XIXAX Film Forum

The Director's Chair => The Director's Chair => Topic started by: Pedro on March 20, 2003, 11:46:16 PM

Title: Woody Allen
Post by: Pedro on March 20, 2003, 11:46:16 PM
Thoughts on the guy?  I love him.  Annie Hall and Manhattan being my favorites while Hannah and her Sister's and Crimes and Misdemeanors are my favorites of his later era.  But now he's really slipping...I think he's bound for a break.  He may be a dirty old bastard, but as a filmmaker he's almost godlike.

OH! Interiors is fucking great too.  Bergman rip-off I know, but perfectly done.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Duck Sauce on March 21, 2003, 12:51:09 AM
Id have to say my favorite Woody Allen film is Sweet and Lowdown, but my favorite Woody Allen-Woody Allen movie is Manhattan. I also really liked Everybody Says I love You, Crimes and Misdemeanors, Annie Hall. Deconstructing Harry and Hannah and Her Sisters, I thought were OK.

All and all I really like Woody Allen, for obvious reasons, but I have no desire to pick up some of his most recent movies. I say take a break, but if the guy likes making movies, let him make movies, I mean, how much longer does he have?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ©brad on March 21, 2003, 05:12:41 AM
i'm doing a critique on three Woody Allen screenplays for class, thanks to a rec. from Mac. I have to pick one from his early work, one from the middle and one recent and see how he's changed/developed. I'm definitely going to start with Annie Hall, end with one of the more recent, but looking for any thoughts on a good one for the middle years. Crimes and Misdemeanors is a personal favorite, might do that one.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: rustinglass on March 21, 2003, 08:10:59 AM
I think that deconstructing harry is also a "bergman-ripoff", or at least a "bergman-huge inspiration". The film: Wild Strawberries.
I really like harry anyway
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pedro on March 21, 2003, 11:44:29 AM
Quote from: rustinglass
I think that deconstructing harry is also a "bergman-ripoff", or at least a "bergman-huge inspiration". The film: Wild Strawberries.
I really like harry anyway


Haven't seen wild strawberries yet...I've seen Autumn Sonata, Cries and Whispers, The Seventh Seal, that's it.  I'm trying to hunt down Persona.  Anyway it's sort of strange for him to do such a Bergman influenced film when he parodies such things in Love and Death, but Bergman is a talent that I guess needs to be parodied and honored.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: xerxes on March 21, 2003, 02:56:18 PM
has anyone seen play it again, sam???  man i love that movie
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Duck Sauce on March 21, 2003, 03:51:41 PM
Quote from: rustinglass
I think that deconstructing harry is also a "bergman-ripoff", or at least a "bergman-huge inspiration". The film: Wild Strawberries.
I really like harry anyway


He mentions in Manhattan I think how much he likes Bergman, saying "Bergman is the only genius left" or something
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: children with angels on March 27, 2003, 12:29:38 PM
Quote from: [b]cbrad4d
[/b]i'm doing a critique on three Woody Allen screenplays for class... looking for any thoughts on a good one for the middle years. Crimes and Misdemeanors is a personal favorite, might do that one.


Does Stardust Memories count as a middle-year period film? I think it's an absolutely amazing movie (and key to an understanding of the way his mind works, just like 8 1/2 is for Fellini) - my favourite along with Deconstructing Harry: I'm a sucker for the whole blatantly autobiographical film thing...

But Crimes and Misdemeanors is great too.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SoNowThen on March 27, 2003, 01:40:12 PM
Radio Days and Zelig.

Completely unappreciated. Almost never spoken of. By far his best.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Victor on March 27, 2003, 03:45:06 PM
i like in deconstructing harry when he says, "im writing a story, its basicly me, thinly disguised. but im thinking of not even disguising him, i mean, its me."  he plays this in a lot of his movies, i think. usually this would make me go, what an egotistical, uncreative, narccasistic jerk-off. but with Woody, i like it for some reason. even though hes playing the same character, he manages to keep it interesting, and has a real charm to him. im working on my Allen movies, i think Zelig's next on my netflix.

does anyone else think about the end of magnolia when watching the end of manhattan?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Ghostboy on March 28, 2003, 12:35:26 AM
I love Deconstructin Harry.

The usual opinions of his work apply when it comes to my own -- he's slipped a bit since Sweet & Lowdown, but his undisputed masterpieces are just that.

And as far as his early slapstick stuff goes, 'Sleeper' is a hoot.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ©brad on March 28, 2003, 06:06:58 AM
I love Deconstrucing Harry. The scene with Kirsty Allen screaming at him, and he cuts to her patient listening in the other room is hysterical. i like the ovation all his characters give him at the end.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Cecil on March 28, 2003, 10:49:12 AM
i like his cameos in the simpsons.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Born Under Punches on March 29, 2003, 04:25:27 PM
Funny to look at his earlier work like Take the Money and Run and Bananas and think that this guy made Interiors and Crime and Misdermeanors.  Quite impressive move into, I don't know if I'm right saying it, but cerebral comedic and dramatic works.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: TenseAndSober on March 30, 2003, 05:24:28 PM
I love Woody Allen.  I've noticed alot of Allen in Wes Anderson films...little things.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on April 05, 2003, 01:51:15 PM
My favourite Allen films are "Annie Hall", "Manhattan", "Hannah and Her Sisters", "Everybody Says I Love You" and "Crimes and Misdemeanors".. thats a tough top 5.. since he made other great ones too.
He really shows signs of slowing down though, yeah. He once said though that if his movies aren't making a profit, he's doing something right. I disagree now because I think his films seem to be aiming at dumber, simpler audiences now, and thats what making them not that good. I'm sort of surprised by this though.. since Bergman was his main influence/inspiration and he made great films up until the day he died, whereas Allen can't really think of something great anymore.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: children with angels on April 06, 2003, 06:24:34 AM
Yeah - Allen once said something like, "the only worthwhile art is that which strives for the essential themes of existance: anything less is being lazy..."

I feel like mailing that to him, along with one copy of Crimes and Misdemeanors and one copy of Hollywood Ending.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on April 06, 2003, 10:45:27 AM
I actually hope to god that "Anything Else" is a good movie. I found out that its rated R.. and maybe that'll be the difference maker with this PG-13 crap he's been making. Its seemed like Allen has been making movies lately for people around that age group. the last R movie he made was "Celebrity", unfortunately.. but the one preceding that was "Deconstructing Harry".. this movie coming up looks more like the latter.. so I'm still going in with high hopes.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Ravi on April 06, 2003, 02:59:27 PM
I only saw a few minutes of Celebrity, but it seemed that Kenneth Branagh was merely acting like Woody Allen would have.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pedro on April 06, 2003, 04:05:15 PM
Quote from: Cinephile
I actually hope to god that "Anything Else" is a good movie. I found out that its rated R.. and maybe that'll be the difference maker with this PG-13 crap he's been making. Its seemed like Allen has been making movies lately for people around that age group. the last R movie he made was "Celebrity", unfortunately.. but the one preceding that was "Deconstructing Harry".. this movie coming up looks more like the latter.. so I'm still going in with high hopes.


The Rating doesn't mean anything...Crimes and Misdemeanors was PG-13 and one of his greatest.  Annie hall is PG.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Sigur Rós on April 06, 2003, 04:07:02 PM
I'm being serious.....I hate this guy!!!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pedro on April 06, 2003, 04:10:58 PM
Quote from: Sigur Rós
I'm being serious.....I hate this guy!!!


You're not alone.  Most people love or hate him.  He's just not your cup o' tea which is groovy.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Sigur Rós on April 06, 2003, 04:25:46 PM
Quote from: Pedro the Wombat
You're not alone.  Most people love or hate him.  He's just not your cup o' tea which is groovy.


Thanx, for being so understanding. I dont like him as a person. I dont like his naive-innocent-"nobody loves me"-"i'm married to my daughter"-thinh. I think he's a phoney.....yeah, that's the rite word.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on April 06, 2003, 06:02:06 PM
Quote from: Pedro the Wombat

The Rating doesn't mean anything...Crimes and Misdemeanors was PG-13 and one of his greatest.  Annie hall is PG.


I know it doesn't mean much, but I just think his later films have been much more tame and he hasn't benefited from them. People don't like them. People liked "Deconstructing Harry", which was one of his recents that was R.. I dunno.. I'm just thinking that perhaps more people will be attracted to the content of it.. Hey, I like his PGs anyhow.. "Annie Hall", "Radio Days", "Hannah and Her Sisters", "Love and Death", etc.. I wish he could go back to that.. but maybe he needs to throw that edge back in so he can make better films again. Who knows.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: children with angels on April 08, 2003, 03:38:54 PM
[quote="Sigur Rós I think he's a phoney.....yeah, that's the rite word.[/quote]

You can call Allen a lot of things, but I don't think you can call him a phoney. Maybe in his life he is, but in his art? His films are some of the most honest, wear-your-heart-on-you-sleeve efforts you could ever see.

Even if he does deny they're about him (the most ridiculous claim I've heard a filmmaker make). Is he lying or deluded - what does anyone think...?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on April 08, 2003, 04:23:26 PM
I would say neither. He's a very modest individual when you watch his interviews. I doubt he wants to draw attention to himself by saying they're all about him. He's smarter than that.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: EL__SCORCHO on April 09, 2003, 04:31:51 PM
Woody's the man! Annie Hall and Manhattan are some of my favorite movies of all time.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Keener on April 25, 2003, 10:19:10 PM
Take the Money and Run was my first Allen movie and will always be my favorite.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ©brad on April 26, 2003, 05:04:49 AM
Quote from: Ravi
I only saw a few minutes of Celebrity, but it seemed that Kenneth Branagh was merely acting like Woody Allen would have.


Just read a bio on Allen. Woody went up to Kenneth after a few weeks of shooting and was like "Um, it seems like you're just playing me." Kenneth insisted that he wasn't, but towards the end Woody said he just kind of threw in the towel and let him do what he wanted. I guess it has to do with the writing, that self-loathing neurotic protagonist is there in every script, no matter who plays him. In Bullets over Broadway (great movie) John Cusack also kinda plays Woody Allen.

For the Allen haters, look u can't deny Woody's talent. How many filmmakers write/direct one movie a year? And all this talk about ratings is nonsense. I've enjoyed Allen's last few movies- Small Time Crooks, Hollywood Ending, Curse of the Jade Scorpion. Why does a movie have to be offensive and disrupt the status quo in order to be meaningful?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Keener on April 26, 2003, 11:05:53 AM
I love Small Time Crooks and The Curse of the Jade Scorpion. Hollywood Ending dissapointed me, though. But I really loved Small Time Crooks. It was my second Woody Allen movie.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on April 26, 2003, 12:19:55 PM
The reasoning in little love for Woody's last three films, his comedies, is that he really isn't adding anything he has done before. You can see his comic touch in these movies in his early 70s movies and his one liners then all through out his career. And then to see him start working in a structure of factory produced comedies like in the old days of Hollywood is disheartening because he only can do so much, which really, is a reliance on the charm of his one liners. Those don't go far enough though in satisfaction for these films. Instead of Allen forwarding his career, he went into dead stand observance on a structure and style that was cliche 50 years ago. And why does a movie had to disrupt the status quo in order to be meaningful? Because if it doesn't, it has lost all importance because better examples can just be found in earlier works by other people so what's the point on watching these films? I could just as easily read all the one liners shot out by him in print in these films and still get the same pleasure. But if you like these films on a personal basis only, then fine. But when it comes to talk on importance from outside the personal love, then these films achieve very little.

~rougerum
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Keener on April 27, 2003, 12:19:58 PM
I agree partly with what you said. I didn't enjoy Small Time Crooks or Curse because they were something fresh or amazing. I enjoyed them because they made me laugh and at the same time had an entertaining story.

What new ground did Christopher Guest break with Best In Show ? Nothing that we didn't already see in Waiting for Guffman and partially in Spinal Tap form. It's still one of my favorite movies (on a personal basis).

I wasn't trying to credit his later work as being something that'll be remembered and studied in 5 years. I just thought they were enjoyable and not as bad as people made out.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ©brad on April 27, 2003, 01:32:35 PM
Quote from: Keener
I agree partly with what you said. I didn't enjoy Small Time Crooks or Curse because they were something fresh or amazing. I enjoyed them because they made me laugh and at the same time had an entertaining story.

What new ground did Christopher Guest break with Best In Show ? Nothing that we didn't already see in Waiting for Guffman and partially in Spinal Tap form. It's still one of my favorite movies (on a personal basis).

I wasn't trying to credit his later work as being something that'll be remembered and studied in 5 years. I just thought they were enjoyable and not as bad as people made out.


thank you.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: joeybdot on April 27, 2003, 07:52:54 PM
Manhattan,Annie Hall, Bananas,Sleeper,Sweet and Lowdown,Whats up tigerLily greatest experiment i have ever seen over dubbing a movie by urself and changing it completely.Brilliance!!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on April 27, 2003, 08:16:14 PM
Well, obviously your meaningulness lies in personal love for the movies, which I did say was fine and acceptable. I don't really share the same opinion though, but structurally, this films seem even of lesser works when compared to all that Allen has done in comedy and what has been done in other films by other people in this category. Cbr, you should stop disagreeing or agreeing and explain some more on your positions.

~rougerum
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Keener on April 27, 2003, 11:33:39 PM
The Gold Trumpet, help me push the car.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ©brad on April 28, 2003, 05:02:56 AM
I think Keener pretty much summed it all up for me. arguing on this matter would be like beating a dead horse. it's a difference in opinion, yes? i can be happy and watch a movie like small time crooks because I am a big woody allen fan. Whether his movies are groundbreaking or constantly original, well, I mean who cares? I'm just happy he is still making movies.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on April 29, 2003, 08:23:01 AM
I've never called someone anything or said they were this or that. I've always tried to discuss the subject with them instead and if terms couldn't be accepted, then fine. But I've always tried to reason, argue, or debate it out. Cbr, I've honestly given up on you. You are one gigantic fucking idiot. You can't discuss or reason shit. You say if you like this or that and that's it. I say this now here because obviously, you didn't read a single fucking word I said. So go and have fun making minor complaints with people you think have minor opinions because it doesn't matter, you only speak in minor so you trying to make sense of any bad fucking opinion is pointless anyways.

~rougerum
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ©brad on April 29, 2003, 08:40:23 AM
GT, look I don't want to argue with u because there seems to be too much of it going on around here and its not cool. Let me just say this: first off, you're being childish, and if you have a bone to pick with me do it in a pm. Second off, I'm not a film critic nor do I pretend to be one. Third, maybe I could have a healthy debate with you if I could understand what the hell you were saying. If I copied any one of your random posts and pasted it in Microsoft Word, I think my computer would crash from a bad grammar overload. Trying to discern any sense from your arguments made up of poorly written sentence fragments is near impossible. I bet a linguistic analyst would have a tough time translating your nonsense.
I’ve tried to avoid responding to your posts, most of which I disagree with, to avoid arguments. I come to xixax.com to enjoy myself, I get enough arguing from parents/girlfriend/friends.

My apologies to everyone else who is subjected to reading this mess. It won’t happen again, at least from my end.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on April 29, 2003, 08:47:14 AM
Simple question: If my sentences are so bad, how did you possibly understand my last post and not the others?

I have some mistakes, yes, but everyone does here since this place is so informal. You argument of me not making any sense is fucking piss poor because I am able to have discussions and debates with everyone else, except you.

~rougerum
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Alexandro on June 04, 2003, 04:06:02 PM
"I'm sort of surprised by this though.. since Bergman was his main influence/inspiration and he made great films up until the day he died, whereas Allen can't really think of something great anymore.[/quote]
"
mmmm....well...Ingmar Bergman is not dead, he's very much alive and about to release a new film from what I've heard...

Allen is the man...he just makes his movies the way he wants year after year...He is an artist completely uncompromised with anything, specially with the kind of thing people expects from artists...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: godardian on June 04, 2003, 04:27:18 PM
Quote from: Alexandro
"I'm sort of surprised by this though.. since Bergman was his main influence/inspiration and he made great films up until the day he died, whereas Allen can't really think of something great anymore.

"
mmmm....well...Ingmar Bergman is not dead, he's very much alive and about to release a new film from what I've heard...

Allen is the man...he just makes his movies the way he wants year after year...He is an artist completely uncompromised with anything, specially with the kind of thing people expects from artists...[/quote]

I agree, and I'm an Allen fan, but... well, I really disliked Curse of the Jade Scorpion.  Hollywood Ending wasn't a whole lot better, but I thought Scorpion was the worst film of his I've ever seen, and I absolutely include Celebrity and Shadows and Fog (both of which I like) in that assessment.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SoNowThen on June 04, 2003, 04:36:28 PM
I think Celebrity and Deconstructing Harry are two of Allen's best films. I don't know why they're so universally hated.

And I still say I'll take Zelig and Radio Days over everything else. Even Annie Hall and Manhattan.

But I saw Small Time Crooks and just about puked. And then I noticed... produced by Dreamworks... which means he's working for The 'Berg... which can only mean a drop in the quality of his films...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on June 04, 2003, 04:45:44 PM
lets see. woody allen.  i dont really like him (with a few exceptions), yet i feel compelled to keep seeing his movies for fear of  missing out.  ive seen:

HOLLYWOOD ENDING
SMALL TIME CROOKS
SWEET AND LOWDOWN
CELEBRITY
DECONSTRUCTING HARRY
EVERYONE SAYS I LOVE YOU
MIGHTY APRHODITE
BULLETS OVER BROADWAY
MANHATTAN
ANNIE HALL
EVERYTHING YOU EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT SEX...
BANANAS

Loved Annie Hall, Manhattan, Everyone Says I Love You.  Thought Bananas and Sweet and Lowdown were hilarious.  Hated Everything you ever wanted to know about sex..., Small Time Crooks and Celebrity.  Thought everything else was okay.  plan on seeing Whats Up Tiger Lily, Sleeper, Love And Death, Broadway Danny Rose, Hannah and Her Sisters soon.  anyone want to recommend anything? sway me from those?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on June 04, 2003, 04:50:17 PM
Quote from: themodernage02
anyone want to recommend anything?


"Crimes And Misdemeanors"
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Mesh on June 04, 2003, 05:01:23 PM
Quote from: Ravi
I only saw a few minutes of Celebrity, but it seemed that Kenneth Branagh was merely acting like Woody Allen would have.


I think that's accurate.  I also think it was totally intentional.

edit:  whoops.  I guess according to previous posts in the thread, it wasn't intentional.  I think I like the fact that Branagh was doing Woody, Woody asked him about it, he kept on doing it, and it was left at that.  Woody has always coaxed career performances out of his actors, possibly by letting them go, to a large extent....Not that Celebrity is a shining example of that trend.....
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: godardian on June 04, 2003, 05:04:32 PM
Quote from: MacGuffin
Quote from: themodernage02
anyone want to recommend anything?


"Crimes And Misdemeanors"


Hannah and Crimes are Woody must-sees.

My favorite, though, is Husbands and Wives. Absolutely top-notch, in my opinion. And his most visceral work.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Mesh on June 04, 2003, 05:18:03 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
I think Celebrity and Deconstructing Harry are two of Allen's best films. I don't know why they're so universally hated.

And I still say I'll take Zelig and Radio Days over everything else. Even Annie Hall and Manhattan.

But I saw Small Time Crooks and just about puked. And then I noticed... produced by Dreamworks... which means he's working for The 'Berg... which can only mean a drop in the quality of his films...


I liked Celebrity and I love, love Deconstructing Harry.  It's the best late-era Allen film, IMO.

I'm gonna go ahead and score some Woody films we've mentioned.  Outta 10 possible points:

Zelig - 7.4
Radio Days - 8.8
Celebrity - 7.1
Deconstructing Harry - 9.6
Annie Hall - 10.0
Mighty Aphrodite - 8.6
Small Time Crooks - 6.1
Curse of the Jade Scorpion - 4.8
Wild Man Blues - 7.3

Oh, and speaking of Spielberg:  I rewatched Amistad last night:  8.1
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Mesh on June 04, 2003, 05:28:25 PM
Know what I'm just now realizing?  I think I've seen more Woody Allen films than I have by any other director.....

Off the top of my head, I know I've seen from beginning to end:

Annie Hall
Manhattan
Zelig
Radio Days
Small Time Crooks
Celebrity
Mighty Aphrodite
Deconstructing Harry
Wild Man Blues
Shadows and Fog
Hannah and Her Sisters
Crimes and Misdemeanors
Stardust Memories
Curse of the Jade Scorpion
The Purple Rose of Cairo

...and now, checking IMDB, I've also seen all or part of:

Sweet and Lowdown
Bananas
Sleeper
What's Up, Tiger Lily?
New York Stories (Allen-directed segment)
Bullets Over Broadway
Everyone Says I Love You
(Did I see any of Interiors?  I'm confused....I can't remember....which is as good as having never seen it, I suppose)

That's 21 feature films, not counting the New York Stories segment.  Holy shit.  And I'm not even that big a fan.  There's just no way I've seen more films by anyone else.  No chance....
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: godardian on June 04, 2003, 06:51:16 PM
Quote from: Mesh
Know what I'm just now realizing?  I think I've seen more Woody Allen films than I have by any other director.....

Off the top of my head, I know I've seen from beginning to end:

Annie Hall
Manhattan
Zelig
Radio Days
Small Time Crooks
Celebrity
Mighty Aphrodite
Deconstructing Harry
Wild Man Blues
Shadows and Fog
Hannah and Her Sisters
Crimes and Misdemeanors
Stardust Memories
Curse of the Jade Scorpion
The Purple Rose of Cairo

...and now, checking IMDB, I've also seen all or part of:

Sweet and Lowdown
Bananas
Sleeper
What's Up, Tiger Lily?
New York Stories (Allen-directed segment)
Bullets Over Broadway
Everyone Says I Love You
(Did I see any of Interiors?  I'm confused....I can't remember....which is as good as having never seen it, I suppose)

That's 21 feature films, not counting the New York Stories segment.  Holy shit.  And I'm not even that big a fan.  There's just no way I've seen more films by anyone else.  No chance....


Ya gotta give Husbands and Wives a try. In m opinion, it's right up there with Manhattan and Deconstructing Harry as a peak in his ouevre.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Ravi on June 04, 2003, 06:56:56 PM
Quote from: Mesh
(Did I see any of Interiors?  I'm confused....I can't remember....which is as good as having never seen it, I suppose)


Seen it.  It was a few years ago, so I can't even remember the plot well.  All I remember is that there were 3 sisters, one of which was Diane Keaton.  Is this the one with the manipulative, obsessive mother?  I remember the scene where she's criticising the decor of the apartment of one of the sisters.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: children with angels on June 04, 2003, 07:11:18 PM
Stardust Memories is my favourite. It's basically a full-on homage to 8 1/2. Very much a precurser to Deconstructing Harry (which I also love). It's something of a filmed mental breakdown (as is 8 1/2) about a movie director who used to make comedies and now wants to make more serious movies, but the public keeps wanting his "early, funny ones". (Sound familiar?)

It's fascinating the amount of self-loving and self-loathing one man can have and put on screen (maybe Vincent Gallo will make his 8 1/2 one day...!). I've said earlier in the thread how ridiculous and funny I find his claim that his movies are not about him: you just need to look at this one. He's directly making reference to the fact that he recently made Interiors and it was critically mauled (undeservedly). The film opens as if it's a symbolic, deep opening (a la Fellini, or possibly Bergman), only for the beginning of the movie to be shouted down and ridiculued by studio executives claiming, "I've seen it a thousand times: artists trying to justify their own petty neurosis by attatching them to these adolescent philisophical themes." "Why  doesn't he just stick to making people laugh?"

It really is a beautiful thing. Charlotte Rampling is astounding as the mentally unstable girlfriend, as if she walked right off the set of one of Bergman's best female character studies. The movie has a particular kind of transcendental, surrealist visual beauty that I feel none of his others have (the images of Woody as a child magician, flying, being given an elephant). The conclusion is just wonderful, and moving and true - then the audience watching the movie walk out telling you it's wonderful and moving and true...

I guess basically I'm just a sucker for the whole tell-it-all-in-art thing, and this movie really is the epitome of his career if you want to indulge that particular fetish.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: godardian on June 04, 2003, 08:02:53 PM
Quote from: children with angels
Stardust Memories is my favourite. It's basically a full-on homage to 8 1/2. Very much a precurser to Deconstructing Harry (which I also love). It's something of a filmed mental breakdown (as is 8 1/2) about a movie director who used to make comedies and now wants to make more serious movies, but the public keeps wanting his "early, funny ones". (Sound familiar?)

It's fascinating the amount of self-loving and self-loathing one man can have and put on screen (maybe Vincent Gallo will make his 8 1/2 one day...!). I've said earlier in the thread how ridiculous and funny I find his claim that his movies are not about him: you just need to look at this one. He's directly making reference to the fact that he recently made Interiors and it was critically mauled (undeservedly). The film opens as if it's a symbolic, deep opening (a la Fellini, or possibly Bergman), only for the beginning of the movie to be shouted down and ridiculued by studio executives claiming, "I've seen it a thousand times: artists trying to justify their own petty neurosis by attatching them to these adolescent philisophical themes." "Why  doesn't he just stick to making people laugh?"

It really is a beautiful thing. Charlotte Rampling is astounding as the mentally unstable girlfriend, as if she walked right off the set of one of Bergman's best female character studies. The movie has a particular kind of transcendental, surrealist visual beauty that I feel none of his others have (the images of Woody as a child magician, flying, being given an elephant). The conclusion is just wonderful, and moving and true - then the audience watching the movie walk out telling you it's wonderful and moving and true...

I guess basically I'm just a sucker for the whole tell-it-all-in-art thing, and this movie really is the epitome of his career if you want to indulge that particular fetish.


I love Stardust Memories (it's my third favorite, after Husbands and Wives and Purple Rose of Cairo). And Charlotte Rampling is, indeed, spectacular in it. That quick-cut montage where she addresses the camera and seems to be breaking down? Perfect. I loved that. The editing style in that is very, um... Godardian.
Title: If you were to introduce someone...
Post by: Stringstroker on June 05, 2003, 03:04:54 AM
to Woody Allen  (if they have never seen a film from him before), where would you start and in what order would you go?

I know I shouldn't even be posting on this board without seeing any of his stuff, and I really want to, I just don't know where to start.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: xerxes on June 05, 2003, 04:22:09 AM
start with annie hall or manhattan
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Keener on June 05, 2003, 05:32:55 AM
Take the Money and Run !
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: chainsmoking insomniac on June 05, 2003, 07:06:11 AM
Manhattan!!!!!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: chainsmoking insomniac on June 05, 2003, 07:18:02 AM
Quote from: themodernage02
lets see. woody allen.  i dont really like him (with a few exceptions), yet i feel compelled to keep seeing his movies for fear of  missing out.  ive seen:

HOLLYWOOD ENDING
SMALL TIME CROOKS
SWEET AND LOWDOWN
CELEBRITY
DECONSTRUCTING HARRY
EVERYONE SAYS I LOVE YOU
MIGHTY APRHODITE
BULLETS OVER BROADWAY
MANHATTAN
ANNIE HALL
EVERYTHING YOU EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT SEX...
BANANAS

Loved Annie Hall, Manhattan, Everyone Says I Love You.  Thought Bananas and Sweet and Lowdown were hilarious.  Hated Everything you ever wanted to know about sex..., Small Time Crooks and Celebrity.  Thought everything else was okay.  plan on seeing Whats Up Tiger Lily, Sleeper, Love And Death, Broadway Danny Rose, Hannah and Her Sisters soon.  anyone want to recommend anything? sway me from those?


I'm rather fond of Love and Death and Manhattan Murder Mystery...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SoNowThen on June 05, 2003, 09:01:51 AM
Annie Hall, or Hanna And Her Sisters. Maybe even Purple Rose Of Cairo. But definitely not Manhattan. I guess because it took me 3 watchings to love it, and I was bigtime into him...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Royal Tenenbaum on June 05, 2003, 09:10:37 AM
Woody Allen is the best, I love all of his work. My favourites are Manhattan, Sweet and Lowdown, and Purple Rose of Ciaro, with Annie Hall, and then all the rest of his pre-Annie films coming next. He is the comedic genius of our times, the greatest, the funniest. I can't properly express how much his films mean to me.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on June 05, 2003, 09:19:19 AM
watch all of his films in order
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: godardian on June 05, 2003, 11:50:17 AM
Setting aside my own personal favorites, I would introduce you by order of legend and popular stature, and then if your interest is at all piqued, work your way into the good stuff.

Start with Annie Hall and Manhattan, followed by Bullets Over Broadway and Hannah and her Sisters.

If you go for those, do Purple Rose of Cairo and Crimes and Misdemeanors.

After that, Husbands and Wives (my personal favorite), Stardust Memories, Zelig, and Radio Days.

Once you've made it that far, it's a free-for-all; just dig in, and you won't be disappointed (except maybe for the last 3 Allen films and some of the pre-Annie Hall stuff, though Sleeper is much better than you might think, even in comparison to his later, more cinematic work).

Good luck, and enjoy.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: RegularKarate on June 05, 2003, 03:09:02 PM
They're all wrong... do it like this:

-Crimson Tide
-U571
-The Borne Identity (not the remake, we're talking the Woody Allen ORIGINAL!)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Mesh on June 05, 2003, 04:59:43 PM
Quote from: godardian
Setting aside my own personal favorites, I would introduce you by order of legend and popular stature, and then if your interest is at all piqued, work your way into the good stuff.

Start with Annie Hall and Manhattan, followed by Bullets Over Broadway and Hannah and her Sisters.

If you go for those, do Purple Rose of Cairo and Crimes and Misdemeanors.

After that, Husbands and Wives (my personal favorite), Stardust Memories, Zelig, and Radio Days.


I'd put Radio Days where you put Bullets Over Broadway, but other than that, sound Woody advice.

 :lol:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: pookiethecat on June 05, 2003, 05:05:42 PM
stringstroker- i haven't seen much woody allen either.  this thread was valuable to me too.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: dufresne on June 05, 2003, 06:04:12 PM
Manhattan is my favorite Woody Allen film, but i'm not sure if i like it so much for Woody Allen or for Gordon Willis.

hmmm....
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pas on June 05, 2003, 06:37:18 PM
Quote from: Mesh

I'm gonna go ahead and score some Woody films we've mentioned.  Outta 10 possible points:

Zelig - 7.4
Radio Days - 8.8
Celebrity - 7.1
Deconstructing Harry - 9.6
Annie Hall - 10.0
Mighty Aphrodite - 8.6
Small Time Crooks - 6.1
Curse of the Jade Scorpion - 4.8
Wild Man Blues - 7.3

Oh, and speaking of Spielberg:  I rewatched Amistad last night:  8.1


What's the difference between a 7.4, a 7.3 and a 7.1 movie ?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: dufresne on June 05, 2003, 09:12:34 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
But definitely not Manhattan. I guess because it took me 3 watchings to love it, and I was bigtime into him...


really? that intro alone got me hooked on Allen.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: dufresne on June 05, 2003, 10:47:48 PM
Quote from: Booth

What's the difference between a 7.4, a 7.3 and a 7.1 movie ?


hmm...about 0.1, 0.3, and 0.2 respectively?

i dunno...maybe he has a really efficient grading system.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Mesh on June 06, 2003, 11:33:15 AM
Quote from: dufresne
Quote from: Booth

What's the difference between a 7.4, a 7.3 and a 7.1 movie ?


hmm...about 0.1, 0.3, and 0.2 respectively?

i dunno...maybe he has a really efficient grading system.


I like to mess with that 100 point grading scale.  It allows for fine distinction about how I rate films and it's especially useful in a case like Woody Allen's; dude's made like thirty movies.  I wouldn't want to give 19 of 'em 4 Stars.  That'd be dull.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Duck Sauce on June 06, 2003, 11:47:43 AM
Manhattan.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pedro on June 06, 2003, 03:25:03 PM
Annie Hall, because it's probably his funniest.  After that Manhattan as it shows some of his dramatic flair while still full of hilarity.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: chainsmoking insomniac on June 07, 2003, 10:55:31 AM
Quote from: dufresne
Quote from: SoNowThen
But definitely not Manhattan. I guess because it took me 3 watchings to love it, and I was bigtime into him...


really? that intro alone got me hooked on Allen.


Hell yeah man.  I got chills the first time I watched it on my brand-spanking new entertainment system.....then after the movie I rushed out and bought the soundtrack! I fucking love Gershwin now...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: chainsmoking insomniac on June 07, 2003, 10:56:13 AM
Just saw Stardust Memories. Interesting.  I think I'm going to watch it again.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: rustinglass on June 07, 2003, 01:33:04 PM
bananas
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on June 07, 2003, 04:48:50 PM
fuckin hilarious.  when he takes off the beard after he has sex with the woman he's in love with at the end, and she says "oh, i knew something was missing!"  i almost pissed my pants. hehe
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on July 24, 2003, 10:42:43 AM
Downey Jr. & Ryder on Board Woody Allen's Next Film
Source: Variety

Robert Downey Jr. and Winona Ryder are in talks to join the cast of Woody Allen's next film, which is scheduled to shoot in the fall and will be distributed by Fox Searchlight. Like all Allen films, the title, script and plot are being kept secret.

Downey next toplines The Singing Detective for Paramount Classics, and also stars in the thriller Gothika, from French helmer Mathieu Kassovitz, which is in post-production at Warner Bros. Pictures.

Ryder next stars in Milos Forman's Embers, opposite Sean Connery, based on the novel of the same name by Sandor Marai, and she is attached to Robert Altman's WWII drama The Widow Claire.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on July 24, 2003, 11:09:03 AM
damn, winona on a roll.  i guess he liked her, because she's back for another round after celebrity.  i didnt think he re-used many young actresses/actors anymore recently after his old stand-bys like mia farrow, dianne wiest, and diane keaton.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SoNowThen on July 24, 2003, 11:16:37 AM
I love Winona. She was great in Celebrity. Good job, Woody, on bringing her back.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on July 25, 2003, 09:18:10 AM
Quote
Downey Jr. & Ryder on Board Woody Allen's Next Film
Source: Variety

Robert Downey Jr. and Winona Ryder are in talks to join the cast of Woody Allen's next film, which is scheduled to shoot in the fall and will be distributed by Fox Searchlight. Like all Allen films, the title, script and plot are being kept secret.



fucking great news. I stil hope "Anything Else" turns out to be one of the best Woody Allen films in recent years (and when I mean recent, I mean last 2 or 3 years, since I think his last great movie was "Sweet And Lowdown"). I love all of his films, with the exception of "Everything you always wanted to know about sex" and "Hollywood Ending", 'cause I think they're missing something, which I can't explain, although even these two movies are better than your average comedies.

Only recently have I completed the Woody Allen filmography (I had a hard time getting a chance to see "Another Woman") and I can safely say that for me, he's one of the best screenwriters ever, casts the best actors for every role and on most of his films uses the perfect visuals to tell the story. Long live Woody Allen.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on July 30, 2003, 02:57:19 AM
(http://ffmedia.ign.com/filmforce/image/anything-else-poster.jpg)

Opening September 19th from DreamWorks is Woody Allen's Anything Else. Jason Biggs (back in theaters this week with American Wedding), Christina Ricci (Sleepy Hollow), Jimmy Fallon (Almost Famous), Stockard Channing (The Business of Strangers), and Danny DeVito (Death to Smoochy) star with Allen in this comedic tale of an artist (Allen) who mentors an assistant (Biggs) and has an affair with his girlfriend (Ricci).

It was announced last week that Anything Else will open the 60th Mostra Internazionale d'Arte Cinematografica (a.k.a., the Venice International Film Festival) on August 27th, with Allen in attendance.

"I'm looking forward to going to the festival," says Allen. "I've never been to Venice at festival time and the city has been so generous and supportive to me and I love it so much that it will be a great honor."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on July 30, 2003, 09:10:52 PM
Trailer for "Anything Else" here. (http://www.anythingelse-themovie.com/)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on July 30, 2003, 10:18:18 PM
why the fuck isn't woody in the trailer?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Dr. Duke on August 02, 2003, 09:02:54 AM
Quote from: SoNowThen
Radio Days and Zelig.

Completely unappreciated. Almost never spoken of. By far his best.


I don't agree with Radio Days, but you're right about Zelig, it is a fantastic film. Altough, it doesn't come anywhere near to Annie Hall or Manhattan
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on August 02, 2003, 08:32:46 PM
Quote from: eward
why the fuck isn't woody in the trailer?


very interesting.  today, at work, we had about 3 different versions of an Anthing Else 30 second TV spot, NONE of which featured Woody, nor did any of them mention that he would be in it or OR that he wrote and directed it.  so basically they are seeing if they can try to sell this thing without his name anywhere near it.  a few of the questions from the survey were even...

"if i told you Woody Allen directed this would you be a lot more interested in seeing it, a little more, no effect, little less, or a lot less in seeing it?" and the same thing for him being in the movie.  so i guess if it doesnt look like anyone else cares about him being in it, they will sell this as a young adult romantic comedy.  there was also a question about whether it being rated R had any effect on wanting to see it.  

isnt marketing terrible?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on August 02, 2003, 08:50:47 PM
i just get such a rush when i see woody on screen, trailer or not
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on August 02, 2003, 08:54:10 PM
Quote from: eward
i just get such a rush when i see woody on screen, trailer or not


thats so weird, cause i get such a woody when i see rush on screen.

(http://www.chris-g.com/images/rush_1.gif)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on August 02, 2003, 09:02:39 PM
clever clever boy...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Dr. Duke on August 03, 2003, 12:18:06 AM
Its so obvious that the studio is marketing Anything Else for teenagers. For some reason the powers that be believe that only teenagers with sub-human IQs go to movies, so they market accordingly. They only show Jason Biggs and Christina Ricci because they are the only stars that teens will recognize. They figure that the kids will go see this movie because its got "that guy that screwed the pie and the chick who's in all of those other movies". The trailer doesn't show Devito or Stockard Channing because the youngsters wouldn't recognize them (not unless they Devito was in his Penguin makeup). And forget about showing Allen. Teens hate him- even though they've probably never seen one of his movies- because they know him as the creepy old guy that had sex with his daughter. It's unfortounate.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Cecil on August 03, 2003, 12:33:01 AM
sigh, theres allready a woody allen thread here http://www.xixax.com/viewtopic.php?t=2909
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on August 12, 2003, 02:01:28 AM
Chloe Sevigny Joining Woody Allen's Latest
Source: Variety  

Chloe Sevigny (Shattered Glass) is in talks to join Woody Allen's new untitled pic at Fox Searchlight.

Plot details are being kept mum by the filmmaker, but Sevigny will star alongside Winona Ryder and Robert Downey Jr.

Sevigny next appears in the Michael Alig biopic Party Monster, unspooling in September, and in Olivier Assayas' Demonlover, also out next month.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on August 12, 2003, 12:02:18 PM
Quote from: MacGuffin
Plot details are being kept mum by the filmmaker, but Sevigny will star alongside Winona Ryder and Robert Downey Jr.

could this be woody's return to form? yes.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on August 12, 2003, 12:37:41 PM
so i guess you dont hold much hope for Anything Else?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on August 13, 2003, 02:42:14 AM
Mitchell Replacing Ryder in Woody Allen Film
Source: The Hollywood Reporter  

Radha Mitchell (Phone Booth) has joined the cast of Woody Allen's upcoming untitled feature for Fox Searchlight, replacing Winona Ryder who had been in talks to star.

Although the plot for the feature is being kept under wraps, Mitchell joins a cast that also includes Robert Downey Jr. and Chloe Sevigny.

Mitchell, repped by WMA and Gold Coast Management, is shooting 20th Century Fox/Regency Enterprises' Man on Fire, opposite Denzel Washington for helmer Tony Scott. She next stars in Miramax Films' J.M. Barrie's Neverland with Johnny Depp.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on August 13, 2003, 03:08:42 AM
i dunno, mitchell is australian and all.. but i'd take a little mousy face over her big square one anyday.

and i do hav hope for anything else. tever, it's good he's still doin ish every year. unlike other ppl.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on August 13, 2003, 11:41:58 AM
Quote from: MacGuffin
Mitchell Replacing Ryder in Woody Allen Film


fuuuuck. c'mon winona, dont blow this.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on August 26, 2003, 02:14:38 AM
Robert Downey Jr. a No Go for Woody Allen Pic
Source: Variety

Robert Downey Jr. won't be starring in Woody Allen's next film at Fox Searchlight. The director is in talks with Jason Biggs to replace him.

Downey and the studio were unable to reach a workable solution to cover the collateral on the insurance premium that must be paid due to Downey's past problems with substance abuse. The actor reportedly didn't find out the insurance cost until after he took and passed a physical for the film.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pwaybloe on August 26, 2003, 09:54:50 AM
Quote from: MacGuffin
Downey and the studio were unable to reach a workable solution to cover the collateral on the insurance premium that must be paid due to Downey's past problems with substance abuse. The actor reportedly didn't find out the insurance cost until after he took and passed a physical for the film.


Damn.  Is that a first?  You usually hear actors being dropped due to overabundant salaries, but never insurance premiums.

I thought actors/actresses treated themselves as independant contractors, thus supplying their own health insurance.  Oh wait, is this another form of insurance relating to job hazards?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on August 26, 2003, 10:00:29 AM
Quote from: Pawbloe
I thought actors/actresses treated themselves as independant contractors, thus supplying their own health insurance.  Oh wait, is this another form of insurance relating to job hazards?


It's the insurance for the movie; being completed, completed on time, etc. They have to make sure their employees are in great shape so the production goes through without incident.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SoNowThen on August 26, 2003, 10:15:27 AM
two things:

1) Pawbloe, I'm in love with your new av

2) Biggs for Downey is not a fair trade.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: bonanzataz on August 26, 2003, 08:06:30 PM
and how! i thought woody works at dreamworks, why is he making a movie for fox?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Fernando on August 26, 2003, 10:50:49 PM
Quote from: bonanzataz
and how! i thought woody works at dreamworks, why is he making a movie for fox?


I did a little search and found that DreamWorks acquired domestic distribution rights of the finished film Small Time Crooks, after that he made a three picture deal with DW, that deal now includes Anything Else, Hollywood Ending and The Curse of the Jade Scorpion.

Also, before that, provided his voice in the animated film Antz which was done at DW, that begun his relationship with them.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on August 26, 2003, 11:50:09 PM
Woody Allen Recruits Miller for His Next Film
Source: The Hollywood Reporter

Jonny Lee Miller (Trainspotting) has joined the cast of Woody Allen's upcoming untitled project for Fox Searchlight Pictures. He joins Radha Mitchell, Chloe Sevigny and Chiwetel Ejiofor. Jason Biggs is in talks to replace Robert Downey Jr. in the film.

The movie, for which the plot is being kept under wraps, will begin shooting this fall in New York. Miller next stars in Renny Harlin's Mindhunters for Dimension Films and Intermedia Films.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jokerspath on August 27, 2003, 01:18:14 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
2) Biggs for Downey is not a fair trade.


Seriously, this is blasphemy...

E: And by blasphemy, I mean it sucks that Biggs is even considered for the same role as an actor ten times his superior.  I know this is obvious, but, ya...

aw
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Fernando on August 27, 2003, 03:48:53 PM
I found a little interview made at the time of Small Time Crooks, it's fairly interesting, don't know the source, had it on saved on my PC.

Small Time Crooks is more reminiscent of your earlier films, more slapstick and less serious. In it, your character Ray is real schlep as opposed to the intellectual, weighty characters you're more known for. Why did you do this?
Woody Allen: Because the idea occurred to me that it would make a funny movie to have a group of people that wanted to rob a bank and set up a front next door, and the store that they set up did better than their bank robbery. You know there's only two things that I can really play; I'm a very limited actor. I can play an intellectual, and I can play a lowlife. I've played--as in Take the Money and Run and Broadway Danny Rose--a little thief or a crook or a bookmaker. It's something that comes more natural to me. And then I can also play an intellectual because I look intellectual.

Do you see yourself continuing in this lighter direction?
Woody Allen: No. Not necessarily at all. I mean, I might if the next idea occurred to me was a light idea, and it was a good idea, I would do it. If it was an idea about the Holocaust, I would do that. It really just depends on what works for me at the time.

Is it true that you never rewatch your own movies?
Woody Allen: That is true. I haven't seen Take the Money and Run since 1968. I haven't seen any of my movies again.

Yet there are other movies that you do watch over and over again. How come not your own films?
Woody Allen: Well, because mine I would hate if I watched them over and over. If I saw them again I could only see what's bad about them, the mistakes, those things that if I had the chance I could do over again, but I really can't do them over because it's not possible. Whereas if I watch somebody else's movie again and again, it's purely pleasurable!

What do you think of the state of comedy today, with films such as There's Something About Mary and the hit of South Park. Do you ever watch these?
Woody Allen: I don't watch them, so I don't know. I mean I'm not really a big fan of what I guess you'd call commercial movies. I don't see a ton of movies, and I'm not that interested in comedy, really. And so I don't really get to see that stuff.

I find it interesting that you say you're not really interested in comedy when that's the genre you're most closely associated with.
Woody Allen: I know, I never have been. I always wished that I had Tennessee Williams's talent or Arthur Miller's talent, as opposed to mine. Because I enjoy serious stuff more than I enjoy comedy, so when I go to see a film or a play or read a book, I enjoy a serious one. That's my own taste. So I rarely go to see comedies. I've never seen too many good American talking comedies. I mean, I like the films of the Marx Brothers, but in terms of talking comedies, there haven't been many good ones. Lubitsch did a couple of good ones. Born Yesterday was sort of funny. I think it's probably, in terms of talking comedies, the best American one. Better than all that nonsense with Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant and the leopard, which I always found stupid. The two films that you should see in terms of talking comedy--and I'm not talking about the talking comedies like the Marx brothers, because those are not really legitimate comedies, those are records of the Marx brothers as performers--but in terms of comedies where the movie itself functions, you have to see Born Yesterday and Trouble in Paradise. And then after that, if you haven't seen it, you should see The Shop Around the Corner.

You are definitely an important cultural figure in American arts. Are you aware of this as you're making films? Is it a burden or an honor?
Woody Allen: Completely unaware. I see no trace of an influence anywhere at all. I had this conversation with Scorsese and I was telling him that I see him as an influence everywhere, and I see Spielberg as an influence everywhere. And I just don't see myself as an influence anywhere.

What would you like to be remembered for?
Woody Allen: Gee, only that I never sold the audience short. I always felt the audience was at least as intelligent as I am, and more. So I never made a picture, or tried to make a picture, that slanted down to the audience. I never pandered to them in any way. That I always had a great respect for them.

Which living filmmakers do you admire now?
Woody Allen: Well, of course, Bergman's still alive and I admire him. I admire Bertolucci. I admire Marty Scorsese and Francis Coppola and Robert Altman. I mean there's a lot of people whose films I admire.

What was the last film you saw?
Woody Allen: I saw a few films that I liked. I like Wonder Boys. I liked Magnolia. East-West is a very good film.

Do you still divide people into "the horrible and the miserable"?
Woody Allen: Yes, I divide people into horrible and miserable, and I still have a very pessimistic life. You know, the concept of life as a monstrous, monstrous thing. And I still feel that way about it, and I'm really not off into any kind of lighthearted thing.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jokerspath on August 28, 2003, 10:01:43 AM
This man is seriously one of my favorite American filmmakers ever.  I appreciate you posting the interview and I need to buy that book of interviews he did movie by movie with Stig Bgorkman [sp].

aw
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: mutinyco on August 28, 2003, 09:23:45 PM
I was watching the trailer for Anything Else a few weeks ago and we noticed it seemed more in the Gordon Willis style of Woody's older work. I looked up the credits and found it was shot by Darius Khondji. Interesting.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Fernando on August 28, 2003, 11:55:54 PM
From movies.com (http://movies.go.com/news/2003/8/veniceopens082703.html)

Venice Film Fest Opens With Woody Allen Pic

VENICE, Italy (Reuters) — Notoriously press-shy Woody Allen is finally showing his face at the Venice Film Festival, where his new comedy, Anything Else, kicked off the 60th edition today to laughs from nostalgic movie buffs.
"There's great wisdom in jokes," Allen tells his young protégé, played by Jason Biggs, as the camera sweeps across New York's Central Park in the opening scene. And moviegoers flooding the lagoon city for the world premiere tended to agree.

"We're back to the good old Woody Allen," one film critic said after the press preview. "It's better than going into the festival with a hard-hitting film, and he's such a legend."

Anything Else is one of 145 titles showing this year at the world's oldest film festival. But it is not among 20 vying for the coveted Golden Lion, to be awarded Sept. 6.

"I've always been invited but I've always made excuses. I felt I just owed it to the Italian … people to come and participate," Allen, 67, told reporters.

The quirky American director and his cast, including Biggs, Christina Ricci, and Danny DeVito, were expected to tread the red carpet for a gala screening on the Lido later today.

Organizers were even hoping he would improvise a few jazz tunes on his clarinet at an exclusive dinner afterwards.

In his new movie, Allen relinquishes the leading man role to Biggs (American Pie), who plays Jerry Falk, an aspiring comedy writer madly in love with neurotic Amanda, played by Ricci.

In typical Woody Allen fashion, Amanda falls for Jerry but soon discovers she can only have sex with other men.

"She's really the ultimate nightmare girlfriend … the quintessential Woody Allen girl," Ricci said in press notes.

"They make me look good," Allen said of his young upstarts. "They think I'm making a big contribution; in fact, my big contribution is casting and then getting out of their way."

Allen plays Dobel, an aging, paranoid mentor to Jerry who is obsessed with self-defense and imaginary anti-Semitic plots — a man Allen says reflects the growing tensions felt in the world today, who brings a hint of seriousness to the film.

"The film is microcosmic to some of the problems that have happened to Israel," he said.

Allen's first-ever appearance at the festival marks the return of his films to Venice after he opted to premiere Hollywood Ending at Cannes last year. His previous eight films had all taken their first bow on the Lido, though Allen himself always shied away from the festival.

But he has had a long-term love affair with Venice.

He secretly married Soon-Yi Previn here in 1997 after a much gossiped-about breakup with Mia Farrow, Soon-Yi's adoptive mother and his longtime movie muse. He shot parts of the 1996 musical Everyone Says I Love You on the city's winding canals.

Gondoliers proudly point out the hotel where he and Soon-Yi stay on their visits and hail his contributions to the famed La Fenice opera house, which was destroyed by a fire in 1996.

Allen, however, was not the only star luring fans to the Lido today. Johnny Depp, Antonio Banderas, and Salma Hayek were expected to arrive for the premiere of Once Upon a Time in Mexico, the latest gun-slinging film by Robert Rodriguez.

Nicole Kidman, George Clooney, Catherine Zeta-Jones, and Hollywood legend Omar Sharif will also stroll down the red carpet in coming days.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on August 29, 2003, 04:50:24 AM
I don't think this will be Woody Allen going precisely back to his roots, because when I think of that, I think of "Bananas" and "Annie Hall".. this looks like a good Allen comedy though. I'm going to enjoy Ricci's character and the fun casting of the rest.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on September 02, 2003, 06:46:02 PM
Woody Allen Says He's Not Famous in U.S.

PARIS (AP) - Woody Allen disagrees with those who think he's a Hollywood legend. The director and actor famed for playing neurotic characters said Tuesday that his star power is far greater outside the United States and that few up-and-coming American filmmakers want to emulate him.

"In my country I have a small, loyal following - very loyal, very small,'' said Allen, who was in Paris to promote his new film "Anything Else.''

"By most people in the United States I am very reluctantly acknowledged as someone who has been around for a long time and they frankly can't understand what the fuss is about - when there's a fuss.''

"They're kind but very, very unimpressed,'' Allen, 67, said about the majority of American moviegoers.

In Europe and particularly France, Allen is revered. Europeans admire the intellectual nature of his films. His dark humor and psychological themes fit well with local cinematic genres.

Allen said young filmmakers back home have all but ignored him and try to emulate directors like Martin Scorsese - a thought he shared with Scorsese in a recent conversation.

"I was saying to him, it seems to me that everyone in film who is influenced is influenced by him,'' Allen said. "I never, never see anybody influenced by me.''

"I don't mind this, it's just a fact,'' he said.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ©brad on September 02, 2003, 07:02:20 PM
poor woody.

i totally disagree w/ him though. i think the problem is that a lot of people really haven't seen his films. i made a couple buddies, who's film knowledge begins w/ animal house and ends w/ whatever colin farrell film of the moment, watch deconstructing harry once, and they were falling on the floor. one wanted more, so we watched annie hall. i let him borrow manhattan and love and death.

so u see, he could have a much bigger following if the stupid movie studio wouldn't fuck him on the release/marketing of his films.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ono on September 02, 2003, 07:05:12 PM
Interesting thought coming from Woody, but it seems like vintage Woody self-deprecation to me.  Case in point: last semester I took a movie criticism class.  We'd screen movies and then discuss them in groups for an hour-ish.  To start off discussions, we'd go around and rate the movie we just saw, from 1-10.  When it came time to discuss Annie Hall, pretty much everyone was familiar with Woody Allen, three or four people gave Annie Hall a 10 (a record for our class; neither The Godfather, Amelie, nor Fight Club came close, though they were the other most liked films in our class, from what I recall), and there were only a few who hated his work or were apathetic to it (mostly girls).  Of course, this was an academic setting, and it was a small cross-section of all movie goers, but still, he gives himself too little credit.  At least he's no Vincent Gallo.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on September 08, 2003, 01:09:33 AM
Will Ferrell Replacing Downey Jr. in Woody Allen Film
Source: Variety

Will Ferrell has replaced Robert Downey Jr. in Woody Allen's next film, which will be released by Fox Searchlight. Also joining the cast are Amanda Peet, Brooke Smith, Zak Orth, Wallace Shawn, Gene Saks and Vinessa Shaw.

Previously cast were Radha Mitchell, Chloe Sevigny and Jonny Lee Miller.

Production is scheduled to begin Sept. 22 in Gotham and wrap in November.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Ghostboy on September 08, 2003, 01:17:51 AM
Quote from: MacGuffin
Will Ferrell

Amanda Peet

Wallace Shawn

Chloe Sevigny



YES YES YES YES YES.

Particularly in regards to Mr. Ferrell.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: mutinyco on September 08, 2003, 11:02:41 AM
Vinessa Shaw was Domino in Eyes Wide Shut...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SoNowThen on September 08, 2003, 11:13:27 AM
Shaw is damn beautiful and soooo under-used since Eyes...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on September 08, 2003, 11:22:30 AM
Quote from: mutinyco
Vinessa Shaw was Domino in Eyes Wide Shut...

how come u know every bit-actress from that movie?

also what can u tell me about post-EWS Nuala? "N-U-A-L-A"
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: mutinyco on September 08, 2003, 01:14:53 PM
I know everybody from EWS because I spent 3 years writing an analysis of it. Go to:

http://www.movienavigator.org/eyeswideshut.htm

As for Nuala, she's my girlfriend... :)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: mutinyco on September 08, 2003, 01:15:20 PM
One of them anyway...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Ghostboy on September 08, 2003, 02:16:02 PM
I wrote off Vinessa Shaw after she played the romantic lead in Corky Romano.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ©brad on September 08, 2003, 02:41:42 PM
here's the first review of anything else i could find.

http://www.sick-boy.com/anythingelse.htm

seems sumwhat promising.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on September 09, 2003, 07:19:28 AM
Quote
Will Ferrell has replaced Robert Downey Jr. in Woody Allen's next film


As much as I think Will Ferrell is an hilarious actor, I also think Robert Downey Jr. is one of the best actors working today (when he's working), and I'd love to see him in a Woody Allen film, so I can't really say these are great news for me, though I expect Ferrell to do a great job here...

Ever since "Jack & Jill" I thought Amanda Peet would be great in a Woody Allen movie so her casting doesn't really surprise me. And Chloe Sevigny..... god damn, this film's gonna rock.

By the way, I just went to the "Anything Else" official site and saw a couple of clips and stuff from the film and all I can say is that I'm dying to see the movie. As much as the American Pie series has its flaws, I don't think anyone in their right mind can say that Jason Biggs isn't a great comedy actor. And Christina Ricci is sooooooo great and beautiful.... They'll be great together. And did any of you ever notice the only clip in the site where Woody appears? Hilarious. Fucking great.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: edison on October 08, 2003, 11:27:54 AM
Steve Carell ("Daily Show," BRUCE ALMIGHTY) has joined the cast of Woody Allen's new movie for Fox Searchlight and signed to star in SLEEPOVER for MGM. Allen's pic will star Josh Brolin, Brooke Smith, Will Ferrell, Amanda Peet, Zak Orth, Wallace Shawn, Gene Saks, Vinessa Shaw, Radha Mitchell, Chloe Sevigny and Jonny Lee Miller.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: godardian on October 08, 2003, 03:34:00 PM
Quote from: EEz28
Steve Carell ("Daily Show," BRUCE ALMIGHTY) has joined the cast of Woody Allen's new movie for Fox Searchlight and signed to star in SLEEPOVER for MGM. Allen's pic will star Josh Brolin, Brooke Smith, Will Ferrell, Amanda Peet, Zak Orth, Wallace Shawn, Gene Saks, Vinessa Shaw, Radha Mitchell, Chloe Sevigny and Jonny Lee Miller.


If Allen is with Fox Searchlight now, maybe he can finally break the "DreamWorks Curse."  :)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Sleuth on October 08, 2003, 03:47:05 PM
Will Ferrel, Steve Carell, Zak Orth, that's so fucking weird
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on October 08, 2003, 05:28:01 PM
How you guys feel about Anything Else? Where does it stand in his filmography? (I think I'll have to wait for next year to be able to see it around here).

I'd also really like to see Woody act in a serious film by a great filmmaker. I'd like to see him beeing Woody in other people's movies. Like what Paul Thomas Anderson did with the Sandler persona and put him in a really great movie, I'd like to see someone doing that to Woody (the only diference beeing I love most of Woody Allen movies and hated everything Sandler did in everything but P-DL)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on October 08, 2003, 05:35:07 PM
Anything Else is certainly no Annie Hall or Hannah and Her Sisters.. nothing like that. He has his films that have writing thats worth an Oscar nod (and then some) and he has his films where they aren't worth Oscars but they're enjoyable for anybody to see and they're funny.. things like Small Time Crooks fall under this category. It's a good Woody Allen film.

As for his neurotic character in other people's big movies.. I wouldn't want to see that, personally. I like the Woody Allen character acting in movies written by him instead of seeing him handle other people's dialogue.. I mean I've seen his other movies where he hasn't directed them and they're pretty good, but I'd rather see Woody doing his famous character in his own films.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on October 08, 2003, 05:39:10 PM
yeah, but you know... imagine Scorsese putting him on a film or something. Relax, I just said imagine  :wink:

You think he'll get another one of those Oscar nods with Anything Else?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: meatwad on October 08, 2003, 06:08:07 PM
Quote from: RoyalTenenbaum

You think he'll get another one of those Oscar nods with Anything Else?


nope
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on October 09, 2003, 04:33:07 PM
Woody Allen Autobiography Is Talk of the Fair

FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Quirky film director Woody Allen is ready to write his autobiography, sparking fevered interest among publishers at the world's biggest book fair.

News that the cinema icon is willing to tell his controversial story was the big buzz in Frankfurt, the industry's biggest marketplace of the year.

"There is huge interest. It is the book of the fair -- even if it is a virtual one," said Caroline Michel from HarperCollins' HarperPress which is believed to have bid one million dollars for the British and Commonwealth rights.

"If he were to write it, we think it would be the autobiography of the decade. It would be huge and funny and beautifully written," she told Reuters at the fair where 80 percent of the world's rights deals are clinched every year.

Reports that Allen was not ready to start writing until the price was right could not be confirmed.

Publishing News, the trade paper distributed at the fair, reported: "The comic icon is said to be awaiting what the international market offers before putting pen to paper."

But a spokeswoman for the ICM agency, reported to be handling the deal, would only tell Reuters: "Woody Allen has expressed an interest in writing an autobiography but he has not made a decision yet."

The notoriously press-shy director, whose private life became as famous as his offbeat New York comedies, has said in the past that celebrity really makes him cringe.

His famously unstable movie characters, frequently played by himself, have suffered a string of phobias and fears, often seeking solutions on the psychiatrist's couch.

Allen, whose neuroses have provided the cannon fodder for so-many of his sardonic one-liners, found himself the center of international attention after his bitter break-up with longtime partner Mia Farrow.

Revealing all about their split could be a major selling point in any autobiography.

Allen and Farrow ended their decade-long relationship in 1992 and five years later he married Farrow's adopted daughter Soon-Yi.

The scrawny comic's latest films have not gained the critical acclaim of earlier classics like "Annie Hall" which achieved cult status and garnered a clutch of Oscars.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on October 15, 2003, 08:14:30 AM
This looks interesting, as he probably has some great stories about his stand-up days and about his childhood and stuff. A Woody Allen autobiography would be really funny to read. The ones expecting Woody to gointo his relationships and marriages might get disappointed though, because I really don't see him talking about it. He doesn't seem like the kind of person to do so.

And now for something completely differente, it seems that Woody enjoyed working with Jason Biggs as he is listed as a part of the cast of his next film on IMDB. I haven't seen "Anything Else" yet, but I always liked Biggs a lot. I always thought he was a great comic actor, so the fact that he got into a Woody Allen film was great news for me, and knowing they liked the collaboration so much to the point they would do another film together right away makes it even more interesting.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Teen Wolf on October 16, 2003, 02:28:08 PM
I'm excited for this. I've been wanting to read a book on Woody for awhile. I've held off because Woody's so guarded, it seems like a book on his life would be sort of speculative and gossipy in nature.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: godardian on October 16, 2003, 06:51:07 PM
Farrow's aubiography was actually quite nicely written and much kinder to Woody than I would have ever though, all things considered. Well worth reading.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on October 18, 2003, 11:37:57 AM
Woody Allen Autobiography Not Likely  

NEW YORK - Will Woody Allen write his memoirs? Contradicting a published report, his publicist said Friday he was not close to a deal. In fact, it wasn't even his idea to do the book.

"This was completely his agents' idea," Leslee Dart said Friday.

"Many times over the past two to three years, they've asked him to write his memoirs and he said he wasn't interested. They then told him they could get a phenomenal amount of money for it, and he said that for a phenomenal amount of money he could see if he could get interested."

Allen, the comedian and Academy Award-winning filmmaker whose many works include "Annie Hall" and "Manhattan," is represented by Amanda Urban and John Burnham at International Creative Management. Burnham declined comment. Urban did not immediately return calls from The Associated Press.

According to The New York Times, Allen was near agreement with Riverhead Books, an imprint of Penguin, for a deal worth around $3 million, well below what he had reportedly been seeking.

But Dart said Allen had turned down Riverhead and that no other offers were being considered, although he had not given up. "He has no real passion for this," she said.

Penguin spokeswoman Marilyn Ducksworth said she hadn't heard about Allen's decision. "We hope it's not true, but if it is, we wish him well," she said.

In his book proposal, a copy of which was obtained earlier this week by the New York Post, Allen promises a tale "full of fascinating and juicy real life dramas and conflicts," including his long-term relationship with Mia Farrow and his affair with her adopted daughter, Soon-Yi Previn, to whom he is now married.

Allen's recent movies, among them "Anything Else" and "The Curse of the Jade Scorpion," have done poorly at the box office, but Dart denied he was in financial trouble. She said he was at work on a new film, currently untitled, with a cast that includes Will Ferrell and Chloe Sevigny.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: molly on October 19, 2003, 12:58:58 PM
I'd love to see Allen just as an actor in a movie by some other director. Without neurosis. something completly new and never seen before. In some interview, a journalist asked him, why he acts only in his movies, and he replied that it's because nobody hires him.  :(
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on October 19, 2003, 02:12:38 PM
the front
king lear
scenes from a mall
picking up the pieces
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on October 19, 2003, 11:22:59 PM
Quote from: eward
the front

Oh yes! Especially The Front! This is one of my favourite movies, as I love the chemistry between Allen and Zero. Great movie.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: TheVoiceOfNick on December 01, 2003, 03:05:06 PM
Happy birthday to Woody Allen!  He's 68 today.  May he make many more movies that bomb in the US and rate first in the box office of France!  

Happy birthday Woody... one my most favorite-ist directors of all time. :)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ono on December 01, 2003, 04:22:10 PM
Quote from: MacGuffin
... She said he was at work on a new film, currently untitled, with a cast that includes Will Ferrell and Chloe Sevigny.

Woody Allen + Will Ferrell + Chloe Sevigny = :yabbse-thumbup:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on December 01, 2003, 06:00:30 PM
Quote from: TheVoiceOfNick
Happy birthday Woody... one my most favorite-ist directors of all time. :)


Not one of... THE one :-D  

By the way, "Anything Else" will only be released here in Portugal in the first weekend of January, keeping the tradition of the past two years (2002 "The Curse oh The Jade Scorpion" and 2003 "Hollywood Ending") and as always, I'll be there on opening night (I don't give a fuck how bad the reviews were on this one). As for his next film... I love the cast and am really looking forward to this.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on December 01, 2003, 07:01:23 PM
You'll like "Anything Else", I wouldn't worry about any negative reviews.. I loved that film.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on December 02, 2003, 05:51:40 AM
Quote from: Cinephile
You'll like "Anything Else", I wouldn't worry about any negative reviews.. I loved that film.


I bet I will. A fan opinion is always more reliable than a critic's. I'll post something about it when I see it.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: meatwad on December 02, 2003, 09:37:06 AM
A friend of mine ran into Zach Orth at the UCB Theatre a few weeks ago (he was in a show there), and they asked him about the new Woody Allen movie. He said he has a really small part, and that Will Farrell is great in the film so far. I believe at that point they were still shooting.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: abuck1220 on December 03, 2003, 09:15:43 AM
i just re-watched manhattan murder mystery last night and loved it. i watched it a few years ago and i wanted to see if i liked it as much as i remember liking it. and i did. i don't understand why this gets overlooked when talking about woody's best work. it's one of my favorites.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: coffeebeetle on December 03, 2003, 10:11:02 AM
I think this is a great film too.  When it comes to the Allen/Keaton chemistry, ya can't beat it!

Interestingly, he's been quoted as saying it's one of his least favorite films.  Go figure.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: abuck1220 on December 03, 2003, 10:31:54 AM
Quote from: coffeebeetle
I think this is a great film too.  When it comes to the Allen/Keaton chemistry, ya can't beat it!

Interestingly, he's been quoted as saying it's one of his least favorite films.  Go figure.


really?? that's surprising. he's really funny in it. some of his best one-liners are in that one.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: coffeebeetle on December 03, 2003, 10:34:07 AM
Agreed.  "You have nothing that can't be cured with a little Prozac and a polo mallet..."

Heheh
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: TheVoiceOfNick on December 03, 2003, 10:39:13 AM
Woody is such a great filmmaker... he's so underrated... at least he's big in Europe...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on December 03, 2003, 11:36:08 AM
Manhattan Murder Mistery is, for me, the ultimate Woody Allen comedy (I only said comedy, not movie) on pair with Love & Death.

"My favorite thing in life is, you know, to look at cancelled postage." -- this is just gold
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SHAFTR on December 13, 2003, 12:42:38 AM
I just saw my 2nd Allen film (after Annie Hall)...Manhattan.

Another piece of gold...I need to watch more Woody Allen films.

Isn't he almost 70 now????!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on December 13, 2003, 01:08:40 AM
(http://paradisesimpson.free.fr/resume/2f31/thumb/084.jpg)
Now, my Woody Allen impression..
I'm a neurotic nerd who likes to
sleep with little girls
.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on December 13, 2003, 01:22:25 AM
Quote from: SHAFTR
I just saw my 2nd Allen film (after Annie Hall)...Manhattan.

Another piece of gold...I need to watch more Woody Allen films.


Number three should be "Crimes And Misdemeanors".
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on December 13, 2003, 01:27:23 AM
Fair enough, but I would've went with "Hannah and Her Sisters" for number three.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on January 01, 2004, 08:03:02 PM
Woody Allen Wants to Act in New Film

NEW YORK - Consider it a New Year's resolution for Woody Allen. The Academy Award-winning filmmaker says he wants to act in, but not direct, a film about a New Year's 1972 robbery at the Pierre Hotel, the Daily News reported in Thursday's editions.

According to the paper, Allen said he's talked to actor John Cusack about the project. The film would be based on a book called "The Man Who Robbed the Pierre: The Story of Bobby Comfort" by Ira Berkow.

Allen's works as an actor-director include hits like "Annie Hall" and "Manhattan," but recent films, among them "Anything Else" and "The Curse of the Jade Scorpion," have fared poorly at the box office.

In the 1972 robbery, five men in tuxedoes tied up 16 Pierre Hotel employees and took several million dollars in cash and jewelry.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on January 02, 2004, 05:12:50 AM
Quote from: MacGuffin
Woody Allen Wants to Act in New Film

NEW YORK - Consider it a New Year's resolution for Woody Allen. The Academy Award-winning filmmaker says he wants to act in, but not direct, a film about a New Year's 1972 robbery at the Pierre Hotel, the Daily News reported in Thursday's editions.

According to the paper, Allen said he's talked to actor John Cusack about the project. The film would be based on a book called "The Man Who Robbed the Pierre: The Story of Bobby Comfort" by Ira Berkow.

Allen's works as an actor-director include hits like "Annie Hall" and "Manhattan," but recent films, among them "Anything Else" and "The Curse of the Jade Scorpion," have fared poorly at the box office.

In the 1972 robbery, five men in tuxedoes tied up 16 Pierre Hotel employees and took several million dollars in cash and jewelry.


Strange.... I mean, does he want to write it and star in it but give the director's job to someone else (probably to get more people to see it) or what? It just doesn't seem normal with Woody Allen to say he wants to star in a film and ask John Cusack to be in it  :?  Anyway, I'm looking forward to seeing him in any movie.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on January 02, 2004, 12:04:37 PM
Maybe he thinks he can pull off a great performance with a role in that film. After all, he was wonderful in Annie Hall, Manhattan, etc.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: abuck1220 on January 26, 2004, 12:07:01 PM
all right, bookworms...you gave me some good advice on the altman book question (thanks for that). now i'm looking for some more advice.

which woody allen book would you recommend?

Woody Allen on Woody Allen: In Conversation With Stig Bjorkman

or

Woody Allen: A Life in Film (by richard schickel)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: soixante on January 26, 2004, 12:23:17 PM
There's a great bio of Woody, I forgot what it's called -- it's not the one by Eric Lax, who falls in love with his subject.  I would think the Schickel book would be good, as Schickel has long recognized Allen's genius -- Allen was on the cover of Time in 1979 for Manhattan (if you can dig up that issue at the library, it's worth reading).
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on January 26, 2004, 12:26:22 PM
(http://i.timeinc.net/time/magazine/archive/covers/1979/1101790430_400.jpg)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on February 02, 2004, 11:00:54 AM
Finally saw 'Anything Else' and I loved it. It's a sweet, romantic, paranoid, little work of a genius, who's coming close to the end of his career (I suppose so) and, I thought, while watching the movie, trying to tell us what he always wanted to, in his movies (since 'Love and Death' or so...): life is a bitch, but it beats the shit out of beeing dead, so we'd better recognize that. That's what I felt, while watching the movie as I felt him recaping his older work - his older life? - and coming to terms with it. (Believe me, if you think I've no idea about what I just said, you'reprobably right. I suck as a film critic).

Mr. Allen, I'm already waiting for the next one.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on February 02, 2004, 05:21:48 PM
Quote from: Cinephile
Fair enough, but I would've went with "Hannah and Her Sisters" for number three.


go with husbands and wives for number 4
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on February 24, 2004, 01:44:40 PM
okay i just skimmed through all 10 pages and didnt see any mention of this, although its very possible that i could've missed it.  somebody told me this the other day and i didnt believe him because i'd never heard it before in my life and sure enough when i looked it up on imdb, its right there...

Allen originally envisioned Annie Hall as a murder mystery, and that's how it was shot, with a subplot about a romance. During editing, Allen realized that all the best footage was of the romance, so he reedited the film as a romantic comedy.

that is THE fucking wildest thing i ever heard in my life!  i cant believe it.  he fucking shot a murder mystery and without a fucking MAJOR re-shoot, edits the ENTIRE plot out seamlessly and wins best fucking picture!  unbelievable.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SoNowThen on February 24, 2004, 01:55:22 PM
Also, I read that it was on a suggestion from the editor that he did that.

On the special edition dvd that will never happen, I envision 1 hour of deleted scenes, Spinal Tap style.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on February 24, 2004, 01:57:53 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
Also, I read that it was on a suggestion from the editor that he did that.

On the special edition dvd that will never happen, I envision 1 hour of deleted scenes, Spinal Tap style.

how about an alternate cut of the film Lord of the Rings style?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on February 24, 2004, 05:57:20 PM
in the book WOODY ALLEN ON WOODY ALLEN, woody explains that in early SCRIPT form it was a murder mystery, but later rewritten as the annie hall we all know and love today...and the murder mystery element eventually became MANHATTAN MURDER MYSTERY, respectively...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on February 25, 2004, 05:42:55 AM
Quote from: eward
in the book WOODY ALLEN ON WOODY ALLEN, woody explains that in early SCRIPT form it was a murder mystery, but later rewritten as the annie hall we all know and love today...and the murder mystery element eventually became MANHATTAN MURDER MYSTERY, respectively...


Exactly. the script evolved from a muder mystery story to a romantic one and, as far as I know, The first cut of the film was about 2h40m and when Woody test-screened it to some friends, nobody really liked it. Then the editor came in and did some cutting and turned it into he masterpiece it is now. Rumours are that deleted scenes footage is lost forever.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on February 25, 2004, 11:16:51 AM
yeah but doesnt anyone find it a little strange that what most consider his best movie was a total accident?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Weak2ndAct on February 25, 2004, 11:25:24 AM
Quote from: themodernage02
yeah but doesnt anyone find it a little strange that what most consider his best movie was a total accident?

Well, yes and no.  Annie Hall is certainly one of his most stylistic-risk-taking films, and I guess the real question is, how much of the 'style' of the movie is due to all the cutting/re-cutting/re-shooting/re-re-cutting.  If it's a lot, my hat's off to Allen for finding creative solutions to fixing the messes.  Sometimes by screwing up, you find new and interesting things that would have never happened by rigidly sticking to the script and shot list.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: soixante on February 25, 2004, 03:49:51 PM
The Conversation is an example of a film that was heavily reshaped in post-production, if not entirely restructured.  It sounds like they found the spine for Annie Hall in post-production.  On the other hand, Stardust Memories plays like three or four movies floundering around in serach of a spine.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: soixante on February 25, 2004, 03:52:49 PM
The film the director thought he was shooting can turn out to be something entirely different after the editing process.  For example, when Godard finished Breathless, he said something like, "I thought I was making a gangster B-movie, but it turned out to be more like Alice in Wonderland."

Also, with Annie Hall I believe Allen added some direct-address monologues to the camera and voice-over narration, which added some glue to the narrative.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on February 25, 2004, 04:37:55 PM
yeah but doesnt anyone find it a little strange that he shot a murder mystery and ended up with one of the most memorable romantic comedies of all time?  this is more than just shaping the film in the editing room.  this is abandoning the fucking concept and going 180 in some other direction!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on February 25, 2004, 07:31:37 PM
I find it strange, yes, but the result was Annie Hall, so who cares how he got there, right?  8)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on February 25, 2004, 07:51:03 PM
Quote from: themodernage02
yeah but doesnt anyone find it a little strange that he shot a murder mystery and ended up with one of the most memorable romantic comedies of all time?  this is more than just shaping the film in the editing room.  this is abandoning the fucking concept and going 180 in some other direction!


once again, HE DID NOT SHOOT IT THIS WAY...

from WOODY ALLEN ON WOODY ALLEN

STIG BJORKMAN: Manhattan Murder Mystery is a murder story...
WOODY ALLEN: Yes, and it's just a lark for me.  A vacation.  I've had the idea of making a murder mystery for a long time.  In fact, Annie Hall was originally a murder mystery.  But during the various rewrites of the script this element was abandoned.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Duck Sauce on February 25, 2004, 08:34:46 PM
Quote from: soixante
The Conversation is an example of a film that was heavily reshaped in post-production,


yes yes, go on
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: soixante on February 26, 2004, 02:08:59 AM
After Coppola shot The Conversation, he went off to shoot Godfather 2 and let Walter Murch edit it.  I think the continual cutting back to the conversation in the park was Murch's editorial invention, along with the sound design, so in the editing process a linear story became less linear.  Maybe someone else knows more about this and can fill in more details.  Murch and Coppola both go into detail in the Convesation DVD commentary.

Annie Hall was originally conceived as Anhedonia, which means fear of pleasure.  Apparently the first cut was a multi-story, multi-character film, and the Annie-Alvy thread played the best, so everything was cut accordingly.  And the title was changed for obvious reasons.

Manhattan Murder Mystery, I think, was written around the same time, and was put in a desk drawer by Allen until a later date.  This is not uncommon for writers -- Roger Waters wrote both The Wall and Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking in 1978, presented both to the other members of Pink Floyd, and they decided to record The Wall.  Waters finally recorded Pros and Cons in 1984.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on February 26, 2004, 09:48:58 AM
woody allen claims that he had had the idea of doing a murder mystery, and certain plot points and characters and whatnot since the early seventies, but he didn't write anything until he planned on definitly making it, which he did, right after it was written.....small time crooks, curse of the jade scorpion, and hollywood ending were unfinished scripts/ideas/notes etc.. that had been filed away and found again....as for annie hall originally being a multi-character film, every interview i've read with woody allen about annie hall he basically says he pretty much knew what he was doind while shooting....if someone can prove me wrong, please do, i'm curious about this but i don't think it's true....
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SoNowThen on February 26, 2004, 09:57:06 AM
Quote from: soixante
After Coppola shot The Conversation, he went off to shoot Godfather 2 and let Walter Murch edit it.  I think the continual cutting back to the conversation in the park was Murch's editorial invention, along with the sound design, so in the editing process a linear story became less linear.  Maybe someone else knows more about this and can fill in more details.  Murch and Coppola both go into detail in the Convesation DVD commentary.


The dream sequence in the fog was supposed to be the real ending. Murch trimmed it down and inserted it earlier, and they ended on the great apartment tear-down. I believe it was also Murch's idea to put a variation on the "he'd kill us if he had the chance" line...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: meatwad on March 14, 2004, 09:03:44 AM
i don't know if this is old news or not, but i just read over at Guardian that the title of his new film is "Melinda and Melinda"
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Dottie_Hinkle on April 19, 2004, 08:56:44 AM
My favorites, not in order:

Crimes and Misdemeanors
Bananas
Sleeper
Take the Money and Run
Zelig
Hannah and Her Sisters


I love almost anything he does.  I'm what you'd call an Allen freak.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on April 19, 2004, 06:18:01 PM
Allen freak!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: El Duderino on April 19, 2004, 06:31:14 PM
Quote from: Dottie_Hinkle
My favorites, not in order:

Crimes and Misdemeanors
Bananas
Sleeper
Take the Money and Run
Zelig
Hannah and Her Sisters


I love almost anything he does.  I'm what you'd call an Allen freak.


you cant be an Allen freak without Annie Hall, Interiors, or Tiger Lilly
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Dottie_Hinkle on April 19, 2004, 10:03:14 PM
well....i don't think you can dictate but i can play.  in my opinion, you can't be an allen freak wo bananas.  so there!!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: NEON MERCURY on April 19, 2004, 10:19:46 PM
.....i have actually NEVER seen a woody allen film.....
..but he must have an interesting take on life ...considering he's married to his daughter......
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on April 19, 2004, 11:46:13 PM
Quote from: NEON MERCURY
.....i have actually NEVER seen a woody allen film.....
..but he must have an interesting take on life ...considering he's married to his daughter......

 :shock:  :shock:  :shock:
I don't think I can talk to you anymore. You must see a Woody Allen film and report back to me.

The magic of Allen's funniest films is the neurotic spin he puts on his characters that he's been mastering since the early 60's in stand up. You must see his films.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: godardian on April 20, 2004, 12:10:39 AM
Quote from: El Duderino
Quote from: Dottie_Hinkle
My favorites, not in order:

Crimes and Misdemeanors
Bananas
Sleeper
Take the Money and Run
Zelig
Hannah and Her Sisters


I love almost anything he does.  I'm what you'd call an Allen freak.


you cant be an Allen freak without Annie Hall, Interiors, or Tiger Lilly


Some of the above picks are just as essential as those three, definitely... I personally find Husbands and Wives to be far and away my favorite Allen film, and I've seen them all.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Ghostboy on April 20, 2004, 01:20:03 AM
Bananas and Sleeper are fantastic, but they represent a more slapstick sense of humor, something that marks his earlier work, before he had the clout, I imagine, to start delving into the personal issues that he explored in his best work.

I have not yet seen Interiors; don't ask me why, since I have no honest explanation. I'm certain that I'll love it when I do.

I still really love Deconstructing Harry, since it was the first of his 'serious' films I ever saw; after that, I started seeking his earlier work.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Myxo on April 20, 2004, 05:06:39 AM
Sleeper kicks ass.

Too many people immediately go, "Annie Hall!"
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on April 20, 2004, 05:24:21 AM
I think I said it before, but I'm not sure, so I'll say it again... When it comes to "early funny" Woody Allen, there's nothing better than Love & Death.

Quote from: Ghostboy
I still really love Deconstructing Harry, since it was the first of his 'serious' films I ever saw; after that, I started seeking his earlier work.


I think it was my first Woody Allen movie ever. In the days that followed it, I cought Manhattan Murder Mistery on TV and Celebrity which was in theaters at that time... 6 years later, ElPandaRoyal became an Allen junkie, having seen each one of his films at least twice...  :shock:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Dottie_Hinkle on April 20, 2004, 06:54:24 AM
Man, Love and Death is hilarious.... wheat!


I agree that most people blurt out Annie Hall as the best but if you're talkin his serious films, Crimes and Misdeameanors tops my list.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on April 20, 2004, 04:48:22 PM
Quote from: Myxomatosis
Sleeper kicks ass.
Too many people immediately go, "Annie Hall!"

Quote from: themodernage02
HOLLYWOOD ENDING
SMALL TIME CROOKS
SWEET AND LOWDOWN
CELEBRITY
DECONSTRUCTING HARRY
EVERYONE SAYS I LOVE YOU
MIGHTY APRHODITE
BULLETS OVER BROADWAY
MANHATTAN
ANNIE HALL
EVERYTHING YOU EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT SEX...
BANANAS
WHATS UP TIGER LILLY?
BROADWAY DANNY ROSE
HANNAH AND HER SISTERS
SLEEPER

i've seen all those but annie hall is still my favorite (probably followed by manhattan.  i love the ending.  particularly the music cue and how it cuts to black perfectly.)  he just has so many fucking movies, that i can never seem to catch up.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: The Silver Bullet on April 21, 2004, 05:43:36 AM
Thus far:

01. Hannah and Her Sisters (1986)
02. Annie Hall (1977)
03. Husbands and Wives (1992)
04. Crimes and Misdemeanours (1989)
05. Shadows and Fog (1992)


06. Deconstructing Harry (1997)  
07. Sweet and Lowdown (1999)  
08. Love and Death (1975)  
09. Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993)  
10. Manhattan (1979)
11. Celebrity (1998)
12. The Curse of the Jade Scorpion (2001)
13. Another Woman (1988)
14. Zelig (1983)
15. Sleeper (1973)
16. Broadway Danny Rose (1984)
17. Small Time Crooks (2000)
18. Bananas (1971)
19. Stardust Memories (1980)
20. Hollywood Ending (2002)
21. Everyone Says I Love You (1996)
22. The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985)
23. Take the Money and Run (1969)
24. Oedipus Wrecks (segment from New York Stories) (1989)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on April 21, 2004, 07:41:00 AM
no no no u all got it wrong,

this is the secret ultimate perfect ranking list that solomon himself agreed with:

1. Love and Death
2. Zelig
3. Crimes + Misdemeanors
4. Annie Hall
5. Bananas
6. Hannah + Sisters
7. Deconstructing Harry or Sleeper

i only havn't seen Another Woman, Bullets/Broadway, and everything after Sweet'n Lowdown.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SoNowThen on April 21, 2004, 09:09:29 AM
Quote from: Pubrick
no no no u all got it wrong,

this is the secret ultimate perfect ranking list that solomon himself agreed with:

7. Deconstructing Harry or Sleeper


Hehehehe, classic.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on June 09, 2004, 12:53:54 AM
Kate Winslet Possibly in Woody Allen's Latest
Source: Variety

Variety says that Woody Allen is making an extremely rare foray outside New York, as the Gotham-centric helmer readies to shoot his latest movie in London.

Details of the project are shrouded in secrecy, but a production office is up and running at Ealing Studios, in West London, with shooting reportedly to start July 12.

The movie, known only as "Woody Allen Summer Project," is set in London's high society, with Kate Winslet possibly among the cast. The budget is said to be $15 million.

Allen is currently completing Melinda and Melinda for Fox Searchlight.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on June 09, 2004, 06:38:33 AM
:-D

Melinda will rock and then a Woody Allen movie with Kate Winslet set in London already seems promissing enough.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SHAFTR on July 03, 2004, 02:48:41 PM
just saw Hannah & Her Sisters, another great Woody Allen film.  So far I have loved Annie Hall, Manhattan & Hannah & Her Sisters.  I have liked Tiger Lilly & Sleeper and I'm not a fan of everything you wanted to know about sex*.  With that said, where do I go next with his work?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on July 03, 2004, 04:02:19 PM
Quote from: SHAFTR
With that said, where do I go next with his work?


"Crimes And Misdemeanors"
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on July 06, 2004, 07:54:29 PM
then husbands and wives, then purple rose of cairo, then mighty aphrodite
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on August 23, 2004, 11:06:47 PM
(http://cdn.netflix.com/us/boxshots/large/60001210.jpg) (http://cdn.netflix.com/us/boxshots/large/60011615.jpg) (http://cdn.netflix.com/us/boxshots/large/60011316.jpg)

started Woody Allen week tonite with Stardust Memories, Zelig, and the Purple Rose of Cairo.  stardust memories was exhausting just seeing the sheer number of people approach him for things, mostly because i know its true.  (from my pta encounter and a doc i saw on allen traveling with his band called wild man blues), i can see that this is hardly exaggerated.  however, in the end the movie felt a little too self concious to me without ever connecting totally (or... being funny enough), but it was interesting nonetheless.  zelig, which i didnt realize until right before i put it in was a mockumentary (or faux documentary) or whatever.   the most notable part being the pre-gump seamless integration of allen into vintage materials.  the movie however, even at a brisk 80 minutes was not funny enough to sustain its running time.  it could probably have been cut down to a 15-20 minute short and not lost much of importance.  purple rose of cairo was very similar to the later last action hero, and unfortunately not a whole lot better.  an interesting premise but the movie fell flat mostly, (although i did like the ending).  its always strange to watch a woody allen movie that doesnt star woody allen, so maybe that took some getting used to.  one of the most interesting things i noticed while watching zelig and purple rose is how quickly allen went from being young and hip and cutting edge to being sort of an old standard.  where did the guy from bananas and sleeper, etc. turn into the old fart reminiscing about the 20's and obsessing over jazz?  it almost seems as if he had aged 30 years in the 10 year span between the early 70's and early 80's.

while stardust was my favorite of the three, i wasnt blown away by any of them.  oh well, crimes and misdemeanors (recommended from mac) and husbands and wives (from godardian) are up next so hopefully good things are in store...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on August 23, 2004, 11:52:55 PM
you'll be totally blown away by both of them, so don't let these disappointments discourage you any
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on September 03, 2004, 08:31:19 AM
http://www.aint-it-cool-news.com/display.cgi?id=18252

Just saw this and got really really excited about it. I mean, I am this huge Woody Allen fan and I get excited with every Allen movie (despite some minor ones like Hollywood Ending and whatnot) but after reading this... man, oh man... I think this one's gonna rock hard.  :-D
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on September 03, 2004, 12:10:25 PM
thank the lord if this turns out to be accurate.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SHAFTR on September 03, 2004, 03:39:41 PM
I just saw Banananas and I liked it probably best of his Pre-Annie Hall films that I've seen.  I'm not a big fan of slapstick, but it was fun.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on September 03, 2004, 04:52:05 PM
Quote from: SHAFTR
I just saw Banananas and I liked it probably best of his Pre-Annie Hall films that I've seen.  I'm not a big fan of slapstick, but it was fun.


Still, nothing beats out Love and Death among his pre-Annie Hall stuff.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on September 03, 2004, 10:58:59 PM
play it again sam might.  granted he didnt direct it, but he wrote it so whatever
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on September 03, 2004, 11:22:04 PM
(http://cdn.netflix.com/us/boxshots/large/406734.jpg) (http://cdn.netflix.com/us/boxshots/large/60010462.jpg)

finished up woody allen week with the two mentioned above.  while both were interesting i wasnt in love with either.  cam was dark and different, and haw was familiar but not.  the jump cuts, shaky documentary style camerawork and overlapping dialogue etc. seemed like he was going through a frenchnewwave thing.  there was a lot of things in the film that i found to be really true about the way people/relationships are.  

but the most interesting and sort of sad thing i noticed when i got to the end of these films was how i watched woody and mias relationship deteriorate over the course of a few films.  in purplerose she was the lead character whose sympathies lie with us, zelig she cures all ills, etc. but by the time we reach husbands & wives, their relationship has crumbled.  seeing it reflected onscreen is just depressing.  but i've probably seen 20 or more woody allens by this point and i'm just not in love with him yet.  i mean, its interesting how he has shown such a range of styles/influences/etc. while still examining the same issues over and over and over again.  i guess if i'm not in love with the characters in the film though, its not going to work for me.  favorites are still Annie Hall, Manhattan, Bananas, and maybe Everyone Says I Love You.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: pete on September 03, 2004, 11:36:52 PM
I thought crimes and misdemeanors had one of the most beautiful endings of all time, despite the fact that the song was originally sang by Liberaci.  He used the same techniques as Annie Hall, sure, but this one felt way more weighty, and I was moved even though I didn't agree with his philosophy.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on September 17, 2004, 09:38:39 PM
Woody Allen Says Films Cure Insomnia as Wins Award

U.S. film director Woody Allen said his films were a cure for insomnia on Friday, as he accepted an award at the San Sebastian film festival for his life's work.

"When they told me ... they wanted to give me a life-time achievement award I felt I should not really accept because you know, after all, what have I actually achieved?

"I'm not a scientist or a doctor who has discovered some great cure and then I thought about my films and I thought that actually they were a cure for insomnia and I thought that I could accept the award in all conscience," he said after receiving the prize from Spanish director Pedro Almodovar.

Allen's new movie, a tragi-comedy called "Melinda and Melinda," premiered at the festival on Friday. Starring Radha Mitchell in the double lead role, the film shows the interchangeably tragic and comic nature of life, but Allen, a self-confessed neurotic, says he can only ever focus on the tragedy.

"I have a extremely pessimistic outlook. To me the glass is always empty, not half empty, but completely empty ... For me it's tragic or extremely tragic."

The 68-year old New Yorker, who has made more than 30 films including most famously "Annie Hall" and "Manhattan," said he chose the name Melinda for his lead character because it was easy to type.

"I call her Melinda because I type my scripts and Melinda is easy to type so I can type it rapidly. All the women's names that I use in my films are very short and easy to type," Allen told reporters.

Allen's style ranges from intellectual self-obsessive comedy to serious drama, and is hugely popular in Europe. In his near 40-year career he has been widely honored both in his home country and in Europe, with the prestigious Cannes Palme D'Or.

The Donostia prize, derived from the Basque language name for the seaside resort which hosts the festival, is awarded for a great film personality in recognition of their career.

Actors Jeff Bridges and Annette Bening will also receive Donostia prizes this year for their life's work and their latest films are being shown at the festival, which started on Friday and runs until September 25
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on September 22, 2004, 01:26:56 PM
Woody Allen Joins Anti-Bush Bandwagon

Actor/director Woody Allen blasted US president George W Bush when he collected his lifetime achievement award at Spain's San Sebastian film festival on Friday. Allen - who is currently shooting an untitled movie in London - insisted it would be "tragic" if Bush was re-elected in November. He says, "If you observe (Bush), it's quite amusing. If you listen to him as he speaks, if you follow him closely, it would provide you a great many laughs. But it's the perfect example of islands of comedy, comic moments against a very, very tragic background." Allen's criticism comes after directors Jonathan Demme and Wim Wenders condemned the state of American politics at the Venice Film Festival earlier this month.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on November 16, 2004, 07:43:26 AM
Woody Allen play extended
From Associated Press

It hasn't opened yet, but "A Second Hand Memory," the new play by Woody Allen, already has had its limited engagement extended at the Atlantic Theater Company in New York City because of strong ticket demand.
 
The play, featuring Michael McKean, Dominic Chianese and Elizabeth Marvel, concerns a 1950s Brooklyn family dealing with issues of loyalty and ambition. It opens Nov. 22 and will now run through Jan. 23. It originally had been set to close Jan. 9.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on December 22, 2004, 04:23:11 PM
All Things French in Vogue for Woody Allen

In Woody Allen's America, Bordeaux or Burgundy wine and other things French are always in vogue. But he admits his European sensibility makes his films less popular back home.

Even with trans-Atlantic ties at a low ebb, the French are still seen as standard-bearers of class, elegance and, well, romance among Americans, he said, and the U.S. filmgoing public knows it.

"If you were doing a scene of seduction, and the man gets the woman in a candlelit restaurant, he would never order a California wine because then everyone would laugh," Allen told reporters in Paris. "It will not be a Portuguese wine, it will just always be French."

"There's a mystique that Americans have about French wine," he said. "Despite any political conflicts America has with France, most Americans have enormous affection for thing French."

France's vocal opposition to the U.S.-led war in Iraq chilled relations between Paris and Washington, but Allen stopped short of any comment on the soured ties.

The bespectacled filmmaker was in Paris to promote his new film "Melinda and Melinda," which explores both tragedy and comedy through two separate and parallel lives of a young woman each played by Radha Mitchell that are the subject of a dinner conversation.

The film gave Allen the chance to dabble in tragedy admittedly not his strong point. It is to be released next month in France and in the United States in March.

Allen said he liked Michael Moore's anti-Bush film "Fahrenheit 9/11" which won top prize at the Cannes Film Festival this year but insisted filmmakers face limits in changing political attitudes.

"I don't think that it made any real difference in the outcome of the election," Allen said of Moore's film. "It's no question that I was disappointed in the outcome of this election."

But "I don't think people see movies and say, 'Well, I'm going to go out there and now I'm going to vote for somebody different,'" Allen said.

Allen's films are wildly popular in countries like France, and he acknowledged that these days his penchant for European culture doesn't win him much favor in America.

"It's not surprising to me that all over, my films have some kind of European sensibility," he said. It "doesn't help their popularity in the United States but it's unconscious."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on December 26, 2004, 06:02:04 PM
Melinda and Melinda will come out January 6th here in Portugal, and guess who's horny to see it? That's right. Moi memme, fukkos  :yabbse-grin:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Kal on April 10, 2005, 01:11:34 AM
I saw 'Zelig' tonight and its one of the funniest things I've ever seen... this is when Woody Allen shows his real genius... it was great!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: classical gas on April 10, 2005, 03:25:28 AM
is he really a genius?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: mogwai on April 10, 2005, 03:35:05 AM
wtf is woody allen?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: classical gas on April 10, 2005, 03:42:08 AM
genius
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on April 10, 2005, 10:11:53 AM
yes, he is.  despite melinda and melinda.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cron on April 11, 2005, 08:06:25 PM
PLOT/LOCATION SPOILERS FOR THE NEW MOVIE

The Woody Allen guide to London

For his new film, Match Point, Woody Allen has abandoned Manhattan, the backdrop for so many of his films, and come to London. The director talks to Peter Kelly about the settings that inspired him - and how he put them on film(http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-images/Film/Pix/pictures/2005/04/08/woodylondon1.jpg)

After 30 years of using New York as both his location and inspiration, Woody Allen has become synonymous with the city. No other director or screenwriter has tied their themes and style so tightly to a particular place, and no one else has spent 25 of their 38 films making the architecture of Manhattan seem both impressive and romantic. So it was a surprise to his fans that his next release, Match Point, was shot entirely in London.


Woody Allen openly admits his pragmatic reasons for filming in the UK. "It was really because the finance was raised in London." Having selected London, however, Allen accepts "it was a felicitous choice" because the capital contains enough architecture to match his requirements.
American directors, annoyingly, often see filming in London as a kind of tourism. Mainstream films still tend to reference the standard landmarks of the Palace of Westminster, Buckingham Palace and Trafalgar Square to establish a London setting, while those on a smaller budget try to get to the "real" London by showing the small back streets of the east end. Neither has given much time to depicting the increasingly landmark-strewn South Bank, which is why Match Point is seen as essential to promoting London as a modern, international city.

Using the right people was clearly vital to Allen producing an authentic London film. Santo Loquasto has been Woody Allen's production designer for around 20 years but was unable to come to London to work on Match Point. So the role of realising Allen's vision in a British setting fell to Jim Clay.

"He was so meticulous and imaginative - sometime quite astonishingly - working in the same way Santo works, which is on a very limited budget but producing very large impressive sets for me," says Allen. "He did beautiful opera sets from scratch and he made the interior of Tate Modern.

"I'd never heard of what you call 'the Gherkin', but Jim showed me the exterior and the interior - both worked very well for me. He also showed me certain neighbourhoods, with very wealthy homes [in Belgravia and Pimlico] we had to shoot in. I also needed some tennis locations and he put me on to some ones that were perfect for the character but also were quite lovely to look at [Queen's Club, West Kensington]."

Early plot details of the film (Allen is famously secretive about forthcoming films and his plot outlines often change) involve a young tennis instructor who becomes entangled with a wealthy family. This leads to his rise in the world of the upper classes and affairs with two women, which have murderous consequences. The subtext of social tension - a recurring Woody Allen theme - has been reflected in the choice of locations, ranging from grand country estate homes to the Covent Garden hotel and the Curzon Cinema in Soho.

Clay says: "I spent five weeks with Woody travelling around with him. For Woody, who doesn't know London that well, everything was a joy and an experience, but he's not a pushover by any means. He says right away if he thinks it doesn't work for a scene, or if he doesn't like it, or if it isn't the right atmosphere for what he has in mind."

From Clay's point of view, it was essential to avoid the potential pitfalls of working with an American director: "We had to be careful not to make it look like a tourist movie, and where possible would throw those elements away. For example, you just have to be very careful how you show the Millennium Wheel. I was prepared to argue that case but I didn't have to in the end because Woody's so astute."

Perhaps understandably, Allen is unsure about using London architectural cliches in his film. "I don't recognise them as such, so I'm sure I shot a certain amount of picture-postcard London, but that wasn't on my mind. I was just trying to do the story." In assembling a British crew Allen has ensured that he has people who understand London as much as he understands Manhattan.

Tate Modern immediately seemed the ideal building for a Woody Allen film. "It has all those warm colours, it's vast and it has a fabulous light quality, which changes throughout the day. Early on, at eight in morning when the sun is just coming in through that end of the turbine hall, it's just a magical space," says Clay. The challenge was to make all these disparate elements of the London urban landscape coherent, both in this film and in the broader context of Allen's oeuvre. As Clay explains: "The Millennium bridge links the South Bank so successfully with St Paul's. Apart from being a superb piece of design and engineering, it has this fantastic backdrop. Cinematically, that stretch of the river looks stunning.

This portrayal of modern London could only go so far, however: Daniel Libeskind's London Metropolitan University building was rejected - it would stand out in film as bizarrely as it does on Holloway Road. "Woody is fairly traditional in his outlook. I think the Gherkin is as far as we wanted to go in the contemporary world," says Clay.

There were also more specific requirements when selecting locations for the film. Woody Allen frequently includes long scenes with one continuous shot as the characters walk and talk through block after block, down the long, straight streets of New York. These kinds of streets just don't exist in London, so St James's Park was used to accommodate extended pieces of dialogue.

Most heartening is what Clay said about working with Woody Allen: "He made me see London differently."

www.blueprintmagazine.co.uk
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on April 26, 2005, 01:33:23 PM
Scarlett and Woody at It Again
With their collaboration Match Point set to debut at Cannes, Scarlett Johansson will head back to London for Woody Allen's next project. Source: FilmStew.com

Scarlett Johansson, who'll be seen at the Cannes Film Festival this year in Woody Allen's Match Point, is re-pairing with the filmmaker for another London-set feature. Johansson has been cast as the female lead in the next project from Allen, which will once again film during the summer in the U.K. Production will start on June 28.

As per usual with Allen films, both the title and the plot details of the film, which Allen wrote and will direct, are being kept close to the vest. Letty Aronson and Helen Robin will produce the project, with Stephen Tenenbaum serving as executive producer.

Match Point co-stars Emily Mortimer and Jonathan Rhys-Meyers and marked the first time Allen left Manhattan to shoot a project.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on April 26, 2005, 02:40:26 PM
strange.  is she the new diane keaton/mia farrow?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on April 26, 2005, 04:20:20 PM
Quote from: MacGuffin
and marked the first time Allen left Manhattan to shoot a project.


what about bananas and things of the like??  were those not shot on location?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on April 26, 2005, 09:58:58 PM
or part of everyone says i love you?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on April 26, 2005, 10:27:09 PM
Love & Death?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: classical gas on April 27, 2005, 12:26:45 AM
Manhattan
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Sleuth on April 27, 2005, 12:28:10 AM
Monk is filmed in LA instead of San Francisco
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: russiasusha on April 27, 2005, 01:16:40 AM
Woody  Allen had sex with Mick Jagger

Proven fact
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on May 12, 2005, 12:17:12 AM
BBC Films looking for laughs

BBC Films, the pubcaster's movie-making arm, said Wednesday it was looking to build a slate of comedy projects and has sealed a deal to back Woody Allen's next British set movie after "Match Point." BBC Films chief David Thompson said the deal for Allen's next London-set movie following "Match Point" -- which unspools Out of Competition at Cannes Thursday -- is being ironed out but is expected to see the Beeb co-produce the project and take television rights. No further details were available on the Allen project but Thompson said the aim was to diversify the upcoming slate from the broadcaster's movie arm to include more comedy.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on May 12, 2005, 01:44:15 PM
At Cannes, Scarlett says she's not Allen's muse

Away from the red carpets and beyond the yachts crowding the harbor next to the Cannes Film Festival, the following items were seen and heard on Thursday:

- - - -

WOODY ALLEN'S MUSE?

Scarlett Johansson may be a lot of things to a lot of people, but "Woody Allen's latest muse" is not a title the young American actress with a skyrocketing career is after.

Johansson was asked at a news conference after the world premiere of their film "Match Point" what it was like to be Allen's new "muse" -- a woman or force personified as a woman who is the source of inspiration for a creative artist.

The journalist was referring to Allen's past on- and off-screen partnerships with Diane Keaton and Mia Farrow.

But before Johansson, 20, could answer, Allen, 69, leaned over toward her and gave a stage whisper loud enough for their microphones to pick up: "Careful, careful." They both laughed.

"I guess I'm glad we're working together again," said Johansson, who stars in "Match Point" and will work with Allen again on a new film mid-year. "I'm thrilled. I don't know about being his 'muse', but it's nice to work with him. We'll get to eat the free lunch from catering again."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on May 14, 2005, 01:18:57 PM
Woody Allen Eyes Barcelona for Next Film

Woody Allen said Saturday he wants to shoot his next movie in Barcelona.

Allen said his production company is in the advanced stage of talks on filming a romantic comedy in Spain's second-largest city. He said he hopes to get started next summer or the one after that.

He spoke during a visit to the northern city of Oviedo, where in 2002 he won an arts award from a foundation run by Crown Prince Felipe.

Allen said some of the scenes in the next movie might be filmed in Oviedo.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SiliasRuby on June 02, 2005, 08:52:29 AM
No, he doesn't.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on June 02, 2005, 10:01:36 AM
Quote from: flagpolespecial
can we give woody his own forum? jesus. finchers got one.
Quote from: SiliasRuby
No, he doesn't.

hahaah, wow, PWNED by silias..
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on June 21, 2005, 04:40:25 PM
Quote from: flagpolespecial
can we give woody his own forum?


I always supported this one.  :yabbse-grin:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on June 30, 2005, 01:39:44 AM
Allen Not Interested in September 11

Director Woody Allen has dismissed the September 11th attacks as a negligible historical event not worthy of the silver screen. The Melinda And Melinda filmmaker regards the al-Qaeda attacks on America's east coast as a minor disaster compared to other historical events. Allen tells Pagesix.Com, "As a filmmaker, I'm not interested in 9/11 - it's too small, history overwhelms it. The history of the world is like: He kills me, I kill him, only with different cosmetics and different castings. So in 2001, some fanatics killed some Americans, and now some Americans are killing some Iraqis. And in my childhood, some Nazis killed Jews. And now, some Jewish people and some Palestinians are killing each other. Political questions, if you go back thousands of years, are ephemeral - not important. History is the same thing over and over again."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: JG on October 30, 2005, 03:40:56 PM
i didn't want start a thread, so i wanna ask here:  is there a thread for match point?  there is a lot of buzz about this movie, ebert calling it one of allen's four best.  there's also a trailer.  

Christmas day release date.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Tictacbk on October 30, 2005, 03:42:54 PM
Its called the search button...


http://xixax.com/viewtopic.php?t=7614&highlight=match+point
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: JG on October 30, 2005, 03:44:08 PM
yeah i tried and couldn't find it.  i'm not really good with the search.  then i figured out a way to make it so that i only looked in the grapevine section and found it.  i was gonna make a quick edit, but you beat me to it.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: polkablues on October 30, 2005, 07:21:04 PM
Quote from: JimmyGator
i'm not really good with the search.


http://www.xixax.com/viewtopic.php?t=7892

All you'll ever need to know.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on October 31, 2005, 06:30:49 PM
Woody Allen Grateful for Wife Soon-Yi

Woody Allen says his relationship with wife Soon-Yi Previn, which has a "more paternal feeling," is "one of the truly lucky things that happened to me in my life."

Allen, a two-time Oscar winner, married Previn in 1997. She is the adopted daughter of Andre Previn and Mia Farrow, Allen's former girlfriend.

In 1992, Allen was discovered to be having an affair with Previn, then 22, while he was dating Farrow. He and Previn have two daughters, ages 5 and 6.

"I'm sure there are things that I might have done differently," he says in an interview in Vanity Fair magazine, on newsstands Nov. 8. "Probably in retrospect I should have bowed out of that relationship (with Farrow) much earlier than I did."

But Allen, who will be 70 on Dec. 1, says age hasn't brought wisdom.

"I've gained no wisdom, no insight, no mellowing. I would make all the same mistakes again, today," he tells the magazine.

Despite the calamitous beginnings of his relationship with Previn, he says, "It was just completely fortuitous. One of the truly lucky things that happened to me in my life."

"I don't ever feel that I'm with a hostile or threatening person. It's got a more paternal feeling to it."

Though his separation and subsequent custody battles with Farrow over their three children was bitter, Allen says he wanted to cast her in his 1995 film, "Mighty Aphrodite." Casting director Juliet Taylor talked him out of it, and the part went to Helena Bonham Carter.

"I'm just not the kind of person that thinks, `Well, you did a terrible thing to me in my life, and so I'm not working with you,'" he says. "I mean, there's a line that you draw. I wouldn't put, you know, Hermann Goring in a part, but short of Nuremberg crimes ..."

Allen will release his latest film, "Match Point," in December, a thriller starring Scarlett Johansson and Jonathan Rhys-Meyers. It has been acclaimed as a return to form for Allen, who won Oscars for 1977's "Annie Hall" and 1986's "Hannah and Her Sisters."

His screen credits also include "Interiors," "Manhattan," "Broadway Danny Rose," "The Purple Rose of Cairo" and "Deconstructing Harry."

"I'm made, oh, perfectly decent films," he says. "But not `8 1/2,' not `The Seventh Seal,' `The 400 Blows' or `L'Avventura' ones that to me really proclaim cinema as art, on the highest level. If I was the teacher, I'd give myself a B."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ᾦɐļᵲʊʂ on October 31, 2005, 11:37:37 PM
Quote from: Pubrick
Quote from: flagpolespecial
can we give woody his own forum? jesus. finchers got one.
Quote from: SiliasRuby
No, he doesn't.

hahaah, wow, PWNED by silias..


Unpwned, now that Soderbergh has made room for him and Aronofsky.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cowboykurtis on November 11, 2005, 08:28:15 PM
theres a good woody allen article in the new vanity fair
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on December 18, 2005, 12:36:36 AM
Stardust Memories
Woody Allen on his prolific career -- The ''Match Point'' director revisits the highlights of career
by Josh Rottenberg, Entertainment Weekly
 
Stepping gingerly into an elegantly appointed hotel suite in Beverly Hills, shoulders slouched, eyes casing the room, Woody Allen looks a little out of his element. No surprise: This is the man who raised feeling uncomfortable — in social settings, in love, in a cold and godless universe — to an art form, and, as anyone familiar with his life and work knows, Los Angeles is not exactly his turf. As the Brooklyn-bred filmmaker quipped in his 1977 masterpiece Annie Hall, Los Angeles is ''a city where the only cultural advantage is that you can make a right turn on a red light.''

Settling into a sofa, Allen says he enjoys visiting L.A., ''but I could never live here. I need a more close-packed city. And I don't like the sunshine.''

But Allen has been straying outside his comfort zone more and more lately. Even as his films have struggled to find an audience, he has entered into new partnerships, like a three-picture deal with DreamWorks from 2000 to 2002, that step up the pressure on him to at least break even at the box office. In 2001, he split with his longtime friend and producer Jean Doumanian in a bitter legal battle. The next year, he stunned audiences by making his first-ever appearance at the Academy Awards — in a tuxedo, no less.

His new film, Match Point — his 36th — represents another unexpected turn. Filmed in England, with a mainly British cast, it's a straight-up Hitchcockian thriller: the story of a social-climbing tennis pro (Jonathan Rhys Meyers) who dives into a passionate, ill-fated affair with his brother-in-law's fiancée (Scarlett Johansson). Since debuting at the Cannes film festival — where Allen walked the red carpet and did his best to smile for the cameras — Match Point, in limited release Dec. 28, has been heralded as a return to form for the director and earned a Golden Globe nomination for Best Drama.

Allen seems wary of the buzz. ''People like to talk,'' he says dismissively. The reality is, after 50-plus years in show business, he's heard it all. He's been hailed as a comic genius and attacked as a self-indulgent narcissist. His films have been celebrated as cultural events (Annie Hall, Manhattan, the list goes on) and panned or, worse, ignored (September, Anything Else, that list goes on as well). His persona as the neurotic Everyman made him an unlikely folk hero, while his offscreen life — most notably the revelation in 1992 of his affair with his current wife Soon-Yi Previn, the adopted daughter of his longtime girlfriend and cinematic muse Mia Farrow — brought scorn from some quarters. Allen says he tunes out the background din of acclaim, disdain, and everything in between: ''Even when I'm embraced, I'm not embraced warmly. It doesn't matter to me.''

Earlier this month, Allen turned 70. He's a little hard of hearing and moves more slowly than he used to. Yet he keeps plugging away, making a film a year with a regularity you can set a watch to. His parents lived to be 93 and 100, and with his next comedy, Scoop, already in the can, he shows no signs of stopping.
 
This constant forward motion (''like a shark,'' to quote Annie Hall again) means Allen doesn't look back much. But today, he offers ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY a rare opportunity to revisit some of the highlights of his legendary career. Seen through his famous thick-framed and far-from-rose-colored glasses, it seems the hits and misses are sometimes one and the same.

TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN 1969
Having won fame as a stand-up comic, Allen had transitioned into films as a writer and actor with What's New, Pussycat?, What's Up, Tiger Lily?, and Casino Royale. Still honing his comedic style, he made a promising solo directorial debut with this madcap mockumentary about a hapless would-be criminal.

I felt I was ready to direct, but the people in my corner said, ''People will resent it. They'll think, Who is this guy?'' So I tried to get Jerry Lewis, because I thought he was quite a good comedy director, and he agreed to direct it. But we couldn't work it out with the studio, and Jerry went off to do something else. Then this new company, Palomar Pictures, formed, and they were willing to take a chance on me. The picture was very well received critically, but two or three years after it came out, they had still not broken even. I knew I was not destined to be a cash cow. But even when I was a cabaret comic, I always had a tough time getting an audience. They'd book me into Caesars Palace in Las Vegas and they'd have half a house. By the third night, the head waiters would be pulling the potted plants in so they could make the space much smaller for the audience.

SLEEPER 1973
A nonstop Orgasmatron of inspired silliness, this futuristic Rip Van Winkle comedy displayed Allen's growing storytelling skill, though the difficulties of creating the world of 2173 (giant bananas and all) forced him to pour his salary into reshoots. Most important, the film showcased his comedic chemistry with a young actress named Diane Keaton, with whom he had been romantically involved.

Marshall Brickman and I wanted to write a movie that wasn't just gag-gag-gag. I was good at writing gags, but to write a story with a real plot and real characters — that was much harder. I was used to working as a comic, where if you don't hear the laughs for 60 seconds, it's disconcerting. I had a small budget, and I was working in the future, so every car had to be built, every costume had to be designed. Fortunately, my costume designer was Joel Schumacher. He had, like, a $10,000 budget to do all the costumes, but he was brilliant and inventive and he did it.

I knew Diane very well. I had done a play with her, Play It Again, Sam, we had lived together, and we were very close. I just felt she had a limitless comic talent. I've always felt that the two great movie comediennes of all time were Judy Holliday and Diane Keaton.

ANNIE HALL 1977
Allen's artistic breakthrough had a difficult birth. In its two-hour-and-30-minute rough cut, the film (originally titled Anhedonia) was a formless collection of comic bits and pieces. After extensive and ruthless editing, the 93-minute film that emerged would become one of the most iconic romantic comedies in Hollywood history. Audiences didn't just love it — they luhrved it, they luffed it, and the film earned Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, and Best Actress for Keaton. Allen, however, was a no-show at the Oscars.

The movie was originally supposed to be what my character was thinking, in a not really coherent fashion. It was this abstract experimental idea of my mind at work, and the relationship was one big part of it, but there were many other parts. And I shot it that way. But when Marshall Brickman saw the first cut, he said, ''I wrote it with you and even I can't follow it.'' So we restructured it and reshot the ending many times. I was able to find the love story, and audiences were charmed by it beyond my expectations. I didn't save outtakes or any of that stuff. I'm not a big nostalgia person.

They gave the Oscars out Monday evenings in those days. I always played clarinet with my jazz band on Monday evenings, and it was something I always looked forward to. I don't like to fly. I don't like to get into a tuxedo. So I'm not going to suddenly cancel my band and fly to California. People made a big deal out of that, but I don't write movies to win awards.

INTERIORS 1978
Allen's abrupt turn toward drama with this somber, Bergmanesque portrait of a family falling apart brought him his first major critical drubbing.

I didn't see it coming. There were people who loved it, and there were other people who thought I was committing a crime: I was in bad faith, I had violated my contract with the audience. I didn't feel it was fair. I thought I should be able to try something, even if I made the worst film in the world. After Interiors I knew there would be consequences if I tried to make that kind of film again. But I did it. Because the alternative is letting other people tell you exactly what to do in your career. Maybe they're even right, but, you know, it's hard to live that way.

MANHATTAN 1979
A wistfully romantic ode to Allen's hometown and an indelible portrait of angsty urbanites in search of love, this gorgeously shot, Gershwin-drenched comic drama grossed nearly $40 million, Allen's biggest hit up to this point, and was hailed as another triumph — by everyone but Allen himself.

I was so disappointed when I saw my final cut, I thought, If this is as good as I can do at this point, I shouldn't be making films. I went to United Artists and said, ''Look, don't put this out. I'll make another film, no charge.'' They thought I was nuts. And it was a very, very big hit. Audiences don't have the same criteria I do. They say, Okay, you had some grandiose idea and maybe you failed, but we like this film. So once again, I shut up and just felt I got away with it. I got off with my life.

STARDUST MEMORIES 1980
The most polarizing film of Allen's career concerns a successful director, played by Allen, whose midlife crisis plays out across a surreal, Fellini-esque canvas. Many were angered by the film's bitter, mocking portrayal of critics and moviegoers as sycophants and vulgarians.

I certainly did not think my audience was stupid or grotesque, the way they seemed to be portrayed in the movie. I never had those thoughts — and if I did, I was much too smart to express them. I had an idea about an artist who had everything in the world and still couldn't beat his sense of mortality — that's all that was interesting to me. But it was not taken that way. It was taken as an act of hostility. I've played the part of the neurotic so intensely and so often, when a movie like Stardust Memories comes out, it's very hard for audiences to separate [me from the character]. Chaplin could put on the little tramp's hat, but I go on the screen like this, so they make the assumption that I'm that guy. But it's not me. A few months after the movie came out, John Lennon was murdered. In my movie, I show that exactly: The relationship between the audience and the entertainer is very often a kind of worship but also homicidal. I felt I had a good insight into that world.

HANNAH AND HER SISTERS 1986
This novelistic look at the tangled lives and loves of three Manhattan sisters earned over $40 million, topping Manhattan as Allen's biggest-grossing film. But in his mind, it didn't come out the way he had intended.

I had written a different ending that was not as upbeat: Michael Caine's character is still hopelessly in love with [his wife] Hannah's sister, who has married another guy because he couldn't bring himself to act, and he's stuck with Hannah and it's going to be a nothing marriage. And I shot that ending. But when I looked at it, it was like the picture dropped off the table. It was negative — and not like a good, Chekhovian negative, it was an inept negative, a downer. So I guided the thing instinctively to an ending where all the characters came out happy, and the picture was very successful. But I never felt positive about it. I felt I had a very poignant idea, but finally couldn't bring it home.

CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS 1989
One of Allen's most deft balancing acts of comedy and drama juxtaposes a morality play about a prominent ophthalmologist (Martin Landau) who plots to murder his mistress, with a comic story featuring Allen as a struggling filmmaker.

For me, the interesting story was Marty Landau's story, and as I was putting that picture together, I so regretted that I had my story in there. I thought, My God, if I had made this film just about Marty and his predicament, it would have been so much of a better movie. As soon as I put myself in the picture, I felt that it ratcheted down in substance instantly, because I can only play a clown, a joker. I'm always seduced by serious stuff. I wish my gift in life had been Tennessee Williams' gift or Ingmar Bergman's or Eugene O'Neill's. It wasn't — my strong point was comedy. Comedy can never go as deep, by its very nature; when a situation becomes tense, you make a joke and it relieves it. These are just personal feelings of mine. Other people don't feel that way.

HUSBANDS AND WIVES 1992
Allen's most caustic look at relationships in crisis hit theaters as his personal troubles were exploding in the press, bringing his decade-plus-long on-screen and offscreen partnership with Farrow to a crashing end.

The movie had no relation to my life in any way. But when it came out, my private life was all over the headlines. I could always work under stress, though. Whenever things go bad, the two things I've always been able to do are lose myself in work and lose myself in sleep. Work has always been a lifesaver. I can immerse myself in the problems of the second-act finale and avoid having to face the problems that are really unpleasant and that I can't deal with.

SWEET AND LOWDOWN 1999
Sean Penn and Samantha Morton earned Oscar nominations for this bittersweet period piece about a callously self-absorbed jazz guitarist who is as reprehensible in his life as he is brilliant in his art.

I liked that movie — it was one of the ones, like The Purple Rose of Cairo [1985] or Husbands and Wives, that came out very much the way I wanted it to. I had that idea almost from the start of my career, around the time of Bananas [1971], and I was going to play the guitar player. I went to United Artists and they said, ''We assumed you were going to do comedies when we signed this contract.'' So I took it back and two weeks later I gave them Bananas. Years later, I rewrote it for Sean. When I was younger, I could have played it, but I never would have brought to it Sean's acting skill and his tortured persona.

MATCH POINT 2005
Critics are hailing Allen's latest as a comeback, but in his mind, he's never gone anywhere.

I had the idea for a while to do a murder story where the murderer kills the victim's next-door neighbor so it looks like the other murder was just in passing, to deflect the police. Then when I made the guy a tennis player, the metaphor came of getting the bounce one way or the other, and the thing evolved from there. People impute to it calculation and going in a different direction and ''this is what's happening in his private life so he does this or that.'' None of that ever enters into it remotely. I just sit in a room or walk the streets in New York and think, Gee, what should I do next? It's always just by sheer chance. I could make 10 movies in a row that would be as serious as Interiors or as light as Small Time Crooks. There's no way of me knowing. I'm just happy to get any ideas.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on December 19, 2005, 02:10:10 AM
Woody Allen is mediocre and makes miserable films: Woody Allen

In his trademark pessimistic style, US cinema legend Woody Allen said he is a "mediocre" director of "miserable work".

"I've disappointed myself most of the time," the New Yorker told BBC television, rejecting claims he is a film artist.

In London for the world premiere of his new film "Match Point", set in the British capital, Allen said: "People think I'm an intellectual because I wear glasses and they think I'm an artist because my films lose money".

Allen's movies have often been better received in Europe than in America but he said he was grateful for any US acclaim as it would have overlooked his "glaring faults and miserable work".

"I'm one of the smallest money making Academy Award winners in history," the 70-year-old said, referring to his Oscars for "Annie Hall" in 1977 and "Hannah and Her Sisters" in 1986.

"My relationship with the American audience is exactly the same as it has always been: they never came to see my films, and they don't come now.

"I've often said that the only thing standing between me and greatness is me," he mused.

Summing up his giant filmography as "mediocre", Allen said "Match Point", "Husbands and Wives" (1992) and "The Purple Rose of Cairo" (1985) were "three films of mine that are good films. Those are good films by anybody's standards".

Allen claimed he had led a pretty dull, middle-class life.

"I was married a couple of times. I'm not a dope addict, I don't drink. I'm not really a neurotic," he said.

He touched on his love of playing the clarinet.

"I'm a terrible clarinet player. But I play with my heart. I don't have a great ear for music," he said.

"It thrills me and it amazes me" that people turn up to watch his band, he said.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on January 02, 2006, 06:44:08 PM
Allen, Mediapro team for Spanish pic
Source: Hollywood Reporter

MADRID -- Woody Allen has signed on to shoot a film with Spanish production house Mediapro in 2007, the Barcelona-based producer said Monday. Allen will write and direct the English-language script that will use international and Spanish actors and is expected to shoot in the first half of 2007. No other details were immediately available. "I'm happy to be able to work with Mediapro and make a film in Spain," Allen said in a statement released by the production house. "I hope that I'll be able to enjoy my stay in Spain, a country that has become very special to me." In recent years, Mediapro produced Oliver Stone's "Comandante," along with Isabel Coixet's "The Secret Life of Words" and Fernando Leon's "Mondays in the Sun."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on April 04, 2006, 11:22:50 PM
Williams packs for Paris with Allen film role
Source: Hollywood Reporter

Michelle Williams has signed on to star in Woody Allen's untitled Paris-set movie. It is Williams' first role since her Oscar-nominated turn in "Brokeback Mountain."

Like most of Allen's movies, story details are being kept under wraps, though it is understood to focus on young Americans in the City of Lights. Production begins in the summer.
 
Written and directed by Allen, the movie is being produced by Letty Aronson, Stephen Tenenbaum and Gareth Wiley. Vincent Maraval, Benjamin Waisbren and Daniel Wuhrmann are exec producing.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on April 05, 2006, 12:08:18 AM
jesus christ, the mans a machine
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on April 11, 2006, 11:12:02 PM
Krumholtz's number up for Allen pic
Source: Hollywood Reporter

David Krumholtz, star of CBS' "Numbers," has signed on to star opposite Michelle Williams in Woody Allen's untitled Paris-set movie.

Like most of Allen's movies, story details are being kept under wraps, though it is understood to focus on a trio of young Americans in the City of Lights. Production begins in the summer.
 
Written and directed by Allen, the movie is being produced by Letty Aronson, Stephen Tenenbaum and Gareth Wiley. Vincent Maraval, Benjamin Waisbren and Daniel Wuhrmann are exec producing.

The movie is being co-produced and distributed by Virtual Films and Wild Bunch, with On Pictures taking distribution rights for Spain and TF1 having distribution rights for France.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on April 18, 2006, 07:31:14 PM
Woody was Just Kidding About That Whole Paris Thing

Oops. Michelle Williams? David Krumholtz? Cancel those Paris plane tickets, and never mind about that job. Look at this way -- now, instead of counting your money and adding "Starred in a Woody Allen movie" to your list of accomplishments, you can go look for work! Ah, the struggles of life in Hollywood. It turns out, you see, that Allen's mysterious (the people at Variety are hilariously pleased with themselves for uncovering the fact that it was going to be about "Americans in Gaul." Gee, ya think?) Paris project isn't actually, um, happening any more. According to elusive insiders, the budget was getting out of control, so Woody just punted and ran back to London, his new favorite city in all the world.

Now, instead of filming in Paris, Allen is going to shoot a third film in London (Match Point was filmed there, as was the upcoming Scoop) before heading off to Spain next year, where he has already agreed to mount a production.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on April 19, 2006, 06:06:31 PM
Stardust Memories
Woody Allen on his prolific career -- The ''Match Point'' director revisits the highlights of career
by Josh Rottenberg, Entertainment Weekly
 
Stepping gingerly into an elegantly appointed hotel suite in Beverly Hills, shoulders slouched, eyes casing the room, Woody Allen looks a little out of his element. No surprise: This is the man who raised feeling uncomfortable — in social settings, in love, in a cold and godless universe — to an art form, and, as anyone familiar with his life and work knows, Los Angeles is not exactly his turf. As the Brooklyn-bred filmmaker quipped in his 1977 masterpiece Annie Hall, Los Angeles is ''a city where the only cultural advantage is that you can make a right turn on a red light.''

Settling into a sofa, Allen says he enjoys visiting L.A., ''but I could never live here. I need a more close-packed city. And I don't like the sunshine.''

But Allen has been straying outside his comfort zone more and more lately. Even as his films have struggled to find an audience, he has entered into new partnerships, like a three-picture deal with DreamWorks from 2000 to 2002, that step up the pressure on him to at least break even at the box office. In 2001, he split with his longtime friend and producer Jean Doumanian in a bitter legal battle. The next year, he stunned audiences by making his first-ever appearance at the Academy Awards — in a tuxedo, no less.

His new film, Match Point — his 36th — represents another unexpected turn. Filmed in England, with a mainly British cast, it's a straight-up Hitchcockian thriller: the story of a social-climbing tennis pro (Jonathan Rhys Meyers) who dives into a passionate, ill-fated affair with his brother-in-law's fiancée (Scarlett Johansson). Since debuting at the Cannes film festival — where Allen walked the red carpet and did his best to smile for the cameras — Match Point, in limited release Dec. 28, has been heralded as a return to form for the director and earned a Golden Globe nomination for Best Drama.

Allen seems wary of the buzz. ''People like to talk,'' he says dismissively. The reality is, after 50-plus years in show business, he's heard it all. He's been hailed as a comic genius and attacked as a self-indulgent narcissist. His films have been celebrated as cultural events (Annie Hall, Manhattan, the list goes on) and panned or, worse, ignored (September, Anything Else, that list goes on as well). His persona as the neurotic Everyman made him an unlikely folk hero, while his offscreen life — most notably the revelation in 1992 of his affair with his current wife Soon-Yi Previn, the adopted daughter of his longtime girlfriend and cinematic muse Mia Farrow — brought scorn from some quarters. Allen says he tunes out the background din of acclaim, disdain, and everything in between: ''Even when I'm embraced, I'm not embraced warmly. It doesn't matter to me.''

Earlier this month, Allen turned 70. He's a little hard of hearing and moves more slowly than he used to. Yet he keeps plugging away, making a film a year with a regularity you can set a watch to. His parents lived to be 93 and 100, and with his next comedy, Scoop, already in the can, he shows no signs of stopping.
 
This constant forward motion (''like a shark,'' to quote Annie Hall again) means Allen doesn't look back much. But today, he offers ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY a rare opportunity to revisit some of the highlights of his legendary career. Seen through his famous thick-framed and far-from-rose-colored glasses, it seems the hits and misses are sometimes one and the same.

TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN 1969
Having won fame as a stand-up comic, Allen had transitioned into films as a writer and actor with What's New, Pussycat?, What's Up, Tiger Lily?, and Casino Royale. Still honing his comedic style, he made a promising solo directorial debut with this madcap mockumentary about a hapless would-be criminal.

I felt I was ready to direct, but the people in my corner said, ''People will resent it. They'll think, Who is this guy?'' So I tried to get Jerry Lewis, because I thought he was quite a good comedy director, and he agreed to direct it. But we couldn't work it out with the studio, and Jerry went off to do something else. Then this new company, Palomar Pictures, formed, and they were willing to take a chance on me. The picture was very well received critically, but two or three years after it came out, they had still not broken even. I knew I was not destined to be a cash cow. But even when I was a cabaret comic, I always had a tough time getting an audience. They'd book me into Caesars Palace in Las Vegas and they'd have half a house. By the third night, the head waiters would be pulling the potted plants in so they could make the space much smaller for the audience.

SLEEPER 1973
A nonstop Orgasmatron of inspired silliness, this futuristic Rip Van Winkle comedy displayed Allen's growing storytelling skill, though the difficulties of creating the world of 2173 (giant bananas and all) forced him to pour his salary into reshoots. Most important, the film showcased his comedic chemistry with a young actress named Diane Keaton, with whom he had been romantically involved.

Marshall Brickman and I wanted to write a movie that wasn't just gag-gag-gag. I was good at writing gags, but to write a story with a real plot and real characters — that was much harder. I was used to working as a comic, where if you don't hear the laughs for 60 seconds, it's disconcerting. I had a small budget, and I was working in the future, so every car had to be built, every costume had to be designed. Fortunately, my costume designer was Joel Schumacher. He had, like, a $10,000 budget to do all the costumes, but he was brilliant and inventive and he did it.

I knew Diane very well. I had done a play with her, Play It Again, Sam, we had lived together, and we were very close. I just felt she had a limitless comic talent. I've always felt that the two great movie comediennes of all time were Judy Holliday and Diane Keaton.

ANNIE HALL 1977
Allen's artistic breakthrough had a difficult birth. In its two-hour-and-30-minute rough cut, the film (originally titled Anhedonia) was a formless collection of comic bits and pieces. After extensive and ruthless editing, the 93-minute film that emerged would become one of the most iconic romantic comedies in Hollywood history. Audiences didn't just love it — they luhrved it, they luffed it, and the film earned Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, and Best Actress for Keaton. Allen, however, was a no-show at the Oscars.

The movie was originally supposed to be what my character was thinking, in a not really coherent fashion. It was this abstract experimental idea of my mind at work, and the relationship was one big part of it, but there were many other parts. And I shot it that way. But when Marshall Brickman saw the first cut, he said, ''I wrote it with you and even I can't follow it.'' So we restructured it and reshot the ending many times. I was able to find the love story, and audiences were charmed by it beyond my expectations. I didn't save outtakes or any of that stuff. I'm not a big nostalgia person.

They gave the Oscars out Monday evenings in those days. I always played clarinet with my jazz band on Monday evenings, and it was something I always looked forward to. I don't like to fly. I don't like to get into a tuxedo. So I'm not going to suddenly cancel my band and fly to California. People made a big deal out of that, but I don't write movies to win awards.

INTERIORS 1978
Allen's abrupt turn toward drama with this somber, Bergmanesque portrait of a family falling apart brought him his first major critical drubbing.

I didn't see it coming. There were people who loved it, and there were other people who thought I was committing a crime: I was in bad faith, I had violated my contract with the audience. I didn't feel it was fair. I thought I should be able to try something, even if I made the worst film in the world. After Interiors I knew there would be consequences if I tried to make that kind of film again. But I did it. Because the alternative is letting other people tell you exactly what to do in your career. Maybe they're even right, but, you know, it's hard to live that way.

MANHATTAN 1979
A wistfully romantic ode to Allen's hometown and an indelible portrait of angsty urbanites in search of love, this gorgeously shot, Gershwin-drenched comic drama grossed nearly $40 million, Allen's biggest hit up to this point, and was hailed as another triumph — by everyone but Allen himself.

I was so disappointed when I saw my final cut, I thought, If this is as good as I can do at this point, I shouldn't be making films. I went to United Artists and said, ''Look, don't put this out. I'll make another film, no charge.'' They thought I was nuts. And it was a very, very big hit. Audiences don't have the same criteria I do. They say, Okay, you had some grandiose idea and maybe you failed, but we like this film. So once again, I shut up and just felt I got away with it. I got off with my life.

STARDUST MEMORIES 1980
The most polarizing film of Allen's career concerns a successful director, played by Allen, whose midlife crisis plays out across a surreal, Fellini-esque canvas. Many were angered by the film's bitter, mocking portrayal of critics and moviegoers as sycophants and vulgarians.

I certainly did not think my audience was stupid or grotesque, the way they seemed to be portrayed in the movie. I never had those thoughts — and if I did, I was much too smart to express them. I had an idea about an artist who had everything in the world and still couldn't beat his sense of mortality — that's all that was interesting to me. But it was not taken that way. It was taken as an act of hostility. I've played the part of the neurotic so intensely and so often, when a movie like Stardust Memories comes out, it's very hard for audiences to separate [me from the character]. Chaplin could put on the little tramp's hat, but I go on the screen like this, so they make the assumption that I'm that guy. But it's not me. A few months after the movie came out, John Lennon was murdered. In my movie, I show that exactly: The relationship between the audience and the entertainer is very often a kind of worship but also homicidal. I felt I had a good insight into that world.

HANNAH AND HER SISTERS 1986
This novelistic look at the tangled lives and loves of three Manhattan sisters earned over $40 million, topping Manhattan as Allen's biggest-grossing film. But in his mind, it didn't come out the way he had intended.

I had written a different ending that was not as upbeat: Michael Caine's character is still hopelessly in love with [his wife] Hannah's sister, who has married another guy because he couldn't bring himself to act, and he's stuck with Hannah and it's going to be a nothing marriage. And I shot that ending. But when I looked at it, it was like the picture dropped off the table. It was negative — and not like a good, Chekhovian negative, it was an inept negative, a downer. So I guided the thing instinctively to an ending where all the characters came out happy, and the picture was very successful. But I never felt positive about it. I felt I had a very poignant idea, but finally couldn't bring it home.

CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS 1989
One of Allen's most deft balancing acts of comedy and drama juxtaposes a morality play about a prominent ophthalmologist (Martin Landau) who plots to murder his mistress, with a comic story featuring Allen as a struggling filmmaker.

For me, the interesting story was Marty Landau's story, and as I was putting that picture together, I so regretted that I had my story in there. I thought, My God, if I had made this film just about Marty and his predicament, it would have been so much of a better movie. As soon as I put myself in the picture, I felt that it ratcheted down in substance instantly, because I can only play a clown, a joker. I'm always seduced by serious stuff. I wish my gift in life had been Tennessee Williams' gift or Ingmar Bergman's or Eugene O'Neill's. It wasn't — my strong point was comedy. Comedy can never go as deep, by its very nature; when a situation becomes tense, you make a joke and it relieves it. These are just personal feelings of mine. Other people don't feel that way.

HUSBANDS AND WIVES 1992
Allen's most caustic look at relationships in crisis hit theaters as his personal troubles were exploding in the press, bringing his decade-plus-long on-screen and offscreen partnership with Farrow to a crashing end.

The movie had no relation to my life in any way. But when it came out, my private life was all over the headlines. I could always work under stress, though. Whenever things go bad, the two things I've always been able to do are lose myself in work and lose myself in sleep. Work has always been a lifesaver. I can immerse myself in the problems of the second-act finale and avoid having to face the problems that are really unpleasant and that I can't deal with.

SWEET AND LOWDOWN 1999
Sean Penn and Samantha Morton earned Oscar nominations for this bittersweet period piece about a callously self-absorbed jazz guitarist who is as reprehensible in his life as he is brilliant in his art.

I liked that movie — it was one of the ones, like The Purple Rose of Cairo [1985] or Husbands and Wives, that came out very much the way I wanted it to. I had that idea almost from the start of my career, around the time of Bananas [1971], and I was going to play the guitar player. I went to United Artists and they said, ''We assumed you were going to do comedies when we signed this contract.'' So I took it back and two weeks later I gave them Bananas. Years later, I rewrote it for Sean. When I was younger, I could have played it, but I never would have brought to it Sean's acting skill and his tortured persona.

MATCH POINT 2005
Critics are hailing Allen's latest as a comeback, but in his mind, he's never gone anywhere.

I had the idea for a while to do a murder story where the murderer kills the victim's next-door neighbor so it looks like the other murder was just in passing, to deflect the police. Then when I made the guy a tennis player, the metaphor came of getting the bounce one way or the other, and the thing evolved from there. People impute to it calculation and going in a different direction and ''this is what's happening in his private life so he does this or that.'' None of that ever enters into it remotely. I just sit in a room or walk the streets in New York and think, Gee, what should I do next? It's always just by sheer chance. I could make 10 movies in a row that would be as serious as Interiors or as light as Small Time Crooks. There's no way of me knowing. I'm just happy to get any ideas.


Nice to see the man looking back on his career even if only for talking shit about his own work. It's funny how he hates "Manhattan", probably the best movie ever made...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ©brad on April 19, 2006, 09:42:07 PM
was it necessary to quote that whole thing?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Jannemanneman on April 20, 2006, 03:01:44 AM
was it necessary to quote that whole thing?
I guess it was..  :ponder:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: polkablues on April 20, 2006, 03:42:09 AM
Now, instead of filming in Paris, Allen is going to shoot a third film in London (Match Point was filmed there, as was the upcoming Scoop) before heading off to Spain next year, where he has already agreed to mount a production.

Woody Allen's career is turning into the last five seasons of the Simpsons.  "This week, Woody goes to India... with hilarious results!"
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on April 20, 2006, 04:34:27 AM
was it necessary to quote that whole thing?

Yes.

Quote from: MacGuffin
Woody Allen's career is turning into the last five seasons of the Simpsons.  "This week, Woody goes to India... with hilarious results!"

 :lol:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on April 20, 2006, 10:54:01 AM
was it necessary to quote that whole thing?
I guess it was..  :ponder:

introduce yourself (http://xixax.com/index.php?topic=2.570) before posting again.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: samsong on May 11, 2006, 05:47:32 PM
i really love Sweet and Lowdown.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: polkablues on May 11, 2006, 06:41:17 PM
And I like pie, but I don't spontaneously post about it.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: godardian on May 11, 2006, 07:04:20 PM
i really love Sweet and Lowdown.

This is a spontaneous post, but I agree it's worth saying. It was probably his last really up-to-par film until Match Point (though I certainly thought Melinda and Melinda found Woody getting back on track).

As an aside, there's a girl who looks a lot like Samantha Morton who works in the Italian gourmet-goods shop in my neighborhood. When I said this to her, she had no idea who Morton was.  :yabbse-sad: I demanded she rent up Morvern Callar post-haste.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: eward on May 11, 2006, 11:35:05 PM
it really saddens me that more people dont like small time crooks.  and fuck melinda and melinda.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on May 12, 2006, 08:18:41 AM
people don't like it because it's terrible.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Fernando on May 12, 2006, 11:18:15 AM
I'm not one of those ppl, I love small time crooks and as a matter of fact is one of my fave flims of his, I know that it isn't among his best work but I really like it, and the same goes to The Curse of the Jade Scorpion.

As for Sweet and Lowdown, that I say is among his best work without a doubt, and visually is also amazing.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: godardian on May 12, 2006, 12:51:03 PM
If I had to choose between Sweet and Lowdown and Small Time Crooks, I would choose the former. But that doesn't mean I thought Small Time Crooks was a bad movie; in fact, I quite enjoyed it at the time, assuming it was a little dessert movie, Woody giving himself a little break and keeping his body of work diverse.

I think the really steep drop-off point was Curse of the Jade Scorpion. Now that is a bad movie. It may be my least favorite of all of his.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: samsong on May 12, 2006, 01:41:48 PM
but do you really love pie?  exactly.

i like Small Time Crooks, too.  it's funny.  tracy ullman? ELAINE MAY?! gold.  it's inconsequential, sure, but it's also harmless and endearing and a lot of fun to watch. 
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: polkablues on May 12, 2006, 07:50:57 PM
Small Time Crooks had a very funny first half, and a very boring and unfunny second half. 

Maybe it was Woody's homage to Full Metal Jacket, I don't know.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on May 12, 2006, 09:00:08 PM
Small Time Crooks had a very funny first half, and a very boring and unfunny second half. 

Maybe it was Woody's homage to Full Metal Jacket, I don't know.
jesus, first HULK and now this.

---------------------best taste in everything---------------------------------------------------------

[polkas former ranking]























--------------rags on HULK, FMJ, likes Family Guy, thinks Thrindle is a good catch-----------------

[polka's current standing]



















--------------------------------point of no return---------------------------------

[soon, when he confesses his belief that Orlando Whom is the greatest, most charismatic leading man of our time]
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: polkablues on May 13, 2006, 01:28:36 AM
Seriously, I just said that 'cause I knew it would set you off.  I like Full Metal Jacket.

But let's look at this critically... Hulk: as good as most of that movie was, you gotta admit it ended ridiculously.  Family Guy: lots of perfectly reasonable people like Family Guy.  Just don't make me try and name any of them.  Thrindle: crazy Canadian girl who knows where her G-spot is.  I'm batting 1.000 so far.

And for your information, I would defend Orlando Bloom vehemently, if I could remember any moment of any performance I've ever seen him in...

But let's get back to Small Time Crooks, about which my taste is inarguable.  Here's a short synopsis of the film:
 :yabbse-smiley:  :-D  :lol:  :rofl:  :yabbse-cheesy:  :?  :yabbse-undecided:  :yabbse-tongue:  :roll:  :sleeping:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on May 17, 2006, 11:15:06 AM
Colin Farrell starring in Woody Allen's next?

Woody Allen has signed a typically A-grade cast, including Colin Farrell, Tom Wilkinson and Ewan McGregor, to headline his next – characteristically, untitled still – movie.

The film, set to be shot in the U.K, was quickly hobbled together after Allen’s Paris-set project, which was set to star Michelle Williams and David Krumholtz, fell apart at the seams.

According to the ABC, the project will shoot in the Summer. It’s Allen’s third film to be shot in London, following the critically acclaimed “Match Point”, and the upcoming “Scoop”.

More details when they come to hand.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Just Withnail on May 18, 2006, 06:58:39 AM
Tom Wilkinson and Ewan McGregor starring in Woody Allen's next?

Cool
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: godardian on May 18, 2006, 09:43:31 AM
Tom Wilkinson and Ewan McGregor starring in Woody Allen's next?

Cool

That is pretty cool, but I was excited about Michelle Williams and am still getting over my disappointment.  :violin:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on May 25, 2006, 09:19:18 PM
Woody Allen Loses Fight Over Movie Editing

Woody Allen, in another legal fight with two former friends and producers he accused of cheating him out of $12 million, has lost a skirmish over what versions of six of his movies will be shown on television and in airplanes.

State Supreme Court Justice Bernard Fried ruled that terms of a settlement of a lawsuit Allen filed against Jean Doumanian, his former producer and friend of 30 years, allow her to develop the television and in-flight versions of "Bullets over Broadway," "Mighty Aphrodite," "Everyone Says I Love You," "Deconstructing Harry," "Celebrity" and "Sweet and Lowdown."

The fight over the modified versions stems from the 2001 lawsuit Allen filed against Doumanian, Jacqui Safra, her personal and professional partner, and their production company, Sweetland Films.

Allen, 70, alleged that Doumanian and Safra refused to give him an earnings report for eight films, including the six currently in dispute, and had cheated him out of as much as $12 million.

After a nine-day trial in 2002, the parties settled the lawsuit without revealing the terms of their agreement.

But the judge's decision, made public Thursday, said one settlement provision says that if the parties disagree over how to edit Allen's films to meet television standards the matter would be submitted to Manhattan's state Supreme Court for resolution.

They sent the matter to the court in 2004 after Allen objected to Doumanian's cuts and her decision to replace words rather than bleeping them out. But the judge agreed with Doumanian, who had argued that television networks generally did not accept Allen's approach.

Allen's lawyer, Michael Zweig, said the filmmaker had not decided whether to appeal.

"We now respectfully disagree with Judge Fried's decision and believe that, in any case, any future effort by the producers to modify the films will not, in the long run, prove attractive or commercially viable," Zweig said.

Doumanian's lawyer, Stephen Hayes, referred calls to publicist Dan Klores, who was not immediately available for comment.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on June 20, 2006, 03:36:27 PM
EXCLUSIVE: Woody Allen Stops To Smell the "Books"
Source: TMZ.com

Alejandro Agresti's "The Lake House" opens nationwide this weekend, reuniting Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock, so we thought it a good time to catch up with the fascinating Argentinian emigre director at home in Holland.

When I rang him up at his home in Holland this morning, Agresti was still a bit jetlagged from the American premiere of the film in L.A. But not so tired that he couldn't share with me some exciting news about his next film, "The Scent of Books.": Based on his novel of the same name, it's about three writers, now in their 60s, who receive an inheritance of 20,000 rare, first edition books from their mentor. And, TMZ is happy to be the first to report, both Woody Allen and Christopher Plummer are in negotiations to star as two of the writers. If scheduling proves workable, it will be the first film Allen stars in but doesn't direct in fifteen years, back when he starred in Paul Mazursky's "Scenes from a Mall." (Allen's newest directing and acting effort, "Scoop" premieres at the Venice Film Festival in late August, which felicitiously puts him in Europe for a September start to principal photography on "Books".) Both Cillian Murphy ("Red Eye") and Jason Biggs ("American Pie") are also in negotiations to star as the younger selves of two of the once-idealistic novelists.

"I'm interested in how memory distorts things, how we sometimes we so radically change that we become traitors to our own ideas," explains Agresti, "but inside yourself, you still have this forgotten person. These characters try, without a map, to go and find that (forgotten) person."

It's a feeling that Agresti is familiar with. The son of an Italian father and a Czech mother, he was born in Argentina and came of age during the military coup of the late 1970's, when Eva Peron was forced from power and replaced by an economically incompetent, politically corrupt and dissident-murdering military regime.

"It bore a certain similarity to Nazi Germany," says Agresti, "in that most of the people were happy with these sons-of-bitches, but today, everyone says they were against them."

Like thousands of other Argentinians, Agresti lost close friends and lovers who were "disappeared" into political prisons and often mass graves reserved for those who spoke out against the junta. Then-members of the young communists federation, both his girlfriend and several close friends were hunted down and "disappeared" by the government. At the age of 20, he fled for Europe, determined to make films.

After arriving in Paris, Agresti was told he could couch-surf at a friend's place "anytime." When he showed up, however, the friend was on holiday for two weeks, and Agresti spent the next ten days sleeping in a Parisian phone booth.

"I had this huge bag with all the rushes from my 16mm movie, which I used as a kind of mattress at night," recalls Agresti, "but during the day, you don't, you don't know what to do, so you just keep walking. It was so heavy, about 80 pounds of film, but what impelled me was a kind of revenge for everything that happened (back home.) I thought of showing it in festivals, of meeting great directors. I was dreaming, of course."

Today, Agresti is rubbing elbows with great directors, and though he has the acceptance of Hollywood, he's not so eager to return its embrace. "The Scent of Books," while attracting a top-flight cast, isn't a project that Agresti is keen to make with an American studio. Agresti says he's taking the money he made from "The Lake House" and using part of it to make his next movie, with the help of the same Dutch financier who financed his 2000 art house hit, "Valentin."

"It's difficult to work with a studio on every project, because there's always 'an intervention' about things, a committee full of people with notes. It's difficult to work with a studio when you wrote the novel, wrote the script, and are going to direct it yourself," he pauses, laughing, "But they can buy it when we're done!"
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on June 22, 2006, 05:21:09 PM
Allen Picks Female Lead; No One Has Heard of Her

In a report that surfaced first in European publication Screen Daily, it's been revealed that the female lead in Woody Allen's next film is the little-known Brit Hayley Atwell.

Atwell has done some stage work and also starred in the BBC's The Line Of Beauty; though she's currently filming a pair of new BBC projects, her only major exposure so far seems to have come from that show. That, however, didn't stop Screen International (the parent publication of Screen Daily, which explains the latter's glee at the news) from naming the girl one of their "Stars of Tomorrow" earlier this year. For his part, Allen is fully stoked to have Atwell in his film, and has told the press that he is "going to present her so [we] can see what [he is] talking about." He wants all of us, you see, to "Share [his] enjoyment of her."

The movie, which also stars Ewan McGregor, Colin Farrell and Tom Wilkinson, is about "two brothers with financial problems who are persuaded by a third party to turn to a life of crime;" it will shoot in London this summer.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on July 25, 2006, 11:29:03 PM
Woody Allen's iTunes playlist
Source: Hollywood Wiretap
 
Here's list of what Woody's listening to, with his commentary:

1. "Blue Horizon," Sidney Bechet: "There are so many great recordings by Sidney Bechet. I could do the whole list just on him. Resisting the temptation, I picked one. A perfect blues."

2. "Burgundy Street Blues," George Lewis: "George Lewis is the New Orleans clarinetist with the miraculous, angelic sound. There are many versions of this great blues and I could have picked any of them, but this one is well-recorded."

3. "Origainal Jelly Roll Blues," Jelly Roll Morton: "Arguably, the greatest traditional jazz recordings made. There are a number of them each greater than the last - I picked this one..."

4. "The Pearls," Jelly Roll Morton: "...and for my next choice, the same group playing 'The Pearls.' "

5. "Coronet Chop Suey," Louis Armstrong: "In the movie 'Manhattan,' I chose 'Potato Head Blues' to represent Louis Armstrong, so I thought I'd pick another unbelieveably great trumpet record."

6. "Shine," Louis Armstrong: "This is an example of Louis as soloist with a big band. Amazing as usual and worth it just for the end part.

7. "Over the Rainbow," Bud Powell: "Hands down, the greatest of all jazz piano players. Dark chords, troubled, very deep."

8. "A Night in Tunisia," Bud Powell: "An uptempo tune that shows how astonishing he was."

9. "Just You, Just Me," Thelonious Monk: "Monk is one of a kind and there are so many recordings he made that are fabulous that I could have picked others just as easily."

10. "Koko," Charlie Parker: "Like Sidney Bechet, you could pick nothing but Charlie Parker's great sides so I chose one rather than 100 others just as great."

11. "Giant Steps," John Coltrane: "I could have picked something by Stan Getz, the unbelievably great Sonny Rollins, Albert Burbank of New Orleans, Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, or a tune called 'Lonely Woman' by Ornette Coleman, but with one slot open I had to pick John Coltrane playing 'Giant Steps' because it's so amazing and changed the direction of jazz."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on July 26, 2006, 08:19:20 AM
what, no wagner?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pozer on July 26, 2006, 02:06:29 PM
what, no nin?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on July 26, 2006, 02:12:55 PM
woody allen listens to jazz?!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on August 11, 2006, 12:18:41 PM
Judge Awards $95,000 to Woody Allen

Woody Allen has been awarded $95,000 in legal fees in a dispute with his former producer.

State Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Bernard Fried on Thursday ordered Jean Doumanian, Allen's former producer and friend of 30 years, to pay the sum to Allen's Moses Productions.

The two clashed earlier this year over how to edit Allen's films to meet television standards.
 
The judge ordered the producer to pay Allen $48,000 in legal fees, and held Doumanian's production company, Sweetland Films, in contempt for failing to put money in escrow. Fried ordered Sweetland to pay Allen another $47,000 in fees.

In May 2001, Allen had filed a lawsuit charging Doumanian and Jacqui Safra, her personal and professional partner, had cheated him out of $12 million from six movies. The parties settled the dispute in 2002 for an undisclosed sum.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on August 22, 2006, 03:10:23 PM
Woody Allen’s Wild Bunch production ends
Source: Cineuropa

Filming on a new, yet untitled film by Woody Allen, co-financed by French sales outfit Wild Bunch and US-based Virtual Films, is currently wrapping up in London.

Starring Colin Farrell, Ewan McGregor, Hayley Atwell, Sally Hawkins, Mark Umbers and Tom Wilkinson, the "Untitled Woody Allen Summer Project" – the New York director’s third consecutive feature to be set in London after Match Point and Scoop – is the story of two Cockney brothers in south London (Farrell and McGregor) who buy and restore a boat. A young woman (Atwell) who lands in London on her search for fortune crosses the two men by accident on her path.

When McGregor’s character falls in love with her, she becomes aware of her power to attract the opposite sex and uses this to the point of leading the two brothers, who are in financial difficulty, into crime, and creating a dangerous rivalry between the two men.

The seven-week shoot, which began on July 10, is now drawing to a close, with the team and Hungarian veteran and three-time Oscar nominated DoP Vilmos Zsigmond having travelled from Brighton to London (Studios Ealing) for filming.

The €13m budget film, which includes investment from TF1 Films Production and was substituted last spring for a too ambitious Parisian project, has already been pre-sold by Wild Bunch to almost all international territories.

An increasingly important player in the film industry, with the production of the "Untitled Woody Allen Summer Project" the French company has passed yet another milestone in its development and reinforces its credibility as a partner for ambitious projects, including US films.

Slated for next spring, the film’s theatrical release could be preceded by a premiere at the 2007 Cannes Film Festival before Allen heads to Spain for the summer to shoot a new feature produced by MediaPro.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on August 25, 2006, 10:14:32 AM
Details on Woody Allen's Spanish Project
Source: Variety

Woody Allen's Spanish project is set to start filming after he completes his third London movie. The pic will be set in Barcelona and star English-speaking actors who play foreigners in the Spanish city. The drama will turn on a love entanglement.

The movie will be produced by Mediapro and Gravier Productions, the company of Allen's sister Letty Aronson, his longtime producer.

Allen signed with Spanish production house Mediapro in December to shoot the film next summer, using international and Spanish actors.

Allen will write the script after he finishes editing his latest London movie, which follows last year's Match Point and Scoop, released this summer.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: godardian on September 26, 2006, 03:53:04 PM
So I finally saw Scoop a while back. Kind of the light counterpart to Match Point (hardly an original thought, I know, but it was my perception). Scarlett and Hugh have to be the hottest couple in any of Allen's films. They're both quite beautiful people, and for me, that added an extra sizzle to the proceedings. Anyway, I enjoyed it, but I hope he will return to more serious stuff like Match Point soon. It's listed as a "drama" on IMDB, but we never know until it's done....
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: gob on October 11, 2006, 03:51:59 PM
Only recently saw "Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Sex But Were Afraid to Ask'' and I can safely say that Gene Wilder's performance in 'What Is Sodomy?' is one of my favourites of all time.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on February 02, 2007, 01:14:32 PM
Woody Allen’s Next Star: Penelope Cruz
Source: Fox News

We should have known it would happen. I think I can tell you exclusively that Penelope Cruz, the hottest star going right now, is set to headline Woody Allen’s next project.

The untitled comedy-drama will film all summer in Barcelona, where Allen will move his family and crew.

Woody told me only that much last night at the annual amfAR dinner to raise money for AIDS research, where he and wife Soon-Yi showed up so Woody could offer a testimonial to Dr. Mathilde Krim.

Woody and Dr. Krim go way back — her late husband, Arthur, was the head of Orion Pictures, the home of many classic Allen films like “Bananas,” “Annie Hall” and “Manhattan.”

The Spanish film — in which Penelope will speak both Spanish and English — is the latest in a line of dramas for Woody. He got incredible acclaim for “Match Point,” a couple of years ago. It was my pick for best film of 2005.

But before he begins production on the Cruz film, Woody still has to bring out “Cassandra’s Dream.” He told me that one is “heavy” and “serious” and “more like 'Match Point.' If you liked that one, you’re going to love this.”

Allen and producing partner Letty Aronson, his sister, will take “Cassandra’s Dream” to the Cannes Film Festival in May and look for a distributor. It’s unlikely to open the festival, Woody said, “because I don’t put my films in competition.”

“Cassandra” stars Colin Farrell, Ewan McGregor and Tom Wilkinson. And for the record, Woody — who’s had his ins and outs with temperamental actors — says of Farrell: “He was a dream to work with.” Just in case you were wondering.

Meanwhile, Woody’s speech for Dr. Krim at Cipriani 42nd Street was the first of many warm and heartfelt talks given last night by the likes of Sharon Stone, Whoopi Goldberg, Richard Gere, Natasha Richardson, Garry Shandling, Beyonce, Eve, designer Kenneth Cole, MAC Cosmetics’ John Demsey and MTV’s John Reidy.

Also spotted in the cavernous room (another former bank vault) were Sigourney Weaver, comedian David Brenner, Russell Simmons, Milla Jovovich, Kim Cattrall, Cary Lowell (Mrs. Gere to you), our old pal Vin Roberti of Palisades Pictures and the stunning Carol Alt.

Singer Tracy Chapman livened things up with a couple of songs including “Stand by Me.”

It was Woody’s speech, though, that everyone came to hear. Allen doesn’t make a lot of public appearances, so this was one was unique.

He did so well that afterwards he was inundated with well wishers including Playboy publisher Christie Hefner and Shandling, each of whom introduced themselves.

Shandling was set to later do similar honors for Stone. Is he working on anything new? “Just reading this,” he said, clutching a sheath of papers. “You know the expression one day a time? I believe in one minute at a time.”

Woody waxed eloquently about the Krims, recalling that when he first met them “I was a complete non-entity. I hadn’t done a movie. She was my boss’ wife.”

In time, though Allen spent many New Year's Eves with the Krims and listened to stories of their ranch in Texas. “What did they do there, I wondered? Herd cows?”

There were plenty more speeches, including a lovely one from Goldberg, who was honored — and rightly so — for her tireless charity work. “It’s only what my mother told me I should do in the world,” Whoopi said.

But you know, it was Stone — looking like a million bucks — who was the final speaker. She was, as always, a dynamic presence.

She repeated for the audience the anecdote of how she got involved with amfAR. It was after her acting teacher, the late Roy London, told her she had to do something. She answered a call for the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and found a young girl dying of HIV. The rest, as they say, is history.

Sharon said the girl’s wish was to be taken to Paul Newman’s camp. Stone got a trailer and took her there with nurses. They went to the camp, and on the way home, the girl died.

There wasn’t a dry eye in the house. For the record, amfAR raised $3 million. Next stop: the annual fundraiser in May at the Cannes Film Festival.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Kal on February 02, 2007, 04:34:13 PM
baH!!!!!!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on February 08, 2007, 05:52:37 PM
Turner Classic recently aired Purple Rose and Hannah...

why aren't this guy's dvd's more available or if they are, why not any special editions?

the only one that i've seen and didn't care for much was Hollywood Ending, yet that was before i had seen much of his work. i might have only seen Annie Hall at that time, so it could be that i put the high standards of AH on it.

**edit**

kinda answering my own question after looking at his IMDB page:

Said in a 2003 interview that he was "not interested in all that extra stuff on DVDs", and that he hopes his films would speak for themselves. To date [2006] has never recorded an audio commentary, or even so much as be interviewed for a DVD of any films he's been involved with
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on February 08, 2007, 09:27:15 PM
Said in a 2003 interview that he was "not interested in all that extra stuff on DVDs", and that he hopes his films would speak for themselves. To date [2006] has never recorded an audio commentary, or even so much as be interviewed for a DVD of any films he's been involved with

just as well. he's really not that interesting to hear talking about films. see: his worthless contribution to A Life in Pictures.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on February 21, 2007, 02:11:28 PM
Bardem joins Woody Allen project
Spanish star joins Cruz in Barcelona set movie
Source: Variety

MADRID — Javier Bardem has joined Penelope Cruz in the cast of Woody Allen's upcoming, untitled summer shoot in Barcelona.

As with Cruz, Bardem's role is unknown: Allen, who is currently editing "Cassandra's Dream," has yet to finish the screenplay. But, like Cruz, Bardem has been asked to keep dates free for the summer.

Details of the pic remain sketchy. More or less the only things that has been made public by Allen or pic's Spanish producer Mediapro is that it is produced by Mediapro and Gravier Prods., the banner of Allen's sister Letty Aronson, his longtime producer, it will shoot mainly in Barcelona and contains English and some Spanish dialogue. Also, its plot features foreigners in the Spanish city and turns on a love entanglement, Allen has declared.

A summer stint with Allen dovetails nicely with Bardem's immediate commitment to tubthump the five-part feature "Invisibles," which Bardem produced, with contributions from Wim Wenders, Isabel Coixet, Fernando Leon, Mariano Barroso and Javier Corcuera.

Turning on some of the world's most overlooked conflicts and illnesses, the five-part fiction/docu pic, played in the Berlin Fest's Panorama last week and shortly bows in Spain.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: hedwig on February 21, 2007, 03:38:43 PM
he's also got a new book coming out.

(http://www.randomhouse.com/catalog/covers_450/9781400066414.jpg)

June 12, 2007
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on March 07, 2007, 04:13:24 PM
Allen Eyeing Johannson and Hall for Spanish Film
Source: ComingSoon

Screen Daily reports that Woody Allen wants to cast Scarlett Johansson and Rebecca Hall (The Prestige) opposite Penélope Cruz and Javier Bardem in his new film, to be shot in Barcelona, Spain this summer.

Allen described the story as "romantic but serious." A script has been completed and Allen is currently auditioning English-speaking actors.

Prized Spanish cinematographer Javier Aguirresarobe has been tapped for the film as part of a reportedly all-Spanish crew. The film will also shoot in Oviedo, a city in Spain 's northern Asturias region.

Johannson previously starred in Allen's Scoop and Match Point.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on June 21, 2007, 08:57:57 PM
Allen makes opera debut

NEW YORK -- Woody Allen is having his night at the opera. The veteran director will make his operatic stage debut this fall with the Los Angeles Opera’s production of Giacomo Puccini’s “Gianni Schicchi.”

Fellow film director William Friedkin returns to stage Puccini’s “Il Tabarro” and “Suor Angelica,” with the three one-act operas rounding out the composer’s “Il Trittico” triptych, opening the company’s 2008/2009 season.

“I have no idea what I am doing,” said Allen, “but incompetence has never prevented me from plunging in with enthusiasm.” 

The company’s broad general director and opera singing legend Plácido Domingo recruited the notoriously LA-phobic director to his stage. “I’ve seduced many a film director into directing opera, starting with John Schlesinger and “The Tales of Hoffmann” at London’s Covent Garden,” Mr. Domingo said. “I will admit that my pursuit of Woody takes the prize of the longest pursuit, because LA Opera chairman and CEO Marc Stern and I first started talking to him some four years ago.” Friedkin previously directed for the company in 2003.

The production will be designed by Santo Loquasto, who has worked as a prtoduction designer on more than 20 of Allen’s films. Music director James Conlon will conduct the production, which opens on Sept. 6, 2008.

Allen’s section of the 1918 triptych is based on a story referenced in Dante’s “The Divine Comedy” involving a dramatic showdown over money and marriage. The director recently released his first collection of short stories in 25 years, “Mere Anarchy.” He hosted a suprise premiere of his latest film, “Cassandra’s Dream,” in Aviles, Spain this week.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on July 02, 2007, 06:44:44 PM
Woody Allen finds love in Barcelona
Director unveils cast details of latest feature
Source: Variety

BARCELONA -- Woody Allen and Barcelona declared their affection for each other at a sweltering press conference on Monday with a phalanx of pols and security guards in attendance.

“I hope I can present Barcelona to the world as I see it, the same way I presented Manhattan to the world as I saw it with my eyes,” said Allen, dressed in a natty fly-fisherman hat, as he unveiled a few more details about his next pic, which shoots in Spain from July 9.

“I want to write a love letter to Barcelona and from Barcelona to the world,” he added, as much perhaps by way of diplomacy as clarification.

That affection is returned by Barcelona and Spain at large.

Standing next to him, Spain’s ebullient Culture Minister Carmen Calvo proved Allen’s closest fan, producing a fuchsia-colored abanico to profusely fan the director, before declaring that Allen “makes philosophy with cinema. He’s a brilliant example of what cinema represents in contemporary culture.”

The little news that emerged from the press conference was that Patricia Clarkson, Kevin Dunn and Chris Messina have joined the cast.

Toplining Scarlett Johansson, Javier Bardem and Penelope Cruz, a shroud of silence surrounds pic’s title and subject -- as is usual with Allen’s pics.

The press conference did at least round out the full cast of the film, which is produced by Gravier and Spain’s Mediapro.

Zak Orth (“Music and Lyrics”) and Pablo Schreiber (“Lords of Dogtown”) join the already-announced Carrie Preston in secondary roles.

Local thesps scoring parts include Abel Folk, Lluis Homar, Joel Joan, Julio Perillan and Mireia Ros.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on September 28, 2007, 12:59:20 AM
Mediapro woos Woody Allen
Pair likely to extend business relationship
Source: Variety
 
Woody Allen looks set to make two more pics with Spain's Mediapro, the co-producer of Allen's untitled Barcelona-set pic, now in post.

Mediapro is in talks with Gravier Prods., the shingle of Allen's sister Letty Aronson.

Speaking at a packed press dinner at the San Sebastian Film Festival, Mediapro topper Jaume Roures said he and Allen have "a verbal agreement" to jointly make one film in Europe, outside Spain, and another "a little bit further away."

No deal had been signed with Allen, he said. Nor had he seen anything from Allen's Spanish shoot, and wouldn't until Easter. By that time, a deal could be tied down for the future projects.

Allen's Barcelona project, now in post and toplining Scarlett Johansson, Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem, had begun with a verbal agreement, Roures said.

Money should be no problem for Mediapro, which has recently picked up multi-year TV rights to Spanish soccer clubs, including Real Madrid and Barcelona.

Roures declined to detail the future projects' subjects: That's hardly surprising since little is known about Allen's Barcelona pic, save for its fall 2008 release date, despite the fact it has been one of the most paparazzied productions in Spanish history.

The Allen projects underscore the emergence of Mediapro as one of the most ambitious production houses in Spain.

"Mediapro intends to make three to four films a year. The problem we have in Spain is a lack of ambition. The solution is to make bigger films and lower-budget, new talent-driven projects," Roures said.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: idk on November 19, 2007, 11:41:44 PM
Just saw Scoop and I highly recommend it if you haven't seen it.  So far my fav WA film although the only others ive seen are "Match Point" and "Broadway Danny Rose". It did seem to end a little to fast but still pretty, pretty, pretty, pretty funny, oh and good.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on November 20, 2007, 12:21:38 AM
So far my fav WA film although the only others ive seen are "Match Point" and "Broadway Danny Rose". 

wait.. what?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on November 20, 2007, 12:35:48 AM
Just saw Scoop and I highly recommend it if you haven't seen it.  So far my fav WA film although the only others ive seen are "Match Point" and "Broadway Danny Rose".

ah, to be a greenhorn again. between this and bottle rocket, i'm expecting you next to say The Departed is your favourite scorsese film.

that's cool tho. i was the same way, you first get into whatever's most recent at the time of your initiation. my introduction to woody was his mid-90s output, mighty aphrodite, everyone says i love you, and especially Deconstructing Harry. i was like "wow DH is the best movie ever".

except, unlike you, i was lucky in that they were actual woody allen films.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: idk on November 20, 2007, 06:45:51 PM
Quote
that's cool tho. i was the same way, you first get into whatever's most recent at the time of your initiation. my introduction to woody was his mid-90s output, mighty aphrodite, everyone says i love you, and especially Deconstructing Harry. i was like "wow DH is the best movie ever".

except, unlike you, i was lucky in that they were actual woody allen films.

well im getting to his others...i take it you didn't think much of Scoop

I feel like im being unfairly criticized

Quote
i'm expecting you next to say The Departed is your favourite scorsese film.

It is!! but then again only out of the 3 ive seen
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on November 20, 2007, 06:57:53 PM
well im getting to his others...i take it you didn't think much of Scoop

I feel like im being unfairly criticized

my bad, i should've been clearer: you havn't seen a woddy allen film yet.

Quote
i'm expecting you next to say The Departed is your favourite scorsese film.

It is!! but then again only out of the 3 ive seen

were the other 2 also from the last 7 years? you haven't seen a martin scorsese film yet.

it's not a real criticism cos it's not your fault, it's only your bad luck that the films these great directors have made since 2000 are not indicative of what made them great to begin with. so your perception will either be tainted by what you've been exposed to, or you'll look back on these innocent times and say "ah, to be a greenhorn again."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: w/o horse on November 20, 2007, 07:26:41 PM
my introduction to woody was his mid-90s output, mighty aphrodite, everyone says i love you, and especially Deconstructing Harry. i was like "wow DH is the best movie ever".

Yeah.  Deconstructing Harry is still one of my favorites of his.  idk you should check out Deconstructing Harry.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on November 24, 2007, 12:42:08 AM
idk, if you have Turner Classic Movies, search the schedule, I've seen several of Woody's films free in my own home that way.

Take the Money and Run airs today (Sat the 24th at 10:15 est).
It's his first solely directed film and it's very funny.

I picked up Sleeper in the used DVD bin for a few bucks not too long ago, and it's great as well.

Did anyone buy the Allen box sets from 2000/01?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: hedwig on November 24, 2007, 12:52:41 PM
Did anyone buy the Allen box sets from 2000/01?

(http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a175/Leven321/Copy2ofEWSwarning1.png)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on November 24, 2007, 01:26:41 PM
no comprende.
deep discount's sale may be a good time to pick one up.
i just wonder how long (or even if) expanded editions of his films will come out - and yes i know, he's personally said he's not big on doing extras, but Kubrick's works were essentially barebones for the longest.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: hedwig on November 24, 2007, 09:04:53 PM
this is nothing, but give me your computer.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on November 25, 2007, 03:43:14 AM
hahaha this will never end.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on November 25, 2007, 04:04:49 AM
hedwig, are you capping movies with a camera phone? jesus christ. kubrick must be spinning in his BED.

deathbed.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: hedwig on November 25, 2007, 03:10:09 PM
haha yeah.. and if i hadn't used my phone, bigideas still wouldn't have understood the message. :doh:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: idk on November 25, 2007, 08:42:27 PM
idk, if you have Turner Classic Movies, search the schedule, I've seen several of Woody's films free in my own home that way.

Take the Money and Run airs today (Sat the 24th at 10:15 est).
It's his first solely directed film and it's very funny.

I picked up Sleeper in the used DVD bin for a few bucks not too long ago, and it's great as well.

Did anyone buy the Allen box sets from 2000/01?


Well thanks for the info but i missed it, i don't really care though nothing can beat Scoop

What is Hedwig talking about?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on November 25, 2007, 08:50:04 PM
i don't really care though nothing can beat Scoop

http://xixax.com/index.php?topic=948.0

What is Hedwig talking about?

http://xixax.com/index.php?topic=3494.msg252506#msg252506
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: idk on November 25, 2007, 09:12:12 PM
hahahahahah, whats wrong with asking questions

I was hoping you'd appreciate my Scoop praise
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: hedwig on November 25, 2007, 09:18:07 PM
i recommend staying out of this thread until you've seen some other woody allen movies.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: idk on November 25, 2007, 09:45:38 PM
geez, i was just messing with Pubrick

you guys seem a little uptight
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on November 25, 2007, 09:50:01 PM
you guys seem a little uptight

nerds are a little too serious sometimes.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on November 25, 2007, 10:30:32 PM
Well thanks for the info but i missed it, i don't really care though nothing can beat Scoop

The Woody that made Woody Woody is the earlier stuff.
That's why they're saying that.
I enjoyed Scoop as well, but it doesn't give you an idea of what Woody has done in the past.

It would be like saying you know the Beatles having only heard Let it Be.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on November 25, 2007, 10:38:16 PM
nerds are a little too serious sometimes.

you're talking about yourself right?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on November 25, 2007, 10:41:00 PM
nerds are a little too serious sometimes.

you're talking about yourself right?

I try to take movies seriously. I notice some others take themselves a little too seriously.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: hedwig on November 25, 2007, 10:47:39 PM
i don't know what you're talking about. this isn't a personal thing. i advised idk to check out some of woody allen's classics before he posts about woody and how Scoop compares to his other work. pretty reasonable.

anyway my favorite is Curse of the Jade Scorpion.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on November 25, 2007, 10:58:28 PM
i don't know what you're talking about. this isn't a personal thing. i advised idk to check out some of woody allen's classics before he posts about woody and how Scoop compares to his other work. pretty reasonable.

anyway my favorite is Curse of the Jade Scorpion.

Haha, I thought his comment about uptightness was general so I gave him a general responce. I've always been against the "stupidest thing you've heard" thread so I saw uptightness as the manner that usually takes place in that thread. I'm also not trying say I'm perfect either. In context to the thread you got cute with the Eyes Wide Shut reference. It it was joking, alright, but it didn't look that way. When he made his original comment about Scoop I smiled because he did seem young, but I didn't think it was something to reply to. I liked Pubrick's first reply because it was genuine but things seemed to unwind from there.

It's good to know Woody Allen's history before commenting on his best, of course, but is Curse of the Jade Scorpion more Woody-esque than Scoop? A legitimate question because I haven't seen either but I thought Curse of the Jade Scorpion was a standard project for him as well.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on November 26, 2007, 12:15:10 AM
In context to the thread you got cute with the Eyes Wide Shut reference. It it was joking, alright, but it didn't look that way. When he made his original comment about Scoop I smiled because he did seem young, but I didn't think it was something to reply to. I liked Pubrick's first reply because it was genuine but things seemed to unwind from there.

you don't realise it but you're talking about two different ppl there. hedwig's EWS reference was a joke aimed at bigideas, the joke had one level, he asks a lot of questions. no one got it. then i explained it by linking to he moment where bigideas finally stopped asking a question in every single post. but u know, i was just explaining the joke that no one got, like i'm doing now. i wasn't making any point. just like:

Haha, I thought his comment about uptightness was general so I gave him a general responce. I've always been against the "stupidest thing you've heard" thread so I saw uptightness as the manner that usually takes place in that thread.

i also wasn't making any point with that link. it also was a joke response to idk repeating how much he loves Scoop, it was an exaggerated reaction to his own exaggerated statement that Scoop is all he never needs to see. then HE either didn't get it or thought i was uptight, cos he says "i thought you'd appreciate my scoop praise". appreciate is too strong a word, cos it wasn't a very good joke, but i did acknowledge it and it went over everyone's head. just like:

It's good to know Woody Allen's history before commenting on his best, of course, but is Curse of the Jade Scorpion more Woody-esque than Scoop? A legitimate question because I haven't seen either but I thought Curse of the Jade Scorpion was a standard project for him as well.

another joke you didn't get. the gag here is that after all this talk of making (light) fun of idk cos we've seen actual woody allen films, hedwig makes the hilarious (FAKE) confession that Curse of the Jade Scorpion is his favourite. the joke is what you half-guessed, the movie is mediocre at best and the irony is the nonchalant way he admits it.. it's faux self-effacing hypocrisy with a subtle delivery which like many times in the past, has gone way over your and ( as the last page has shown) many ppl's heads.

so to draw further conclusions from this very revelatory series of posts.. the ultimate divide is not "those who take themselves too seriously" and those who don't. no, cos the flaw in that is you seem to have placed yourself in the latter, and that cannot be so because you couldn't identify that no one else was taking themselves seriously either. a conundrum!

the solution is a new dichotomy: the real division in any group of ppl is between those who get the joke, and those who don't. the schism is mitigated by a patient explanation from the former, and a recognition of misunderstanding from the latter.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on November 26, 2007, 12:33:05 AM
Duly served. Do I need to keep making dumb comments to inspire such long thoughts by you? I can only imagine the possibilities of it applied to a film review.

I think a few years ago my original comment would have been laced with fire and brimstone and defended until the death, but now it's dumb ignorance. I'm happy to jump ship and admit stupidity.

I still revolt against "The Stupidest Thing You've Heard" thread :salute:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: B.C. Long on November 26, 2007, 12:35:59 AM
what a clusterfuck of misunderstanding. :bravo:

Match Point is Woody's best. (That may or may not be a joke)

I still revolt against "The Stupidest Thing You've Heard" thread

I always figured that thread was an elitist joke, no?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on November 26, 2007, 01:16:28 AM
i love Celebrity
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on November 26, 2007, 11:23:33 AM
soooooooo,

did anyone buy the Woody boxsets?*

regardless, unless i read some overtly good praise on them, i think i'll just check the TCM schedule now and again since they play just about all his films up through the mid 80's at least and there don't seem to be any extras except some antedotes in the dvd case booklets and trailers.

*uhh, i like dat.......dat's how i roll...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on November 26, 2007, 11:50:48 AM
i love Celebrity

So do I, what makes us about 5 in the entire planet.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on November 26, 2007, 12:40:31 PM
soooooooo,

did anyone buy the Woody boxsets?*

regardless, unless i read some overtly good praise on them, i think i'll just check the TCM schedule now and again since they play just about all his films up through the mid 80's at least and there don't seem to be any extras except some antedotes in the dvd case booklets and trailers.

*uhh, i like dat.......dat's how i roll...

You might as well buy them. Woody Allen isn't interested in extra features. Criterion had somewhat of a chance to release Crimes and Misdemeanors in a special edition but it went nowhere. If Woody Allen has no interest for Criterion, he likely has no interest for special editions.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on November 26, 2007, 04:19:01 PM
soooooooo,

did anyone buy the Woody boxsets?

regardless, unless i read some overtly good praise on them, i think i'll just check the TCM schedule now and again since they play just about all his films up through the mid 80's at least and there don't seem to be any extras except some antedotes in the dvd case booklets and trailers.


You might as well buy them. Woody Allen isn't interested in extra features. Criterion had somewhat of a chance to release Crimes and Misdemeanors in a special edition but it went nowhere. If Woody Allen has no interest for Criterion, he likely has no interest for special editions.

Thanks for actual responding.

I am aware that Woody has stated that he cares not for extras, but did not know Criterion had approached him and he rejected it. I don't think Kubrick cared for extras either (I mean he went as far as totally destroying deleted scenes) - of course, DVD's were nowhere as popular as they are now - but new extras added editions keep coming out (of course, these came out after he died as well).
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Alexandro on November 26, 2007, 06:22:19 PM
The only woody movie that i would call mediocre, or better said, a cinematographic ass rape to my good taste and measure, is that dreadful one with jason biggs and christina ricci, which thankfully i dont even remember it's title right now...

scoop was awesome.

the guy is old now. he pathologically makes a movie a year, he can't help it. he couldn't care less at this point if someone likes or dislikes this or that film, but he is always interesting. he has mellowed in the 2000's...so what?

oh and deconstructing harry IS one of his bests...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on November 26, 2007, 10:19:17 PM
I was thinking - when Woody's films are sent to Oscar voters, aren't there at least EPK's and stuff? Those aren't always the greatest things, but it would be interesting to at least see him directing a scene or working with actors.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SiliasRuby on November 26, 2007, 10:22:51 PM
The only woody movie that i would call mediocre, or better said, a cinematographic ass rape to my good taste and measure, is that dreadful one with jason biggs and christina ricci, which thankfully i dont even remember it's title right now...
Anything else....
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on November 27, 2007, 05:44:55 AM
The only woody movie that i would call mediocre, or better said, a cinematographic ass rape to my good taste and measure, is that dreadful one with jason biggs and christina ricci, which thankfully i dont even remember it's title right now...
Anything else....

... which is a perfectly fine movie.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Fernando on November 27, 2007, 12:08:32 PM
hedwig makes the hilarious (FAKE) confession that Curse of the Jade Scorpion is his favourite. the joke is what you half-guessed, the movie is mediocre at best and the irony is the nonchalant way he admits it..

I actually really like Scorpion :yabbse-undecided:, in fact yesterday I cought the last 30min. and there was a hilarious line by Dan Aykroyd when he tells Helen Hunt's character Woody has escaped from prision: "Looks like your little termite ate his way out".

I don't think Kubrick cared for extras either (I mean he went as far as totally destroying deleted scenes) - of course, DVDs didn't exist in the 60's, 70's and 80's were nowhere as popular as they are now - ...

Fixed.

Just for the record, last page was hilarious.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on November 27, 2007, 01:30:47 PM
Kubrick lived when DVD's were around.
Did they not put deleted scenes, etc, on laser discs - i have no idea?
Or are you implying that Kubrick would have saved the scenes had DVD been around?
I wouldn't think so.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on November 27, 2007, 02:51:33 PM
Kubrick lived when DVD's were around.
Did they not put deleted scenes, etc, on laser discs - i have no idea?
Or are you implying that Kubrick would have saved the scenes had DVD been around?
I wouldn't think so.

Special editions were made for laser disc. I believe Kubrick even had a helping hand with them. Criterion released special editions of a few of his films, including Dr. Strangelove and 2001: A Space Odyssey.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Fernando on November 27, 2007, 03:11:54 PM
Kubrick lived when DVD's were around.

I know, I only fixed your sentence because SK only did one movie when dvds were starting to dominate the market and the way you phrased it seemed like he was aware of them since forever.

Or are you implying that Kubrick would have saved the scenes had DVD been around?
I wouldn't think so.

Not at all, I remember Harlan (or was it leon?) said he didn't care for deleted scenes to be seen so he destroyed all the material, had he lived to see the explotion of dvds who knows what he would do with the format, taking a wild guess he probably still like to let the film speak for itself and not include too many extras, but who knows.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on November 27, 2007, 04:59:57 PM
Kubrick lived when DVD's were around.
Did they not put deleted scenes, etc, on laser discs - i have no idea?
Or are you implying that Kubrick would have saved the scenes had DVD been around?
I wouldn't think so.

Special editions were made for laser disc. I believe Kubrick even had a helping hand with them. Criterion released special editions of a few of his films, including Dr. Strangelove and 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Any idea if the Kubrick approved extras translate to the later DVD versions?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on November 27, 2007, 05:12:09 PM
Special editions were made for laser disc. I believe Kubrick even had a helping hand with them. Criterion released special editions of a few of his films, including Dr. Strangelove and 2001: A Space Odyssey.

http://www.dvduell.de/criterion_website/criterion/criterion_bydirector.html#Stanley%20Kubrick
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on November 27, 2007, 05:16:15 PM
Gracis, Mac.

Kubrick also supervised renovations of films like Dr. Strangelove and Paths of Glory. When Criterion set out to produce Dr. Strangelove, they found MGM's copies were badly damaged so Kubrick gave over his original print for Criterion to make their laser disc from.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Fernando on November 27, 2007, 06:07:13 PM
^^ I remember reading that, IIRC it was one of the things he did in the 90's, probably between Aryan Papers developing AI and the EWS script, guy was a machine.  :yabbse-sad:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on November 27, 2007, 10:15:42 PM
Special editions were made for laser disc. I believe Kubrick even had a helping hand with them. Criterion released special editions of a few of his films, including Dr. Strangelove and 2001: A Space Odyssey.

http://www.dvduell.de/criterion_website/criterion/criterion_bydirector.html#Stanley%20Kubrick

wow, thanks.
i had no idea they had put out that many laserdiscs - especially not so many that they have not put out on DVD themselves.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on November 28, 2007, 03:32:55 AM
Just for the record, last page was hilarious.

yeah, the best part was when ElPandaRoyal admitted to loving Celebrity but wasn't joking about it.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Ravi on November 28, 2007, 02:28:08 PM
Note that the extras on the Kubrick Criterion LDs of 2001 and Dr. Strangelove are mostly about the subjects of the films (space travel and the atomic age) and not the making of the films themselves.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on November 28, 2007, 05:30:49 PM
Just for the record, last page was hilarious.

yeah, the best part was when ElPandaRoyal admitted to loving Celebrity but wasn't joking about it.

I guess there are only four of us then...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SiliasRuby on November 28, 2007, 11:57:47 PM
Just for the record, last page was hilarious.

yeah, the best part was when ElPandaRoyal admitted to loving Celebrity but wasn't joking about it.

I guess there are only four of us then...
I LOVE Celebrity...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on November 30, 2007, 01:00:12 AM
I guess there are only four of us then...
I LOVE Celebrity...

yep.. still only four.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Alexandro on November 30, 2007, 02:51:30 PM
five.
i love celebrity too.

his whole 90's output ranges from very good to great for me. i catched "manhattan murder mystery" the other day, and it's still very funny.

i was reading the fellini thread, some people defending his later phase, talking about how, in general, that particular stage of his career gets usually (i'd dare say commonplacey) trashed. sometimes it takes a couple of fresh eyes on certain director's late movies to understand their brilliancy, or at least to receive a fairer, more open appreciation. i remember in the 90's when i was thinking woody allen movies were incredible, a bunch of old critics complained that his best work ws behind him, just as today. i've heard that complain about scorsese too, and i think is bullshit. so maybe in a few years a new generation will make a case for the compelling aspects of woody movies from this decade. even, and i find that hard to believe, but even anything else...or of course, celebrity.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on November 30, 2007, 06:02:43 PM

his whole 90's output ranges from very good to great for me.

Ditto. To me, the man didn't lose anything. He is as great as ever, and even a lesser Woody Allen movie is always entertaining, intelligent and funny.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on January 13, 2008, 06:17:59 PM
Fucking hell! Cassandra's Dream is my favorite movie seen in 2008... and I bet it's still going to be one of the best 12 months from now. Great, great, GREAT movie.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on February 02, 2008, 10:31:51 PM
Hold onto your stereotypes, Woody Allen's laying claim to contentment
The star says his body of angst-ridden work belies the true fulfillment he's found.
By Ellen McCarthy, Washington Post

For this scene, Woody Allen won't be on the couch.

After all, he's 10 years into a loving marriage now. He's crazy about his kids. Every day he brings them to school, takes a turn on the treadmill, then sits down to write. Almost every night there's dinner with friends.

It's all happy and healthy, and besides, for this session he has chosen to sit on the bed. Suddenly our national embodiment of neurosis is saying things such as: "I think I'm the luckiest guy in the world, because I've had only good breaks."

It will sound sacrilegious, but here goes: Woody Allen, at 72, seems awfully well-adjusted.

Maybe he was never really quite as crazy as Alvy Singer led us to believe. "I'm not. I think I'm an underrated actor and I've played the neurotic skillfully over the years . . . but if you use your common sense, I can't be that neurotic if I've been around for that many years and I've been productive," he says.

It almost goes without saying that "productive" is an understatement. He's on the phone -- ostensibly -- to chat about "Cassandra's Dream," the 38th film he has written and directed in 41 years.

This is another dark one, in the vein of 2005's well-received "Match Point." Again set in London, it trails two brothers, played by Ewan McGregor and Colin Farrell, as they try to improve their humble existences and, in doing so, find themselves becoming hit men for a wealthy uncle.

Allen fans, especially loyalists of his early comedies, will inevitably question the direction he has taken, both in tone and location. They're welcome to overthink it; he's already over it.

And he has already moved on, having shot a romance in Barcelona, Spain, last summer, getting ready to do a comedy in New York come spring.

"So 'Cassandra's Dream' is old hat to me. I have no interest in how it's regarded or what it makes or anything," he says. "It's ancient history. I haven't seen the film in a year."

In a year -- since he wrapped. Likewise, he hasn't seen "Take the Money and Run" since 1968, a year before it hit theaters. Hasn't watched "Annie Hall" in 30 years.

Because if there is a compulsion, it's not -- as one might expect -- to obsess. It's to just move on. To write the next thing, start the next project.

"If I didn't, I would just sit home and brood. When I finish a film, I sit home for a couple of days and, you know, nothing happens. . . . And three days later I'm champing at the bit to start writing again, because I have nothing to fill my time -- nothing interesting to fill my time," he reasons.

Allen says he writes the way some guys collect stamps and others fool around on their boats. Everybody gets their kicks somehow. His come through the page, through the process.

He spent a good long time working on a novel a few years back. Finished it, showed it to some folks and decided it wasn't good enough. "So I dumped it. And had no regrets or problems doing that. It was fun writing it. The fun was in writing the thing," he says.

So seven days a week he's at it, and yet "I feel I've never worked a day in my life, actually."

Over four decades, two categories have been born of that continual impulse to create: good films and not-so-good films.

Naturally, Allen and his critics don't always agree which is which. Nor does he care where they, or anyone else, draw the line. Allen notoriously declines to read his reviews. He doesn't frequent award shows or look at box office numbers. In terms of whom these films are intended to entertain, even the audience is a distant second.

"I always like it if someone says to me 'I enjoyed your film' as I'm walking down the street. You know, yes, I think that's nice. But I would never do anything to elicit that response from them," he says, slightly aghast. "I think when I'm making it, I want to please myself, really."

It's an attitude that goes back to 1965, when Allen wrote his first film, "What's New, Pussycat?" Someone else directed, and it became a huge hit -- one of the most successful comedies of its time. Allen hated it, hated the experience of it "and vowed that I would never do another movie unless I could be the director." Three years later he was given $1 million to make "Take the Money and Run."

And, ever since, he has had "complete artistic control over [his films] in every way" -- not just writing and directing but often acting in them as well.

So maybe it was self-absorption that led to mediocre movies. But it's probably the same condition that has liberated him to move beyond "Annie Hall," no matter how loudly everyone clamors for him to produce another of those. And another and another.

"It's very important to please yourself," he says. " 'Cause if you please yourself, you get something out if it. If you don't please yourself, even if the film is critically or commercially successful, you don't get any fun out of it, and it's not an enjoyable memory."

Those pesky critics he ignores have wondered publicly whether the man even has another "Annie Hall" in him. The brilliance of those first few films was in their thorough intimacy, their ability to wallow in a moment and a place and a generation. Woody Allen was intellectual New York, circa 1978.

It's not clear he can be that in 2008.

But even the question may be missing the point; it's the critics doing the wondering, not the filmmaker.

"I do feel disconnected [from today's culture]. And I don't want to be connected there, because I don't like it," he explains. "The culture, at the moment, is not one that inspires me."

Allen doesn't subscribe to the theory that successive generations are getting dumber, but something has changed. Something that has put him at odds with young audiences. When he was 20, 21, he reminisces, there was a hunger for sophistication, for discerning tastes that led to foreign films and avant-garde ideas.

Now what he sees among twentysomethings is film illiteracy and an adoration of locker-room humor.

On any given Saturday night, Allen complains, he's hard-pressed to find a quality new piece of American cinema, "once you see the three or four good ones of the year." The rest, he continues are "stupid and formulaic and toilet jokes and moronic and infantile and unoriginal."

Allen can envision the day when he decides to be done with the camera. Sure, he'll go on writing every day, but it will be plays or New Yorker stories. Maybe another crack at a novel. But the thought of it isn't so tempting while opportunities, and funds, keep presenting themselves.

"The hardest part of making a film is getting the financing, and as long as people want to finance them, you know, I feel, 'Why not make them?' Because there will be a time, I'm sure . . . when people will say, 'Enough with this guy. He's a loser.' "

If the sheen is off his zeitgeist and the neurosis never really was, then what remains is Allen himself: a cinematic legend who would never admit as much. ("I don't feel I've been an influence . . . and don't think that I'm in a class with, you know, my gifted contemporaries.")

By now, though, after all these years, he must at least be comfortable with his place in the cinematic canon?

"My place? My place is, I've been lucky beyond all measure," he quickly fires. "I feel I'm a modest talent who's been very lucky and has made, you know, the most of what little talent I've had."

There is less equivocation about his other place in life -- the one at home in Manhattan, with a treadmill and wife and two daughters ages 9 and 7. The wife, you'll recall, is Soon-Yi Previn, the adopted daughter of Mia Farrow, Allen's former partner of 12 years. Previn was 21 when Farrow discovered a nude Polaroid of her on Allen's mantle. Allen calls the public battle that ensued "really the only conflict I've ever had in my life."

Perhaps most surprising is what sprung from it: quiet, contented domesticity.

"I came to it late in life," Allen says. "I'm very grateful, and I am happy that in the most absurd and unpredictable way, I met someone that became my wife, and I have a family with her and have had many years now of great happiness."

This chapter unfolded with twists even he would deem outlandish, but there it is: life conspiring. Karma or the unconscious, or maybe it's kismet.

He will call it all luck.

Whatever it is, it's keeping Woody Allen off the couch.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: idk on February 04, 2008, 04:20:45 PM
In Mighty Aphrodite at the end(spoilers ahead) there is the scene where Lenny runs into that hot girl who has his child and they are in a toy store. I am pretty sure that is the same toy store the final scene of Eyes Wide Shut takes place in.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on February 05, 2008, 06:13:44 AM
In Mighty Aphrodite at the end(spoilers ahead) there is the scene where Lenny runs into that hot girl who has his child and they are in a toy store. I am pretty sure that is the same toy store the final scene of Eyes Wide Shut takes place in.

Do you mean Mira Sorvino? When I saw Mighty Aphrodite in my teens, I developed this big crush on her... that never went away. Damn, she's hot!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Alexandro on February 05, 2008, 10:51:14 AM
In Mighty Aphrodite at the end(spoilers ahead) there is the scene where Lenny runs into that hot girl who has his child and they are in a toy store. I am pretty sure that is the same toy store the final scene of Eyes Wide Shut takes place in.

Made out to be? Didn't they shot EWS in London?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on February 07, 2008, 10:02:34 AM
Larry David, Evan Rachel Wood to star in Woody Allen's next movie
Source: Entertainment Weekly

How much neurosis can one movie channel? We're about find out. Larry David, the mind behind Seinfeld and Curb Your Enthusiasm, is set to be the lead in Woody Allen's next, as-yet-untitled feature, which is scheduled to shoot in New York City in the spring. Plot details are being kept under wraps, but David will act alongside Evan Rachel Wood (Across the Universe). The movie marks Allen's return home after he made three films in London and one, the upcoming Vicky Cristina Barcelona, in Spain.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: grand theft sparrow on February 07, 2008, 10:29:48 AM
Goddamn, did Scarlett get too old for him already?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on February 07, 2008, 11:09:03 AM
more like "Goddamn, LARRY DAVID and WOODY ALLEN TOGETHER AT LAST."

Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: hedwig on February 07, 2008, 11:13:33 AM
more like "Goddamn, LARRY DAVID and WOODY ALLEN REUNITED AT LAST."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on February 07, 2008, 04:48:04 PM
I think I came... then I read this and came again.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: w/o horse on February 09, 2008, 01:59:51 PM
Speaking of Woody Allen, Deconstructing Harry, Curb Your Enthusiasm, and Larry David:  The scene in Deconstructing Harry when Harry visits his sister and she calls him a self-hating Jew is eerily similar to the scene in the wheelchair writer episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm in which Larry gets called a self-loathing Jew for whistling Wagner, I noticed last night.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on March 31, 2008, 08:16:28 PM
Woody Allen Sues Over NY Billboard

Woody Allen asked a federal court on Monday to strip a clothing company known for its racy ads featuring scantily clad models of at least $10 million for using his image on billboards and on the Internet.

In a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Manhattan, the actor-director said he does not endorse commercial products or services in the United States, which makes the May 2007 American Apparel billboards in Hollywood and New York and Web site displays "especially egregious and damaging."

The lawsuit said Allen was not contacted by the company and did not consent to the use of his image, which was taken from one of his movies.

American Apparel Inc., which is based in Los Angeles and operates worldwide, did not immediately reply to a telephone message seeking comment Monday.

The lawsuit complained of a billboard featuring a frame from "Annie Hall," a film that won Allen a best director Oscar. The image showed Allen, 72, dressed as a Hasidic Jew with a long beard and black hat and Yiddish text meaning "the holy rebbe." The words "American Apparel" also were on the billboard.

The billboard falsely implied that Allen sponsored, endorsed or was associated with American Apparel, said the lawsuit, which seeks at least $10 million in compensatory damages and unspecified punitive damages.

Allen's lawsuit describes him as among the most influential figures in the history of American film and a man who has maintained strict control over the projects with which he is associated.

The lawsuit accuses American Apparel of "blatant misappropriation and commercial use of Allen's image" and notes that the company on its Web site promotes itself as one known for "provocative photography."

In a news release two weeks ago, American Apparel Chairman Dov Charney called 2007 the company's most successful year and said the company planned to develop "into a pre-eminent global retail brand."

As of February 2007, American Apparel had more than 6,700 employees and operated 184 retail stores in 13 countries, according to its latest earnings release.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Ravi on April 01, 2008, 12:47:32 AM
The lawsuit complained of a billboard featuring a frame from "Annie Hall," a film that won Allen a best director Oscar. The image showed Allen, 72, dressed as a Hasidic Jew with a long beard and black hat and Yiddish text meaning "the holy rebbe." The words "American Apparel" also were on the billboard.

http://www.forward.com/articles/10697/

(http://img381.imageshack.us/img381/17/woodyallenadnk7.jpg)

On Allen St., no less.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on April 11, 2008, 11:16:39 AM
this is 3 blocks from my apartment.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cron on July 30, 2008, 06:01:29 PM
from avclub.com

Woody Allen teaming up with Larry David
posted by: Steve Hyden
July 30, 2008 - 9:55am

Woody Allen has had better luck with dramas than comedies lately--and even his dramas have been pretty scattershot--but there's reason to hope his new movie with Larry David might have some legit laughs. Allen tells The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel the movie is called Whatever Works and it's "a slightly different one for me. It's a blackish comedy." That's not a surprise coming from David, who Allen says has "a great, what would you call it, sarcastic, sour or vitriolic, wonderful, wonderful, no nonsense sense of humor."

"I think I'm more illusory than him," Allen added. "He's a stronger personality. I'm more of a schlemiel, a dope. I would be the guy they would plant the microfilm on and I would never know it, and I would be out there wondering why people are shooting at me. Larry has a different quality." There is no further info on Whatever Works as of now; Allen's latest film Vicky Cristina Barcelona comes out Aug. 15.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: matt35mm on July 30, 2008, 08:30:49 PM
Finally!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SiliasRuby on July 30, 2008, 09:20:46 PM
This is not the first time that he was in a woody allen movie, he had a bit part in 'Radio Days', but this is the first time he's going to STAR is a WA flick
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: hedwig on July 30, 2008, 09:46:26 PM
This is not the first time that he was in a woody allen movie, he had a bit part in 'Radio Days', but this is the first time he's going to STAR is a WA flick
i think matt's just reacting to the fact that there's finally some news about this movie, including the title. the LD-WA collab story broke on the previous page (and i made the same point about radio days).
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on December 24, 2008, 01:12:47 AM
Woody Allen says he hopes to film a new comedy in Paris

PARIS (AFP) – US filmmaker Woody Allen said Tuesday he hopes to shoot a new comedy in Paris next summer, continuing his recent run of choosing to film in European cities over his native-New York.

"I have always wanted to shoot a film in Paris. I have a scenario for Paris all written. I was going to shoot it a few years ago but when we came here and I started to put the film together, suddenly it became such an expensive film that I could not do it," he said.

Allen's last batch of films, including "Vicky Cristina Barcelona" and London-based drama "Match Point", were filmed in Europe.

He said financial problems should not derail the Paris project completely but added that he is prepared to film the comedy during the summer of 2011 in the event of more delays.

"Now that there is a new tax incentive in Paris we are returning and trying to see if it is possible to come again to do it," he said after meeting with French Culture Minister Christine Albanel.

"If I can't do it, then I will probably do another film in the US this year," he added.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on December 24, 2008, 02:13:36 PM
If Big Lots! gets Volume 1 give me a holla!

I'm still waiting for Cassandra's Dream to get cheaper at Blockbuster... :yabbse-undecided:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: WideShot on February 04, 2009, 01:33:26 AM
Hope I'm posting this in the right place.


From: http://www.reuters.com/article/filmNews/idUSTRE5120UQ20090203
Allen's comedy "Works" for Sony Pictures Classics
Tue Feb 3, 2009 12:47am EST
 
By Steven Zeitchik

LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) - Sony Pictures Classics is reteaming with Woody Allen, buying U.S. rights to the director's latest comedy, "Whatever Works."

Ed Begley Jr., Patricia Clarkson, Larry David and Evan Rachel Wood star in the picture, which involves a relationship between an older man and younger woman and the entanglements the man has with the woman's parents.

The New York-set movie marks a return for Allen to his home turf after a group of pictures shot across the Atlantic, including Oscar nominee "Vicky Cristina Barcelona."

SPC, the specialty division of the Sony Pictures studio, plans a summer release for the new film. The deal marks a reunion for the distributor and Allen, who teamed 10 years ago for the music-themed Oscar nominee "Sweet & Lowdown."

Reuters/Hollywood Reporter
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on February 04, 2009, 01:35:31 AM
Hope I'm posting this in the right place.

Already taken care of:

http://xixax.com/index.php?topic=10543.0
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: WideShot on February 04, 2009, 01:38:13 AM
Shit man, you're faster than Reuters.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on February 11, 2009, 12:08:16 AM
Hopkins, Brolin join Woody Allen pic
Film to start shooting in London this summer
Source: Variety

Woody Allen has set Josh Brolin and Anthony Hopkins to star in the film he wrote and will shoot in London this summer.

Brolin and Hopkins are the first in an ensemble cast. As usual, Allen is keeping title and plot under wraps.

The film will be financed by Spain-based Mediapro, which provided coin for "Vicky Cristina Barcelona." Letty Aronson and Steve Tenenbaum are producing.

There is no domestic distributor yet on Allen's upcoming film. He made a recent deal with Sony Pictures Classics for U.S. distribution on "Whatever Works," a comedy that will likely be distributed this summer.

Brolin, Oscar-nominated for "Milk," is next booked to star in the title role in "Jonah Hex," a live-action adaptation of the DC Comics series for Warner Bros. He previously worked with Allen on 2004's "Melinda and Melinda."

Hopkins recently completed "The Wolf Man" for Universal.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: hedwig on February 11, 2009, 12:27:20 AM
i miss the old woody allen. the jewish one.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: private witt on February 11, 2009, 06:06:22 PM
Hopkins, Brolin join Woody Allen pic
Film to start shooting in London this summer
Source: Variety
Woody Allen has set Josh Brolin and Anthony Hopkins to star in the film he wrote and will shoot in London this summer.

Is Variety aware they're referring to Sir Anthony Hopkins.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on February 23, 2009, 06:14:31 PM
Naomi Watts joins Woody Allen pic
Actress to star alongside Brolin, Hopkins
Source: Variety

Naomi Watts is joining Woody Allen's latest film, starring alongside the already-announced Josh Brolin and Anthony Hopkins.

Mediapro, the Spain-based company behind "Vicky Cristina Barcelona," is financing the as-yet-untitled pic, which will be produced by Letty Aronson, Steve Tenenbaum and Jaume Roures.

Allen's next pic, "Whatever Works," will be released by Sony Pictures Classics in June.

Watts is currently filming "Mother and Child."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: SiliasRuby on February 23, 2009, 06:43:55 PM
This is going to be Vicky Christina Barcelona 2: The old people version
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on February 24, 2009, 12:23:17 AM
Watts, Pinto join Woody Allen film
'Slumdog' actress takes on ingenue role in film
Source: Variety

Freida Pinto will follow up her performance in the Oscar-winning "Slumdog Millionaire" with a role in Woody Allen's latest project.

This year's Cinderella at the Oscar ball will join the long list of Allen's muses as she takes on the ingenue role in the helmer's still-untitled pic.

Naomi Watts has also signed on to star in the film, joining the already-announced Josh Brolin and Anthony Hopkins.

Mediapro, the Spain-based company behind "Vicky Cristina Barcelona," is financing the as-yet-titled pic, which will be produced by Letty Aronson, Steve Tenenbaum and Jaume Roures.

Allen's next pic, "Whatever Works," will be released by Sony Pictures Classics in June.

Pinto, who has become one of the most pursued thesps since her breakout performance in "Slumdog," signed with CAA in November and began mulling projects. Allen's film will mark the first post-"Slumdog" pic for the Indian-born model-turned-actress.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on February 26, 2009, 06:33:20 PM
Antonio Banderas joins Woody Allen pic
Film slated to start shooting in London in the summer
Source: Hollywood Reporter
 
Woody Allen has been throwing some international flavor into his latest casting gumbo.

The Oscar-winning writer-director has just hired Antonio Banderas for his untitled project. The Spaniard joins Indian Freido Pinto, British-Australian Naomi Watts, American Josh Brolin and Brit Anthony Hopkins.

Allen's new film is scheduled to start shooting in London in the summer.

Letty Aronson, Steve Tenenbaum and Jaume Roures are producing, with financing from the Spain-based Mediapro, which also funded "Vicky Cristina Barcelona."

Sony Pictures Classics will release Allen's "Whatever Works" on June 23.

The WMA-repped Banderas recently starred in "The Other Man" and "Take the Lead." He will appear in the DreamWorks Animation sequel "Shrek Goes Fourth" in May 2010.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on March 25, 2009, 07:49:28 PM
Nicole Kidman cast in Woody Allen film
Pic's cast includes Antonio Banderas, Naomi Watts
Source: Hollywood Reporter
 
Adding another ingredient to the global recipe of his latest film, Woody Allen has drafted Aussie Nicole Kidman into the cast.

The Oscar-winning actress joins Spaniard Antonio Banderas, India's Freida Pinto, British-Australian Naomi Watts, American Josh Brolin and Brit Anthony Hopkins in the as-yet-untitled project.

Letty Aronson, Steve Tenenbaum and Jaume Roures are producing, with financing from Spain-based Mediapro, which also funded "Vicky Cristina Barcelona." The film is scheduled to start shooting in London in the summer.

Sony Pictures Classics will release Allen's "Whatever Works" on June 19.

The CAA-repped Kidman most recently starred in Baz Luhrmann's "Australia," which has grossed $206 million worldwide. She will next appear in Rob Marshall's musical "Nine" for the Weinstein Co. in November.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on April 16, 2009, 01:43:59 AM
Woody Allen says American Apparel is harassing him

NEW YORK (AP) — A clothing company known for its racy ads is fighting a $10 million lawsuit brought by Woody Allen, arguing that it can't have damaged his reputation by using his image because the film director has already ruined it himself.

The 73-year-old Allen started the fight against American Apparel Inc. when he sued the company last year for using his image on the company's billboards in Hollywood and New York and on a Web site.

Allen, who does not endorse products in the United States, said he had not authorized the displays, which the Los Angeles-based company said were up for only a week.

Now the company plans to make Allen's relationships to actress Mia Farrow and her adopted daughter Soon-Yi Previn the focus of a trial scheduled to begin in federal court in Manhattan on May 18, according to the company's lawyer, Stuart Slotnick.

"Woody Allen expects $10 million for use of his image on billboards that were up and down in less than one week. I think Woody Allen overestimates the value of his image," Slotnick said.

"Certainly, our belief is that after the various sex scandals that Woody Allen has been associated with, corporate America's desire to have Woody Allen endorse their product is not what he may believe it is."

One billboard featured a frame from "Annie Hall," a film that won Allen a best-director Oscar. The image showed Allen dressed as a Hasidic Jew with a long beard and black hat and Yiddish text. The words "American Apparel" also were on the billboard.

Allen's lawsuit said the billboard falsely implied that Allen sponsored, endorsed or was associated with American Apparel.

Slotnick said it was not a cheap shot to bring up Allen's sex life in a lawsuit over the billboard and Internet ads.

"It's certainly relevant in assessing the value of an endorsement," he said, noting that Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps lost endorsement power after a photograph surfaced of him using marijuana.

Farrow starred in several of Allen's movies during a relationship with the director that ended in 1992, when she discovered he was having an affair with her oldest adopted daughter, then 22. Allen married Soon-Yi Previn in 1997.

During a bitter custody fight, Farrow accused Allen of sexually abusing their adopted daughter Dylan, 7. Allen was exonerated of the abuse charges, but Farrow won sole custody of the children.

Leslee Dart, a spokeswoman for Allen, said Friday that she does not believe Allen wants to comment on the litigation at this point.

American Apparel is known for its provocative ads of scantily dressed young models in tight-fitting and sometimes see-through garments.

Allen testified at a December deposition that he considered the company's advertising to be "sleazy" and "infantile."

Lawyers for American Apparel have complained that Allen has refused to turn over much of the information they have demanded to prepare for trial.

Among their demands were documents concerning any endorsement requests that were withdrawn after the sex scandal with Farrow and Previn became public.

The documents defined sex scandal as "your relationship with Soon-Yi Previn including the discovery ... (of) nude pictures you took of Soon-Yi Previn."

The lawyers also requested documents concerning Allen's public image and reputation, including his contention during his deposition that he was a "special kind of entity" or a "special taste."

Allen's attorneys said the request for documents related to the sex scandal and custody battle were "vexatious, oppressive, harassing" and not relevant.

Slotnick said he could not discuss whether there were any settlement talks under way but he hinted that the company may be open to avoiding a trial.

"All I can say is that the company has apologized for the use of Mr. Allen's image, however brief. And the company apologized if they offended Mr. Allen's sensibilities," he said.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on April 16, 2009, 11:37:40 AM
wow, those guys are assholes. Bitter to the very end.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on May 07, 2009, 01:12:55 PM
American Apparel founder praises Woody Allen

NEW YORK - The founder of a trendy clothing company being sued by Woody Allen insists he truly admires the actor-director.

Dov Charney says that despite the nasty legal battle, Allen "is a source of inspiration to me."

Allen sued American Apparel for $10 million after the company used his picture on its billboards in Hollywood and New York and on a Web site. He claims the company didn't have permission.

Company lawyers had said they were thinking about calling Allen's former companion Mia Farrow and his current wife — Farrow's adopted daughter — as witnesses to show that his personal life has devalued his image.

But Charney now denies the defense ever wanted to delve into Allen's past.

Jury selection for the trial in federal court in Manhattan is set for May 18.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on May 12, 2009, 11:13:29 PM
Kidman bolts from Woody Allen film
Actress was to star alongside Brolin, Watts
Source: Variety
 
Nicole Kidman has ankled her role in Woody Allen's latest, untitled project.

Pic, which co-stars Antonio Banderas, Anthony Hopkins, Josh Brolin, Naomi Watts and Freida Pinto, is set to start shooting in London in the summer.

There is no word yet on who Kidman's replacement will be.

Steve Tenenbaum, Gravier Prods.' Letty Aronson and Mediapro's Jaume Roures are producing, with Mediapro also financing.

Gravier and Mediapro previously teamed to make Allen's "Vicky Cristina Barcelona."

Allen's London-set project will be the first of a three-picture deal between Allen and Mediapro.

Spain's Imagina Intl. is handling international sales.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: matt35mm on May 13, 2009, 05:29:08 AM
Ooh, this'll be the first time I'll be in a city where Woody Allen is shooting a movie.  Hopefully I'll get to hang out and watch.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Ravi on May 13, 2009, 11:26:33 AM
Ooh, this'll be the first time I'll be in a city where Woody Allen is shooting a movie.  Hopefully I'll get to hang out and watch.

"These pretzels are making me thirsty!"
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on May 19, 2009, 12:28:10 AM
Woody Allen, American Apparel settle suit
Director to receive $5 million
Associated Press
 
NEW YORK -- Woody Allen agreed Monday to a $5 million settlement in his lawsuit accusing American Apparel of using an image parodying him as a rabbi without his permission.

Both sides announced the settlement -- to be paid by American Apparel's insurance company -- on the morning a trial was to start in federal court in Manhattan.

Reading from a statement outside court, Allen said he hoped the outcome "would discourage American Apparel or anyone else from ever trying such a thing again."

American Apparel president Dov Charney told reporters it wasn't his decision to settle. The company's insurance company "controlled the defense" in the case, he said.

"I'm not sorry of expressing myself," he said.

Allen, 73, sued the trendy clothing company last year for $10 million after the advertisements turned up on billboards in Hollywood and New York, and on a Web site. Using a frame from the film "Annie Hall," the ads depicted Allen as a Hasidic Jew -- long beard, side curls, black hat -- and featured Yiddish text meaning "the holy rebbe."

Court papers filed on Allen's behalf had described the actor-director as one of the most influential figures in the history of American film, and say he believes maintaining strict control over his image has been critical to his success.

The papers claimed Allen hasn't done commercials in the United States since 1960s, when he was a struggling standup comic. The billboards, he says, falsely implied he endorsed a clothing line known for its racy advertising -- a "blatant misappropriation and commercial use of Allen's image."

American Apparel lawyers have called the $10 million demand "outrageous," especially since the billboards were taken down after a week. They also have threatened to call Allen's former longtime companion, actress Mia Farrow, and his current wife, Soon-Yi Previn, as witnesses to show that his image has already been devalued by scandal. Previn is Farrow's adopted daughter.

Farrow starred in several of Allen's movies, including "Crimes and Misdemeanors." Their relationship ended in 1992, when she discovered he was having an affair with Previn, then 22.

On Monday, Allen blasted American Apparel, calling their First Amendment defense "sheer nonsense," and accusing of it of trying "to smear me."
Charney insisted there were no hard feelings, saying the billboards were misunderstood.

"We would never try to malign the dignity of Mr. Allen," he said. "I have respect for Mr. Allen. ... I hope to meet him on more friendly terms at a different point."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on May 30, 2009, 10:29:31 AM
Woody Allen finds Kidman replacement
U.K. actress Lucy Punch joins cast of untitled pic
Source: Variety

Woody Allen has tapped British actress Lucy Punch to join the cast of his upcoming untitled film. She replaces Nicole Kidman.

Allen does not disclose details on plot, characters or even his titles, but sources said Punch will play a high-priced call girl similar to Ashley Dupre, who was at the center of the scandal that brought down New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer. Kidman bowed out because of a schedule overlap with "The Rabbit Hole," the John Cameron Mitchell-directed film she is producing as well as starring in.

Landing the role is a coup for Punch, who was a regular a few seasons back on the CBS sitcom "The Class." Her screen credits include "Hot Fuzz" and she just wrapped the Anna Faris-Topher Grace-starrer "Young Americans."

Punch joins Josh Brolin, Anthony Hopkins, Antonio Banderas, Naomi Watts and Freida Pinto in a film that Allen will shoot in London, with financing from Mediapro, the Spain-based company responsible for "Vicky Cristina Barcelona."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on June 18, 2009, 12:35:03 PM
Woody Allen wants to cast France's first lady
Carla Bruni-Sarkozy 'would be wonderful,' director says
Reuters
 
PARIS -- Woody Allen would like to use France's first lady Carla Bruni-Sarkozy for a film role, the director said on RTL radio Thursday.

"I'm sure she would be wonderful," he said through a translator. "She's got charisma, she's already acted so she's not unknown to an audience. There are a lot of ways I could use her though I don't have a story for her at the moment," he said.

"But I'll certainly talk to her about it and I'll ask her if she's interested."

Bruni-Sarkozy, one of the world's top models before starting a career as a singer and marrying President Nicolas Sarkozy last year, has appeared briefly on the big screen, playing herself in Robert Altman's 1994 fashion satire "Pret-a-Porter."

Allen, whose latest film "Whatever Works" comes out in France next month, plans to shoot a film in Paris next year, RTL said.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on August 05, 2009, 09:53:57 AM
http://thequietus.com/articles/02083-of-montreal-s-kevin-barnes-on-woody-allen-his-films

don't really understand how the article worked - he wrote the paragraph titles, they asked him certain questions but left them out?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on October 14, 2009, 12:18:12 AM
Woody Allen offered 17 million dollars to film in Rio
   
RIO DE JANEIRO (AFP) – A film studio and Rio de Janeiro city and state authorities have offered 17 million dollars to US film director Woody Allen to work his celluloid magic in the fabled Marvelous City, media reports said Tuesday.

The offer was made last week when Allen's sister and film producer Letty Aronson was given a guided tour of Rio by advertising executive Claudio Loureiro, as quoted by the Folha daily.

Loureiro told the newspaper that Allen was offered 15 million dollars to film in the city by Brazilian film studios Conspiracao and 1.7 million dollars by the authorities of both Rio de Janeiro city and state.

Shooting would begin in 2012, Loureiro said, since Allen is booked up until 2011.

Major film productions in Rio have been scarce, with many businesses shunning the city in recent years due to its high crime rate.

Allen has already worked on films outside his beloved New York and the United States: he shot "Match Point" (2005) in London and he filmed 2008's "Vicky Cristina Barcelona" mostly in the Spanish city and other locations in Spain.

Next year, the American director is expected to shoot a film in France.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: cine on October 14, 2009, 12:49:51 AM
yeah, book him when he's 77. that works. as if he'll be alive. he'll be a vegetable.

in related news, i'll be seeing him speak live in NYC this sunday aft as part of the New Yorker Festival. should be a good time had by all.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: modage on October 14, 2009, 04:31:19 PM
I didn't know he was speaking at the New Yorker Festival.  This will be my first year going to it (to see Matt Weiner talk about Advertising) because even though they have great speakers they're always super expensive.  If you approach him, makes sure it's with an obscure reference to one of his films in hand and with a photographer friend standing by to capture it.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on October 26, 2009, 12:10:33 PM
Woody Allen's latest is 'Stranger'
"You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger" produced by Mediapro
Source: Hollywood Reporter

MADRID -- "You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger" is the name of Woody Allen's new film, starring Antonio Banderas, Josh Brolin, Anthony Hopkins and Naomi Watts, the Spanish producer Mediapro announced Monday.

The announcement came as the Barcelona-based producer said Spanish broadcaster Antena 3 has entered the project as a co-producer, repeating the same relationship the two forged on "Vicky Cristina Barcelona."

Gemma Jones, Freida Pinto and Lucy Punch round out the cast in the film that revolves around different members of a family, their tangled love lives and their attempts to try to solve their problems.

Slated for release in fall 2010, "Stranger" is the second of four Mediapro Woody Allen projects.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on November 29, 2009, 09:51:43 PM
Woody Allen recruits France's first lady
Carla Bruni-Sarkozy says she's "not at all an actress"
Associated Press
 
PARIS -- Woody Allen has successfully courted France's first lady, Carla Bruni-Sarkozy.

The former supermodel and wife of President Nicolas Sarkozy says she's agreed to be in the famed director's next film, but doesn't know what role he has in store for her and admits she could be a terrible actress.

Allen "asked me to be in his next film," she said on Canal Plus television, where she appeared for an interview and duet with crooner Harry Connick Jr.

Asked if he had told her what part she would play, Bruni-Sarkozy replied: "No. But I said 'yes'... I do everything a little bit blindly. If I don't, I won't do anything."

"I'm not at all an actress. Maybe I'll be absolutely terrible," she added.

"I'd like to -- you know -- when I'm a grandmother, to have done a Woody Allen film," said Bruni-Sarkozy, who has a son from a relationship before Sarkozy. "I cannot in my life miss an opportunity like this."

The bespectacled cinematic legend asked Bruni-Sarkozy not to make another film before his, she said.

"If this ever comes about, it'll be a great experience," she said.

Bruni-Sarkozy, now a singer-songwriter, has largely shelved her concert tour plans to make way for her responsibilities as France's first lady.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on February 19, 2010, 01:52:18 AM
Is Owen Wilson becoming Woody Allen’s new muse?
Source: Hollywood Reporter

Owen Wilson is attached to star in the new Woody Allen movie that will shoot this summer.

As with all the writer-director’s film work, Allen is keeping the untitled feature’s story line and characters hush-hush, and it’s not clear how big Wilson’s role is. In November, Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, France’s first lady, mentioned that Allen had seduced her into taking a role in the film, though the writer-director’s camp would not confirm.

Spain’s Imagina is selling the new project in Cannes.

The UTA-repped Wilson most recently voiced a supporting role in Wes Anderson’s animated “Fantastic Mr. Fox.” The actor has also voiced the title role in the Fox comedy “Marmaduke,” which hits theaters in June.

Beyond that, Wilson will appear in two December releases: James L. Brooks’ untitled project for Sony and the “Meet the Fockers” sequel coming from Universal.

Allen’s next film, “You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger,” stars Antonio Banderas, Josh Brolin, Anthony Hopkins, Naomi Watts, Gemma Jones, Freida Pinto and Lucy Punch. Its Spanish producer, Mediapro, has a September release scheduled. Allen’s previous film, “Whatever Works,” came out last June.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: 72teeth on February 19, 2010, 02:30:23 AM
i don't think they know what muse means...
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on March 03, 2010, 01:02:49 PM
Woody Allen Hires Cotillard For Lead Role
By MIKE FLEMING; Deadline Hollywood
 
EXCLUSIVE: I've just learned Woody Allen has set Marion Colillard to play the "Muse" and star opposite Owen Wilson in that untitled film he's shooting this summer in Paris. France’s First Lady, Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, also has been mentioned as a possible participant, but nothing's set as of yet. Allen's pic is being financed under his 3-picture deal with Spain’s Mediapro. It still seems odd watching the quintessential New York director shoot in Paris, London, or Barcelona. (Though he returned for Whatever Works.) Allen long enjoyed a relationship with studios that few directors could match, where they financed his films without even reading the script. Those days are long gone -- except overseas. Woody recently wrapped You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger in London and scheduled for release in September. Cotillard most recently starred in Nine.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on March 04, 2010, 12:00:22 AM
Rachel McAdams joining Woody Allen film
Actress will star opposite Owen Wilson, Marion Cotillard
Source: Hollywood Reporter
 
Rachel McAdams is in negotiations to star opposite Owen Wilson and Marion Cotillard in Woody Allen's untitled movie scheduled to shoot in the summer.

As with most Allen movies, plot details are being kept under wraps, though the setting for the ensemble is France. Spain's Mediapro is financing and plans to sell the movie in Cannes.

McAdams' boarding comes on the heels of Allen's latest movie, the London-set "You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger," being acquired by Sony Pictures Classics. "Stranger" also was financed by Mediapro.

McAdams is coming off the success of "Sherlock Holmes" and has on her docket Terrence Malick's untitled movie project, in which she will co-star with Christian Bale, Javier Bardem and Olga Kurylenko. The movie shoots this year.

The actress, repped by UTA and Magnolia Entertainment, next appears with Harrison Ford in the J.J. Abrams-produced "Morning Glory," which Paramount releases Oct. 28.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on April 22, 2010, 03:26:54 PM
Woody Allen reveals details of upcoming pic
Director goes public with 'Midnight in Paris,' cast members
Source: Variety

Woody Allen has gone public with details about his upcoming film, titled "Midnight in Paris" and shooting this summer in Paris.

The usually reclusive filmmakers revealed Thursday that the pic stars Owen Wilson, Marion Cotillard, Rachel McAdams, Kathy Bates and Carla Bruni. Also in the cast are Michael Sheen, Nina Arianda, Tom Hiddleston, Corey Stoll, Mimi Kennedy and Kurt Fuller.

Deals for Wilson, Cotillard and McAdams had been disclosed in late March while the participation of Bruni -- wife of French president Nicolas Sarkozy – had been rumored for months but the remainder of the cast had stayed under the radar.

"Midnight in Paris" is a romantic comedy that follows a family travelling to the city for business, including a young engaged couple that has their lives transformed throughout the journey. "The film celebrates a young man's great love for Paris, and simultaneously explores the illusion people have that a life different from their own is better," the announcement said.

Letty Aronson, Steve Tenenbaum and Jaume Roures are producing "Paris," part of a three-picture financing deal between Allen's Gravier Prods. and Mediapro.

Spain-based Mediapro also funded Allen's "Vicky Cristina Barcelona" and his upcoming "You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger," set to be released domestically by Sony Pictures Classics this fall. "Stranger" is also set to screen out of competition at Cannes next month.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Alexandro on April 22, 2010, 08:13:04 PM
this man leaves no stone unturned. owen wilson? that could actually be a nice combination. he should work with nicholson somehow too.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on April 22, 2010, 08:30:43 PM
Any movie that reminds me of the charm that was "Everyone Says I Love You" is something to look forward to. Woody Allen, sentimentality and Paris is a good thing.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on May 15, 2010, 10:45:29 AM
Woody Allen shares tales of love, death at Cannes

CANNES, France - Love, death, the terrible pitfalls of aging, romance between older men and younger women — they're all part of the Woody Allen canon, whether in his films or when he's just shooting the breeze.

Allen's latest mix of comedy and drama, "You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger," premiered Saturday at the Cannes Film Festival, presenting an ensemble of characters dealing with familiar issues at the heart of the filmmaker's 40-some movies.

The film features Naomi Watts, Anthony Hopkins, Antonio Banderas, Josh Brolin, Gemma Jones and Freida Pinto as an ensemble of Londoners coping with failing marriage, stymied ambition, the yearning for new relationships and the fear of mortality.

In a news conference, Allen addressed many of these issues, along with such matters as why he shoots films in London rather than near his home in Manhattan and why he has not costarred in his recent pictures.

• On aging: "I find it a lousy deal. There's no advantage in getting older. I'm 74 now. You don't get smarter, you don't get wiser, you don't get more mellow, you don't get more kindly. Nothing good happens. Your back hurts more. You get more indigestion. Your eyesight isn't as good. You need a hearing aid. It's a bad business getting older, and I would advise you not to do it."

• On May-December romances: "It's a good laugh-getter, and a good provocative kind of thing, so that's really why I use it. ... It gives me something that you can get good situations from and good jokes from."

• On London: "The films that I make in London I could make in New York. They would just be more expensive to make in New York. It's a pleasure to work in London, because the summers are cool, the skies are gray, good for photography. There are wonderful crews and wonderful actors."

• On not appearing in his films: "For years, I played the romantic lead, and then I couldn't play it any longer, because I got too old to play it, and it's no fun just not playing the guy who gets the girl. So unless I can think of some way to do it, no. ... You can imagine how frustrating it is when I do these movies with Scarlett Johansson and Naomi Watts, and the other guys get them. And I'm the director. I'm the, you know, that old guy over there is the director. I don't like that. I like being the one that sits across from them in the restaurant and looks in their eyes and lies to them."

• On death: "My relationship with death remains the same. I am very strongly against it."

"You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger," Allen's 10th film at Cannes, spins a convoluted tale of troubled lives as Alfie (Hopkins) becomes obsessed with aging and leaves his wife, Helena (Jones), eventually marrying a young, gold-digging actress-prostitute (Lucy Punch).

Alfie and Helena's daughter, Sally (Watts), supports husband Roy (Brolin) while he struggles to finish a novel that might fulfill the promise of his first published book. Meantime, Roy falls for a beautiful neighbor (Pinto), while Sally develops feelings for her boss (Banderas) at an art gallery.

Helena finds comfort from a quarter in which Allen himself places no faith — the prognostications of a fortuneteller. Everyone needs their own little fictions to cope with the harshness of life, he said.

"I do feel that it's a grim, pitiful, nightmarish, meaningless experience," Allen said. "The only way that you can be happy is if you tell yourself some lies and deceive yourself, and I'm not the first person to say this or the most articulate person on it. It was said by Nietzsche, it was said by Freud, it was said by Eugene O'Neill. One must have one's delusions to live. You look at life too honestly and clearly, life does become unbearable, because it's a pretty grim enterprise, you must admit."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on May 15, 2010, 10:59:51 AM
cannes news week, hell yeah.


• On death: "My relationship with death remains the same. I am very strongly against it."


hahah, he's still got it!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on May 17, 2010, 12:28:21 AM
Adrien Brody joining Woody Allen film
Source: Hollywood Reporter
 
Oscar winner Adrien Brody is joining Woody Allen's all-star cast for the romantic comedy "Midnight in Paris." The project begins shooting this summer in the French capital.

Owen Wilson, Marion Cotillard, Rachel McAdams, Kathy Bates and Michael Sheen are among those already cast, as is the first lady of France, Carla Bruni-Sarkozy.

The film is about a family traveling to the City of Lights for business. The party includes a young engaged couple forced to confront the illusion that a life different from their own is better. Sources describe Brody's role as "flashy."

Letty Aronson, Steve Tenenbaum and Jaume Roures are producing the film, which reunites Brody with his "The Darjeeling Limited" and "Fantastic Mr. Fox" co-star Wilson.

Brody, who is repped by Paradigm and Red Hawk Management, next stars in the Warner Bros. sci-fi thriller "Splice," due out June 4, followed by the July 9 release of Fox's "Predators." He won a best actor Oscar for his role in Roman Polanski's "The Pianist."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: blackmirror on May 19, 2010, 12:39:38 PM
Sweet and Lowdown is my favorite Woody Allen film.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on August 22, 2011, 02:04:46 PM
Woody Allen’s Euro-Trip Continues; Eyes Munich As Setting For Next Film
Source: Playlist

Lensing on Woody Allen‘s Rome-set film, “Bop Decameron,” is still in progress but it looks like the prolific director already has his sights set on the setting of his next film. Continuing his European adventures, Allen is reportedly eyeing a teaming with Bavaria Studios which would see him visit Munich, Germany next summer for his next, currently-untitled and as-always mysterious film. The budget would run at around $25 million.

The stop off in Munich will follow Allen’s recent ventures in Barcelona (”Vicky Cristina Barcelona”), London (”You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger,” “Match Point,” “Cassandra’s Dream,” “Scoop”) and Paris (”Midnight In Paris”) which was all catalysed by his inability to shoot his scripts in the United States due to ballooning costs. 2005’s “Match Point” was, in fact, originally set in New York and the Hamptons with Allen forced to anglicize it and shoot in London. It’s certainly paying off, though, with “Midnight In Paris” now Allen’s biggest box office success of his career that is even drawing Oscar talk from certain corners.

Allen has no problem attracting stars for these projects either with his latest congregating strong talents from around the globe: Jesse Eisenberg, Ellen Page, Alec Baldwin, Penelope Cruz, Judy Davis, Greta Gerwig and Alison Pill all star with Italian thesps Robert Begnini, Antonio Albanese, Fabio Armiliata, Alessandra Mastronardi, Ornella Muti, Flavio Parenti and Alessandro Tiberi also on board for the story loosely based on the Decameron—a collection of over 100 14th century novellas by Italian writer Giovanni Boccaccio—which will involve four unconnected vignettes, two of which involve American characters in the city, the other two involving Italian cast members. The latter two segments will likely be in Italian as well.

We’re expecting nothing less from Allen’s next with the Bavarian capital sure to rival its European counterparts as the extra character in the director’s recent run abroad. We’re sure he’s doing wonders for tourism as well.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: wilder on November 16, 2011, 02:43:16 PM
'Woody Allen: A Documentary (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1895299)' will air on PBS on November 20th from 9 - 11pm, and November 21st from 9 - 10:30pm. Trailer here (http://tinyurl.com/7jps9qe)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on November 18, 2011, 06:53:30 PM
This looks good, thanks for the link.

I just happened to catch Sleeper on TV the other night and it was so funny. The part where he's holding the nose at gunpoint.  :yabbse-grin:
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: classical gas on December 04, 2011, 05:44:30 AM
Godard meets Woody Allen:

http://t.co/MEcM7Bu5  or

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=3431389813541137243


Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on December 04, 2011, 10:52:46 AM
They must be having an age-off.

Last one standing dies.

It would be like the scene with Deniro and Pacino in Heat but instead of talking they just sit there and see who can eat their mushy peas the slowest.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: chere mill on December 04, 2011, 12:36:04 PM
Godard meets Woody Allen:

http://t.co/MEcM7Bu5  or

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=3431389813541137243

thanks for posting that. fun to watch. reminds me of when lars von trier talked with pta in that edition of blackbook magazine.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on June 04, 2012, 02:41:18 PM
Comedians Louis C.K., Andrew Dice Clay Round Out Woody Allen Cast
BY MIKE FLEMING | Deadline

Deadline has picked off most of the casting of Woody Allen’s upcoming film already, but the Woodman has finalized the ensemble of the film he will shoot in San Francisco. The surprise is the additions of standup comedians Louis C.K. and especially Andrew Dice Clay. Dice had an arc of episodes on Entourage, but this is a big deal for him. Here’s the announcement.

NEW YORK (June 4, 2012) – Woody Allen announced today the cast of his latest untitled film. Starring, in alphabetical order, are Alec Baldwin, Cate Blanchett, Louis C.K., Bobby Cannavale, Andrew Dice Clay, Michael Emerson, Sally Hawkins and Peter Sarsgaard. Co-stars include Max Casella and Alden Ehrenreich. It is a Gravier Productions film produced by Allen’s long time producers, Letty Aronson and Stephen Tenenbaum.

The new film will be shot in New York and San Francisco this summer. This marks Allen’s second time directing in San Francisco — his directorial debut, 1969’s TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN, was also set there.

Allen recently won an Academy Award® for Best Original Screenplay for MIDNIGHT IN PARIS. His upcoming film, TO ROME WITH LOVE, will be released on June 22 by Sony Pictures Classics.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pozer on June 04, 2012, 06:25:34 PM
might actually have to see a woody allen movie in the theater.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: wilder on July 10, 2013, 09:51:20 PM
How Woody Allen Sees It
BY CHARLES MCGRATH
via The Wall Street Journal

Even as he approaches 80, Woody Allen remains one of the most prolific filmmakers working today. With the release of his 48th feature, "Blue Jasmine," the celebrated director opens up about playing the romantic lead, the hit-flop trap and why he just can't quit the business.

(http://i.imgur.com/Sai7i4Y.jpg)

IN REAL LIFE, WOODY ALLEN isn't much different from the character he plays in his movies. He has the same reedy Brooklyn accent he uses on-screen and wears the same dorky, black-framed glasses he's worn since he was 17. He's shy, meek, insecure, a little phobic. When he showers, he makes a point of standing away from the drain, and he's not crazy about tunnels. Too much like the womb.

That such a person manages the existential crisis of getting out of bed in the morning, or accomplishes anything at all, let alone becoming a celebrated filmmaker, seems miraculous. But Allen's nebbishness disguises immense willpower and Stakhanovite work habits. Not long ago, Marshall Brickman, an old friend and collaborator (he cowrote Manhattan and Annie Hall, among other classic Allen movies), was reminiscing about Allen's career. They first met, he recalled, in the early '60s at The Bitter End, a club in Greenwich Village, where Brickman performed with the Tarriers, a folk group, and Allen, a stand-up comic, was the nervous opening act. Though Allen was an inspired joke writer, stand-up did not come naturally to him then. He didn't have the temperament and was often terrified and miserable. Yet he kept at it, even attempting stunts like boxing with a kangaroo if Jack Rollins, his longtime manager, thought it would help the act. "Some hole in his persona needed it so badly that he was willing to endure all the anxiety and humiliation of getting out in front of an audience and bombing," Brickman said. "And to think he went from that to being thought of in the pantheon along with people like Bergman."

These days, every month or so, Brickman and Allen go for a walk in Central Park. They follow the same route and have the same conversation every time. "We talk about the business"—the film business, that is—"and how awful it is," he said. "We talk about women. Years ago we'd see a couple of old guys unwrapping a sandwich on a bench, and now it's us—we're the old guys. We also talk about hearing."

But though he has gone gray and is a little stooped, Allen, who is now 77—how can that be?—doesn't look or act like an old guy. He's so busy you could say it's a little neurotic, a little overcompensating. Most Thursdays he rehearses with his jazz ensemble, and every Monday he plays clarinet at the Carlyle hotel. He frequently writes "casuals"—or humor pieces—for The New Yorker. He's working now with the theater director Susan Stroman on a Broadway musical version of his 1994 film Bullets Over Broadway, and he just finished making a movie written and directed by John Turturro in which he plays the owner of a failing bookstore who turns to pimping to make ends meet. And Allen continues to write and direct his own movies at an assembly-line pace, just as he has for five decades. Some are better than others, but there is no such thing as a really bad Woody Allen movie, and they come along—a new one every year—as reliably as the taxman. The critic Peter Biskind once called Allen the Joyce Carol Oates of moviemaking.

Allen's 48th feature, Blue Jasmine, starring Cate Blanchett and Alec Baldwin, opens in July. It's based on a story Allen's wife, Soon-Yi, told him about a woman she knew whose lifestyle became suddenly downsized after a financial disaster. Blanchett plays a pill-popping, vodka-swigging East Side sophisticate married to a Waspy version of Bernie Madoff (Baldwin). When he's found out, she loses everything and has to move into the San Francisco apartment of her adoptive sister—a bagger at a grocery store—and her two mouth-breathing sons. The story is more serious than comic, and though it's hard to take your eyes off her, the Blanchett character isn't always likable. Will it work at the box office? Allen can't stop to worry about that. He's already at work on the next one.

Chaplin, whose career in many ways resembles Allen's, stopped making movies in the late '60s. Fellini quit when he was 70. Allen, who used to say that filmmaking was a young man's game and that he would be done by the time he was 50, is edging into the rarefied territory occupied by Robert Bresson and Ingmar Bergman, who both made movies into their eighties. After a brief slump, he is even on a bit of a roll now. Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008) and To Rome With Love (2012) were well received, and Midnight in Paris (2011) was, by Allen standards, a big hit, making more than $150 million worldwide.

But despite his enormous body of work, Allen no longer occupies the place he once did in the moviemaking firmament. He might be more highly regarded, in fact, if he'd made fewer films. There are so many you can hardly keep track. Broadway Danny Rose, Mighty Aphrodite, Radio Days, Sweet and Lowdown: They're all packed away in the attic of our movie-going memory.

(http://i.imgur.com/dttCAvl.jpg)

Some of his fans deserted Allen after the tabloid debacle of 1992, when Mia Farrow—with whom Allen had a son and two adopted children—discovered that he was also romantically involved with Soon-Yi, her 21-year-old adopted daughter with André Previn. Farrow's custody suit, in which she alleged, though it was never proven, that Allen had molested their adopted daughter, Dylan, made headlines for weeks. (Allen and Soon-Yi married in 1997 and have two adopted daughters, now teenagers. Meanwhile, Allen's son with Farrow, Ronan, remains estranged from him, claiming it's not possible to have a relationship with someone who is both your father and your brother-in-law.) And with younger moviegoers Allen has never established the kind of following he enjoyed in the '60s and '70s. By now, his movies—small, talky, with no action scenes or special effects, owing less to Hollywood than to arty European masters like Bergman, Fellini and Luis Buñuel—may even be a bit of an acquired taste.

None of this bothers Allen very much. His main regret these days is that he's getting too old to play the romantic lead. "It's an inevitable disaster of aging, and there's nothing I can do about it," he said recently, sitting in the cutting and screening room he rents in a swanky East Side apartment building. (It says "Manhattan Film Center" on the door, but in fact the place used to be a bridge club.) "I can't play the scenes where I'm sitting opposite Diane Keaton or Mia or Dianne Wiest or Judy Davis. If I think of parts for myself now, all I can be is Pop, the lovable doorman backstage at the theater who takes phone numbers for the guys, or the psychiatrist, or the amiable dad at the wedding." He sighed. "I like to be the lover."

Allen is fond of saying that the only thing standing between him and greatness is himself, and likes to come across not as a grand old director but as a self-taught schlepper. He insists, for example, that his characteristic use of long master shots—ones that record an entire scene from a single camera angle—is the result of laziness, not conscious technique. "I don't have a technical attention deficit disorder, but I have an honorary one," he said. "I don't have the patience or the concentration to shoot hours of us talking in a two-shot, and then your single and my single and from over your shoulder and over my shoulder. I like to do as many pages as I can in one take."

But Brickman maintains that Allen is in fact very canny about every aspect of the filmmaking business. "Some instinct told him what choices to make, like not going to the Academy Awards, keeping himself apart a little, and yet so often delivering on the promise," he said. "He's figured out how to survive in a very hostile and competitive environment."

One of the things Allen is shrewdest about is money. His films typically cost about $18 million to make, which is next to nothing these days. Most of them go on to make a modest profit—if not in the United States, then when they're shown worldwide—and once in a while he has a hit on the order of Midnight in Paris. It's a fairly foolproof formula, even if it seems to have little appeal to the studios now, who would rather make bigger bets in hopes of bigger payouts. Allen's modest budgets enable him to retain total control of his films, something that's seldom granted to directors anymore, and to be flexible when it comes to probably his greatest strength as a director: casting memorable actors in memorable parts. "I'm not in the hit-flop business," he explained. "I make a film and if it's a big hit it's not going to do anything special for me. If it's a disaster it won't ruin anything, because I'll already be working on the next. The people who play the hit-flop game suffer a lot when they have the flops. I don't, but then I don't get the highs either."

Juliet Taylor, Allen's casting director, who has been with him since Love and Death (1975), pointed out that because he makes movies so cheaply, Allen doesn't have to find the kind of bankable star on whom you hang all the financing. "He's very cognizant of how some people like to see certain actors," she said, "but that's not required of him in terms of putting a deal together. He doesn't get too attached to any one idea. He'll want someone, and if it doesn't work out, he'll just pick himself up and go on to someone else."

Allen doesn't pay star salaries. His actors get the union minimum, with no dickering. And yet he has no trouble finding stars to work for him. Actors—women especially—love to appear in Woody Allen films because he makes them look great, writes interesting roles for them and, based on his track record of 11 best actress or best supporting actress nominations so far, there's a decent chance they might get some Oscar attention. "We have very good luck because actors aren't always offered a lot of stimulating things," Allen said. "The kinds of films that get made now don't always have great acting roles. So when people get a chance to really act, even if it's for no money, which it is, they grab it."

Blanchett said she had been hoping to work with Allen for years, and when the phone call came she said yes immediately. Talking about her part in Blue Jasmine, she said: "This kind of opportunity doesn't come along all the time. The character's like a combination of Ibsen, Tennessee Williams and Shakespeare. There's such electricity in the gap between her knowing and not knowing."

(http://i.imgur.com/JU6vH9V.jpg)

Though he's good at it, Allen actually hates casting, and his process is so eccentric that, Taylor said, "We warn people beforehand." The whole interview typically lasts about a minute, and in most cases the actors aren't even asked to take a seat. "I find the whole experience very awkward, because I am socially awkward," Allen said. "I don't like meeting people. Once in a while a star will come in and Juliet will say you have to let this person sit down for a minute. This is an argument she and I have all the time. She thinks they want to talk. To me, the person always seems to be relieved. They're happy to be in and out."

On the set, Allen is famously nonintrusive. He doesn't meet the actors beforehand, doesn't discuss their characters with them and doesn't believe in rehearsing. The cast simply shows up on the first day and goes to work. "I've worked with amazing people over the years," Allen said. "Meryl Streep, Geraldine Page, Maureen Stapleton, Judy Davis and Gena Rowlands, one after the other, these fabulous women—what do I have to teach them? If Cate, or anyone, is doing it too fast or too slow, or too theatrically or not theatrically enough, I might go over and say, 'Why don't you try that a little faster next time?' They do it, and that's the extent of my direction."

(http://i.imgur.com/GDy44wk.jpg)
DIRECTOR'S CUT | The rented screening room on Manhattan's Upper East Side where Allen has been cutting his films since Stardust Memories.

By now there is a certain mystique about working with Allen. Actors want desperately to please him, and more often than not, by saying very little he gets exactly the performance he wants. He is always encouraging the actors not to stick to the script, for example—to change, cut or add to their lines however they see fit—and the more he does so, the more they tend to deliver their parts verbatim. Saying that she would do it again in a heartbeat, Blanchett called the experience of working with Allen "brutal and electric." "Everyone is on tippy-toes," she said. "I think he thinks the more he says, the more he screws it up. He wants to get out of the actors' way, and they want as much as they can get of him." She added: "He's incredibly restless, and that creates a sort of nervous energy on the set. He wants to get it done now. He wants all the energy of that day and then he wants to go and have dinner."

"Why does Woody still make movies?" Brickman asked. "Because he can. Because they still let him." He laughed and added: "I don't think people understand the degree to which Woody is relentlessly middle-class. From what I gather he's a good family man. He's a very good father, perhaps surprisingly so. He has a very strong, perhaps overwhelming work ethic. I don't think he knows how not to get up in the morning, get on the treadmill, practice the clarinet, write."

Allen ventured a slightly different explanation. "You know in a mental institution they sometimes give a person some clay or some basket weaving?" he said. "It's the therapy of moviemaking that has been good in my life. If you don't work, it's unhealthy—for me, particularly unhealthy. I could sit here suffering from morbid introspection, ruing my mortality, being anxious. But it's very therapeutic to get up and think, Can I get this actor; does my third act work? All these solvable problems that are delightful puzzles, as opposed to the great puzzles of life that are unsolvable, or that have very bad solutions. So I get pleasure from doing this. It's my version of basket weaving."

Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: wilder on July 17, 2013, 08:51:09 PM
Woody Allen Wants To Write A Film To Star In With Louis C.K., Considering Return To Stand-Up Comedy
via The Playlist

While his work ethic hasn't paused for a single moment, Woody Allen has lately been more content to work behind the camera rather than act in front of it. While he does have a role in John Turturro's upcoming "Fading Gigolo," the writer/director has been fairly selective about appearing in his own films, letting six years pass between "Scoop" and "To Rome With Love." But not that he hasn't thought about it, and it turns out one of his "Blue Jasmine" stars may be inspiring him to act again. And it's a pairing we'd certainly endorse.

Chatting with the New York Times, Allen doesn't hold back on the praise for Louis C.K., and reveals that it was while he was casting Bobby Cannavale for "Blue Jasmine," that he discovered the comic actor. "I didn’t know Louis C.K. at all. But someone showed me a tape of Bobby Cannavale – it was to see Bobby Cannavale, and he was in a skit with Louis C.K. Cannavale, I thought, yes, he’s great and right for this part. And I said but who’s that guy with him? He’s wonderful," Allen explained. "So we had him originally for the Andrew Dice Clay part. And he read it, and he read it very well. We thought, he’s so likeable. He’s clearly such a sweet guy. I was dying to use him in something, so we used him to play the sweeter guy. I’d love to do a movie with him and me, a comedy. I’m looking for some idea that would work, for the two of us to do. Of course I hope that people aren’t disappointed that I don’t act with him [in "Blue Jasmine"], and he doesn’t have a commensurately comic part with his talent. But some day, I will get something that we could do together, because I do think it would be fun. I’m such a great fan of his."

Undoubtedly, Louis C.K. must be thrilled that Allen -- who has clearly been an influence, particularly on episodes of "Louie" -- is taken with his skill, but the first attempt to pen something for the duo, didn't quite work out. "When I finished ['Blue Jasmine'], I went into my room and thought, 'What would be a fun picture? My first thought for a while was, 'Can I come up with something at the moment that I could do with Louis C.K.?' But I wasn’t able to get the right idea, and time was starting to move," Allen said. "And I thought, well, here’s an idea that would make a very fun movie, so I started writing it, and I finished it, and I thought, this is a perfect movie for Colin Firth and Emma Stone, so that’s what I did."

And that film is currently gearing up, with Eileen Atkins, Marcia Gay Harden, Hamish Linklater, Simon McBurney, Jacki Weaver, Jeremy Shamos and Erica Leerhsen also slated for roles. And while plot details have largely been kept under wraps, The Film Stage did some diggin and learned the film will take place in 1920s and 1930s era in France.

Anyway, we'll have to keep waiting to see if/when the Allen/C.K. picture ever happens. But it appears the 77 year-old Allen still has few surprises up his sleeve -- he's thinking about returning to stand-up comedy. He recalled recently seeing legendary comic Mort Sahl perform at the Carlyle Hotel (where Allen plays weekly with his jazz band), and he became inspired to get back on the stage.

"Watching him, I had the same feeling now, in 2013, as I had when I saw him in 1950-something. Of, 'Hey, I’d like to get back onstage and do standup again.' He inspired me then to be a standup comic, and all these years later, I thought of it again because of him. He makes that phenomenon so enticing," Allen said, confirming he's thought about putting together a tour for himself. "I was thinking of it. Since I saw him, I’ve just been toying with the idea. I would love to see if I could. Just getting together an hour of stuff to talk about would be a lot of work."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: wilder on July 26, 2013, 06:06:16 PM
Editor Alisa Lepselter Talks Blue Jasmine, Her 15th Woody Allen Collaboration
JULY 25, 2013 BY MATTHEW STEIGBIGEL
via The Credits

After working as an Assistant Editor on movies for the likes of Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, and Nora Ephron, and getting her break cutting Nicole Holofcener’s first feature Walking and Talking (1996), Editor Alisa Lepselter, A.C.E. got the job of a lifetime—she cut Woody Allen’s Sweet and Lowdown (1999). Fifteen years later she is on her fifteenth collaboration with Allen for his newest movie, Blue Jasmine, which opens on Friday. We caught up with Lepselter to speak to her about her career and her work with the legendary director.

(http://i.imgur.com/g4LmXig.jpg)

Alisa Lepselter

The Credits: You’ve been working with Woody Allen as editor since Sweet and Lowdown (1999). What’s your work process with him like and has it changed at all over time?

AL: Not that much has changed, in that because of the way he makes films that are specific to him, he doesn’t want to edit the film until he’s shot the whole thing. It’s unusual. Most directors have the editor doing a rough cut as they’re shooting, because they don’t have the time to omit that step. Woody has a lot more freedom to work at his own pace, and he wants to be in the cutting room with me from day one when he’s done shooting. He comes in and we review all the material, and start cutting from the beginning, from scene one, sequentially, which is also very helpful, because you understand what the tone is as you’re going along. But it’s a luxury that most people don’t have, to work that way, and that’s the only way I’ve ever worked with him, and that’s the only way he has, apparently, ever worked with anyone, so that’s the same.

One thing that’s been different is that he’s been traveling more, to go shoot his films overseas, and I don’t go overseas with the crew, mainly because we’re not going to cut it anyway until he comes back, and I can screen the dailies here, and make notes and talk to him if there is anything I have issues with.

Over the years have his shooting and editing schedules remained consistent?

He does a film a year, almost like clockwork, and his shooting schedules are relatively the same every time because they’re based on the kind of budget that he has, and that’s pretty consistent. The editing is not always consistent, because it depends on the film. Some films are put together very easily and others are more problematic, and we’ll just take as much time as we need.  And most people don’t have that [opportunity] either. It’s not as though there’s a studio giving him a deadline. Yes we have some deadlines, we have a mix time set up, etc…so it’s not like we have no schedule at all, but there’s never a difficulty in getting our actual cut together. By the time we lock picture, and we move onto the sound editing and the color correcting, those are the kind of things that can take a long time, and get us up against deadlines, but actually editing the film – we always have enough time.

Have you been editing digitally or on film?

When I got the job [for Sweet and Lowdown, in fall 1998], I was told Woody cuts on film and don’t even think about asking to do it any other way. And I asked to do it another way and he said OK! Sometimes people underestimate how flexible Woody is. He’s very open-minded. I just had to explain to him why I thought he’d really benefit from working on the AVID [digital editing system], and he said ok, we’ll give it a try. And so we’ve been working on AVID ever since. He’s been very happy with it.  He still does shoot on film, and nobody’s ever convinced him that he’d be better off shooting digitally, because the kinds of films that he makes really wouldn’t warrant that switch just yet. The cinematographers he’s worked with lately really do still enjoy working with film given the chance.

What’s the process at the beginning when you get one of his scripts?

He writes an actual, real script. By the time I see it, it’s about to go before the camera, and so if I have any issues that I think technically are going to be a problem for us, I’ll bring it up, but it’s usually rare or minor when that happens. The thing about Woody is that making a film a year and being the genius that he is, it’s rare that there’s going to be real problems. I don’t feel that when we’re editing we’re trying to solve problems. We’re trying to make it the best movie it can be, and tell the story that he wants to tell, and make it as resonant as it can be. He knows what he’s doing when he’s writing a script.

In Blue Jasmine, were the flashback sequences fairly well positioned at the script stage, or was there opportunity to move their location around a bit during the editing?

It was pretty well delineated in the script. There might have been a little bit of play in a scene or two. But it was clear from the script that it was going to be handled the way that we handled it. There’s often a transition from the dialogue that led to Jasmine [Cate Blanchett] having a flashback.

Does Woody shoot variations of his scripted scenes to see how they might play out at the editing stage?

It depends on the scene. There are sometimes when he might shoot it a few different ways, and then when we’re putting it together see which version feels right to him.

He seems comfortable shooting in the summer and editing in the fall.

Shoot during the summer, and then we edit during the fall, and then in the winter we do all the post, the sound mix and the color correcting, which he’s very involved in. The color correcting is very important to him, and that takes a long time. That’s an area where we’ve recently moved into the digital realm.

Woody seems pretty inexhaustible in terms of having plenty of material.

He already has said he has way more ideas for movies than he can possibly make in his lifetime. That’s what his real genius is.  Nobody’s prolific like that.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: MacGuffin on October 15, 2013, 04:07:53 PM
Woody Allen Names New Film ‘Magic In The Moonlight’
Source: Variety

Woody Allen has titled his new film “Magic in the Moonlight.”

The movie takes place in southern France and stars Eileen Atkins, Colin Firth, Marcia Gay Harden, Hamish Linklater, Simon McBurney, Emma Stone and Jacki Weaver. Co-stars include Erica Leerhsen, Catherine McCormack, Paul Ritter and Jeremy Shamos.

The Gravier Prods. film is produced by Allen’s longtime associates Letty Aronson and Stephen Tenenbaum. A distributor has not been set.

The story line has been kept under wraps but official set photos of Firth, Stone and Gay Harden show the actors in 1930s garb at a mansion.

“Magic in the Moonlight” is the 47th film directed by Allen. He’s been nominated for 23 Oscars and won for directing and writing “Annie Hall” and for writing “Midnight in Paris” and “Hannah and Her sisters.”

Allen’s “Blue Jasmine” was released July 26 by Sony Pictures Classics — the sixth Allen film that Sony Classics has handled — with a cast including Alec Baldwin, Cate Blanchett, Bobby Cannavale, Louis C.K., Andrew “Dice” Clay, Sally Hawkins, Peter Sarsgaard and Michael Stuhlbarg.

“Blue Jasmine” has grossed $31 million domestically and was still playing in 190 theaters last weekend. It’s taken in another $18 million internationally.

“Magic in the Moonlight” will be the second film Allen has shot in France in the past three years following “MIdnight in Paris,” which turned out to be his top grosser with over $150 million worldwide.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jenkins on February 01, 2014, 05:25:52 PM
thought i'd hear more about this, and today i did

Quote
What’s your favorite Woody Allen movie? Before you answer, you should know: when I was seven years old, Woody Allen took me by the hand and led me into a dim, closet-like attic on the second floor of our house. He told me to lay on my stomach and play with my brother’s electric train set. Then he sexually assaulted me. He talked to me while he did it, whispering that I was a good girl, that this was our secret, promising that we’d go to Paris and I’d be a star in his movies. I remember staring at that toy train, focusing on it as it traveled in its circle around the attic. To this day, I find it difficult to look at toy trains.
etc at http://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/kristof/2014/02/01/an-open-letter-from-dylan-farrow/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

does this change your opinion on him as a person, probably, andbut does this change your opinion about him as an artist? i'd like to hear the reasons, and i know there are solid reasons, for this being a force of change on perspectives of his art. the parallel here, and it's slightly and surprisingly less disturbing, is polanski. i myself continue to be fascinated by and appreciative of the works of polanski, although from the details i know, polanski crossed a proper line. like, i wouldn't trust him with my daughter, but i trust his movies
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: wilder on February 01, 2014, 05:34:27 PM
i wouldn't trust him with my daughter, but i trust his movies

marquee that

Edit - Not to diminish or disgregard what could turn out to be horribly true, but when a blog like Gawker (http://gawker.com/dylan-farrow-has-published-an-account-of-the-sexual-ass-1513993604) links to what is still only an accusation and labels the link "an account of the assault she experienced", something is very wrong. Obviously if it is seen through and turns out to be fact, it'll be very sick and disappointing, but it wouldn't change my perception of his films. Regardless, I see no reason to speculate about something this heavy and defaming before due process is sought.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Lottery on February 01, 2014, 05:48:29 PM
There's a thread on Mubi about a similar thing. Polanski and Allen are creeps but I still love Chinatown and Annie Hall.

And yes, Marquee that.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: wilder on February 01, 2014, 05:51:26 PM
Just realized there might be a statute of limitations? I don't know.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Reelist on February 01, 2014, 06:33:48 PM
Quote
What’s your favorite Woody Allen movie?

Match Point


A lot of mixed feelings on this. I've gotten plenty of enjoyment from his films without this knowledge, as I assume we all have. And has this information effected my opinion of his films? No. But I question Woody's character, he's always been secretive and seemed off kilter. This confirms what has been rumored for so long, and it's a tragedy that it took so much time to get out, but I'm proud of Dylan for speaking up and would like to hear more of her experience and surely my support of Woody will wane in the process. I don't know how that would change what I've gotten from his movies. I'll see a deeper subtext, for sure. If I like his films made pre-molestation allegations, will I be clear?
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Lottery on February 01, 2014, 06:59:00 PM
I don't know how that would change what I've gotten from his movies. I'll see a deeper subtext, for sure. If I like his films made pre-molestation allegations, will I be clear?

If I'm concerned about anything, it might be that. I mean how have their own life choices have informed their films- their writing or whatever. I think I heard the stuff that happened to Polanski's wife inspired the ending of Chinatown and the general style of Macbeth. And hey, Allen like the younger chicks in Manhattan.
I've probably felt oddly conflicted but I've enjoyed their films after I heard about all that.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Alexandro on February 01, 2014, 07:22:09 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-mqyS36-n7U

and also:


http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/01/27/the-woody-allen-allegations-not-so-fast.html
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Axolotl on February 02, 2014, 12:25:56 AM
Quote
What’s your favorite Woody Allen movie?

Zelig/Manhattan

This doesn't change my opinion of him as an artist at all mostly because I'm not a huge fan of trail by media. Also I think making the argument that It's ok to like his pre-alleged-molestation films is a bit self serving. The mental constitution of Woody at the time that he molested the kid is the same as when he was making his earlier movies and the movies he made after. I'll have no problem enjoying his films even if these allegations are proven, Chinatown is still one of my favourite films.
It's also unfair to lump Woody Allen with Polanski because he's been *convicted* of raping a 13 year old and is a fugitive from the justice system. The worst thing Woody has been proven to do is marrying his girlfriend's adopted adult daughter, which might be a violation of your personal morals but not illegal in any jurisdiction of the world. I might seem like I'm equating laws with absolute morals which I'm not, but I think due process is an important thing when you're dealing with such grave allegations.
A kid lying about(probably in his mind he believed it) me stealing something as a child and my being corporally punished for it based on nothing but his word being a traumatic experience in my childhood might make me biased about this case. This sounds like a horrible blaming the victim spiel, but when piece of shit sites like Gawker publish allegations as facts some perspective is needed.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on February 02, 2014, 01:52:00 AM
Accusations for and against are pretty murky. If I can mostly separate my interest in someone very guilty of a crime and their work (Roman Polanski), I think I can do it for Woody Allen. The only problem is that unlike Polanski, Allen's filmography is a relatively unstable look at older man's fascination with younger women. Manhattan is wonderful, but I will have to admit Allen's character being interested in a 17 year old girl will come off a little differently now.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on February 02, 2014, 01:48:43 PM
I firmly believe everybody is innocent until  proven guilty, so until then I won't even think of Woody Allen as guilty of anything. It's funny that comparisons to Polanski are being made here, because that article Alexandro linked to makes a very interesting point about that.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jenkins on February 02, 2014, 04:44:21 PM
understand and appreciate the support for conclusiveness on this matter. some people are expressing violent opposition based on an unproven accusation, and there are consequences to consider here. it's tricky

but what's at stake here? we're not a jury, we're a message board. at most it's a matter of controlling the logic of this as gossip. polanski, let's drop him, different, agreed. overall though, the quote that locked my personal opinion goes "i know i would rather stand where i stand and eventually be proven wrong than support woody allen and eventually be proven wrong." immediate slander should be tempered, agreed, but the foundation is a possible molestation of a child. it's simply not in my nature to forget this
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on February 02, 2014, 06:13:32 PM
The thing is, 20 years ago this shit was all investigated and there was no psychological or physical evidence to support these accusations. I've read a few unnoficial Allen biographies and all mentioned this case and how inconsistent the accusations against him were, mainly by Farrow who, among other things, was said to try and settle for a certain financial compensation in order to not go to justice with it. I mean, would you settle for a financial compensation if your child was molested? Is there any money in the world who could cover that up? Either she was molested and Allen should be severely punished by it or, on the other hand, Farrow was bullshitting and acted out on revenge against his former lover and adopted daughter and, by doing it, fucked up the emotional life of her little girl making her believe she was molested. That kid is a victim either way, but I find it strange how Farrow's involvement in all of this is never called into question. But that's the thing: we'll never know anything for sure, and I'll have to go with the investigation from 20 years ago as the closest thing from  the truth about all of this: they certainly know more than me or you.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jenkins on February 02, 2014, 06:23:03 PM
Quote
Even people who give Woody the benefit of the doubt and defend him on the internet are often confused on a few points. Some mistakenly say that the court found him “not guilty” of the molestation charges. The fact is there was never such a ruling because he was never charged with a crime, since investigative authorities never found credible evidence to support Mia’s (and Dylan’s) claim.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ono on February 03, 2014, 12:00:46 AM
and also:


http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/01/27/the-woody-allen-allegations-not-so-fast.html

I want to reiterate Alexandro's posting of this link because it's a very well-written article which goes a long way towards explaining what went down and trying to -- well, not so much vindicate -- as defend Woody.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jenkins on February 03, 2014, 12:41:16 AM
reiterate means to say again, like if you quoted the article, like how there's a quote right above you from the article. fml
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ono on February 03, 2014, 12:59:46 AM
Yes, well, I came across that article from a totally different source, then came back here to see if the link was in the thread.  Saw it was, gave Alexandro credit, and replied saying such.  Excuse me for not reading your quote in which you didn't add anything more to the thread.  Links without context often get ignored without explaining why they're relevant.  The article IS relevant because it goes into a lot of detail about assumptions people make about Woody and his relations to those women.  Woody doesn't defend himself, barely knows how to use a computer, so it is worth pointing that out.  SMH.

Fuck YOUR life?  Please.  I want those 15 seconds back in which I had to explain that!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jenkins on February 03, 2014, 11:33:19 AM
thank you for explaining how late to the conversation you are
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: xerxes on February 03, 2014, 10:36:05 PM
The tone of that article is pretty gross, so I'm gonna post this one to even things out a bit:

http://nakedlaw.avvo.com/crime/six-reasons-dylan-farrow-highly-credible.html?utm_source=hootsuite&utm_campaign=hootsuite
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Neil on February 04, 2014, 01:15:39 AM
I'm not trying to echo the thoughts of others here (el panda specifically), or stir up the shit-pot, but things like this cause more problems than they're worth. It has the potential of leading some to believe that these kinds of write-ups belong in the same realm as the real life justice system; and NO this has NOTHING to do with freedom of speech. As a grad in Communications,  I know plenty about the benefactors that come with 'Freedom of the Press,' but it does have its drawbacks, just like everything else in this world. Specifically in our case, it seems that a difficulty lies within differing definitions of, "the press," and exactly how much freedom they should have, and who should decide this.

I'd give Ed Murrow plenty of freedom as a Journalist, but that's another discussion. With this being said, if you're unable to tell which areas are more editorial than others in the link that Alexandro shared with us, I'm sure someone will point those out.

There are no "evening things out" either, that's the problem.  This information shouldn't sway us one way or the other. Those of us living in the states endorse the justice system here, so why shit all over it? Innocent until proven guilty.  That doesn't mean read all the blogs you can find and try to make up your mind, or find the best representation of both sides of the issue. Leave it to the professionals, because I highly doubt that you or any of the folks that wrote the articles which are linked up earlier in this thread will ever find themselves taking the stand for questioning in court. 

Sure, you're free to speculate, and yes you're free to think whatever you want, and it's ALL SO INTERESTING, but as far as the justice system I participate in is concerned, all you're doing is pissing in the wind with your speculation. Especially if you're just gonna look the other way at what transpired regarding these allegations, which led to an investigation that took place years ago (which no one wants to raise a fuss about or attempt to bring up other than the "gross" article).  I'm not saying court systems don't fail, but that's really not what we're talking about here.  What we are talking about here is how detrimental it can be when you volunteer yourself as a member of the judge jury and executioner.
We could all use a little growin' up, and no matter whose side you think you're on, you should know that you're not really on either, because you don't know shit about it.


 
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jenkins on February 04, 2014, 02:58:40 AM
no matter whose side you think you're on, you should know that you're not really on either
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Alexandro on February 04, 2014, 10:01:10 AM
what freaks me out about this whole mess, although I can't say is unexpected, is the amount of self righteousness and hard judgement people have on the internet on a matter whose truth they can't possibly KNOW. any expression of doubt regarding dylan's statement is immediately discarded as claiming woody allen is innocent and dylan is a liar, and as something that sets a bad precedent regarding sexual abuse victims on speaking out. does stating the reasonable fact that there is plenty of reasons woody allen has not been charged or convicted with this crime, plus all the other weird shit that went on with these people, equals getting him off the hook? those are pretty serious accusations and I don't like that you can just accuse someone of something like that without proof trusting that a large group of people will get behind you on a purely emotional basis. this is an old case that, if I've read correctly, was not taken to the courts because mia farrow didn't want to expose her child. but also if I remember correctly, woody allen was furious about this because he felt his name would always be stained with an incomplete accusation. he was the most interested party in going to trial. this one is just one of many instances in this whole thing where there is very reasonable concerns and doubts about who is telling the truth, and the really disturbing stuff is being said on the comments sections of each one of these articles: a lot of hate, a lot of self righteousness, and plenty of anti intellectual, anti science, anti facts, anti artistic expression, anti women, anti men shit being said. ugly all over the place.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Pubrick on February 04, 2014, 10:13:54 AM
All I know is I'm definitely not on Jenkins side.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jenkins on February 04, 2014, 11:13:58 AM
All I know is I'm definitely not on Jenkins side.
so magical. the one thing we all know to be definite and everlasting

i'll take every hit given to me for not waiting for the court and i'll repeat what i've said: the gossip is high in assaults, the gossip is outta control and villainous, but anyway i can't forget what all this is about. curious about how it'll conclude
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Neil on February 04, 2014, 12:48:42 PM
(http://www.jolyon.co.uk/illustrations/TakingThePiss/images/Image%20(8).jpg)



Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jenkins on February 04, 2014, 01:11:16 PM
what speculation did i make neil. please tell me
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Axolotl on February 04, 2014, 01:32:59 PM
Woody Allen is accused of molesting his daughter. It's probably the most horrible crime someone can be accused of and Woody is despicable if this is true. That's probably what everyone else here believes. But there's no harm in withholding judgment until the case is adjudicated by an impartial authority.
I don't get what you're arguing about, jenk.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jenkins on February 04, 2014, 02:18:26 PM
well, that's the third post in a row that's directed right at me. but i've been vocal in this thread and driven this toward myself. the thing i'm saying is: it's true i'm not an authority, it's true the people it happened to know more than we do, it's true judgment should be suspended, it's true the accusation immediately spiraled woody allen into malicious gossip, and it's true that outside all this the entire conversation is about possible child molestation and like you said, axolotl, that's probably the most horrible crime someone can be accused of. because i think it's horrible, because i really do, i try not to forget that's the conversation's center. other aspects and their repeated mentioning -- the legal system, veracity, social defamation, prior investigations -- aren't more important to me than the possibility that child molestation occurred. i haven't attempted to inflate criticisms against woody allen, i've attempted to steer the conversation back towards the point. because we're not the legal system, because we understand the legal system, because the worst possible and personal responses against woody allen aren't being broadcasted here at xixax, reminders about the future course of the event, the fair and logical way to reach a resolution, strike me not as neutralizing but neutering. i think everyone here also believes in the legal system, i haven't heard anyone say otherwise. all i've heard is reminders of it amid a conversation about possible molestation. the legal system will hopefully continue to work as best as it can, and that will be wonderful, and molestation will continue to work as it does, and that's horrible. that's all i'm saying

i like you asked me to clarify. i hope i've made myself clear. also, did you notice my commas and have you started seiobo? sure gets those commas going
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Axolotl on February 04, 2014, 02:49:07 PM
What would a conversation centered on him being a child molester constitute of?
Like gt posted, films like Manhattan do take a disturbing  aspect when viewed through this lens, but that's been true since the 25 years ago and it doesn't detract from the qualities of that film.
People can and probably will boycott his future films to prevent him from gaining financially on their account and that's fine.
If he is found guilty, that will be the in the first paragraph of any summary of his life ever made, he'll be the daughter diddling director for as long as he is remembered, the forgetting obviously being exponentially accelerated in his case, even the allegation puts a huge irredeemable dent to his image.
And that's outsite the terrible reality of a 7 year old girl being molested by her own father. Trying to be sensible about it doesn't mean I'm ignoring the gravity of the issue.

Havent started Sieobo yet, sorry. I hardly have an hour between work and sleep this week. Will try to chat about it on friday.

Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: polkablues on February 04, 2014, 02:58:46 PM
I can't bring myself to care about this situation yet. We have an accusation and we have a refutation. Both currently bear equal validity, which in a vacuum is none.

If Allen is guilty and can be proven guilty, he should go to jail and we can all learn to live without new Woody Allen movies. Either way, nothing that happens will make Annie Hall stop being a great movie.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jenkins on February 04, 2014, 03:04:33 PM
What would a conversation centered on him being a child molester constitute of?

that's a valid and important question: what would a molestation conversation consist of, and not even him as a convicted child molester, but the mere possibility of it. it seems xixax understands both the horribleness of molestation and the fairness of the legal system, so i think the most interesting potential conversation here is an evaluation of the stakes at risk. like i said earlier, it's tricky

it's been approached in great ways already. i'll quote them:

what freaks me out about this whole mess, although I can't say is unexpected, is the amount of self righteousness and hard judgement people have on the internet on a matter whose truth they can't possibly KNOW. any expression of doubt regarding dylan's statement is immediately discarded as claiming woody allen is innocent and dylan is a liar, and as something that sets a bad precedent regarding sexual abuse victims on speaking out. does stating the reasonable fact that there is plenty of reasons woody allen has not been charged or convicted with this crime, plus all the other weird shit that went on with these people, equals getting him off the hook? those are pretty serious accusations and I don't like that you can just accuse someone of something like that without proof trusting that a large group of people will get behind you on a purely emotional basis. this is an old case that, if I've read correctly, was not taken to the courts because mia farrow didn't want to expose her child. but also if I remember correctly, woody allen was furious about this because he felt his name would always be stained with an incomplete accusation. he was the most interested party in going to trial. this one is just one of many instances in this whole thing where there is very reasonable concerns and doubts about who is telling the truth, and the really disturbing stuff is being said on the comments sections of each one of these articles: a lot of hate, a lot of self righteousness, and plenty of anti intellectual, anti science, anti facts, anti artistic expression, anti women, anti men shit being said. ugly all over the place.

Quote
Neil: Am I allowed to watch Leni Riefenstahl's movies?
Mel:   It won't turn you into bloodsucking nazi if you're asking about that.
Mel:   Beside it is very easy to spot and go around ideological imprint, if you know beforehand it is there.
Neil:   To what extent does one consider the personal life of an artist in relation to their own art?
Neil:   let me rephrase;
Neil:   how relevant is the context of an artists life in relation to their own art?
Neil:   Is the decided on a case to case basis?
Neil:   is this** decided upon a case to case basis?
Mel:   You should wait for smarter folks to answer that. Personally I care very little about the life of the artist.
Mel:   "Everything you think about writing, when not writing is wrong." - I like this sentence.
Mel:   If body of work is honest, emotions and personal experience of the author should came a cross, without introducing the author to the audience.
Mel:   Beside deconstructivism made a whole point of ignoring everything beside work itself.
Mel:   There isn't a simple answer to that question I guess, you can build whole philosophy around it.
Neil:   these are the sorts of philosophically charged discussions i'm interested in. I guess I'll head over to reddit.
Neil:   It's interesting because a guy like Kubrick left all these clues that live outside of the work, however the works themselves also have a lot to say. Where as some artists want the work to "stand alone."
Jeremy Blackman:   Mel, I'm not sure that's true about deconstruction. Quoting Derrida: "One of the definitions of what is called deconstruction would be the effort to take this limitless context into account, to pay the sharpest and broadest attention possible to context, and thus to an incessant movement of recontextualization."
Jeremy Blackman:   His original quote "there is nothing outside the text" is literally translated as "there is nothing except text." Which apparently means that text encompasses its context. (He clarified that later.)
Mel:   As far I understand according to Derrida comments from author shouldn't be privileged and should be treated as separate from the work. Those comments itself are open to interpretation.
Jeremy Blackman:   Well sure, we can all agree with that. Artists don't always understand what they create. And context is a lot greater than an author's comments.
Mel:   Leveling the ground between meaning provided by artist and everyone else - this is what I mean in "ignoring".
Mel:   Mhm, guess that question originated somewhere in "Woody Allen" thread.
Neil:   it was a genuine question from me.
Neil:   But necessarily regarding Nazi Propaganda Films.
Neil:   but not necessarily**
Neil:   nietzsche after all befriended one of his idols, Wagner and Wagner's anti-semitism ended up being one of the things that ended their friendship and Nietzsche's enjoyment of Wagner's music.
polkablues: Artistic intent is always worth considering, but should never be treated as more or less worthy than other forms of interpretation.
polkablues: In the case of Riefenstahl, of course you can and should watch them. They're of immense historical significance, they can be appreciated solely on technical cinematic terms if you so choose, and in any case, watching propaganda, especially 80-year-old propaganda, doesn't make you complicit in it.

If Allen is guilty and can be proven guilty, he should go to jail and we can all learn to live without new Woody Allen movies. Either way, nothing that happens will make Annie Hall stop being a great movie.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Reelist on February 04, 2014, 06:07:28 PM
If Allen is guilty and can be proven guilty, he should go to jail and we can all learn to live without new Woody Allen movies

Well, he wouldn't go to jail for Dylan, but I truly am worried about these girls:


(http://www.bohomoth.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Bechet%2BDumaine%2BAllen%2BWoody%2BAllen%2BSoon%2BYi%2BDaughters%2BD9C1sB3EL5Tl.jpg)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Mel on February 05, 2014, 04:37:09 AM
Well, he wouldn't go to jail for Dylan, but I truly am worried about these girls:

I was about to stay away from this thread, but shit like that just boils my blood. Do you know what you're doing here? Thanks to things like that, some of the worst laws are passed around the globe. "What if" is dream come true for some types of people. "What if Iraq was really in possession of chemical weapons and we didn't intervene?" - this is the same mechanism. "What about those girls, if Woody really is a child molester?" - jenkins pointed out that in this case is better to judge him as guilty, because consequences of being wrong are less severe. Introducing the very possibility of the crime into discussion is scare tactic - anyone using those is either desperate or misguided. You can't possibly win against such arguments.

what freaks me out about this whole mess, although I can't say is unexpected, is the amount of self righteousness and hard judgement people have on the internet on a matter whose truth they can't possibly KNOW.

This is pretty much, where modern media are. Audience is encouraged to take strong stance. It doesn't matter if you agree or disagree with position presented in a paper, TV or on some website as long as you aren't neutral. You are more likely to turn on TV next day, if you're emotionally engaged in the story (picked your side). Some points:


Where do I stand in relation to this case? I have very little interest in Woody as a person, I'm very selfish, when it comes to films. This is pretty much a matter of a question "Will this change how I perceive his work?" for me. I don't think so - this is my honest answer, even if this means I'm evil person.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jenkins on February 05, 2014, 05:45:37 AM
jenkins pointed out that in this case is better to judge him as guilty, because consequences of being wrong are less severe. Introducing the very possibility of the crime into discussion is scare tactic - anyone using those is either desperate or misguided. You can't possibly win against such arguments.

very possibility. "scare tactic" desperate. misguided. win an argument. sounds like the cold war. sounds like a scribble in a newspaper. i like your style. you're right there's much to see here. that fascinates me

i obvs gotta bounce this thread and for no personal reasons to anybody. just, obvs
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Punch on February 05, 2014, 08:42:23 AM
Thoughts on this piece? http://www.slate.com/articles/life/culturebox/2014/02/woody_allen_s_biggest_defender_robert_weide_s_attack_on_mia_farrow_and_her.html
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on February 05, 2014, 09:27:20 AM
I have nothing to say about that piece. She complains about Weide complaining about Mia Farrow, but at least Weide did some research and presented us with a vision about it. This article doesn't do absolutely anything except invalidating Weide's.

To be perfectly clear about this, as right now I don't intend to post any more messages in this thread concerning this case, as I believe only the law can conclude something valid about it:

- There's nothing in Woody's past that suggests that he's a pedophile. One thing is be attracted to late teenage women, other is to force a child to have sex with you.

- If it can be proved that Woody molested a 7-year old girl, he deserves to go to jail for it.

- If nothing is proved, then he's innocent.

- That won't change my perception of his movies at all. The great ones will be great, the lesser will still be mediocre.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Reelist on February 05, 2014, 10:03:37 AM
Woody is going to be fine. Nothing will be investigated and he won't be tried for anything. He has a much more powerful legal team than the Farrow's and will live out the rest of his life happily, making films. Dylan's letter is a small victory in sparking outrage and tarnishing his image temporarily, until the claims are inevitably refuted and swept under the rug, again. For cinephiles, comedy buffs, philosophy majors, and psychiatric cases everywhere there will always be something to marvel at in his films and no single accusation could negate that, but when you piece together the circumstances of his life and look beneath his public image some very questionable things arise in blatant patterns that are impossible to ignore. I think it's even more interesting to watch his films with this in mind, a possible darkness looming that he seems to constantly exorcise through his work to avoid. Lately, I haven't wanted to watch one of his movies until I read Dylan's letter. I want a further look into the man, but unfortunately in this case it seems that those looking from the outside assume they have the clearest picture of all. Woody's biggest fear must be to have someone else tell his story, and that is what's happening now.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: N on February 08, 2014, 04:22:48 AM
Not sure if this has already been posted from another source but.

http://variety.com/2014/tv/news/woody-allen-responds-i-did-not-molest-dylan-1201092405/

Posted on the 7th.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on February 08, 2014, 11:47:25 AM
Not sure if this has already been posted from another source but.

http://variety.com/2014/tv/news/woody-allen-responds-i-did-not-molest-dylan-1201092405/

Posted on the 7th.

That's fairly convincing, actually. I haven't been following this too closely, but it seems like the evidence is on his side. Am I wrong? And my natural bias would be to believe Dylan's story.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on February 08, 2014, 11:54:38 AM
Well, that didn't last long. These, also published on the 7th, seem to debunk at least parts of Allen's defense:

http://variety.com/2014/film/news/dylan-farrow-responds-to-woody-allen-nothing-he-says-or-writes-can-change-the-truth-1201092637/

http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2014/02/woody-allen-sex-abuse-10-facts
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gold Trumpet on February 08, 2014, 04:40:34 PM
Read both sides and I'm tossing my hands up now. No idea who really to believe and don't think I need to have any opinion on the matter. It's an interesting case to follow, but it has no destination for resolution.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: xerxes on February 10, 2014, 12:12:58 PM
http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/02/the-woody-allen-debate-belongs-in-the-public-sphere/283705/
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Drenk on February 10, 2014, 01:38:31 PM
Let's quote Philip Roth.

"There is truth and then again there is truth. For all that the world is full of people who go around believing they've got you or your neighbor figured out, there really is no bottom to what is not known. The truth about us is endless. As are the lies."

I read almost everything about it. And i don't follow the mass of informations anymore. I'm not a lawyer.  I seriously can't know. Too many facts.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: wilder on May 02, 2014, 11:22:56 AM
Joaquin Phoenix Set For Starring Role In Next Woody Allen Movie
via Deadline

Joaquin Phoenix has finalized a deal to star in the next film directed by Woody Allen, which I’m hearing is going to begin shooting in July. As per usual there’s not much known Allen’s projects before they really get going, but his past few have included gangbusters Midnight In Paris and Blue Jasmine, the latter landing its star Cate Blanchett the Best Actress Oscar this year. The writer-director’s next pic in his seemingly endless pipeline is romantic comedy Magic In The Moonlight, about an Englishman brought in to help unmask a possible swindle in the south of France in the 1920s against a backdrop of wealthy mansions, the Côte d’Azur, jazz joints and fashionable spots for the wealthy of the Jazz Age.

Phoenix is coming off Spike Jonze’s Oscar-nommed Her, which earned the actor a Golden Globe nom, and he just finished Inherent Vice for Paul Thomas Anderson. He his repped by WME and attorney David Weber.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: wilder on May 06, 2014, 01:33:59 PM
Emma Stone Reteams With Woody Allen, Joins His Next Film With Joaquin Phoenix
via The Playlist

While Andrew Garfield has at least one more "The Amazing Spider-Man" movie to deal with, Emma Stone is no longer required to square away a big chunk of the year to the franchise, so she's deciding to do some more interesting work instead. With "Magic In The Moonlight" due later this summer, it seems Emma Stone has got on well with Woody Allen, and is ready to work with him again.

The actress is joining the director's next film, which already has Joaquin Phoenix set to star. As per usual, no title or plot details are being revealed, so let's just refocus back on "Magic In The Moonlight," with Allen recently opening up a little bit about the shooting the movie. “This one’s set in Nice in the 1920s. I have a great cameraman, terrific art director, but finding locations was hard. We had to travel around, do selective shooting to re-create primitive spots like in the old days," he told Page Six. “We’re talking bootleggers, nightclubs, the Charleston. But where were the nightclubs? Nothing was there then. It was a great shock. That era was right after the Russian revolution. Rich Russians went to the South of France to escape....But then came another problem — it’s countryside. And I’m a city person. I don’t do greens, trees and butterflies.”

"Magic In The Moonlight" arrives on July 25th and right around that time, Allen will start shooting his next movie.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: wilder on July 22, 2014, 08:56:46 PM
Woody Allen interviewed (http://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/woody-allen/id827905050?i=316584235&mt=2) on a podcast called Happy Sad Confused (I don't know what this is)
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: wilder on January 13, 2015, 01:14:06 PM
Woody Allen Heads To Amazon To Write And Direct His First TV Series, Will Air In 2016
via The Playlist

While Netflix has largely enjoyed dominance in the realm of original programming for streaming services, if they haven't been looking over their shoulders, they'd better start. Over the weekend, Amazon Studios cemented their rep as real-deal contenders when their acclaimed series "Transparent" took home two Golden Globe awards. And now they've just bagged one of American cinema's most legendary figures for his first television series.

Amazon has announced that Woody Allen will write and direct a new half-hour series, with a full season already up and ordered. In true Woody Allen fashion, no title, cast or plot details have been revealed, but the show will arrive on Amazon in 2016. And so we guess that means that for the first time since 1981, Allen won't have a feature film in theaters next year. But trivia aside, we're pretty excited to see what Allen does in a TV series format where he can expand on his characters, and see where they go.

Quote from: Woody Allen
“I don’t know how I got into this. I have no ideas and I’m not sure where to begin. My guess is that [Amazon Studios Vice President] Roy Price will regret this,” Allen dryly stated in a press release. We're sure he won't.

Meanwhile, Allen's next, untitled film starring Joaquin Phoenix and Emma Stone is expected to arrive later this year.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jenkins on January 13, 2015, 06:48:50 PM
i really hope more people like woody allen go into tv. take 'im
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Gittes on January 14, 2015, 12:33:21 AM
I'm curious about who he'll cast in this. This might be a good opportunity for Allen to collaborate with Larry David again, providing the latter is finished with his Broadway play by the time the show starts shooting.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: jenkins on April 29, 2015, 12:40:50 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZvOnxL2pKbI

trailer for new woody allen movie with joaquin phoenix. this'll be a woody i'll either skip or redbox
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: wilder on May 15, 2015, 02:30:31 PM
Woody Allen now playing Woody Allen IRL, I wish there were a reality series following the making of this

Woody Allen Explains Why He Regrets His Amazon Deal, Says He Might Go Digital For His Next Film
via The Playlist

For many filmmakers, streaming services like Netflix and Amazon represent the next great creative frontier. Given healthy budgets and carte blanche, these outlets are responsible for providing numerous writers and directors the kind of freedom they can't get at a studio level. Thus, it was with much excitement when it was announced earlier this year that Amazon had landed Woody Allen to write and direct a series for them. But here's the thing: Allen is one of the writer/directors in Hollywood who gets to do whatever he wants anyway, and he admits he had to be persuaded to take the Amazon deal, but he's not sure it was the right thing to do.

"This was a catastrophic mistake for me. I'm struggling with it," he told a Cannes press conference (via USA Today). "I never should have gotten into it. I thought it would be really easy, to do six half-hours. I thought it would be a cinch. But it's not. It's very, very hard."

"I kept saying I have no ideas for it, that I never watch television. I don’t know the first thing about it," Allen elaborated to Deadline about being approached by Amazon. "Well, this went on for a year and a half, and they kept making a better deal and a better deal. Finally they said look, we’ll do anything that you want, just give us six half hours. They can be black and white, they can take place in Paris, in New York and California, they can be about a family, they can be comedy, you can be in them, they can be tragic. We don’t have to know anything, just come in with six half hours. And they offered a lot of money and everybody around me was pressuring me, go ahead and do it, what do you have to lose?"

And while it does seem like a sweet deal, Allen seems crippled by the broad canvas he's being given to play with. "I have regretted every second since I said OK. It’s been so hard for me," he says. "I had the cocky confidence, well, I’ll do it like I do a movie…it’ll be a movie in six parts. Turns out, it’s not. For me, it has been very, very difficult. I’ve been struggling and struggling and struggling. I only hope that when I finally do it — I have until the end of 2016 — they’re not crushed with disappointment because they’re nice people and I don’t want to disappoint them."

And it seems, Allen is still trying to figure out exactly what he'll do. "I hope it’s just the anxiety again, but this is hard. I’m like a fish out of water. Movies I’ve been doing for decades, and even the stage stuff, I know the stage and have seen a million plays," he said. "But this…how to begin something and end it after a half an hour and then come back the next time. It’s not me."

However, it should be said that the filmmaker is adverse to new forms of storytelling. In fact, Allen reveals that he might drop film stock for his next movie starring Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart, Bruce Willis, and Blake Lively, which shoots this summer.

"Digital looks very good to me if it’s done well. Film always looks great if it’s done well. I’ve never shot anything in digital, but I think I will shoot my next film digitally to see what that’s like. It is more than the wave of the future; it’s the wave of the present, really," Allen said, noting that he doesn't feel particularly strongly about preserving the analog format.

"...digital is really not cheaper and it’s not faster. It’s just that that’s the way everything has moved and it looks pretty. I see digital shot by good cameramen that is beautiful and I wouldn’t be able to tell the difference, so I don’t mind it," he admits. "I like that I can edit fast. You just punch electronics where it used to be you’d cut and then have to splice it and tape it and then look at it and un-tape it. Now, it’s bang, bang, bang, bang, bang and it’s done."
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Cloudy on August 01, 2015, 01:21:21 PM
Irrational Man was wonderful, don't buy the trailers. And the haters can't appreciate the B-movie that this is . . . Joaquin's pot belly precedes him, and he reminded me of the master actors of 30's 40's playing in a tonally confused/jumbled together movie that absolutely works. Some of those images pack a secret punch... they found texture in Joaquin's character ghosting through Rhode Island. A late-night flick. From the reviews I've read people are bringing a lot of their own Woody baggage in and comparing it to his previous films/LIFE which I didn't do.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: JG on August 02, 2015, 01:01:40 PM
i thought a lot of it was trashy and bad, but its charming in a TCM at 3am kinda-way. it hits its stride in a few places, and i especially loved the last scene, but my gushing would be spoilery. my man khondji does his thing as always, and that's worth price of admission alone!
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Cloudy on August 02, 2015, 05:43:04 PM
those trashy elements added to my experience (those voice overs were even great) ... maybe because it was continuously undercut by Joaquin's plunge and khondji's imagery and the Rhode Island location itself. It got under my skin because it didn't and did take itself seriously at the same time.... maybe an unintended push/pull between Woody and Joaquin. Agreed on the TCM at 3am charm.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on August 04, 2015, 09:52:23 PM
Just watched Magic In The Moonlight. I enjoyed it. It was beautifully shot and well acted. He tied it all together really nicely with the final scene.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: wilder on August 07, 2015, 04:54:29 PM
Vittorio Storaro Reportedly Lensing Woody Allen’s 2016 Film, Will Be Set In 1930s
via The Playlist

Woody Allen has worked with some terrific cinematographers in his time — Gordon Willis, Darius Khondji, Sven Nyquist, and Vilmos Zsigmond, among others — and for his 2016 movie, which begins shooting very soon, he's knocking another great craftsman off his bucket list.

Vittorio Storaro will reportedly lens the upcoming picture, which is pretty exciting stuff. The cinematographer is a three time Academy Award-winner for "Apocalypse Now," "Reds," and "The Last Emperor," and counts Bernardo Bertolucci, Francis Ford Coppola, and Warren Beatty among the filmmakers he's worked with.

Woody Allen Pages reports that the film, starring Jesse Eisenberg, Blake Lively, Parker Posey, Kristen Stewart, Bruce Willis, Corey Stoll, Ken Stott, Anna Camp, Stephen Kunken, Sari Lennick, Paul Schneider, and Jeannie Berlin, is set in the 1930s, though it's not clear yet if it's a comedy or drama.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on August 07, 2015, 08:11:55 PM
I admit, I have never heard the word "lensing" before.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: wilder on January 25, 2016, 05:10:51 PM
Miley Cyrus & Elaine May To Star In Woody Allen's Amazon Series
via The Playlist

Deadline reports that the unlikely duo of Miley Cyrusand the legendary screenwriter and director Elaine May ("Tootsie," "The Heartbreak Kid") will star in Woody Allen's Amazon series. And believe it or not, there are some details. The series will run across six half-hour episodes, and be set in the 1960s. Other than that, no exact plot details, but it's a reunion for May and Allen who previously worked together on the director's "Small Time Crooks."

Production will begin in March, with Allen at the helm of all the episodes (he wrote the entire thing too). You'll probably have to wait until 2017 to see the results, but as per usual, Allen already has his next movie in the can, the untitled movie starring Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart, Steve Carell, Blake Lively, and Parker Posey.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: tpfkabi on September 01, 2016, 05:54:18 PM
Irrational Man was wonderful, don't buy the trailers. ...From the reviews I've read people are bringing a lot of their own Woody baggage in and comparing it to his previous films/LIFE which I didn't do.

Finally saw Irrational Man. I enjoyed it, too. Ever since I saw Adaptation I always have the thought that voice overs are a sign of weakness - ha! Emma Stone looked great, though she looks a little scary when she gets emotional.

Re: reviews - I feel the same about a lot of artists who have done well for a long time. If this film had been a director's first film a lot of people would say that this would be someone to watch to see what they do next.
Title: Re: Woody Allen
Post by: Reelist on December 04, 2016, 09:00:59 AM
@timheidecker (https://twitter.com/timheidecker/status/745053520013975554)


(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Clb2M2UWQAA9mRO.jpg)