Pizzello

wilder

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Re: Films with Great Cinematography
« Reply #36 on: December 13, 2014, 02:51:43 PM »
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Mel

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Re: Films with Great Cinematography
« Reply #37 on: January 05, 2015, 06:04:17 AM »
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THR Cinematographers Roundtable 2014:

The cinematographers behind from some of the year's most visually striking movies - Roger Deakins (Unbroken), Dion Beebe (Into the Woods), Jeff Cronenweth (Gone Girl), Benoit Delhomme (The Theory of Everything) Matthew Libatique (Noah) and Dick Pope (Mr. Turner) - discuss film vs. digital, how to develop a relationship with a director & high-dynamic-range technologies.

Simple mind - simple pleasures...

wilder

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Re: Films with Great Cinematography
« Reply #38 on: February 24, 2015, 04:00:02 PM »
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via The Playlist:

Alcott passed away nearly 30 years ago, but he remains, in memory, one of the best cinematographers of his time. Though he has multiple additional credits to his name, he is best known for his four collaborations with Stanley Kubrick. The two men first worked together on “2001: A Space Odyssey”; their partnership then continued over Kubrick’s next three films, “A Clockwork Orange,” “Barry Lyndon,” and “The Shining.”

“Six Kinds Of Light (Masters Of Cinematography)” originally aired on PBS in 1986 (the year of Alcott’s death) and turned its attention on a half dozen cinematographers then working in the industry. The half hour dedicated to Alcott offers incredible insight into how detail-oriented, professional, and attentive he was. He was known for taking extensive time to study the ways light fell into different rooms on set, a fastidiousness which resulted in the appearance of natural light in every shot he oversaw. This dedication to his craft earned Alcott an Oscar in 1976 for his work on “Barry Lyndon.”

In the documentary, Alcott reminisces about how he was promoted to lighting cameraman during production on '2001' when Geoffrey Unsworth became unable to see the film through to completion. More interesting perhaps, though, are the sections of the video in which Alcott analyzes natural, meteorological lighting effects (at 14:08, for example).




wilder

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Re: Films with Great Cinematography
« Reply #39 on: August 24, 2015, 07:44:40 PM »
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Writing with Light (1992) is back online


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jenkins

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Re: Films with Great Cinematography
« Reply #41 on: December 07, 2015, 08:49:35 PM »
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The Calling of Vittorio Storaro - Film and Digital Times

i gotchya bae,

Quote
Since we were talking about the different stages of your career, I can’t resist asking what it’s like now working in this new digital era on the Woody Allen film?

That’s a good question for the next edition of your magazine. But I’ll tell you something about why I convinced Woody Allen to do this movie in digital.

You convinced him?

Yes. Because he never did digital before.

Without any doubt, it was a shock for me that Kodak and Technicolor closed their offices in Rome. I realize that there is something called “Progress” that you can speed up or you can slow down. But you cannot stop it. I realized that even if when I started my first experience in electronic cinema with Sony in 1983, when they went all around the world to make an experiment with their new High Definition Video System and we did “Arlecchino” in Venice, directed by Giuliano Montaldo. But without any doubt the quality of film was keeping me alive all the time. I shot 58 films on film. In 2009 I did one small movie with Carlos Saura titled “Flamenco, Flamenco” using digital capture, but it was done completely in a studio, with full control of all the lighting. Now with this new Woody Allen picture, it was time for me to move into Digital capture. I think that we cannot chase after something that is vanishing, attempting to grab its tail. That’s all I can say now. The next chapter is digital video in our next interview.
Every perspective is an act of creation.

wilder

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wilder

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Re: Films with Great Cinematography
« Reply #43 on: July 14, 2016, 05:24:30 PM »
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