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41
Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread
« Last post by HACKANUT on November 16, 2017, 08:22:18 AM »
thats substantially shorter than I was expecting. I'm sure the film's as tight as possible, but I was really looking forward to that rumored 3 hour cut!
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Has anyone here ever met PTA? Tell us your stories....
« Last post by mogwai on November 16, 2017, 07:18:13 AM »
Some of us must remember this:

Quote
Although Anderson is one of the most autobiographical filmmakers of his generation, drawing heavily on his childhood in the San Fernando Valley, most stories about him offer some variation on "very little is known about his early years" or "little is known about Paul's childhood." He has stopped talking to most of his friends from those years, and none of them can say whether he just moved on naturally or broke with his past for some secret reason.

"When he did Magnolia," Stevens says, "I sent word through someone who worked with him to tell Paul it would be great if he could come back for a visit. I'd love to see him. And the answer came: 'Paul doesn't go back.'"

'The Secret History of Paul Thomas Anderson' - Esquire

I've heard a LOT of jokes being made in film circles about him being addicted cocaine etc and going to rehab. Never got a source on that.

Iím definitely sure he went to rehab after Ted Demme died. Iím
Also sure Tarantino also did some rehab after Jackie Brown.

#pubrick
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread
« Last post by wilberfan on November 16, 2017, 02:18:39 AM »
115 minute run time? 

https://i.redd.it/pfmxwj1xmayz.png
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread
« Last post by Tictacbk on November 16, 2017, 01:38:34 AM »
Woo! Just rsvp'd for Aero Theater on 11/29/2017 7:00 PM. Very excited.
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread
« Last post by matt35mm on November 15, 2017, 08:35:09 PM »
They've just expanded the number of guilds that are allowed to RSVP, which gives me hope that I can snag one with ACE. I'll keep checking each day (as I have been doing). Probably the ones with Q&As will fill up before I get access.

They're over-RSVPing, too.  So seating isn't even guaranteed.

That's standard. Even so, these screenings are never ever full.
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread
« Last post by wilberfan on November 15, 2017, 07:57:16 PM »
They've just expanded the number of guilds that are allowed to RSVP, which gives me hope that I can snag one with ACE. I'll keep checking each day (as I have been doing). Probably the ones with Q&As will fill up before I get access.

They're over-RSVPing, too.  So seating isn't even guaranteed. 
47
Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread
« Last post by matt35mm on November 15, 2017, 07:55:12 PM »
They've just expanded the number of guilds that are allowed to RSVP, which gives me hope that I can snag one with ACE. I'll keep checking each day (as I have been doing). Probably the ones with Q&As will fill up before I get access.
48
Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread
« Last post by wilberfan on November 15, 2017, 07:28:51 PM »
I'm not sure yet where the boundaries are around here.  I was excited to see this, for what it's worth...

https://twitter.com/JohnDarko/status/930922113422077952
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Magnolia discussion
« Last post by Sleepless on November 15, 2017, 08:40:06 AM »
Let us know what you think of Lantana.

My thoughts.

Also, I just found out it has it's own thread. Best bits from there:

There are so many great moments in this film, one of which I really remember: Leon (LaPaglia) is running and he slams into another guy and explodes, yelling at him.  Both their faces are bloodied, the other man's nose possibly broken.  Leon sees the man has dropped a bag, and feeling bad, he runs after him and gets it and tries to smooth things over.  And the man (full grown, strong, goatee and everything) just breaks down and starts crying in Leon's arms.  And I haven't seen anything like that since Brando in Last Tango in Paris.  My jaw dropped open, it was so real, so powerful.  Later on, Leon meets John, the man whose wife he's having an affair with, unbeknownst to him.  They share drinks, and discuss the incident in the bathroom, wondering what it would take for someone to cry like that.  It gets even better when the scene was paralleled later on in the movie when Leon cries upon hearing a tape where his wife professes she still loves him (long story; see the film to understand it).

it really wasn't about a murder case. It's about love and marriage. Two Thumbs Way Up for me for "Lantana".

I was just fucking blown away.

Brilliant, absolutely BRILLIANT! It's an unrecognised gem that nobody should miss.Why?!?

It's still on Mubi for another week. If anyone wants a free month trial and thus give me a free month in return.
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This Year In Film / Re: The Killing of a Sacred Deer
« Last post by wilder on November 14, 2017, 05:53:52 PM »
Continuing to think about this, and about both your reactions. Itís sort of similar to The Lobster in form, the more I do.


SPOILERS

In The Lobster, romantic interactions between people are reduced to hilariously simple schematics. The subtext of what people communicate is made text, to comedic effect (ďweíre compatible because we find each other physically attractive, but weíre not too attractive to be out of each otherís leagues because we also have similar physical weaknessesÖgetting nosebleedsĒ). In the second half, those schematics are eschewed for a dramatization of what occurs when people who canít find a compatible partner escape the compound.

Most times Iíve rewatched the The Lobster, I enjoy the first half more than the second, maybe just because itís funny, but also because itís really interesting to me how Yorgos communicates the obvious in non-obvious terms. Or maybe makes the so-obvious-itís-invisible even more obvious, through them. I think heís doing something similar, here, but to terrifying effect, on a more subconscious kick-you-in-the-gut level, and that the lack of a really big turn in Sacred Deer's third act is for thematically sound reasons.

In The Killing of a Sacred Deer, the familial damage that occurs as a result of Dr. Murphyís alcoholism, and of his denial of his alcoholism, is transmuted into allergorical, supernatural happenings the same way The Lobster transmutes romantic interactions into simple schematics, and Dr. Murphy is brought to some awareness of the suffering he's causing his family by way of his interactions with Martin. Itís a partial journey from darkness up into light.

This movie has a similar ticking time bomb as The Lobster (30 days until youíre turned into an animal / soon youíll be paralyzed), but the dramatic evolution that occurs towards the end of The Lobster isnít there because Sacred Deer has a far more tragic end. In the former, Colin Farrell manages to escape his fate ó itís why the thriller-like third act in the forest exists ó whereas here, Dr. Murphy's hubris and denial perpetuates. He knows Martin is a problem, but never recognizes why. His blaming and scapegoating persists ("An anesthesiologist can kill a patient, but a surgeon never does..."), so the lack of plot progression works, in my view. Ironically, in kidnapping Martin, Dr. Murphy is going after the symptom, not cause, of ailment, betraying the medical prowess he insists he has.
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