Author Topic: Django Unchained  (Read 60741 times)

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Pubrick

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #435 on: February 11, 2013, 06:19:12 AM »
+3
it was fucking embarrassing.

it made an already cringe worthy cameo in an unnecessary scene utterly unbearable.  everyone in the cinema laughed when QT spoke, they thought it was a huge joke. the more i think about how STUPID he is for putting himself in the movie, with that accent, in that scene, the more i think i hate this movie. it really is bad enough to ruin the whole thing. it shows that he has no idea what he's doing, that what simple entertainment the film provided until then was nothing more than a fluke result of alcohol and lowering my expectations MASSIVELY after the turds he's plopped onscreen in the last 10 years.

still not as bad as every scene in the dark knight rises.
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Neil

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #436 on: February 11, 2013, 08:59:16 PM »
0
They get to the first town (nigger town), without Waltz explaining him he is a bounty hunter because is more "cool" or whatever, that he does this at the bar, while serving beers. It's a moment played for laughs, but it's not that funny...

For some reason I feel like you're not giving an accurate account of what happens.  This is like the second scene in the film with dialogue and it also does at least 3 important things for pushing the film forward.

1st- When the bartender sees that Django has come inside the bar got a laugh each time i saw it, not to mention that his arrival to this first town really drives home the outsider that Django is given his current situation.
2nd - we understands how Schultz views slavery and what his intentions are and what purpose Django will serve.
3rd - we see a starting point for the hero and his journey, which is a long way from when Schultz has taught him to read and he reads the handbill that later saves his life.

I just don't feel like one has to, "let tarrantino slide," in order to enjoy this film. I'm fine with the length and the pacing.

still not as bad as every scene in the dark knight rises.

Ha. Fantastic +1 just for this.

it was fucking embarrassing.

it made an already cringe worthy cameo in an unnecessary scene utterly unbearable.
Terrible cameo aside, the sequence you're referencing seems necessary, and I'll say especially considering my 3rd point above.
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Alexandro

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #437 on: February 12, 2013, 01:32:11 AM »
0
They get to the first town (nigger town), without Waltz explaining him he is a bounty hunter because is more "cool" or whatever, that he does this at the bar, while serving beers. It's a moment played for laughs, but it's not that funny...

For some reason I feel like you're not giving an accurate account of what happens.  This is like the second scene in the film with dialogue and it also does at least 3 important things for pushing the film forward.

1st- When the bartender sees that Django has come inside the bar got a laugh each time i saw it, not to mention that his arrival to this first town really drives home the outsider that Django is given his current situation.
2nd - we understands how Schultz views slavery and what his intentions are and what purpose Django will serve.
3rd - we see a starting point for the hero and his journey, which is a long way from when Schultz has taught him to read and he reads the handbill that later saves his life.


I didn't mean to say there should not be a scene with dialog with this info or advancing the plot. I meant to say that this same info and dialogue was put there against all logic purely for style and coolness sake (and humor). It just seems a little too much for me that  after a sequence of the heroes arriving to town in which everyone who comes across them points out the "nigger in a horse", the same joke has to be repeated one last time when they enter the bar, so that the bartender can leave in the most cartoonish possible way to get the sheriff...and then Waltz says something like "get the sheriff, not the marshall"...you would think they would get ready for the sheriff in some way, but they serve beers and THEN he explains everything to django, who he is, what he does, why, etcetera...I understand it's supposed to be clever, but I was mostly waiting for the scene to end...

to be honest...whatever. It's not a deal breaker but it does bring down the film a notch or two for me when these things happen.

Neil

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #438 on: February 12, 2013, 04:09:55 PM »
0
I understand your point, and although it may be cartoony and illogical, I'm just not sure that this film is very interested in that kind of logic. I'm not sure how many outs the guy had with creating humor in such a situation and at this point it's safe to assume that QT will be fairly heavy handed when it comes to the dialogue in his films, and for every time he has his characters go on and on and on, you still get simple lines of dialogue that are very telling, "Stop playing Beethoven," or, "there's nothing worse than a house master."

I don't know, even with regards to how long this film was, i enjoyed the ride.  I was still invested after Schultz's exit, but that was merely because I had no idea where the film was heading.  Never had a problem with the pacing. Also, the thing i really liked was how the protagonist plays out his role. Despite how menacing Candie is, he still keeps his cool, and it isn't until his untimely death that we see Django in real trouble.  I like this approach. 

I may have said this earlier, but the tension that builds from the, "old Ben" scene is great.  In my opinion the conventional approach that we are used to is that the protagonist has a chip on his shoulder anytime he's made to look like a fool, and once Candie finds out from Stephen that Schultz and Django are trying to pull a fast one on him, rather than this being the catalyst for all hell breaking loose, it actually just builds this tension and then the heroes just get ripped off for some cash.  I love that this leads to Candie's death.  The Dumas punchline was great too, "soft frenchy..."

anyhow, I liked this better than IB.
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Frederico Fellini

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #439 on: February 19, 2013, 01:57:23 PM »
+1
I haven't seen SNL in forever, but a friend sent me this today:





Fucking hilarious.
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Cinema is something you do for a billion years... or not at all.

Pwaybloe

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #440 on: February 20, 2013, 03:22:13 PM »
0
Really?  I would say it belongs at home with the rest of the parodies on YouTube.

Frederico Fellini

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #441 on: February 27, 2013, 12:17:25 PM »
0
Now that Tarantino has his Oscar for best ORIGINAL screenplay. We can finally discuss all the shit he ripped off from this episode of the boondocks:

“THE STORY OF CATCHER FREEMAN”






“The freeman is silent” (Yeah, they actually say that at one point Lol).
We fought against the day and we won... WE WON.

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AntiDumbFrogQuestion

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #442 on: March 02, 2013, 12:07:27 PM »
0
I felt as if all the writing/plotting of the film was necessary...although I DID feel strangely jittery once Tarantino started "acting". 
I figured with the confidence he bestowed upon us in, oddly enough, "From Dusk Till Dawn" and "Four Rooms", that by this point in time we would feel confident with his performance onscreen. Knowing he was there kind of felt like watching a Jesse Eisenberg interview. Just couldn't get comfortable.

And on the topic of "The Boondocks"....damn I love that show. Not surprised they tread that ground already. So glad MacGruder gave up the strip for TV.

MacGuffin

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #443 on: March 18, 2013, 04:22:10 PM »
+1
Ennio Morricone is not feuding with Quentin Tarantino over ‘Django’ song — EXCLUSIVE
Source: EW

Just two months ago famed composer Ennio Morricone presented Django Unchained director Quentin Tarantino with a lifetime achievement award in Rome.  But last week, American outlets picked up on a small story in the Italian press where Morricone had allegedly told a group of students at Rome’s LUISS University that he did not care to work with Tarantino again, and that he was unhappy with how he used his song “Ancora Qui” in Django Unchained.

Known for his Spaghetti Western scores for Sergio Leone, and his work on films such as Terrence Malick’s Days of Heaven and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, Morricone has gained modern prominence through Quentin Tarantino’s reappropriation of his songs in Kill Bill Vol. 1 and 2, Inglorious Basterds, and Django Unchained.  Everyone was quick to jump on a portion of Morricone’s lecture, but Morricone was addressing a group of television and film students in Italy. He was not crafting remarks intended for a national audience – and certainly not trying wage a media war of words with Tarantino. Not only that, he says his remarks were taken out of context.

In a statement to EW, Morricone wrote:

What I read about my statements on Quentin Tarantino is a partial writing of my thoughts which has deprived the true meaning of what I said, isolating a part from the rest. In this way my statement sounds shocking, penalizing me and bothering me a lot.

I have a great respect for Tarantino, as I have stated several times, I am glad he chooses my music, a sign of artistic brotherhood and I am happy to have met him in Rome recently. In my opinion, the fact that Tarantino chooses different pieces of music from a work in a film makes the pieces not to be always consistent with the entire work.

The risk for me, when I compose, is not to be consistent with the film work and my desire is that the director accepts my consistency.

Tarantino proposed me to work for Inglorious Basterds, which I consider a masterpiece, but I could only had two months to work since I had to compose the soundtrack for “Baaria” directed by Giuseppe Tornatore and it was not possible.

Regarding Django, the thing is that I cannot see too much blood in a movie due to my character, is how I feel and impress me especially with a film that is made very well and where the blood is well shot. But this has nothing to do with my respect for that Tarantino which remains great.

This is consistent with what Morricone has said in the past. In an interview with The Quietus in 2010, he said that Tarantino’s reappropriation of his songs for Inglorious Bastereds wasn’t a problem.  ”Actually, I was really happy with what he did and I thought it really worked well. The thing is that as what he did was take the different scores from different films and put them all together…what I think he did was just to put them in the right place and used them in the right way,” Morricone told the interviewer. In Inglorious Basterds, Tarantino used “Dopo La Condanna” (from 1966′s The Big Gundown), “Un Amico” (from 1973′s Revolver) and “Rabbia E Tarantella” (from 1974′s Allonsafan).

Morricone went on to explain: “if you are talking about coherence, it was not really there in terms of ideas and conversation because those things are different and taken from different ideas and films. But I think it really worked well though.”

This is not a fight. It’s hype and misinterpretation.
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Skeleton FilmWorks

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #444 on: March 18, 2013, 04:31:08 PM »
0
I didn't really like the use of 'ancora qui'. Kinda brings the movie to a halt. I always skip it when I listen to the soundtrack.
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MacGuffin

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #445 on: March 26, 2013, 03:37:33 AM »
0
Will Smith on turning down ‘Django Unchained’: ‘I needed to be the lead’
Source: EW

When Quentin Tarantino’s western revenge-fantasy Django Unchained was first announced, casting rumors pegged Will Smith as the titular slave-turned-vigilante. But Smith, who teams with his son Jaden in this summer’s sci-fi epic After Earth, tells EW that he turned down the part because his character would’ve been second fiddle to the bounty hunter (played by Christoph Waltz) who teaches Django his trade . “Django wasn’t the lead, so it was like, I need to be the lead. The other character was the lead!” says the Men in Black star, whose departure opened the door for Jamie Foxx to play the role.

Smith says that before he left the project, he even pleaded with Tarantino to let Django have a more central role in the story. “I was like, ‘No, Quentin, please, I need to kill the bad guy!’” (Ironically, Waltz was considered a supporting actor during his Oscar-winning award season, while Jamie Foxx was promoted as the movie’s lead.)

But no hard feelings: Smith was a big fan of the final product. “I thought it was brilliant,” he says. “Just not for me.”
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ElPandaRoyal

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #446 on: March 26, 2013, 05:22:54 AM »
0
Is he joking or what? Does an actor actually turn down a role he apparently likes very much because he doesn't get to kill the bad guy and has to share a big amount of screen time with another actor? Maybe that's the difference between real actors and movie stars? I'm honestly confused.
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Lottery

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #447 on: March 26, 2013, 05:54:34 AM »
0
I wish Smith would take a supporting role, being the biggest movie star in the world really got to his head. But then again, he did admit this just there. It's interesting because this is the first supporting role DiCaprio has had in over a decade- and I previously thought he too was stuck in this leading role mindset (but clearly he isn't).

MacGuffin

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #448 on: May 23, 2014, 02:54:07 PM »
0
Quentin Tarantino Wants a ‘Django Unchained’ Miniseries on Television
Oscar winner wants to put 90 minutes of extra footage to good use
Source: TotalFilm

Hold off on buying that “Django Unchained” Blu-ray. Quentin Tarantino says he wants to release 90 minutes of new footage to include in a four-hour television miniseries.

“I have about 90 minutes worth of material with ‘Django.’ It hasn't been seen. My idea, frankly, is to cut together a four-hour version of ‘Django Unchained,'” USA Today reports Tarantino told an audience at the Cannes Film Festival on Friday. ”But I wouldn't show it like a four hour movie. I would cut it up into hour chapters. Like a four-part miniseries. And show it on cable television. Show it like an hour at a time, each chapter.”

“Django Unchained,” a slavery revenge tale starring Jamie Foxx, Kerry Washington, Leonardo DiCaprio, Cristoph Waltz and Samuel L. Jackson, was a winter hit in 2012 before winning two Oscars.

Foxx played a freed slave who joins a bounty hunter (Waltz) in a quest to save his long-lost wife (Washington) from a sadistic plantation owner (DiCaprio).

Tarantino said he prefers packaging the extra footage as a miniseries because releasing a four-hour cut of the film would “be an endurance test” for audiences.

“We'd use all the material I have and it wouldn't be an endurance test. It would be a miniseries. And people love those,” Tarantino said. ”People roll their eyes at a four-hour movie. But a four-hour miniseries that they like, then they are dying to watch all four parts. That's how I thought it could work.”

Tarantino was in France to host a 20th anniversary screening of “Pulp Fiction” on Friday, and will be paying tribute to Sergio Leone's “A Fistful of Dollars” on Saturday.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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SailorOfTheSeas

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Re: Django Unchained
« Reply #449 on: May 24, 2014, 01:26:53 PM »
+1
That could actually really improve it. Hopefully Broomhilda and the final fifth of the film will be more fleshed out.  Seems like QT is branching out from usual film structure. First the proposed stage version of Hateful Eight and now this.

 

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