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91
News and Theory / Re: What Films Are We Watching?
« Last post by wilberfan on September 11, 2018, 12:26:45 PM »


...awesome trip down memory lane. When you revisit a favorite movie after not having seen it in over a decade, it really is like being  reacquainting with an old friend, being reminded why you loved them to begin with.


My exact experience Sunday evening seeing Barry Lyndon again on the big screen (DCP).  I don't think I'd seen it in at least a couple of decades, and it held up beautifully.  In fact, I think I caught more nuances of plot and performance than I ever had on any previous viewing.  I was surprised at how much of the film I had forgotten. In many ways it was almost like seeing it for the first time.  An excellent audience, too.  No fidgeting, rapt attention, no texting, hearty laughter in all the appropriate places.  Leon Vitali (Lord Bullingdon) was present, and had a short Q&A before the screening.  The moderator asked for a show of hands from those who had never seen the film, and there must have been 50 or so in that category--which surprised me a little in the moment, but probably shouldn't have as the film is over 40 years old now. 
92
News and Theory / Re: What Films Are We Watching?
« Last post by Something Spanish on September 11, 2018, 09:58:19 AM »
 

Mulholland Drive (35mm) last night, awesome trip down memory lane. When you revisit a favorite movie after not having seen it in over a decade, it really is like being  reacquainting with an old friend, being reminded why you loved them to begin with. Had the same experience two weeks prior with Dazed and Confused, seeing on film for the first time, but it had only been about 4-5 years since seeing that one last. Anyway, Mulholland feels like Lynch's version of Pulp Fiction. It's his epic. I know sitting through it the first time in 2001 I had no idea what the fuck I had just experienced, chalking it up to the insane wonderings of a schizophrenic,  those feelings supplanted by a mysterious inclinations to revisit the movie, totaling about 4 viewing by the time it left theatres. It's one of the few movies I felt the need to see over and over without the certainty of a final judgment, having no idea whether I ultimately liked it or not. Now I can say without reservation  Mulholland is a favorite, one of the best out there. The broken narrative, the oddities Lynch infuses it with while connecting those idiosyncrasies with a showbiz parable. All those weird characters weaving in and out like a traveling freakshow. The mood this movie produces is impossible to replicate unless you're its creator. Clichéd as it sounds, there really is only one David Lynch. The Silencio club sequence gets me every single time, those unexplainable emotions welling up as the transformations commence. What a great side by side comparison showing Naomi Watts as this naive newcomer is this dream state only to be smacked into the reality of the morose darkness when success is never achieved and dreams breakdown. Already itching to pop in the blu tonight.
93
The Grapevine / Re: The Old Man And The Gun
« Last post by jenkins on September 10, 2018, 06:05:07 PM »
Quote
Lowery and his team, especially cinematographer Joe Anderson and composer Daniel Hart, give “The Old Man & the Gun” a very period-heavy feel. It’s a movie that doesn’t just take place in a different era—the true story unfolds, mostly, in 1981—but feels like it was made in a different era too. The film stock, the music choices, the cinematic language—it’s all very different from what we’re accustomed to in 2018, enhancing the magical, timeless aspect of the entire project. It's as cheesy as it sounds but this is one of those movies for which the phrase "they don't make 'em like that any more" was invented.

this is sloppy writing but enhances a point i've made and am continuing to build. okay so he calls it "very period-heavy" then says "feels like it was made in a different era" then says "the magical, timeless aspect of the entire project."

what i'm saying is these aren't period movies that Lowery makes, but dreamscape movies. which is the conclusion this critic reaches toward the end of his paragraph. it reminds people of this/that but frankly they weren't ever quite made in this exact way, and The Lowery Touch is unique to itself, a rare bird specimen.
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The Grapevine / Re: The Old Man And The Gun
« Last post by eward on September 10, 2018, 05:43:01 PM »
95
The Grapevine / Re: Halloween
« Last post by eward on September 10, 2018, 05:41:58 PM »
96
News and Theory / Re: Garbage pail trailers
« Last post by jenkins on September 10, 2018, 04:22:01 PM »


why 'garbage' has replaced 'trash' in the cultural lexicon is beyond my understanding--who chooses longer words???--but certainly Uwe Boll is a star in the sphere of trash cinema, like Troma, and like Troma i haven't seen his movies and i don't want to, but props for your bad spirit that's somehow brought you success regardless.
97
The Small Screen / Re: Better Call Saul
« Last post by ©brad on September 10, 2018, 01:25:17 PM »
Man this show is in no hurry at all is it. There are some lovely performances and inventive filmmaking you expect from a Gilligan production, but overall I feel the show lacks urgency, and is outright boring at times. The Mexican cartel turf war stuff is not that interesting, and the more we learn about Gus the less mysterious and scary he is. Never mind the fact that as many have pointed out, it feels like two separate shows that have yet to converge in any surprising way, to the point where one wonders what the point of the series actually is beyond fan service to Breaking Bad fanatics.

It's entertaining and watchable for sure. But it doesn't feel essential. Maybe I just miss Breaking Bad too much.
98
News and Theory / Re: What Films Are We Watching?
« Last post by Something Spanish on September 10, 2018, 08:58:02 AM »
saw Beyond the Black Rainbow on the big screen, mainly because I'm very much looking forward to Mandy this month. heard all about its general oddness and ambiguity, a real understatement, but didn't think it'd be as out there as it was. experiencing it on a large screen with booming sound made it easier to get sucked into the experience, I just have didn't get it, which doesn't equate it with bad movies just self interpretive ones. it had its own style, that's for sure, even if that style could be comparable to a high budged film school thesis. this is a hand crafted unique vision that maybe could have benefitted from some audience inclusion. as a sensory experience, it did its thing. wouldn't mind sitting through it again someday.

after that saw this cheesy, strangely fun early-0techno-rave movie from 1996, Vibrations, starring the lovable Kelly Bundy and James from Twin Peaks, playing an aspiring musician who loses both hands in a violent attack and is nurtured by Bundy and her neighbors into becoming a keyboard techno maestro known as Cyperstorm, due to his new  mechanically implanted robot arms. it's inarguably bad, yet somehow found myself into it in the way a bad movie can spray its charm on you. enjoyably ridiculous. haven't intentionally watched a bad good movie in a long time. it's funny, I remember going for shitty movies on purpose back in the day to get inspired. you kind of imagine how you would handle the bad scenes and dialogue if you were in charge.

 

went to a midnight showing of Blues Brothers on 35mm, too, passing the fuck out halfway in. never saw the whole thing before, but from what I sat through completely understand its cemented legacy.
99
2017 In Film / Re: Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi
« Last post by Drenk on September 10, 2018, 08:35:43 AM »
The thing about burning down the past still infuriate me. And not only because it appeared on headlines, trying to persuade us that it makes the work "mature" and interesting, but mainly because the movie—at the end—does the contrary despite the fact that characters try to spite out themes which can't be respected by a modern Disney franchise.
100
2017 In Film / Re: Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi
« Last post by pete on September 10, 2018, 06:59:30 AM »
there are so many scenes and lines of dialogue of The Last Jedi that only make sense if the characters are aware of the fact that they're in a movie and they have to persuade the audience that the brand is still strong.
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