Author Topic: Federico Fellini  (Read 30616 times)

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mutinyco

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #120 on: April 11, 2004, 11:36:17 PM »
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Guido, do you love me a little?
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Gold Trumpet

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #121 on: April 12, 2004, 12:48:19 AM »
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Quote from: SHAFTR
http://www.turnerclassicmovies.com/ThisMonth/Article/0,,72547,00.html

Starting April 23rd on TCM.
The Magic of Fellini
La Dolce Vita
La Strada
Ginger and Fred


Ooohhh...the first two are tempting big time. Never seen the documentary and I'll finally have a copy of La Dolce Vita widescreen.....but fuck TCM if they couldn't use 8 1/2 instead of Ginger and Fred.

modage

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #122 on: April 23, 2004, 06:10:21 PM »
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Quote from: SHAFTR
http://www.turnerclassicmovies.com/ThisMonth/Article/0,,72547,00.html

Starting April 23rd on TCM.
The Magic of Fellini
La Dolce Vita
La Strada
Ginger and Fred

Just a reminder.  Fellini Night starts tonite at 8 on TCM.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

Seraphim

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #123 on: April 24, 2004, 08:39:28 AM »
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Wow!

Such things should be held here...!  :roll:

Today I bought Amarcord and 8 1/2 on DVD (together with Tornatore's "Cinema Paradiso").

I've experienced less enjoyable days than today. :)
Seraphim's magic words:
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Literature
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Tarkovsky, Bresson, Fellini, Angelopoulos

Redlum

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #124 on: May 14, 2004, 04:43:18 PM »
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Im seeing pre-orders for a Region one Dolce Vita 2-Disc popping up on online retailers (including Amazon). This particular site mentions September the 7th:
http://www2.cd-wow.com/detail_results_2.php?product_code=11261
\"I wanted to make a film for kids, something that would present them with a kind of elementary morality. Because nowadays nobody bothers to tell those kids, \'Hey, this is right and this is wrong\'.\"
  -  George Lucas

MrBurgerKing

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #125 on: May 15, 2004, 11:23:35 PM »
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I saw AMARCORD, it reminded me of Radio Days from Woody. I don't know, I like those nostalgia films, it's sad and great to remember. It's not only a past delicious whopper, but the whole experience of eating that whopper---who I was with-a friend who made a comment on the goth-cashier's attitude, bickering on the way he handed her the cash ("I put my hand out, why did you slide the money to me?"), the weird senior citizen minimum-wage employee wiping the table, even the young couple going at it like rabbits at the corner window (okay, that part I made up, but lots of retrospective thinking is exagerrated :|). Everyone has an Amarcord or Radio Days in them.

One scene I loved was Uncle Theo in the tree screaming about how he wanted a women. He kept everyone at the farm for hours more than they anticipated. When finally they took him down from the tree, he gave a little grin and a shrug, I thought that was a perfect resolution.

SoNowThen

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #126 on: May 16, 2004, 05:36:31 PM »
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:yabbse-thumbup:



Doncha just love it when the boys are dancing in the mist?
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

LostEraser

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #127 on: May 30, 2004, 02:49:55 AM »
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The American Cinemateque is having a complete Fellini festival at the Egytptian Theater here in Hollywood. It's been wonderful. I've been to everything they've played. Tonight I saw La Dolce Vita and Cassanova. Neither of them are available on dvd here in the US so it was great seeing them on the big screen. I didn't even know La Dolce Vita was 2:35! Boy, was I missing out. I really hope this comes out on a region 1 dvd soon. And has anyone else seen Cassanova. It's pretty rare to even find a copy of it on VHS. I had never seen it and was expecting it to be one of the more lesser Fellini films but I highely enjoyed it (though maybe that's just because I wasn't expecting much). It had some of fellini's best visuals in it in my opinion. Particularly Cassanona on a tiny row boat out in the ocean in the beginning. Really cool effects similar to what you would see in a silent movie. Definitly one of his more shallower plots though but one of his more entertaining ones as well. And I actually found the ending - Cassanova dancing (among other things) with a life size doll to actually be very moving. Anyone else see this rare Fellini film?
Capra tells us that, in effect, love's dreams are only dreams and that they will never quite bear translation into practical forms of relationship and expression. They will never be realized in the world but only in our consciousness and in our most daring and glorious works of art - but that, for Capra, is no reason to abandon love's dreams.
--Ray Carney, American Vision: The Films Of Frank Capra

cine

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #128 on: May 30, 2004, 05:27:51 AM »
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Quote from: LostEraser
And I actually found the ending - Cassanova dancing (among other things) with a life size doll to actually be very moving. Anyone else see this rare Fellini film?

Who even cares to see it if you just told the ending?

LostEraser

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #129 on: May 31, 2004, 02:04:14 AM »
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I actually didn't give much of the plot away, there's a lot that happens at the end and I just made a reference to one of them. Though, even if I did give the whole ending away it's not like this is a murder mystery or anything. You shouldn't not a watch a Fellini film just because someone gave a way part of (or even all of) the ending. It's Fellini for gods sake!
Capra tells us that, in effect, love's dreams are only dreams and that they will never quite bear translation into practical forms of relationship and expression. They will never be realized in the world but only in our consciousness and in our most daring and glorious works of art - but that, for Capra, is no reason to abandon love's dreams.
--Ray Carney, American Vision: The Films Of Frank Capra

cine

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #130 on: May 31, 2004, 02:11:41 AM »
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Quote from: LostEraser
It's Fellini for gods sake!

Yeah, look, I know that. And since it IS Fellini, I don't like 'moving' sequences at the ending of his films to be spoiled for me. Maybe you like that sort of thing but I don't.

LostEraser

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #131 on: May 31, 2004, 04:45:52 AM »
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Point taken. From now on I will try to play by the rules and write "spoilers" before I write anything about a movie that gives away the plot. Though when I scan the Paul Thomas Anderson Boards or Quentin Tarantino boards I see that quite a few other people aren't playing by the rules either. Oh well. I'll still try. Cheers.
Capra tells us that, in effect, love's dreams are only dreams and that they will never quite bear translation into practical forms of relationship and expression. They will never be realized in the world but only in our consciousness and in our most daring and glorious works of art - but that, for Capra, is no reason to abandon love's dreams.
--Ray Carney, American Vision: The Films Of Frank Capra

SoNowThen

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #132 on: May 31, 2004, 10:25:09 AM »
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Are you being serious Cinephile? It sounds like you're just kidding...

Your post was fine, LostEraser. It's pretty much a stock Fellini ending. It wouldn't "ruin" anything, per se.

Unless you told everyone about how the doll eats Casanova!!!

Hahahaha, I really ruined it for you all!!!! Now you'll never enjoy it!!!!!!!

Seriously though, this movie isn't even available on video, I think. I'd love to see it.
Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

LostEraser

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #133 on: June 01, 2004, 11:35:09 PM »
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Thanks, I didn't really think anything was particularly wrong with my post either. But since I'm still technically new here I though I should just play ball and step back for the time being. But, like I said, people discuss major plot points in movies (yes even the endings) in other threads all the time without writing "spoilers" on them. It's just a risk you take reading a board like this where people analyze films so much.

Oh, and no Cassanova is not available on DVD and the VHS has been long out of print. So, yea, I hope that changes soon. While, like I said, it's definitly not one of Fellini's best films it's certainly not his worse either. It deserves to be on dvd much more than say And The Ship Sails on. I'd rank it a little above Satyricon in the Fellini library.
Capra tells us that, in effect, love's dreams are only dreams and that they will never quite bear translation into practical forms of relationship and expression. They will never be realized in the world but only in our consciousness and in our most daring and glorious works of art - but that, for Capra, is no reason to abandon love's dreams.
--Ray Carney, American Vision: The Films Of Frank Capra

Ravi

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Federico Fellini
« Reply #134 on: June 07, 2004, 11:12:35 PM »
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I watched La Strada today.  I haven't seen much Fellini, but this is the most endearing of his films I've seen so far.

 

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