Author Topic: The Master - Spoiler-Free Thread  (Read 313227 times)

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HeywoodRFloyd

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1515 on: August 31, 2012, 10:46:28 PM »
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That scene when Joaquin gets shat on his face.. priceless.

MacGuffin

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1516 on: September 01, 2012, 07:38:55 AM »
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***Read At Own Risk****



Venice Review: 'The Master' Is Paul Thomas Anderson's Most Complex And Distinctive Film To Date
Source: Playlist
 
No movie has been more keenly anticipated by cinephiles in 2012 than Paul Thomas Anderson’s “The Master.” The filmmaker has been one of cinema’s most exciting new voices for a decade and a half now, but reached a new level of adulation with his last picture, ”There Will Be Blood,” which won awards and topped critical lists the world over five years ago. As such, the genesis and production of “The Master” was avidly followed, not least because the film was long ago said to revolve around a fictionalized surrogate of L. Ron Hubbard and his ever-controversial Scientology, and because Anderson had shot the film on 70mm film, the first major production to do so since Kenneth Branagh’s “Hamlet” in 1996.

One questions whether you could ever live up to the expectations that Anderson has to put up with here, but the filmmaker’s helped matters a little by taking the film on the road for a series of sneak preview screenings around the country, ahead of the official premiere at the Venice Film Festival tonight. So, while the excitement at the press screening this morning wasn’t quite as fevered as it might have been, but there was still a hushed anticipation in the build up. In the aftermath, what we were left with is something that shows Anderson’s continued growth as a filmmaker – it’s certainly his most original and distinctive work to date – but also a picture that’s somewhat at odds with itself.

Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix, in his first performance since his faux-retirement) is discharged from the navy after VJ day, and proceeds to spend the next several years drifting through a series of jobs. Sex-obsessed, and prone to rages, arguably his greatest skill is making potent moonshine on the side, but it’s this hobby that sees him fleeing after a fellow worker is taken ill.

The next morning, he wakes on board a boat en route from San Francisco to New York, via the Panama Canal, and is greeted by Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman), a self-proclaimed “writer, doctor, nuclear physicist, theoretical philosopher, but above all else, a hopelessly inquisitive man.” Dodd is the founder of something close to (but not quite) a religion, known as the Cause, travelling with his wife (Amy Adams), daughter (Ambyr Childers), son (Jessie Plemons), new son-in-law (Rami Malek), and various other followers, and he takes Freddie under his wing. The younger man becomes a loyal servant of the Cause, but even Lancaster can’t seem to entirely curb Freddie’s self-destructive instincts.

Many of the things you’ve heard, or suspected, about the film are absolutely correct. Despite stepping away from regular DoP Robert Elswit (who was committed elsewhere) for the first time, Anderson’s film looks phenomenal; replacement cinematographer Mihai Milaimare Jr truly makes his mark with eye-popping, somewhat nautically color-coded photography that looks especially good projected in 70mm (aided by intricate, reach-out-and-touch it design work). And it sounds fabulous too; Jonny Greenwood’s percussive, unpredictable score might even exceed his astonishing work on “There Will Be Blood.”

Furthermore, Joaquin Phoenix is indeed as titanic as early buzz suggested. Snarling and mumbling, sometimes to the point of inaudibility, Freddie’s clearly haunted by a drunk father and psychotic mother, and by his experiences in war (subtly alluded to without ever being spelt out – he’s a little more lucid and in control in pre-war flashback sequences). Lancaster speaks to him about how man should be seen above the animals, and yet Freddie is absolutely a wild animal, impulsive and furious and just smart enough to realize that he’s not very smart at all. It’s a reminder of how fiercely Phoenix’s presence on screen has been missed in the last few years.

But there are plenty of pleasures in the film that early word skipped over. For one, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams are certainly in the same league as Phoenix here. The former, reunited with regular collaborator Anderson after missing “There Will Be Blood,” gives what might be a career-best turn as the titular Master. It’s less showy than his Truman Capote, for sure, but from his very first scene, one instantly sees the charisma, the ego and the flaws of the man. Adams, meanwhile, doesn’t get as much to do, but she’s cast beautifully against type as his wife Mary Sue, in public the supportive, folksy, ever-pregnant spouse, in private the Lady Macbethish power behind the throne, and someone who clearly has her husband wrapped around her little finger.

Perhaps the element of the film that’s lingered the most for us, even above the fantastic performances, is the rhythm of the film. Languid and dreamlike (aided by some sequences that may be flashbacks, may be fantasies, or may even be time travel, if Lancaster is to be believed), it’s as hypnotic as the ‘processing’ that’s central to the Cause, until you’re released blinking and dazed into the daylight once the credits roll.

It’s this rhythm (courtesy of editors Leslie Jones and Peter McNulty), along with a relative sparsity of showy set-piece shots, that make it the most exciting and original film, formally, that Anderson’s made to date. There was a sense in his early work – even “There Will Be Blood,” to a degree – that he was a filmmaker in thrall to his influences (not necessarily a criticism, it should be said), but “The Master” feels like something fresh, something entirely his own, and the start of a new phase in the director’s career.

And yet it ultimately feels (on first viewing at least) like a film to admire (enormously) rather than to cherish, because of the way it hangs together as a whole. It sometimes feels that the film is two films – a study of addiction and the traumas of war, and a story of a man who’s created his own religion – thrust together without ever quite gelling. There are interesting things to say on both sides, but we wonder if seeing the Cause through Freddie’s eyes, and Freddie through the Cause’s, was necessarily the best approach.

Particularly as Anderson eventually settles on emphasizing a story that he’s already told several times before – that of a father and a son, and it’s this side of things that ultimately feels disappointing. An unsatisfying, extraneous final 20 minutes gives the film a coda that makes it clear that it’s the relationship (dare we say bromance?…) between Freddie and Lancaster that’s mostly interested the filmmaker, and it feels like he’s going over old territory. In fact, it's curiously distant, the gut-punch power of "There Will Be Blood" or heart-on-sleeve emotion of "Magnolia" or "Punch Drunk Love" both proving absent.

It may be that further viewings, and more reflection, sees the film become more narratively, emotionally and thematically satisfying. There are certainly more than enough extraordinary elements in the film, and more than enough complexities and contradictions, than we’ll be seeing it again at the earliest opportunity. Or it may be that another look sees the disappointment at the familiar core of the story deepen. For the moment, we’re simply pleased that the film marks an undeniable progression in the career of one of our most gifted directors. [ B ]
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Drenk

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1517 on: September 01, 2012, 07:57:54 AM »
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Joaquin Phoenix left the conference, apparently. Then he came back. And he always says "I don't know" when he answers.

PTA : everytime I sit I think I'm doing something different but it turns out kind of the same.

PTA : the master-servant romance is great territory for a story

PTA: Tom Cruise saw the film, we're still friends, the rest is between us.

From Twitter: https://twitter.com/Trois_Couleurs
 
And Phoenix smoking during the conference:


I'm so many people.

MacGuffin

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1518 on: September 01, 2012, 09:22:00 AM »
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Venice: Paul Thomas Anderson, Philip Seymour Hoffman Talk ‘The Master’; Joaquin Phoenix? Not So Much
BY NANCY TARTAGLIONE, International Editor | Deadline

Paul Thomas Anderson called The Master a “love story” between its two lead characters and addressed the issue of Scientology and its relationship to the film at a press conference in Venice this afternoon. The movie screened this morning and certainly calls to mind the controversial religion, but Anderson said it wasn’t the “whale in the room” that people thought. He said he based Philip Seymour Hoffman’s character, Lancaster Dodd, in part on Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, but added, “I really don’t know a whole hell of a lot about Scientology.” He also confirmed that he had shown the film to Hollywood’s most famous Scientologist, Tom Cruise, who Anderson directed to an Oscar nomination in Magnolia. “Yes, I showed it to him. We’re still friends and the rest is between us,” he deadpanned.

The Master‘s stars, Hoffman and Joaquin Phoenix, were also present at the standing room only press conference – Hoffman more so than Phoenix who chain-smoked on the dais, didn’t answer any questions and disappeared for a few minutes in the middle. Harvey Weinstein, who’ll release The Master on Sept 21, looked on from the front row. Hoffman, excellent in The Master as in his other collaborations with Anderson, called the director a friend “first and foremost… When we work together, it’s kind of like gravy.” Anderson noted that he had asked Phoenix “to be in every other movie I’ve done which is kind of a pain in the ass, but it was worth it.” Though the movie is complex, and may require repeat viewings, it is being praised as a master stroke of filmmaking and a tour de force for the leads.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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jumjum

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1519 on: September 01, 2012, 10:26:32 AM »
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Pozer

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1520 on: September 01, 2012, 11:55:57 AM »
+1
It may be that further viewings, and more reflection, sees the film become more narratively, emotionally and thematically satisfying. There are certainly more than enough extraordinary elements in the film, and more than enough complexities and contradictions, than we’ll be seeing it again at the earliest opportunity. Or it may be that another look sees the disappointment at the familiar core of the story deepen. For the moment, we’re simply pleased that the film marks an undeniable progression in the career of one of our most gifted directors. [ B ]

why even grade it after this statement? that other playlist review was much better but could have done without the grade. grades are dumb.

another note, cut out with this "we" business. pics of the entire playlist crew together for every screening or stfu.

on the awkward phoenix note, hated letterman during adams but his "bonehead" remark about this freak wasnt inaccurate. 



InTylerWeTrust

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1521 on: September 01, 2012, 12:19:05 PM »
+1
ADMIN EDIT: THESE MAY CONTAIN MAJOR SPOILERS









« Last Edit: September 01, 2012, 01:45:34 PM by picolas »
Fuck this place..... I got a script to write.

HeywoodRFloyd

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1522 on: September 01, 2012, 12:53:28 PM »
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I fucking love Philip Seymour Hoffman, thanks for the links Tyler

InTylerWeTrust

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1523 on: September 01, 2012, 02:57:59 PM »
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You Welcome Heywood and Happy Birthday dude!


And guys, MY BAD for not putting SPOILER ALERT on those videos, thanks to Picolas for fixing that. 


On another note, to the people who have seen the film... You think Joaquin Phoenix is still in character here? He looks just as insane as he does in the trailers   :saywhat:

Fuck this place..... I got a script to write.

P Heat

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1524 on: September 01, 2012, 04:30:41 PM »
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Hope PT and PSH do a charlie rose interview soon. I've enjoyed the prior ones.
anyway it was after i posted my first serious fanalysis. after the long post all he could say was that the main reason he wanted to see the master was cos of all the red heads.
  :P

InTylerWeTrust

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1525 on: September 01, 2012, 04:42:28 PM »
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That is my (very poor) drunk attempt at mashing all the teasers together...... I'm sure someone out there can do a better job with this idea. Go ahead and try, would love to see it.



P.S: Yeah, at one point there are 3 songs playing at the same time... and that's as Godard-esque as I'm gonna get. Feel free to say it sucks  :yabbse-thumbup:
Fuck this place..... I got a script to write.

Cloudy

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1526 on: September 01, 2012, 05:06:44 PM »
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Heywood,

Where did you find that pic of PTA/JP on set? Happy birthday!

MacGuffin

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1527 on: September 01, 2012, 06:17:47 PM »
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Venice 2012: Paul Thomas Anderson Says Tom Cruise Has Seen 'The Master' 'And We're Still Friends'
The film is greeted by raves and crowds as Joaquin Phoenix disappears from the press conference, and Philip Seymour Hoffman talks about sex in the city streets.
Source: THR

VENICE – Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Master -- a fictional account Anderson said was “inspired” by Church of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard -- created the biggest buzz yet at the Venice Film Festival, screening four times on Saturday to packed cinemas, including one where moviegoers started lining up 90 minutes before showtime, and forcing festival organizers to turn journalists away from an over-packed press conference.

The film, which is screening in competition in Venice, stars Phillip Seymour Hoffman as a kind of spiritual Master in the post-World War II period, and Joaquin Phoenix as a gruff, alcoholic drifter who becomes an off-again-on-again disciple of Hoffman’s character, while an unusual bond forms between the two men. Anderson, Hoffman, and Phoenix were all on hand for the press briefing, though the eccentric Phoenix did not answer any questions and disappeared for nearly half of the briefing.

Though Scientology is never mentioned by name in the film, Anderson did permit that it was “inspired by L. Ron Hubbard and the early days of Dianetics,” referring to Hubbard’s philosophy about the metaphysical relationship between a person’s mind and body. At one point during the briefing, Anderson was asked whether he had shown the film to actor Tom Cruise, probably the most high-profile adherent to Scientology, and whether the project had damaged the friendship between the two men. Anderson was coy.

“Yes, I have shown him the film, and yes, we are still friends,” Anderson said. “The rest is between me and Tom.”

Hoffman cast the film as a classic sub-sub-sub genre he described as “the age-old story of a man who needs guidance, finds a mentor, they become co-dependent, the man leaves, and the one who is actually hurt is the mentor.”

Hoffman also said he saw the film as appealing to the nature of human existence. “We ask ourselves, ‘Why can’t we run through the streets of Venice naked, and eat and shit and have sex with everyone we see?’” he said. “But no, we can’t do that, and so sometimes we need a Master to help make sense of the world.”

The film created a buzz long before its screening in Venice, as it was named as the “surprise” 18th and final competition film at the 69th editon of the festival, officially named around two weeks after the rest of the lineup. The Master was connected to Venice as far back as a year ago, though there was some doubt whether it would still screen on the Lido after the December departure of artistic director Marco Mueller in favor of former Italian National Film Museum head Alberto Barbera. In the end, all the speculation swirling around whether or not the film would indeed come to Venice did little but heighten interest.

The Master attracted mostly positive reviews. The Hollywood Reporter chief film critic Todd McCarthy said the film was “overflowing with qualities but also brimming with puzzlements,” but in the end he called the film “a bold, challenging, brilliantly acted drama that is a must for serious audiences.”

The Master will open in the U.S. after screening at the Toronto Film Festival, Sept. 21, a date moved up in recent days. Lucky Red, The Masters’ Italian distributor, on Saturday announced that despite the buzz surrounding the screening in Venice that it would not open in Italy until Jan. 11, 2013.

The premiere of The Master is the second in-competition film in as many days to explore religious themes in a controversial way, following Paradies: Glaube (Paradise: Faith), from Austrian director Ulrich Seidl. Seidl’s film, which explores the real-world manifestation of extreme religious faith, was called “scandalous” in the Italian press.

The Venice Festival continues through Sept. 8.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Fernando

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1528 on: September 01, 2012, 06:56:51 PM »
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Annapurna just posted several international release dates on its website

Australia Nov-8
México Nov-23
UK Nov-9

http://annapurnapics.com/films/#/3/3

I have no hopes to see this on 70mm but at least it's coming this year.

HeywoodRFloyd

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Re: The Master
« Reply #1529 on: September 01, 2012, 11:26:15 PM »
+1
Thanks for the Birthday wishes Tyler & CloudAuteur :) Daunting/depressing as hell to be 4 years closer to when PTA made Boogie Nights.

I found the image by accident on twitter, I'll post it here:




 

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