XIXAX Film Forum


Recent Posts

1
Quentin Tarantino / Re: Once Upon A Time In Hollywood
« Last post by jenkins on Today at 01:51:44 AM »
Model Shop is to this what City on Fire is to Reservoir Dogs, i mean the similarities are striking
2
Finally!
3
The Director's Chair / Re: Roger Avary
« Last post by jenkins on Yesterday at 07:43:07 PM »
i think you could pull off Glamorama with like a handful of real actors and a waterfall of holograms. i'd watch it. sometimes france is better at combining the practical with the artistic
4
The Director's Chair / Re: Roger Avary
« Last post by eward on Yesterday at 07:33:47 PM »
Rules of Attraction is by far the best realized adaptation of any of BEE's books. American Psycho is a fun sort of "Greatest Hits" version of the book, and Bale's performance perfectly captures that character, but the film ultimately comes up short for me. Less Than Zero is bad, as is The Informers. I second the Glamorama hope, and pray that some kind, able-bodied (and moneyed) soul will come along and zap The Golden Suicides back to life.

One of a handful of novels that I feel must be filmed.

What are the others?
5
The Director's Chair / Re: Roger Avary
« Last post by WorldForgot on Yesterday at 07:25:19 PM »
The Rules of Attraction is a good movie

The Rules of Attraction is fun to watch and has some brilliant sequences, but as a movie it seems half-finished. It needs to be longer.

Maybe someday he'll be able to release Glitterati !

I ache for somebody to adapt Glamorama.  One of a handful of novels that I feel must be filmed.
6
The Director's Chair / Re: Roger Avary
« Last post by İbrad on Yesterday at 07:18:41 PM »
The Rules of Attraction is a good movie

The Rules of Attraction is fun to watch and has some brilliant sequences, but as a movie it seems half-finished. It needs to be longer.
7
News and Theory / Re: Assorted movie news
« Last post by WorldForgot on Yesterday at 06:22:38 PM »
Don't know which thread to put this piece in (JB, wilder, feel free to move this to a more apropos thread), but a great Interview/Retrospective from last year w/ Julie Dash, Matty Rich, Darnell Martin, Ernest Dickerson, Leslie Harris and Theodore Witcher and the NYT:

‘They Set Us Up to Fail’: Black Directors of the ’90s Speak Out
Quote
What other kinds of things did you hear?

HARRIS I went to an interview and someone said to me: “You don’t look like a filmmaker. What are you doing here?”

MATTY RICH (“Straight Out of Brooklyn”) Wow.

ERNEST DICKERSON (“Juice”) What does a filmmaker look like?

DASH After “Daughters,” I tried to get representation at the Gersh Agency in New York. They told me I didn’t have a future. They saw no future for me as a black woman director. What were they going to do with me?

DICKERSON There used to be a time where you go after an agency, and they would always tell the story, “We already got our black filmmakers.”

MARTIN And you had to do what they wanted you to do, too, because you were their black filmmaker. It was like, “This is the film, you’ve got to do it.” It was like, “I’m not feeling it.” but you had to do it.

When did you sense that the well was drying up?

RICH I was told that I was in director’s jail. Director’s jail is if your film doesn’t make X amount of money, then it’s going to be hard for you to get another movie financed. [Rich’s 1994 follow-up, “The Inkwell,” earned just under its reported budget of $8 million theatrically.]

DICKERSON I’ve been there.

RICH They told me the only way out of director’s jail is that you have to write your way out of it. So I wrote a Tupac Shakur project for HBO, and I came onboard to write “Subway Scholar” at Showtime for Whitney Houston. But I got frustrated because I had a lot of things stuck in development. I met the C.E.O. of Ubisoft, a gaming company in Paris, and they needed some help on a game [“187: Ride or Die”] that they were about to release. I wound up living there for two years as the creative director and art director. That was kind of my new outlet for storytelling without Hollywood. It felt like everyone had wanted me to make another urban drama, instead of a family-oriented, lighthearted story like “The Inkwell.”

DICKERSON I made a movie called “Bulletproof,” with Damon Wayans and Adam Sandler. Working on that film was the only time I ever got mad enough to punch a hole in the editing room wall. It was supposed to be a raunchy, R-rated comedy slanted more for an adult audience. But I could see we had trouble when they were giving out tickets to 15- to 16-year-old kids at the first preview. Afterward, I had to really sanitize the relationships. It meant savaging the movie.

It still opened at No. 1, but I got the worst reviews of my career. I was criticized for not having everything I was told to take out. I had several projects lined up — I had been developing “Blade,” with Wesley Snipes. The whole idea of where “Blade” went was mine. But the producers looked to “Bulletproof” and thought I had completely lost my street cred. After that, nobody would touch me. I think I’m still in jail, in a way, because I’m doing television. [Dickerson — like many of his peers, including Martin and Dash — has found work on the small screen, with credits on “The Wire” and “The Walking Dead.”] I consider myself a filmmaker who’s working in television.
8
The Director's Chair / Re: Roger Avary
« Last post by eward on Yesterday at 04:06:05 PM »
Agreed!
9
The Director's Chair / Re: Roger Avary
« Last post by jenkins on Yesterday at 03:41:02 PM »
The Rules of Attraction is a good movie
10
The Director's Chair / Re: Roger Avary
« Last post by eward on Yesterday at 03:17:17 PM »
He delved into that in a very deep way on the BEE podcast 2 or 3 months ago, very riveting.