Author Topic: KEVIN SMITH  (Read 24402 times)

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billybrown

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KEVIN SMITH
« Reply #30 on: March 25, 2004, 08:27:49 PM »
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Being that it's only being released on 1600 screens opening wknd, I'll re-adjust my opening wknd accordingly and say 7 mill. Keep all those numbers coming guys... good stuff!

Banky

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« Reply #31 on: March 25, 2004, 09:09:11 PM »
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Quote from: billybrown
Box office predictions for Jersey Girl everyone... I'll go with an opening take of 14.5 mill, total take of about 40-50 mill. I also predict that quite a few of the reviews are going to use words such as "cute", "funny",
"sweet",  and "charming."



http://www.xixax.com/viewtopic.php?t=5827

AntiDumbFrogQuestion

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« Reply #32 on: March 29, 2004, 09:23:02 AM »
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Who is in this same predicament:

You want to see three movies.
First, the Ladykillers, which will be a hit because of Tom Hanks, so will probably be out a little while.
Second, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind looks and sounds GENIUS so it will be around for a LOOOOONG time
And lastly, Jersey Girl, which doesn't even LOOK like a Kevin Smith movie, and like his movies, you have to pay careful attention in the ads to even find out he is involved.  So you see Jersey Girl first, because it may not be out that long.

CUZ THAT'S WHAT I DID!
And even though it seems like Kevin Smith Lite, it wasn't a totally shitty movie. Probably won't spurn any cult followings like Clerks, but we all know THAT already. It was cute, charming and....oh wait. Fuck. That was said already.
But the use of the word 'shit' to replace 'fuck' was interesting, and George Carlin rules, but way too many Will Smith jokes popping up.
Will Smith...Kevin Smith....are they related?
And Racquel Castro could actually act for her age.
THE END.

cine

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« Reply #33 on: March 29, 2004, 02:01:59 PM »
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AntiDumbFrog, two questions:

1. For your prediction of longevity for some of these movies, I must ask: how often do you go to the movies?

2. Have you ever visited Xixax's Now Showing forum? It's cool. Maybe you'll like this thread: http://www.xixax.com/viewtopic.php?t=369

And one answer:
Quote
Will Smith...Kevin Smith....are they related?

Clearly, they are. Isn't it obvious?

modage

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« Reply #34 on: March 29, 2004, 05:13:51 PM »
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i doubt any of those 3 movies will be around too long.  in a month most will probably be completely gone.  the big april PRE-SUMMER movies are coming.  lets get all this quirky/goofy shit out of the way, its time to blow some shit up!
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

Stefen

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« Reply #35 on: March 29, 2004, 11:00:18 PM »
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Has anyone heard anything about Mewes lately? I read in a newsletter that he's back on the black tar. Tragic, really.
Let's go to a motel. We don't have to do anything -- we could just swim.

Raikus

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« Reply #36 on: March 30, 2004, 09:35:30 AM »
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I don't think that's the case. Kevin has him reigned in and working at the View Askew HQ.
Yes, to dance beneath the diamond sky with one hand waving free, silhouetted by the sea, circled by the circus sands, with all memory and fate driven deep beneath the waves, let me forget about today until tomorrow.

Stefen

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« Reply #37 on: March 31, 2004, 11:41:00 PM »
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hahaha check out www.newsaskew.com for april 1st. Almost as funny as the time they turned newsaskew into a pta site.
Let's go to a motel. We don't have to do anything -- we could just swim.

modage

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« Reply #38 on: April 03, 2004, 03:49:25 PM »
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dont think this has been posted....



When Kill Bill opened last fall, critics were quick to point out that despite all the movie's in-your-face ingenuity, it was obvious that Quentin Tarantino didn't have children of his own (no father would direct a scene in which a young girl witnesses her mother's murder on-camera, they argued). Hollywood's full of bad-boy filmmakers -- raunchy, violent new voices who revel in the extreme -- but sooner or later, even bad boys grow up. Take Kevin Smith, whose first movie, Clerks, originally earned an NC-17 rating on the basis of language alone.

Now, in Jersey Girl, audiences are getting the chance to see the softer side of Smith as the director translates his own experience as a new father to the screen. "My mother had always been bugging me to give her something that wasn't an 'R,'" Smith says, "so I was happy to make a movie that was PG-13. It was nice to accomplish that." More Mr. Mom than Mallrats, Smith's latest comedy stars View Askew regular Ben Affleck as a hotshot talent agent who unexpectedly becomes a single dad after his wife dies during childbirth. Here, Smith explains five films that have had a major impact on his career.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Nothing in Common
(1986, dir: Garry Marshall; starring: Tom Hanks, Jackie Gleason)
Nothing in Common was very influential and one of my favorite movies of all time. Tom Hanks is fantastic in it, and Jackie Gleason is nothing short of amazing. It's about the relationship of an adult child to his father and how you come to grips with the fact that one day your parents will not be with you. Hanks is kind of lost in a world of work, and he's forgotten where he came from or how he was raised or who his parents were. If I could've flat-out remade that movie, I would've, but it's so perfect, so why bother? Instead, I made Jersey Girl because that's what was on my mind at the time. That's pretty much what I've done with every movie, just take a snapshot of what's going on in my life at the moment that I start writing, and that was the thing that I was most preoccupied with: being a dad, having a daughter, being married. Also, when my kid was born, I became far more aware of my own mortality and by extension, my wife's mortality, and I had that thought that goes through every new father's head: "What if she died? What if it was just me and the kid?" She's such a natural with the kid. She took to motherhood really quickly, while I was just kind of lost in work, and the kid was just something that happened. It changes your life irrevocably: "What if I didn't have somebody else to lean on?"


You Can Count on Me
(2000, dir: Kenneth Lonnergan; starring: Laura Linney, Mark Ruffalo)
Another movie I saw that really kick-started the whole process was Kenny Lonnergan's You Can Count On Me. Years ago, I was a judge on the Sundance jury, and his movie was something I was really taken by, just in how quiet it was and how small it was in scope. It told a story about family, which is something I hadn't really done before. I was always making movies about extended family, like the relationships one has with a best friend or a girlfriend or between a rubber poop monster and angels [in Dogma]. I hadn't really touched on family, and watching this movie about two kids who had lost their parents and how they leaned on one another reminded me that there was an area that I hadn't gone into yet, and I was a little jealous. Jersey Girl's missing out on all the wonderful profanity that Chasing Amy had, and the pop-culture references and whatnot, but boil it down to the essentials, and it's still the same thing, a mixture of drama and comedy about relationships. For me it's not like Jersey Girl represents a big departure, and now I'm not going to make movies where people curse or talk about sex anymore. That's kind of what I do, what I'm interested in. When you've got a seven-year-old girl in the picture, you can't have everyone running around saying "c---smoker" 96 times a minute, but it doesn't really represent the direction I'm heading.


Batman
(1989, dir: Tim Burton; starring: Michael Keaton, Jack Nicholson)
My next flick [The Green Hornet] is as far away from this as Jersey Girl is from Jay & Silent Bob Strike Back. Batman, for its flaws, was a seminal comic-book movie for me, so I always give it up to that movie for the sheer "eventness" of the whole thing. I was knee-deep in comic books at the time, and that movie was the first one to capture the tone of the actual book. It wasn't campy and kitschy like the Adam West TV show. This was the Batman that we all knew and loved, the one that we were currently reading about. This was the Dark Knight. Tim Burton really nailed that. One problem with a lot of the comic-book movies is that the villain's far more interesting than the main character, and you don't want that, especially when your main character's name is in the title. Batman also ran very close to being just flat-out The Joker inasmuch as that character's far more captivating. I think your villain's always gotta be interesting, but your hero has to be your anchor because the fans have to like him in two different personas: first as the straight guy with the secret identity, and then as the guy who puts on the mask and goes out and beats up chain-snatchers and muggers. To me, it's all about making Britt Reid (who's the Green Hornet's secret identity) the most interesting part of the movie, so much so that when he puts on the mask, it's just gravy at that point.


Slacker
(1991, dir: Richard Linklater; starring: Richard Linklater, Mark James)
['The Green Hornet' will] be the most chatty comic-book movie ever made, that much I can assure you. If I had tried to make this movie 10 years ago, it would've been Green Hornet and Kato sitting off to the side discussing crime as it happened off-camera, one of them exiting the shot and then coming back and talking about what they did. Now, I'm kind of in a place where I'm comfortable enough that I can lean on the visuals to tell the story. Before I became a filmmaker myself, like on my 21st birthday, I went to see Slacker at the Angelika [Theater in New York City]. People spoke quite a bit in that movie, but it was the fact that Slacker was a meandering picture that was groundbreaking for me because it had no plot. It was unlike anything I'd ever seen before. It started with one character and led you to another, and then you lost that first guy for the rest of the movie, and so on. It looked easy to shoot, not all polished and glossy like most movies I'd been used to at the time, and it got me going, "If this is moviemaking, then I want to make a movie, too." I was definitely a little spoiled by the first movie [Clerks], because all we had going for us was what people were saying. Certainly not the look -- it looked like it was shot through a f---ing glass of milk.


Trust
(1990; dir: Hal Hartley; starring: Adrienne Shelley, Martin Donovan)
Slacker got me into the independent film movement, which led me to Hal Hartley's stuff. It's all about dialogue for me, and Hartley's stuff uses very stylized dialogue, but it's all people talking. My all-time favorite Hal Hartley movie was Trust, which is the movie that gave me license to do what I do with dialogue. His dialogue was very stagy and surreal, and it didn't sound like real conversations, whereas with my stuff, people say, "What's great about it is it sounds real, it sounds like that's how people talk." I don't know. I've sat around and listened to people talk my whole life, and people don't talk in monologues. The actually speak in stilted sentences, sometimes monosyllabic grunts. Basically, I just found a middle ground between how people really speak and what Hartley was doing. Hal's conversations are a little more eccentric, where his characters study the psychology of things, and I prefer to discuss the mundane or the shit that everybody does or can do. I'm preoccupied with sex because the whole world is preoccupied with sex, whether they admit it or not. It's the thing that we all do and rarely speak about in mixed company, but we certainly talk about it a lot with our friends, so I was just like, let's take that to the next logical degree and make whole movies about people obsessed with sex. Not the kind of high-school romps where people are trying to get laid for the first time, just actual discussions, anecdotal stuff.
Christopher Nolan's directive was clear to everyone in the cast and crew: Use CGI only as a last resort.

matt35mm

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« Reply #39 on: April 03, 2004, 04:26:34 PM »
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Quote from: Kevin Smith
[Clerks] looked like it was shot through a f---ing glass of milk


Hahaha, I dunno, that just made me laugh.

cine

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« Reply #40 on: May 17, 2004, 12:53:39 PM »
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Kevin Smith on Green Hornet & Future Slate
Source: View Askew

Kevin Smith answered questions from fans this weekend on his official Message Board, and The Green Hornet came up several times.

Asked how the script is going, he said that "It's coming. Was fifty pages in. Then, I sh*t-canned everything and started over. Now I'm sixty pages in and digging it much more. I'm figuring the first draft's gonna come in at around 180 pages."

He also commented on the writing process this time around. "A bit harder. Spent a long time second-guessing myself, trying to write a mainstream flick. Then, I realized that sh*t's for the birds, and I should just write it as if it were a comic book. Since then, it's been much easier."

He said that The Green Hornet won't be his next project. From the looks of it now, he'll first direct an untitled small project, then "Hornet," next Fletch Won and then Ranger Danger. He may squeeze in a few more projects after "Hornet" and the latter two as well.

ElPandaRoyal

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« Reply #41 on: May 17, 2004, 01:34:06 PM »
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Quote from: Cinephile
Kevin Smith on Green Hornet & Future Slate
Source: View Askew

Kevin Smith answered questions from fans this weekend on his official Message Board, and The Green Hornet came up several times.

Asked how the script is going, he said that "It's coming. Was fifty pages in. Then, I sh*t-canned everything and started over. Now I'm sixty pages in and digging it much more. I'm figuring the first draft's gonna come in at around 180 pages."

He also commented on the writing process this time around. "A bit harder. Spent a long time second-guessing myself, trying to write a mainstream flick. Then, I realized that sh*t's for the birds, and I should just write it as if it were a comic book. Since then, it's been much easier."

He said that The Green Hornet won't be his next project. From the looks of it now, he'll first direct an untitled small project, then "Hornet," next Fletch Won and then Ranger Danger. He may squeeze in a few more projects after "Hornet" and the latter two as well.


Cool
Si

El Duderino

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« Reply #42 on: May 17, 2004, 01:47:45 PM »
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wow, he's got a lot on his plate.

i like Kevin Smith, i think he's a good screenwriter and a good director. i think his best work is without a doubt, Dogma. also, i reccomend Clerks the cartoon to everyone, it's hilarious

also, i like that he likes "You Can Count On Me"
Did I just get cock-blocked by Bob Saget?

Banky

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« Reply #43 on: May 17, 2004, 02:49:01 PM »
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you gotta give the guy credit for staying busy

so whens PTA's next movie being released?

Sleuth

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« Reply #44 on: May 17, 2004, 06:19:22 PM »
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OH THAT IS JUST IT I AM DONE DEBATING THE ABSURDITY
I like to hug dogs

 

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