Author Topic: ►Top 25 of the 00s◄  (Read 30170 times)

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Gamblour.

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Re: ►Top 25 of the DECADE ◄
« Reply #75 on: December 02, 2009, 11:59:00 AM »
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Also, revisiting Requiem For a Dream - it seems a bit heavy-handed in retrospect. It's effective, sure, but so is being kicked in the face.

Dunno, I rather like being kicked in the face by a film. Requiem is quite an experience in the theater. I was also 17 at the time and had been building up anticipation for it, so perhaps that helped. As soon as that first title card slammed down, I was in.

I first saw it on DVD around 17 as well, but then saw it in theaters years later, and I was blown away by how much more of an impact it had on me. I still think Requiem holds up.
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Myxo

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Re: ►Top 25 of the DECADE ◄
« Reply #76 on: December 02, 2009, 04:13:52 PM »
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At least Aronofsky has gone on to do other good to great stuff. Dick Kelly ain't done shit.

This is very true.

However, as movie lovers do we ever simply love a film based solely on how it makes us feel? I agree that Donnie Darko is not a good movie overall. But it's on my list because I love it. As a first wide release effort it's remarkable. Obviously we can sit here and discuss better directorial debuts. But I've seen a lot of forgettable films over the years. Donnie Darko stuck with me. The music is great. The storytelling is unique. Not saying it's a great story. But sometimes movies stand out simply by being different. Actually while we're on the topic, I'd put Donnie Darko in the same category of films as District 9 for me personally in terms of how it made me feel walking out of the theater. I didn't think that movie was great either but it was bold as hell, just like Donnie Darko.

To each their own right?

tpfkabi

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Re: ►Top 25 of the DECADE ◄
« Reply #77 on: December 02, 2009, 04:22:20 PM »
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Requiem for a Dream and Fight Club (1999, I know)
Donnie Darko

i never was that into any of these three. i saw them once and that was that pretty much.

i don't think Fight Club is in the same realm as Se7en, even though it was an earlier work.
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socketlevel

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Re: ►Top 25 of the DECADE ◄
« Reply #78 on: December 02, 2009, 04:36:24 PM »
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ya se7en, the game and zodiac are so much better.
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Stefen

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Re: ►Top 25 of the DECADE ◄
« Reply #79 on: December 03, 2009, 02:55:45 AM »
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At least Aronofsky has gone on to do other good to great stuff. Dick Kelly ain't done shit.

This is very true.

However, as movie lovers do we ever simply love a film based solely on how it makes us feel? I agree that Donnie Darko is not a good movie overall. But it's on my list because I love it.

This brings up an interesting question. In the end, I suppose all films are subjective. I know I have tons of movies I love that may not be great movies, but have a special place in my heart for other reasons than their quality. Love Actually and 10 Things I Hate About You are two of those movies. Not great movies, but I like them because of other reasons.
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Re: ►Top 25 of the DECADE ◄
« Reply #80 on: December 03, 2009, 04:17:10 PM »
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yes but for the purposes of top lists, in this case 25 of the decade, all film must have staying power.  it's very risky putting in a film that you just recently saw, because after the initial lust for it is over, will it still hold up? i remember i saw Donnie Darko and was blown away too, but after the gimmicks faded there wasn't anything there to hold on to. so while the film does have a seminal quality with young people, and i'm not knocking that part of it, there is no other depths that reveal themselves over time. Richard Kelly should feel proud of doing at least one of those two things. he just doesn't deserve top accolades.
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Stefen

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Re: Top 25 of the DECADE
« Reply #81 on: December 03, 2009, 05:13:08 PM »
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yeah, but who is going to go back and revisit everything just to make sure it wasn't just initial awe that made you love it? soderberghs solaris remake is a film that will probably be on my eventual list, and i dont know how much of it has to do with my feelings for it the first time i saw it.
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Pas

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Re: ►Top 25 of the DECADE ◄
« Reply #82 on: December 03, 2009, 05:16:39 PM »
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Does anybody still remember Eternal Sunshine? I remember loving it back then but I don't have any feelings for it now. I was reminded of it by my friend's gf who lists it as her favorite movie along with Stranger than Fiction. I think this is coherent, two adolescent movies I guess. She's 25 though  :doh:

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Re: ►Top 25 of the DECADE ◄
« Reply #83 on: December 03, 2009, 05:20:51 PM »
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It's on my list from the previous page.  I still love the shit out of that movie.  I think it's the only movie with a "quirky" woman that brings a depressed and/or generally lame white man out of his shell that I ever liked.  Part of that is because they deal honestly with how fucking grating quirky can be after a little while.  Part of it is because they're not in their 20s, and they actually look like and make sense as a couple.  Part of it is that it never has a character give a dumb monologue about how "this is life and I love you and that's all there is to it."

Stefen

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Re: Top 25 of the DECADE
« Reply #84 on: December 03, 2009, 05:33:53 PM »
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it'll be on mine, too. i loved it at first, then i despised it, and now i love it again because i see it in a different light. its a tragic fucking story. the casual audience loves it because, aw they're supposed to be together, but they're not. not at all. sure, halfway through getting their memories erased, they realize it was a mistake and they want to keep the remaining memories, but that's only because the worst ones, the ones that made them hate eachother in the first place were already erased. tragic. and brilliant.
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socketlevel

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Re: ►Top 25 of the DECADE ◄
« Reply #85 on: December 03, 2009, 06:48:00 PM »
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lol ya eternal sunshine was on mine too. i think that movie stands up and does exactly what i mentioned, it resonates long after the style has faded. it's teaches that we need to remember and endure our endeavors, for if we don't and chose to lock it away in an attempt to forget, we can't possibly progress to the next stage in life. Donnie Darko on the other hand teaches that you can make everything alright if you get a time machine and play washed up trendy 80s tunes. lol I'm only kidding, there are mild themes of sacrifice and teenage rebellion but everything else is pseudo-philosophy mumbo-jumbo bullshit.

now I'm not saying films have to have this, they don't have to have meaning. more should imo, but i would never want to exclusively have message movies, and the best films hide the message beneath great entertainment.  but the point is, the allure of Donnie Darko was that it was dark and deep with tons of context.  so when it proves to not in fact have any, it's worth mentioning and taking a shit on.  if Donnie Darko had the pretense of being a time travel flick and nothing else, i probably would still like it.  it's just so fucking bleeding heart forced.

and stefen i agree sunshine is a beautiful tragic story. funny how so many see it as a happy ending, it's not.  it's tragically content. the idea that even though we won't be together, our time spent will be valued nonetheless is a bitter sweet and very important lesson.  i've written this before but when charlie kauf was on charlie rose, he has this wonderful bit where he talks about the fact that while he was growing up, movies formed many of his views on love.  later in life, when he got to experience it first hand, it wasn't the way it had been depicted. this mirrored my own beliefs, I've often thought that the modern romantic comedy might be one of the most destructive things under the guise of entertainment.  men and mainly women watch these films, and set their ideals based on them, when they might in fact be very false expectations.  ultimately leading to subconscious blame and let down.  eternal sunshine is all about breaking that structure down.  i don't think charlie rose got it, but fuck i totally got it. i was breaking up with someone when i saw it, and it was the most beautiful message i could have gotten from a film.

the original scripted ending has the same point, but it's more twisted. i like the way they went with it, they decided to let the characters know what is happening to them, and chose to go through with it anyway.  ironically it's a very positive tragedy.
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polkablues

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Re: ►Top 25 of the DECADE ◄
« Reply #86 on: December 03, 2009, 06:53:49 PM »
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if Donnie Darko had the pretense of being a time travel flick and nothing else, i probably would still like it.

"Primer: 90210"

I'd watch that.
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socketlevel

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Re: ►Top 25 of the DECADE ◄
« Reply #87 on: December 03, 2009, 06:57:54 PM »
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if Donnie Darko had the pretense of being a time travel flick and nothing else, i probably would still like it.

"Primer: 90210"

I'd watch that.

lol more like "back to the future" or just plain old "primer"

the way it is now it's primer: 90210 directed by Kid Kubrick
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pete

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Re: ►Top 25 of the DECADE ◄
« Reply #88 on: January 01, 2010, 04:19:18 PM »
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Stefen

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Re: ►Top 25 of the DECADE ◄
« Reply #89 on: January 05, 2010, 03:10:42 AM »
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I left a lot of stuff off (mostly in the dishonorable mentions section) and I didn't include any Oliver Stone just to spite Gold Trumpet.

Top 25 Films of the Decade.

1. There Will Be Blood [2007] (wri/dir. Paul Thomas Anderson) Ė Easily the best cinematic achievement of the decade. Paul Thomas Anderson left his contemporaries in the dust with this one. He tried something new and hit it out of the park. I wish more of his immediate peers would attempt something this radically different in tone. (Iím looking at you, Wes Anderson). Daniel Day-Lewis gets the praise for his acting (well-deserved) and Jonny Greenwood gets the praise for his score (also deserved), but to me, Robert Elswitís beautiful cinematography is the real star.
 
2. In The Mood For Love [2000] (wri/dir. Wong Kar-wai) Ė I didnít see this until late and Iím glad thatís the way it played out because I donít see myself appreciating this as much if I saw it when I was younger. Despite itís title, itís not a film that ever really goes the full love flick route. It restrains itself and that may be itís ultimate appeal. It leaves the audience, and itís main characters wanting more. Everything doesnít get resolved, and thatís okay. That avenue is very refreshing for such a western influenced film. As with There Will Be Blood, the cinematography (this time by the always stellar, Christopher Doyle), is one of the main stars.
 
3. A.I. Artificial Intelligence [2001] (dir. Steven Spielberg) Ė Maybe the most controversial film Spielberg has ever done, and with good reason. A story that on the surface parallels that of Pinocchio, adds itís own touches and twists including robotic prostitutes, phallic imagery and fairs where self-aware robots are slaughtered for the amusement of cheering crowds. America! Fuck yeah! Contemporary sci-fi has never been done better. The ending suffers the same fate as most Spielberg films do where they lay the saccharine on too thick, but this time, itís only pretending to be a sweet ending. It isn't a happy ending at all. Whether Speilberg intended it that way or not will always be up for constant debate, but itís the viewer that ultimately decides and that may be why itís such a polarizing film.
 
4. The 25th Hour [2002] (dir. Spike Lee) Ė Spike Leeís at his best when heís making something with social relevancy that focuses on people first and foremost. He pulls no punches here. Heís aided by a top-knotch cast (including the highly underrated and oft-underused Barry Pepper) and a brilliant screenplay by David Benioff (based on his own novel). If Spike Lee was more consistent, I have no doubt that he would be mentioned with some of the all-time greats. A single viewing of this film proves that.
 
5. Irreversible [2002] (dir. Gaspar Noe) Ė Irreversible isnít the first film to be told in reverse chronological order, but itís certainly one of the most controversial. Say what you want about about Gaspar Noe (and everyone has), but the guy does it big here and really presents a film that keeps you glued to the television wondering whatís going to happen next despite the fact you may already know the ending. Is it over the top? Yeah, but I think itís necessary for this sort of story and if youíre going to go over the top, this is your blueprint on how to do it right. Balance, people. Balance.
 
6. George Washington [2000] (wri/dir. David Gordon Green) Ė For a movie where nothing happens through the first hour, it sure does keep you entertained. Between the very genuine and endearing first time acting by the main cast (mostly children), and the beautiful cinematography (courtesy of Tim Orr) it really paints you a moving picture about what itís like to take it easy during the summer in the south. Easily one of my most memorable viewing experiences of the decade.
 
7. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind [2004] (dir. Michel Gondry) Ė Only Chuck Kaufman could come up with an idea this batshit crazy and only Michel Gondry could make a movie out of it. Itís almost perfect and in my mind, itís Kaufmanís crowning achievement. Maybe itís because Iím a pessimist but I always found the ending to be pretty tragic. When I talk to others, they always seem to think it's a happy ending. The only reason they regret getting their memories erased is because all the bad ones were already erased. If you only had memories from the beginning of a failed relationship, youíd probably think it was going to work out, too.
 
8. Talk to Her [2002] (wri/dir. Pedro Almodovar) Ė You could call Almodovar the best filmmaker of the last 20 years and you probably wouldnít be wrong. Some would say Volver is Almodovarís highlight of the decade, but in Volver, he does what he does best; write for women. Here he flips it and his two main characters are men and his writing doesnít miss a beat. This is why I chose this film to represent Almodovar on my list.
 
9. Dancer in the Dark [2000] (wri/dir. Lars von Trier) Ė I had a tough time choosing between Dancer in the Dark and Dogville as far as which von Trier film to represent the decade. I eventually settled on Dancer in the Dark because, despite having so many things working against it (itís a musical about a murderous Czech immigrant on death row losing her eyesight in 1964 Washington state, come on), it manages to take everything and put it together beautifully. The musical bits (especially the final number) are great and the hand-held digital camera Dogme 95-influenced look really makes it seem surreal.
 
10. The Incredibles [2004] (dir. Brad Bird) Ė I donít think Iíve smiled more during a movie than I did during this. The scene where theyíre in the plane and about to get shot down may be the most harrowing and thrilling scene in a movie in the last 10 years. Itís got like 3 endings and theyíre all awesome.

11. Solaris [2002] (wri/dir. Steven Soderbergh) - Itís slow but never boring. Great performances all around. Soderbergh uses ambiance as another character and it works flawlessly. Doesnít make the top 10 on account of an Insane Clown Posse song being used in the background during a key scene (what the fuck, Soderbergh?)
 
12. Let the Right one In [2008] (dir. Tomas Alfredson) Ė Probably one of the creepiest films Iíve ever seen, but thatís what makes it so great. The movie doesnít work if the story involves teenagers or adults. It just doesnít. The best thing about it is itís innocence. Well, Oskarís at least.
 
13. Children of Men [2006] (dir. Alfonso Cuaron) Ė Have you seen the last 20 minutes? It made my head explode. Anything that explodes a head deserves a spot on this list. Plus, contemporary sci-fi is awesome, especially when itís dealing with the potential end of humanity. The whole movies a drag. Just dreary and drab and just not pleasant. A world where dudes canít get women pregnant doesnít sound too bad, though. If weíre being honest, I mean.
 
14. Wonder Boys [2000] (dir. Curtis Hanson) - One of the rare times where the movie is better than the book. Everyone is great in this, but it's Michael Douglas who steals the show as a down on his luck pot smoking literary genius. Itís a movie about college and getting high, but done in a way where Rhodes scholars can like it, too.  

15. City of God [2004] (dir. Fernando Meirelles)  - Initially, I didnít want to include this flick because, even though itís a really great movie, itís kind of suffered the same fate as movies like Fight Club and Requiem For a Dream where they kind of caught on with the wrong audience who was digging them for the wrong reasons, but in the end, if I didnít include it, then the homeboys won. We already lost Scarface to them, dated soundtrack and all. Canít let them take everything.
 
16. 21 Grams [2002] (dir. Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu) Ė The interweaving storylines that Alejandro GonzŠlez IŮŠrritu always does has kind of gotten stale, but this is where he does it best. I donít think Naomi Watts has ever been better. And Sean Penn and Benicio Del Toro are always great; no exception here.
 
17. Amelie [2001] (dir. Jean-Pierre Jeunet) Ė Audrey Tatutou is adorable. The best thing about it are the supporting characters. They give the film life. Itís imaginative and tells a great story. It's full of win.
 
18. Brokeback Mountain [2005] (dir. Ang Lee) Ė Gay cowboys lulz. But seriously, guys; itís got that dork from 10 Things I Hate About You that always wore those gay leather pants doing a complete 180.
 
19. Nurse Betty [2000] (dir. Neil Labute) Ė Neil, you started off your career SO WELL. What the fuck happened? Get a grip, man. Go do some soul searching and get back to being awesome. Take a road trip, get arrested, kill a guy. Do whatever it takes.
 
20. Time of the Wolf [2003] (dir. Michael Haneke) Ė Haneke is a guy that I had to include on my list because heís made some great films this decade and since post-apocalyptic films are some of my faves, I included this one. The beginning of this film is brutal. Haneke got me with that one. I put my guard down for ONE SECOND (you NEVER put your guard down during a Haneke film, even in the opening minutes) and BAM, he got me. Had to turn it off, collect myself, then resume watching during the daytime. Heís a real jerk.
 
21. Munich [2005] (dir. Steven Spielberg) Ė Like most Spielberg movies, it could have been a perfect film if Spielberg just let somebody else handle the third act. For being such a mild-mannered filmmaker, Spielberg sure nails the violence when he gets the chance. Nobody can do violence like Spielberg. The guy is just on another level when heís allowed to get gritty. Itís like he goes all out with the violence because he knows he probably wonít be allowed to do it again for awhile.
 
22. The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada [2005] (dir. Tommy Lee Jones) Ė After 21 Grams, I think this is the best thing Guillermo Arriaga has ever written. The aforementioned Barry Pepper turns in a solid performance here and Tommy Lee Jones does the Tommy Lee Jones thing. Awesome story, awesome pacing, awesome setting. This one seems to always fly under the radar for some reason.
 
23. You Can Count on Me [2000] (dir. Ken Lonergan) Ė Itís so simple and easy, but done so well. Quite possibly my favorite screenplay of the decade.
 
24. Mysterious Skin [2004] (dir. Gregg Araki) Ė Araki is a love him or hate him type of filmmaker and I can see where both sides come from. His movies are pretty terrible but they always had a youthful independent edge that anyone who was a teenager between the years 1995 and 2000 could always find infectious. Mysterious Skin is, in my opinion, Arakiís first real foray into serious adult filmmaking. Itís still riddled with Arakiíisms (the awkward close-ups, the uncomfortable beats), but they arenít annoying here at all and they actually work with the story. Joseph Gordon-Levitt kills it here.
 
25. Almost Famous [2000] (wri/dir. Cameron Crowe) Ė Top 25 because itís one of those movies that will always be around. Itís had a rough few years and maybe doesnít hold up as well as it did upon release, but itís still a solid flick and holds sentimental value for a whole generation. Some of the writing is clumsy and the pacing is a bit off at times, but as a whole, itís a great movie.

Honorable Mentions Ė

Punch-Drunk Love - [2002] (wri/dir. Paul Thomas Anderson)
Finding Forrester [2000] (dir. Gus van Sant)
Yu Tu Mama Tambien [2001] (dir. Alfonso Cuaron)
Traffic [2000] (dir. Steven Soderbergh)
Memento [2000] (dir. Chris Nolan)
Adaptation [2002] (dir. Spike Jonze)
Elephant [2003] (dir. Gus van Sant)
All the Real Girls [2003] (dir. David Gordon Green)
In The Bedroom [2002] (dir. Todd Field)
United 93 [2006] (dir. Paul Greengrass)
 
(Dis)Honorable Mentions

Gladiator [dir. Ridley Scott] Ė  To me, the funniest thing about Ridley Scott is the fact that he tries so hard to be his less talented younger brother, but he always ends up accidentally being slightly better and you can tell that really pisses him off. Tony Scott isnít what youíd call a good filmmaker, but he makes awesome action movies with the sole purpose of making awesome action movies. His brother on the other hand tries to make awesome action movies but they always end up having some sort of quality that appeals to a large group of people. Every time you see a Ridley Scott interview or listen to one of his commentary tracks, you can just tell heís miserable. Blackhawk Down is pretty awesome, though.

Donnie Darko [dir. Some pretentious jerkoff who fell on an alright idea and got in way over his head when he felt like he needed to tell someone] Ė This movie makes absolutely no sense if you think about it. I wish I could travel back in time and erase it from ever being made. The cons of this movie being made far outweigh the pros.

A Beautiful Mind and anything Ron Howard EVER does. Ė The only thing worse than a filmmaker who tries to please 100% of all people and attempts to pass it off as art is when said filmmaker ends up pleasing 75% of all people. Itís pretty hilarious how Russell Crowe even does the Russell Crowe scowl while heís crunching numbers like itís tax season.

Crash Ė Oh, god, where to start? I donít think Iíve ever seen a more manipulative film. It just hammers you over the head over and over again with itís messages. When it was over, I wanted to riot. I wanted to start fires. I stepped out of the theater looking for a vehicle to turn over.

Juno Ė Juno is quite possibly the most annoying character ever written. Sheís a know-it-all who apparently didnít know about safe sex. True story: I actually saw this with Gloria Steinem and halfway through the film she stood up, climbed upon a platform, grabbed a loudspeaker, pointed it at the screen and yelled, ďOh, god, can you please shut up!Ē
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