Author Topic: James Gray  (Read 11769 times)

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wilder

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Re: James Gray
« Reply #60 on: April 09, 2015, 04:16:32 PM »
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Canal Plus Bites Into ‘Hard Apple’ With James Gray
via Variety

Looking to explore different genre and worlds, French pay TV giant Canal Plus is joining forces with American filmmaker James Gray to foray into “Hard Apple,” an adult-skewing animated series.

Gray, whose latest movie, the Marion Cotillard starrer “The Immigrant,” opened in competition at Cannes, will serve as executive producer and will supervise all creative aspects of the series, including the writing.

Inspired by New York-born author Jerome Charyn’s “Isaac Sidel” novels, the series opens in the 1970s and charts the rise of New York City’s premier law enforcer, detective Isaac Sidel, as he covers three decades of crime and political corruption.

“Hard Apple” brings together an A-list creative team, leading with Israeli illustrators Tomer and Asaf Hanuka, who have worked for the New Yorker, Rolling Stone, as well as Ari Folman’s film “Waltz With Bashir.” The pair will create the animation designs such as the decor and characters.

Charyn’s Isaac Sidel literary collection kicked off 40 years ago with “Blue Eyes” and have been translated into seven languages, attracting a cult following worldwide. The franchise’s latest thriller novel, “Under the Eye of God,” came out in 2012.

The series is being produced by Yonatan Israel (“Watermarks”) and Bruno Nahon (“The Churchmen”), Arnold Barkus, Adam Yaffe, Lalou Dammond, and Joaquin Baca-Asay.

Barkus and Yaffe will write the series and will be joined by a few other European scribes. A showrunner and a director will soon be attached.

Fabrice de la Patelliere, the topper of French drama and co-productions for Canal Plus, said the group was particularly proud to “venture into such a singular animated TV series for adults with someone as talented and visionary as James Gray.”

“Animation for adults is rare on television, even though it’s a very rich field of expression,” explained the mild-mannered De la Patelliere, who is notoriously demanding when it comes to scripts and has originated lots of hits and very few misses since joining Canal Plus in 2012. “We love Jerome Charyn’s crime novels, the visual universe of the Hanuka brothers and the sensibility of James Gray. This project is the unique occasion to bring together all this talents.”

Nahon pointed out that while the thriller/detective genre is widely popular in live-action drama series, it has not been explored in animation up until now.” Added Nahon, “Animation for adults has been done successfully with comedies such as ‘South Park,’ which shows us there is an audience for that kind of edgy animation material, so mixing crime drama and animation will allow us to explore a globally appreciated but very familiar genre in a completely original way.”

Per Nahon and Israel, “Gray has a unique sensibility and aesthetic that is a perfect match for the series.”

De la Patelliere has been the driving force behind Canal Plus’ Creation Originale division, which in the last few years has co-produced such hits as “The Returned” and “Braquo” and the upcoming sprawling spy thriller “Le Bureau des Legendes.”

OpO1832

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Re: James Gray
« Reply #61 on: May 13, 2015, 10:00:38 PM »
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I love James Gray, I think The Yards is a masterpiece and i think his first feature is perhaps one of the greatest first movies a director can make, and he made in in his 20s! We Own the Night was a great looking movie but it need a re write but I adore that movie's look. I really dug Two Lovers ( James Gray's own cringe moments for me are when he attempts to do a nightclub scene, the music never works< two lovers  & we own the night/ the yard nightclub stuff was good_ since i am on the topic 25th hour's night club sequences hold it down, liquid liquid cavern then cyamende bra...greatness)

the immigrant was disappointing. j.p was okay , i did not buy marion being a polish immigrant...why the hell didn't he hire a polish actress for that part? I believe he thought he would bank on marion's star power and his ability to bring people in the theatre but it didn't work, she just did not come across well but the worst part was Jeremy Renner, his character was underwritten and his acting was dull. The set pieces and cinematography were astounding and lush, considering that gray had a ton of source material to have fun with ( Sante's Lowlife book is filled to the fucking brim with great stuff ) i was underwhelmed but again the movie is perhaps of the best looking films of the year.

I have HIGH hopes for Lost City of Z. I love the Percy Fawcett story, I love that Gray is going to the jungle. I am huge fan of Herzog and Fitzcarraoldo, Aguire and Cobr Verde!
What has me really excited is the fact that Cumberach is not in the movie and Charlie Hunman is! HE IS PERFECT for the role of Fawcett! I can't wait to see this movie, its the movie I am most excited for to see!

 

wilder

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Re: James Gray
« Reply #62 on: July 07, 2015, 03:18:00 PM »
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OpO1832

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Re: James Gray
« Reply #63 on: August 19, 2015, 11:08:42 AM »
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Any production photos of Lost City of Z this is one of my most anticipated films.


OpO1832

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Re: James Gray
« Reply #65 on: April 16, 2016, 12:59:16 PM »
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damn i missed the uploaded trailer and now its been taken down anyone download and save it?

Drenk

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Re: James Gray
« Reply #66 on: April 16, 2016, 01:49:11 PM »
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damn i missed the uploaded trailer and now its been taken down anyone download and save it?

Don't watch it, it was a trailer to sell the movie: it showed way too much.
I'm so many people.

wilder

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Re: James Gray
« Reply #67 on: April 16, 2016, 02:59:27 PM »
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Here you go


wilder

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Re: James Gray
« Reply #68 on: April 10, 2017, 05:39:56 PM »
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James Gray Says ‘Heart Of Darkness’-Esque Sci-Fi ‘Ad Astra’ Starring Brad Pitt Shoots This Summer
via The Playlist

A couple months back it was reported that Pitt was circling Gray’s sci-fi flick “Ad Astra,” and the director confirms the film is going ahead, with cameras rolling very soon. Finally, Pitt and Gray will get to make a movie.

“I’m terrified by it. The science-fiction genre is so tricky because there are elements of fantasy usually involved, and there are also fantastical elements. What I’m trying to do is the most realistic depiction of space travel that’s been put in a movie and to basically say, ‘Space is awfully hostile to us.’ It’s kind of a ‘Heart of Darkness‘ story about traveling to the outer edge of our solar system. I have a lot of hopes for it but it is certainly ambitious… It starts shooting July 17th, so not too far away,” the director told Collider.

It’s another interesting clue about the movie, which follows a slightly autistic space engineer who embarks on a one-way trip to Neptune to find out why his father’s previous mission to find signs of intelligent life failed.


Drenk

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Re: James Gray
« Reply #69 on: April 10, 2017, 06:08:46 PM »
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Brad Pitt in a James Gray movie was something I was really excited about for The Lost City of Z almost ten years ago, so I'm very happen it will happen this time!

I'm so many people.

wilder

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Re: James Gray
« Reply #70 on: May 02, 2017, 03:38:19 AM »
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I’ve yet to see The Lost City of Z. As much as I like Two Lovers, believe in the passion behind Gray’s intentions, and appreciate the commentary he’s able to provide around his films, unfortunately I agree with a lot of this:

Quote from: Criterion Forum user Foam
I've had James Gray films recommended to me for a long time and finally over the past month I've been able to see his last three, culminating in this one. This has been one of the most disappointing cinematic experiences I've had in a while. I want to express some of my problems with these films in a way that may come across as overly hostile to Gray and his positive reception. But my point is that I would really like to know if I'm making serious mistakes re: what to expect (particularly about his style) or if I'm getting the bulk of what's there and I just don't care for it. I'm going to speak more at a level of generality about Gray than about this film in particular. If I'm posting this in the wrong thread, my apologies.

Part of what's inescapable about the conversation around these films is that they hearken back to a great era of cinema and the 1970s Hollywood Renaissance in particular. This is part of what had me so excited about his filmography, and in fact I had put off watching any of it to save it as a kind of treat for myself. Unlike a some significant number of cinephiles I didn't grow up on Hitchcock or other golden age directors but first came to love Hollywood through the films of Coppola, Scorsese, Lumet, Ashby, etc. And... maybe these are just the wrong reference points, but I don't think Gray's recent stuff comes anywhere near even the more immature works of these directors.

When I'm watching James Gray movies I feel that he doesn't know how to handle or build to or define "big moments." At my most suspicious, I feel that he has a shyness about playing big moments as big moments, or has an aversion to narrative definition itself, or avoids both of these things, confusing that avoidance for some kind of cinematic seriousness. But this wasn't the approach of the 1970s auteurs I name. Their films are bold, even when they are quiet. Those films are not great just because they are paced more patiently than the films of today and have well-developed characters. Their pacing is dynamic, defined, robust. Their characters are drawn, yes, with subtlety--but also with clarity. They deploy seemingly detached or disinterested camera styles at moments of extreme drama to create a kind of ironic, defamiliarizing effect that did not avoid narrative intensity, but crystallized it. So, to just run through a greatest hits of New Hollywood moments: when Sonny beats up Carlo, when Carlo beats up Connie, when Travis calls Besty, when Travis shoots Sport, when Harold floats in the pool, when cheery pop music plays over a bar fight, when the camera sits at the opposite end of the room while Ned Beatty bellows. These are all moments of sharply drawn drama which play on the rhetorical "disinterestedness" of the camera.

Am I the only one who thinks that Gray's films feel downright amorphously boring in comparison? That perhaps Gray watched all these moments and only saw the stylistic detachment but not the focusing clarity of that detachment as part of an overall cinematic strategy? A strategy which relies upon the larger film's texture which should also include significant moments of more direct, openly loud techniques as well? In a way I feel at a loss to describe what I find unsatisfactory about his films at the level of detail because I don't know how to point to specific examples in his films because I, for the most part, find his filmmaking totally unmemorable. Meanwhile all the moments in the New Hollywood films I mention above were seared into my memory when I first saw them and stayed with me for months until I could see each of them again, anticipating each moment. I guess that's my complaint about the comparison to Great 1970s American Cinema in general: I have a pretty specific idea of what I like about that decade of cinema, and it's not present in Gray's films (as far as I can tell).

And maybe this is too far afield and a little paranoid: but I also slightly sense (not necessarily here, but in film criticism and film social media in general) that there is almost a taboo on criticizing Gray's films too strongly simply because there is apparently nobody else doing mid-budget films of this kind of seriousness in America. I also think that the article, posted above, that Gray lives in an apartment is sometimes being implicitly gestured towards as a way to try and shield him from criticism. "We the cinephiles need to be on board with supporting Gray's films because even if they are all missing that special something, they are at least trying to be a type of thing we are supposed to like." But it's hard for me to take this pressure (which I admit I may be exaggerating) seriously when so many people feel free to dismiss Joe Swanberg's Win It All (which I watched a day after Two Lovers and found infinitely more interesting) with the m-word. It's almost if Joe Swanberg living in an apartment should be understandable because he makes contemporary films about people who live in apartments... but because James Gray wants to have big period sets he deserves to live in a house?

I realize I may just be coming to his films with too much baggage. But if I am, I haven't seen any positive reviews (even those of Brody, who can usually make me understand the appeal of something I don't get) that really explain what makes Gray's films exceptional pieces of film craft. If one of his defenders could single out a particular scene and explain why it's so great, what's so apparently delicate about it, (in a way that's an encapsulation of why Gray's such a big deal) I would greatly appreciate that.

(For the record, I agree with the comment above that The Immigrant may be his best film. It flounders in the last act for me, but redeems itself with that magnificent final shot.)

 

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