XIXAX Film Forum

Film Discussion => News and Theory => Topic started by: Banky on March 25, 2004, 08:36:12 PM

Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on March 25, 2004, 08:36:12 PM
I dont know if this should be here or in Now Showing but it seemed like Everything Else would be a nice home

I have been thinking of doing this thread ever since i joined the site almost a year ago basically because i do this in my head every weekend.  In this thread you post what you think the weekend box office will be and thats pretty much it.  Somone will post the actual box office on
Sundays and it will be intresting to see how close or far people were from the results.

------------------------------------------
heres a list of last weeks totals and this weeks openings to help anyone who wants to make a guesstimation

1. Dawn of the Dead  $  27.3 Million/ New
2. The Passion of the Christ  $  19.2 Million/ $ 295.3 Million
3. Taking Lives  $  11.4 Million/ New
4. Starsky & Hutch  $  10.7 Million/ $ 67.7 Million
5. Secret Window  $   9.6 Million/ $ 33.1 Million
6. Eternal Sunshine...  $   8.6 Million/ New
7. Hidalgo  $   8.5 Million/ $  48.5 Million
8. Agent Cody Banks 2  $   6.0 Million/ $  17.3 Million
9. 50 First Dates  $   4.3 Million/ $ 113.2 Million
10. Confessions of...  $   1.5 Million/ $  27.6 Million

heres a link to a more detailed report

http://movies.yahoo.com/boxoffice/latest/rank.html

this weekends additions

Jersey Girl
Ben Affleck and Liv Tyler star in this Kevin Smith-directed romantic comedy about a father learning to raise his daughter alone after the death of her mother.  

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
The Ladykillers
Tom Hanks stars in this latest movie from the Coen Bros as a conniving criminal mastermind whose latest plan requires his crew to pose as a church band.
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Never Die Alone
DMX stars as the kingpin of a drug empire whose life story is told in retrospect from the perspective of a reporter (David Arquette) who met him just before his death.
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed
Scooby and the Mystery Inc. gang return in this adventure in which they must investigate the reappearances of several of the creatures from the classic TV show.
 

heres my guess (mixed with hope)

1.  Jersey Girl                            22million
2.  The Lady Killers                    19million
3.  Dawn of the Dead                 16million
4.  The Passion                          11 million
5.  Scooby Doo                          10 million
6.  Taking Lives                          7 million
7.  Starsky and Hutch                  6.5 million
8.  Secret Window                       5 million
9.  Eternal Sunshine                    4.5 million
10. Never Die Alone                    4 million  

ive been known not to be to hot at this but thats i guess the fun in just the fun in trying to make a good guess
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: billybrown on March 25, 2004, 09:44:34 PM
I'll re-direct my box office guess for Jersey Girl to here, nevermind the fact that I posted originally the other day... 7 mill. Absolutely no shot in hell it takes in 22 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Stefen on March 25, 2004, 09:51:42 PM
I don't even see it taking 7 mill. That's generous. There really isn't anything enticing about it. Just that it's a Kevin Smith movie, which it really isn't in the traditional sense. From what I hear it's cheezy as all hell. I'll be seeing it, but not in the theater. If eternal sunshine, a good movie starring the box office gold Jim Carrey doesn't do very good, there is no way a bad movie starring Affleck is going to do much better.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: bonanzataz on March 25, 2004, 10:10:36 PM
yeah, banky, a kevin smith movie has never opened number one at the box office. i always hoped it would happen, but it won't with jersey girl. i don't know one person (in real life) that's excited about it. i know tons more who want to see eternal sunshine and haven't gotten around to it yet (myself).
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on March 25, 2004, 10:14:17 PM
Quote from: taz.
yeah, banky, a kevin smith movie has never opened number one at the box office


actually

http://www.imdb.com/BusinessThisDay?day=26&month=August
(http://xixax.com/images/avatars/511517150405a10b9bb247.jpg)


anyways how about some predictions come on this thread is not a damn JG thread
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: bonanzataz on March 25, 2004, 10:18:42 PM
i specifically remember being on the view askew boards on jay and silent bob's opening weekend and kevin being really pissed about opening behind american pie 2 and rush hour 2 (which had opened the week before).
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on March 25, 2004, 10:21:59 PM
Quote from: Banky
Quote from: taz.
yeah, banky, a kevin smith movie has never opened number one at the box office


actually

http://www.imdb.com/BusinessThisDay?day=26&month=August


Actually:
http://www.boxofficemojo.com/weekend/chart/?yr=2001&wknd=34&p=.htm

(http://xixax.com/images/avatars/511517150405a10b9bb247.jpg)
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on March 25, 2004, 10:26:32 PM
hahaha I knew mac was gonna get into this discussion of box office numbers

my fault taz i thought i remembered Smith talking to jason on the JSBSB commentary about him starring in a movie that opened number one and then  i thought the imdb confirmed my thoughts but i guess that link was to movies opening that weekend.


Anyways

come on does anyone want to give a slightly detailed prediction of the weeks box office as appose to "JG WILL BOMB"
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Stefen on March 25, 2004, 10:36:33 PM
Billy brown already did. He said 7 mil. I think it will be below that, around 5 or 6 mil. it may have legs though but not for long.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on March 25, 2004, 10:42:12 PM
i was thinking about predictions more along the lines of this


Quote from: Banky


1.  Jersey Girl                            22million
2.  The Lady Killers                    19million
3.  Dawn of the Dead                 16million
4.  The Passion                          11 million
5.  Scooby Doo                          10 million
6.  Taking Lives                          7 million
7.  Starsky and Hutch                  6.5 million
8.  Secret Window                       5 million
9.  Eternal Sunshine                    4.5 million
10. Never Die Alone                    4 million  

Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Stefen on March 25, 2004, 10:46:21 PM
Thats too much work. But just because you asked nicely.

1. Dawn of The dead - 17 million.
2. Passion - 15.7 million
3. Ladykillers - 14 mil
4. Scooby Doo - 13.7
5. Starsky - 7 mil
6. Secret window 5.4
7. Jersey Girl - 5 mil
8. Eternal Sunshine - 4.9 mil
9. Taking Lives - doesn't matter.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Weak2ndAct on March 25, 2004, 10:47:54 PM
Quit molesting my avatar.

PS: If JG breaks 10 for the weekend, consider me fucking flabbergasted.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Julius Orange on March 25, 2004, 11:02:22 PM
1. Titanic 90 hundred dollars
2. Elligga Wood 100 dollars
3.
4

Thanks
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: billybrown on March 25, 2004, 11:13:23 PM
I'll do Top 5 cuz Top 10 is wayyyy tooo much...

Scooby 2 - 22M
Dawn- 15 M
Passion- 14.5 M
Ladykillers- 13.5 M
Starsky / Jersey- 7 M

* Note: I've re-adjusted my numbers again... I didn't realize what a money maker the first Scooby Doo was.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: pete on March 25, 2004, 11:13:54 PM
Quote from: Julius Orange
1. Titanic 90 hundred dollars
2. Elligga Wood 100 dollars
3.
4

Thanks


elliga please.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on March 26, 2004, 12:55:52 AM
my guess....

1. Jersey Girl 19.5 million
2. Scooby Doo 17 million
3. The Lady Killers 16.5 million
4. Dawn of the Dead 14 million
5. The Passion 11 million
6. Eternal Sunshine 8.5 million
7. Taking Lives 8 million
8. Starsky and Hutch 6.5 million
9. Secret Window 4 million
10. Never Die Alone 3 million
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Chest Rockwell on March 26, 2004, 05:00:52 AM
Let's not kid ourselves here: Jersey Girl isn't opening at first. I hope to see Eternal Sunshine rake in more this week than last week, since it seems like it'd be one of those word-of-mouth type flicks.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pubrick on March 26, 2004, 09:18:48 AM
The Ladykillers 16mil

Jersey Girl 10mil

Never Die Alone 3mil
 
Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed 12mil

dawn of the dead retaining #1.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: SHAFTR on March 26, 2004, 09:21:34 AM
reviews don't really matter much on opening weekend.  I expect Jersey Girl to do well just because of the heavy advertising.

I just hope it's good, I'll find out tonight.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on March 26, 2004, 11:33:52 AM
i think that there is a good place in the market for it right now
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: matt35mm on March 26, 2004, 03:05:33 PM
The Ladykillers will not do great, despite having Hanks.

... either Scooby Doo (the first one was #1 at the BO) will be one, or The Passion will come back to #1.  I don't think Dawn will retain it.

Jersey Girl?  Psh.  #5 is my guess.

So... just for the sake of making the list... here are my guesses:

1. The Passion
2. Scooby Doo 2
3. Dawn of the Dead
4. The Ladykillers
5. Jersey Girl
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on March 28, 2004, 12:21:35 PM
ACTUAL RESULTS

Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed  $30.7M
The Ladykillers  $13M
The Passion of the Christ  $12.5M
Dawn of the Dead  $10.3M  
Jersey Girl  $8.3M  
Taking Lives  $6.53M
Starsky & Hutch  $6.29M
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind  $5.42M
Secret Window  $5.4M
Hidalgo  $5.4M  

damn Scooby Doo man nobody thought of that...
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on March 28, 2004, 02:38:33 PM
Quote from: andyk
damn Scooby Doo man nobody thought of that...


errr....

Quote from: matt35mm
... either Scooby Doo (the first one was #1 at the BO) will be one, or The Passion will come back to #1. I don't think Dawn will retain it.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: matt35mm on March 28, 2004, 03:41:16 PM
Heh.  I was sorta right...     ... sorta...

At least I got Jersey Girl right.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pas on March 28, 2004, 04:55:02 PM
Quote from: Julius Orange
1. Titanic 90 hundred dollars
2. Elligga Wood 100 dollars
3.
4

Thanks


Hahaha what the hell ! Hilarious
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: bonanzataz on March 28, 2004, 06:46:35 PM
i thought sunshine was gonna be huge. that's disappointing.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: El Duderino on March 28, 2004, 07:27:33 PM
why are people seeing Scooby Doo 2? the first one sucked, and this one looked worse....plus, Ruben Studdard was in the trailer.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: NEON MERCURY on March 28, 2004, 07:39:02 PM
Quote from: <question>El Duderino
why are people seeing Scooby Doo 2?



Quote from: <answer>El Duderino
Ruben Studdard was in the trailer.


.........i'm sorry 2004.. :(
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: pete on March 28, 2004, 07:39:48 PM
it looks like power rangers.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on March 28, 2004, 07:45:44 PM
I have the feeling that Eternal Sunshine will pick up... if movie reviews killed Matrix Revolutions they can for sure make this movie a success
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: matt35mm on March 28, 2004, 08:19:44 PM
Quote from: El Duderino
... plus, Ruben Studdard was in the trailer.


Honestly... what is up with that guy?  Why is he the American Idol?  He's total crap, he's (let's face it) not attractive, he doesn't really seem to be all that smart.  I dunno.  Everytime I see him (which actually isn't that much; I see more of Clay Aiken--just goes to show what losers the American Idol winners turn out to be), I just get immediately annoyed.  And it's not like that mofo can REALLY SING all that well.  He sings better than I do, sure, but not as well as a whole lot of other people.  He lacks any real personality.

Entertainment Weekly pointed out that while Clay was on some bigger shows, Ruben was on, heh, a UPN show.

Eh, it's probably just because he always looks like he has nothing going on in his brain that pisses me off.  You guys know what I'm talking about--how some people just piss you off.

Okay, I know this wasn't exactly the thread to do it in, but RANT OVER!
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: pete on March 28, 2004, 08:27:02 PM
Quote from: andyk
I have the feeling that Eternal Sunshine will pick up... if movie reviews killed Matrix Revolutions they can for sure make this movie a success


critics didn't kill matrix revolutions.
lines like "you can't die 'cause I love you too damn much" killed it.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: SiliasRuby on March 28, 2004, 08:29:58 PM
Quote from: matt35mm

You guys know what I'm talking about--how some people just piss you off.

I know exactly what you mean.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: matt35mm on March 28, 2004, 09:14:01 PM
(As long as the above post wasn't a sarcastic comment against me, then) YEAH!  THAT person understands!!
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on March 28, 2004, 10:19:11 PM
Smith's response to JG box office

http://www.xixax.com/viewtopic.php?t=369&start=270
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Bethie on March 30, 2004, 12:08:57 AM
Quote from: matt35mm


Entertainment Weekly pointed out that while Clay was on some bigger shows, Ruben was.....



Ruben was just, heh, bigger.


(I apologize in advance for the lame joke :| )
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on April 04, 2004, 09:13:31 PM
1. Hellboy  $ 23.5 Million/ New
 2. Walking Tall  $ 15.3 Million/ New
 3. Scooby-Doo 2  $ 15.1 Million/ $  50.0 Million
 4. Home on the Range  $ 14.0 Million/ New
 5. The Prince and Me  $ 10.0 Million/ New
 6. Passion of the Christ  $  9.9 Million/ $ 330.1 Million
 7. The Ladykillers  $  7.0 Million/ $  23.4 Million
 8. Jersey Girl  $  5.1 Million/ $  15.8 Million
 9. Dawn of the Dead  $  4.4 Million/ $  51.5 Million
 10. Eternal Sunshine...  $  3.6 Million/ $  22.0 Million


results

it was pretty obvious that Hellboy would be number one although it is a kinda small opening weekend for a movie with that budget.  Walking tall did pretty good as well.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on April 04, 2004, 10:47:33 PM
i guess jersey girl didnt fare too well in that second weekend like smith had hoped.  did they expand to more screens only to make less money?  i guess the word of mouth is not carrying the film as far as he had hoped.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Raikus on April 04, 2004, 11:01:44 PM
It still made 5.1 over the weeked. That's not a bad number or bad second week percentage. The screen count is just about the same (around 1500-1600 I think). I don't think Smith thought JG would go over it's first weekend business. Word of mouth movies just continue to pull in steady amounts at the box office. Think the horror that was My Big, Fat, Greek Wedding.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on April 10, 2004, 04:21:10 PM
The Alamo
Billy Bob Thornton and Dennis Quaid star in this latest historical epic about the siege of the Alamo, at which a small band of Texans found themselves hopelessly surrounded by a huge Mexican army.
 

Ella Enchanted
Anne Hathaway stars in this romantic fantasy set in the world of fairy tales as a girl cursed with obedience who sets out on an adventure in an attempt to dispel the hex and gain her freedom.
 

The Girl Next Door
Elisha Cuthbert stars in this sexy teen comedy as a teenage boy's new neighbor who happens to have a former life as a porn star.

 
Johnson Family Vacation
Cedric the Entertainer stars in this comedy as the father of a family on a vacation where everything seems to go disastrously wrong.
 
The Whole Ten YardsBruce Willis and Matthew Perry return in the continuing adventures of an unlikely quartet of assassins and dental professionals.


last weekends results

Quote from: Banky

1. Hellboy  $ 23.5 Million/ New
 2. Walking Tall  $ 15.3 Million/ New
 3. Scooby-Doo 2  $ 15.1 Million/ $  50.0 Million
 4. Home on the Range  $ 14.0 Million/ New
 5. The Prince and Me  $ 10.0 Million/ New
 6. Passion of the Christ  $  9.9 Million/ $ 330.1 Million
 7. The Ladykillers  $  7.0 Million/ $  23.4 Million
 8. Jersey Girl  $  5.1 Million/ $  15.8 Million
 9. Dawn of the Dead  $  4.4 Million/ $  51.5 Million
 10. Eternal Sunshine...  $  3.6 Million/ $  22.0 Million





with the unslaught of new movies im not gonna try and guess specific figures rather just order

1.  The Girl Next Door
2.  The Passion
3.  The Alamo
4.  Hellboy
5.  Walking Tall
6.  Scooby Doo 2
7.  JFV
8.  Ella Enchanted
9.  The Whole Ten Yards
10.  Jersey Girl
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: matt35mm on April 10, 2004, 05:04:38 PM
1. The Alamo
2. The Passion
3. Girl Next Door
4. Hellboy
5. Walking Tall
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on April 10, 2004, 06:14:08 PM
1 The Alamo
2 The Girl Next Door
3 The Passion
4 HellBoy
5 Scooby Doo 2
6 The Whole Ten Yards
7 Walking Tall
8 Johnsons Family Vacation
9 Ella Enchanted
10 Jersey Girl
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: puddnanners on April 10, 2004, 09:48:51 PM
1. Passion
2. Alamo
3. Hellboy
4. Girl Next Door
5. Scooby-Doo 2
6. Whole 10 Yards
7. Johnson Family Vacation
8. Walking Tall
9. Home on the Range
10. Ladykillers
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on April 11, 2004, 12:38:41 PM
Title  Weekend   Gross
The Passion of the Christ  $17.1M  $355M  
Hellboy  $11.1M  $41.1M  
Johnson Family Vacation  $9.2M  $11.6M  
The Alamo  $9.2M  $9.2M  
Walking Tall  $8.3M  $28.8M  
Home on the Range  $8.19M  $27.5M  
Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed  $8M  $62.9M  
The Whole Ten Yards  $6.72M  $6.72M  
Ella Enchanted  $6.11M  $6.11M  
The Girl Next Door  $6M  $6M  

man nobody was even close... what the hell happened with the new opennings... terrible
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: cine on April 11, 2004, 12:42:00 PM
Quote from: andyk
man nobody was even close... what the hell happened with the new opennings... terrible

Um, I don't know about you, but its been well known since early March that the Passion would have a rebirth at the box office this weekend (oh, rebirth... I get it). Read past newspaper articles. This was predicted for a good while now.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on April 11, 2004, 12:59:34 PM
Quote from: Cinebunny
Quote from: andyk
man nobody was even close... what the hell happened with the new opennings... terrible

Um, I don't know about you, but its been well known since early March that the Passion would have a rebirth at the box office this weekend (oh, rebirth... I get it). Read past newspaper articles. This was predicted for a good while now.


Yep I read that... but I'm not surprised about The Passion making 17 mil... I'm surprised that all the others combined did nothing...

I had a feeling that The Alamo wouldnt do so good... they definetly picked a wrong time of the year to release it... but I did think that comedy would do better (Girl Next Door, Whole Ten Yards, etc)
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on April 11, 2004, 12:59:40 PM
Quote from: andyk
Johnson Family Vacation  $9.2M  $11.6M  

i never even heard of this till friday when i saw an ad in the paper for it. where the hell did it come from?  (i dont really want to know, its rhetorical.)
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on April 11, 2004, 01:05:04 PM
Quote from: themodernage02
Quote from: andyk
Johnson Family Vacation  $9.2M  $11.6M  

i never even heard of this till friday when i saw an ad in the paper for it. where the hell did it come from?  (i dont really want to know, its rhetorical.)


It came from the minds that said, 'let's remake National Lampoon's Vacation...but with a Black family'.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on April 11, 2004, 01:09:38 PM
right, '...but remember how that movie was funny?  lets NOT do that.'
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on April 11, 2004, 01:12:49 PM
What is incredible is that I didnt see ANY advertising ANYWHERE... not a single TV ad, magazine, review, online, NOTHING...

This is obviously the type of movie that these stupid families go to the theatre together and they say "hey, look at that, how funny... lets go in!"

BTW, any movie with Bow Wow should be destroyed
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on April 11, 2004, 03:14:03 PM
the fact that THAT film, that nobody here had even HEARD of before friday had a bigger opening than the Alamo!  must be driving disney executives crazy right now.  its a staggering testament to the power of the 'urban audience'.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Stefen on April 12, 2004, 02:48:44 AM
This was an epic battle for good vs evil this weekend. I was really hoping hellboy would get the 1 spot over the easter weekend cause that would have been neat.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on April 18, 2004, 01:04:43 PM
Tarantino's Kill Bill Vol. 2 Dominates the Box Office

Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill Vol. 2, starring Uma Thurman, David Carradine, Michael Madsen, and Daryl Hannah, dominated the box office this weekend earning an estimated $25.6 million from 2,971 theaters. The Miramax release averaged a strong $8,604 per site. The first film opened with $22 million last October, making this the biggest debut for a Tarantino film so far. It also ranks as the third-biggest April opening ever, surpassing Hellboy which made $23.2 million earlier this month.

Lions Gate's The Punisher took the second spot with $14 million from 2,649 theaters. The $33 million-budgeted comic book adaptation, starring Tom Jane, John Travolta, and Rebecca Romijn-Stamos, averaged $5,285 per site.

Fox Searchlight's Johnson Family Vacation remained in the third spot adding $6.4 million from just 1,326 theaters. The comedy, which cost only $12 million to make, has collected $21.4 million in two weeks.

Columbia's Hellboy dropped two spots to fourth making $5.7 million in its third weekend. The $66 million Guillermo del Toro film has earned $50.4 million. Disney's Home on the Range rounded out the top five with $5.4 million for a three-week total of $37.7 million. Warner Bros.' Scooby-Doo: Monsters Unleashed garnered $5.1 million in its fourth week for a total of $72.2 million.

Mel Gibson's The Passion of The Christ dropped 72% from Easter weekend, adding $4.2 million. The $30 million Newmarket release has earned a massive $360.9 million, allowing it to climb to the 7th spot on the all-time domestic blockbuster list. Disney's $107 million-budgeted The Alamo lost 55% in sales and made just $4.1 million for a disturbing two-week sum of $16.3 million.

Universal's Connie and Carla debuted outside the top 10 at number 13 with $3.3 million from only 1,014 locations.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Chest Rockwell on April 18, 2004, 02:38:38 PM
That's good. I love that the Alamo is doing so terribly.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Find Your Magali on April 18, 2004, 02:46:51 PM
I am still in a bit of shock over how little money "The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" has earned.

If they knew it wasn't going to rake in the money, they should have at least saved it until the fall, so give it some potential Oscar legs.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Sleuth on April 18, 2004, 02:56:02 PM
How did Volume 1 do (rank wise, not money) in comparison to vol2
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on April 18, 2004, 03:43:25 PM
Quote from: Find Your Magali
I am still in a bit of shock over how little money "The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" has earned.

If they knew it wasn't going to rake in the money, they should have at least saved it until the fall, so give it some potential Oscar legs.


Focus probably found the best spot possible in terms of the other films they want to release and the competition... It didnt go so bad for that kind of film... it recouped already all the money with theatrical which is great... and now DVD and other licenses will be 100% profit


Quote from: Slomb
How did Volume 1 do (rank wise, not money) in comparison to vol2


Vol. 1 opened 1st also, with 22 Million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: El Duderino on April 18, 2004, 06:00:58 PM
Quote from: Chest Rockwell
That's good. I love that the Alamo is doing so terribly.


me too. it was so awful.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Find Your Magali on April 18, 2004, 07:02:34 PM
Quote from: El Duderino
Quote from: Chest Rockwell
That's good. I love that the Alamo is doing so terribly.


me too. it was so awful.


I KNOW. They could have at least had the Texans win!

Why doesn't Hollywood do feel-good endings any more?
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on April 25, 2004, 04:58:06 PM
im suprised at how well home on the range is doing
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on May 02, 2004, 04:45:38 PM
1. Mean Girls  $  25.0 Million/ New
 2. Man on Fire  $  15.2 Million/ $ 44.5 Million
 3. 13 Going on 30  $  10.0 Million/ $ 35.2 Million
 4. Laws of Attraction  $    7.0 Million/ New
 5. Godsend  $    6.9 Million/ New
 6. Envy  $    6.1 Million/ New
 7. Kill Bill: Volume II  $    5.8 Million/ $ 52.6 Million
 8. The Punisher  $    3.4 Million/ $ 29.6 Million
 9. Home on the Range  $    2.2 Million/ $ 45.5 Million
 10. Scooby-Doo 2  $    2.2 Million/ $ 79.5 Million
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: meatball on May 03, 2004, 12:47:04 AM
I can see why the Money would care, but why should the average moviegoer care about box office?
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: El Duderino on May 03, 2004, 12:50:49 AM
why is scooby doo 2 doing so well?
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Stefen on May 03, 2004, 12:51:33 AM
Quote from: meatball
I can see why the Money would care, but why should the average moviegoer care about box office?


The average moviegoer pays attention to see what everyone else is watching, then they do the same. Sad, really.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: meatball on May 03, 2004, 12:59:11 AM
..
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on May 09, 2004, 06:31:02 PM
1. Van Helsing  $   54.2 Million/ New
 2. Mean Girls  $   14.0 Million/ $ 42.2 Million
 3. Man on Fire  $    7.9 Million/ $ 56.0 Million
 4. New York Minute  $    6.2 Million/ New
 5. 13 Going on 30  $    5.5 Million/ $  42.6 Million
 6. Laws of Attraction  $    3.5 Million/ $  11.9 Million
 7. Kill Bill: Volume II  $    3.0 Million/ $  57.8 Million
 8. Godsend  $    2.7 Million/ $  11.3 Million
 9. Envy  $    2.6 Million/ $  10.1 Million
 10. The Punisher  $    1.2 Million/ $  32.1 Million
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: eward on May 09, 2004, 06:34:39 PM
haha, van helsing will disappear quick i think...the theater i work at had nine walkouts first showing friday...some of whom were kids skipping school who claimed that going to school would have been better
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pubrick on May 10, 2004, 12:42:17 AM
Quote from: Banky
1. Van Helsing  $   54.2 Million/ New
 2. Mean Girls  $   14.0 Million/ $ 42.2 Million
 3. Man on Fire  $    7.9 Million/ $ 56.0 Million
 4. New York Minute  $    6.2 Million/ New
 5. 13 Going on 30  $    5.5 Million/ $  42.6 Million
 6. Laws of Attraction  $    3.5 Million/ $  11.9 Million
 7. Kill Bill: Volume II  $    3.0 Million/ $  57.8 Million
 8. Godsend  $    2.7 Million/ $  11.3 Million
 9. Envy  $    2.6 Million/ $  10.1 Million
 10. The Punisher  $    1.2 Million/ $  32.1 Million

i've never noticed before, or maybe i hav and i'm noticing again, how pathetic it is that there is only like one good movie and one OK movie in that whole list. and the rest are really forgettable pieces of shit that no one will refer to in 2 years. what kind of a world is this? the most shocking thing is that a large number of ppl here are so desperate for entertainment (or whatever passes for it these days) that they willingly contribute to the success of utter tripe.

how is humanity not in total disarray?,, oh wait.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: El Duderino on May 10, 2004, 12:50:52 AM
good point...i see 2 movies in the whole thing that i actually enjoyed or saw.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: eward on May 10, 2004, 05:22:13 PM
i see 4
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on May 16, 2004, 10:41:26 PM
1. Troy  $  45.6 Million/ New
 2. Van Helsing  $  20.1 Million/ $ 84.5 Million
 3. Mean Girls  $  10.1 Million/ $ 55.3 Million
 4. Man on Fire  $   5.3 Million/ $ 64.3 Million
 5. Breakin' All the Rules  $   5.3 Million/ New
 6. 13 Going on 30  $   4.2 Million/ $  48.6 Million
 7. New York Minute  $   3.8 Million/ $  10.7 Million
 8. Laws of Attraction  $   2.1 Million/ $  15.4 Million
 9. Kill Bill: Volume II  $   1.6 Million/ $  60.8 Million
 10. Godsend  $   1.0 Million/ $  13.4 Million
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on May 23, 2004, 04:48:14 PM
1. Shrek 2  $ 104.3 Million/ New
 2. Troy  $  23.8 Million/ $ 85.8 Million
 3. Van Helsing  $  10.2 Million/ $ 100.2 Million
 4. Mean Girls  $   6.9 Million/ $ 64.7 Million
 5. Man on Fire  $   3.5 Million/ $ 69.3 Million
 6. Breakin' All the Rules  $   2.8 Million/ $  9.0 Million
 7. 13 Going on 30  $   2.5 Million/ $  52.1 Million
 8. New York Minute  $   1.2 Million/ $  12.2 Million
 9. Kill Bill: Volume II  $   1.0 Million/ $  62.7 Million
 10. Supersize Me  $    0.9 Million/ New
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on May 30, 2004, 05:13:16 PM
Shrek 2 Takes Over Holiday Box Office Lead
Source: Reuters Sunday, May 30, 2004

DreamWorks Shrek 2 topped the first three days of the Memorial Day Weekend pulling in an estimated $73.1 million from 4,223 theaters. The animated blockbuster has earned a massive $237.8 million, having raced past the $200 million mark on Saturday, it's 11th day. Only Spider-Man did it faster, taking nine days to do so in 2002. But the $70 million-budgeted Shrek 2 broke Spidey's old record for a second-weekend haul, which was $71.4 million. The next record in the studio's sights is the one for a four-day Memorial Day holiday, which The Lost World: Jurassic Park set in 1997 with a tally of $90.2 million.

20th Century Fox's new The Day After Tomorrow earned $70 million for the three days from 3,425 theaters for second place. The $125 million Roland Emmerich disaster film, starring Dennis Quaid and Jake Gyllenhaal, also collected $82.1 million internationally, bringing its worldwide total to $152.1 million. Fox said it was the best worldwide opening for a non-sequel, smashing the old mark of $107 million set three weeks ago by the monster thriller Van Helsing.

Warner Bros.' Troy lost 52% of its audience from last weekend, adding $11.5 million for a total of $106.1 million and third place. The Wolfgang Petersen epic film was budgeted at $150 million.

Touchstone's new comedy Raising Helen made an estimated $11.2 million from 2,717 theaters for the fourth spot, while MGM's Soul Plane crashed on take-off with just $5.7 million from 1,566 theaters for the fifth spot.

Universal's sixth-ranked Van Helsing earned $4.9 million in the three days. Its 24-day total rose to $108.8 million and international tally stands at $120.2 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on June 06, 2004, 10:50:14 AM
Harry Potter Breaks Opening Day Record
Source: ShowBIZ Data

Warner Bros. Pictures' Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban broke the opening day record set by Spider-Man on May 3, 2002. The third installment in the popular "Harry Potter" franchise pulled in an estimated $41.2 million from 3,855 theaters on Friday, surpassing Spidey's take of $39.4 million from 3,615 theaters. It is also on its way to beat Spidey's opening weekend figure of $114.8 million. "Prisoner of Azkaban" carried a production budget of $130 million.

DreamWorks' Shrek 2 managed to hold up well to start its third weekend with $10.4 million on Friday. The $70 million-budgeted animated sequel has made a total of $287 million and has already climbed to #21 on the all-time domestic blockbuster list.

20th Century Fox's The Day After Tomorrow took a tumble making $8.4 million, which is a drop of about 64% from its opening day last Friday. The Roland Emmerich disaster film cost $125 million to produce and has earned $109 million so far.

Touchstone's Raising Helen took the fourth spot for the day, adding $2 million for a total of $19.6 million.

Warner Bros.' Troy made $1.7 million and has collected $114.6 million domestically.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on October 31, 2004, 01:53:18 PM
Horror 'Grudge' Reigns at Halloween Box Office

The haunted-house thriller "The Grudge," starring Sarah Michelle Gellar , held on to the No. 1 slot at the North American box office, scaring up $22.4 million in ticket sales during the Halloween weekend, according to studio estimates issued on Sunday.

"Ray," starring Jamie Foxx in a much-praised turn as the late "Genius of Soul" Ray Charles, hit the road at No. 2 with $20.1 million in its first weekend, while the low-budget thriller "Saw" made the cut at No. 3 with $17.4 million.

Nicole Kidman's new movie, "Birth," was stillborn, opening at No. 11 with $1.7 million. The $20 million supernatural drama has won notoriety for a bathtub scene involving Kidman and a 10-year-old boy who claims to be her dead husband.
 
Kidman is the latest Oscar-winning actress to have a tough time at the box office this year, following Halle Berry ("Catwoman"), Charlize Theron ("Head in the Clouds"), and Gwyneth Paltrow ("Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow").

Rounding out the top five, the maritime cartoon "Shark Tale" was at No. 4 with $8.0 million, followed by the Jennifer Lopez -Richard Gere romance "Shall We Dance?" with $6.3 million. Both were down two places, and their respective totals rose to $147.4 million and $33.9 million.

Overall sales for the top 12 films improved by almost three percent to $92.8 million from the year-ago weekend, according to tracking firm Exhibitor Relations. But the tally was five percent down from last weekend, when "The Grudge" shocked everyone by opening with $39.1 million.

CONSERVATIVE PROJECTIONS

After 10 days, "The Grudge" has sold $71.3 million worth of tickets and is expected to surpass the $90 million mark, according to conservative projections from the film's distributor, Sony Corp 's Columbia Pictures.

"The Grudge," director Takashi Shimizu's $10 million remake of Japanese film "Jo-On," surprised again in its second round by losing only 43 percent of its audience. Many observers had expected it to slide by at least 50 percent, paving the way for "Ray" to open at No. 1. But Halloween festivities and its user-friendly PG-13 rating proved otherwise.

"Ray" took 15 years for its director, Taylor Hackford, to bring to the big screen thanks to apathy among Hollywood studios. Universal Pictures, a unit of General Electric Co. -controlled NBC Universal, picked up the completed film earlier this year after Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz footed the estimated $30 million budget himself.

Two-thirds of the audience was aged over 30, and 59 percent was black, Universal said. Exit polls showed that 99 percent of viewers rated the movie "very good" or "excellent," the studio added. Additionally, the "definite recommend" score was in the 90 percent range, against a norm in the 50 percent range, indicating that word-of-mouth will keep the film in theaters through awards season.

Foxx has generated a lot of early Oscar buzz for his accurate portrayal of the blind pianist, who saw the film shortly before he died in June of liver disease.

"Saw," an R-rated chiller starring Cary Elwes and co-writer Leigh Whannell in a limb-hacking dilemma, ranks behind "Fahrenheit 9/11" ($23.9 million) as the second-best opener in the history of its distributor, Lions Gate Films. The studio is a unit of Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Myxo on October 31, 2004, 02:41:54 PM
God that means a Grudge 2 is in the works for sure.

:evil:
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on November 07, 2004, 02:40:01 PM
'The Incredibles' Soar to $70 Mln at Box Offices

Computer animated movie superheroes "The Incredibles" topped domestic box office charts over the weekend, raking in $70.7 million in ticket sales, according to studio estimates issued on Sunday.

Reigning champion and haunted-house thriller "The Grudge" dropped to No. 3 at $13.5 million, while "Ray," starring Jamie Foxx in the role as the late "Genius of Soul" Ray Charles, maintained its hold on the No. 2 slot with $13.8 million.

Low-budget thriller "Saw" fell from third to fourth with $11.4 million, and debuting "Alfie," a remake of the 1966 film of the same name, took the No. 5 position with $6.5 million at box offices in the United States and Canada.
 
"Incredibles" is the sixth release from Pixar Animation Studios Inc. and The Walt Disney Co. . The pair have enjoyed huge successes with their computer animated movies going back to 1995's original "Toy Story," and "Incredibles" is started in the same direction.

The most recent Pixar/Disney film was 2003's "Finding Nemo," and it debuted in May to a three-day weekend total of $70.3 million, according to figures from box office tracking service Exhibitor Relations Co. Inc.

Wall Street investors had been anxiously anticipating a strong opening weekend, and had pushed Pixar's stock price to a record high of $84.94 in Nasdaq trading on Friday.

Among other movies, the Jennifer Lopez -Richard Gere romance "Shall We Dance?" fell to the No. 6 position with $5.7 million, followed by another computer animated movie, "Shark Tale," in the seventh spot with $4.6 million.

The cumulative box office for "Shark Tale" now stands at $154.1 million, which should please investors in the newly public company DreamWorks Animation .

Finishing the top 10 in order were football film "Friday Night Lights" with $3 million, firefighter saga "Ladder 49" with $2.6 million, and puppet comedy "Team America: World Police" at $1.9 million.

While "The Incredibles" opened strong, it was not enough to boost the total weekend box office above last year. Overall sales for the top 12 films slipped 5 percent to $136.1 million from $143.7 million last year when the No. 1 film was "The Matrix: Revolutions" according to Exhibitor Relations.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on November 14, 2004, 12:07:48 PM
Amazing 2nd weekend for THE INCREDIBLES... $51 Mil... I think it goes straight to be Pixar's highest grossing film.

I'm surprised people are still interested in seeing Chucky at the theatre? What the hell is that?

1 1 The Incredibles BV $51,049,000 -27.6% 3,933 - $12,979 $144,053,000 $92 / - 2
2 N The Polar Express WB $23,532,000 - 3,650 +3,117 $6,447 $30,836,000 $165 / - 1
3 N After the Sunset NL $11,500,000 - 2,819 +1,819 $4,079 $11,500,000 - / - 1
4 N Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason Uni. $8,854,000 - 530 - $16,705 $16,705,000 $70 / - 1
5 N Seed of Chucky Focus $8,767,000 - 2,061 - $4,253 $8,767,000 - / - 1
6 2 Ray Uni. $8,362,000 -38.7% 2,474 +11 $3,379 $52,474,000 $40 / - 3
7 3 The Grudge Sony $7,100,000 -44% 2,816 -520 $2,521 $99,338,000 $10 / - 4
8 4 Saw Lions $6,400,000 -42.3% 2,467 - $2,594 $45,715,000 $1.2 / - 3
9 6 Shall We Dance Mira. $4,082,000 -27.9% 2,065 -477 $1,976 $48,729,000 $50 / - 5
10 5 Alfie Par. $2,775,000 -55.4% 2,215 - $1,252 $11,137,000 $60 / - 2
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Sleuth on November 14, 2004, 12:42:53 PM
atticus...!
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on November 14, 2004, 01:06:18 PM
Quote from: andyk
The Polar Express WB $23,532,000

Still a long way to go... ouch...

Could they possibly have released this movie at a worse time?
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pubrick on November 14, 2004, 09:09:40 PM
Quote from: Jeremy Blackman
Could they possibly have released this movie at a worse time?

i think they were banking on residual election blues.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on November 21, 2004, 07:31:11 PM
Moviegoers Dig 'National Treasure'

Oscar award winner Nicolas Cage , who has not had a hit movie in years, ended the two-week reign of "The Incredibles" at the North American box office on Sunday with his new family adventure "National Treasure."

According to studio estimates, "National Treasure" sold $35.3 million worth of tickets across the United States and Canada in the three days beginning Friday, enjoying a narrow lead over kids animated TV favorite "The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie," which opened with $33.5 million.

"The Incredibles," a cartoon revolving around a family of superheroes, slipped to No. 3 with $26.8 million, taking its total to $177.8 million after three weekends.
 
"The Polar Express," a holiday fable featuring a computer-animated Tom Hanks as the train conductor, fell two places to No. 4 with $15.2 million, taking its total to $51 million after 12 days. The film cost a reported $270 million to make and market, prompting much speculation about its chances of turning a profit.

"Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason," starring Renee Zellweger as a hapless "singleton," held steady at No. 5 with $10.1 million after expanding nationally in its second weekend. The film's total stands at $21.6 million.

"National Treasure," from prolific Jerry Bruckheimer, revolves around a treasure-seeker hunting for a secret war chest hidden by the Founding Fathers after the Revolutionary War. It was released through Walt Disney Co.'s family-oriented Walt Disney Pictures label, which also released the Pixar Animation Studios Inc. -produced "The Incredibles."

The opening marks the best score for a Cage-Bruckheimer collaboration, beating the $25.3 million start for "Gone in Sixty Seconds" in 2000. Since then, Cage, who won an Oscar in 1996 for "Leaving Las Vegas," has worked in such under-performers as "Windtalkers" and "Captain Corelli's Mandolin."
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on December 05, 2004, 01:55:36 PM
Cage Film Tops Box Office for 3rd Weekend

Nicolas Cage logged a third weekend atop the North American box office on Sunday with his action-adventure "National Treasure," but overall ticket sales slid as movies competed for attention with shopping in the post-Thanksgiving holiday period.

One of the hardest-hit films was director Oliver Stone's "Alexander," which earned an estimated $4.7 million in the three days beginning Friday, losing about two-thirds of its opening-weekend tally as it dropped one place to No. 7.

The $150 million swords-and-sandals epic, starring Colin Farrell as the youthful Macedonian warrior, has pulled in $29.7 million after 12 days, and should finish with about $40 million, said a spokesman for Warner Bros. Pictures. The studio paid $35 million for North American rights from producer Intermedia Films, a unit of Munich-based IM Internationalmedia AG . Intermedia has said it expects the film to do much better internationally, just as "Troy" did recently.
 
"National Treasure" dug up an estimated $17.1 million, taking its total to $110.3 million. The Walt Disney Co. picture is on track to surpass 1996's "The Rock" ($134 million) as Cage's biggest movie.

The only new entry in the top 10 was director Mike Nichols' potty-mouthed adultery drama "Closer," which opened at No. 6 with $7.7 million, a hefty number for a limited release.

Columbia Pictures' London-set drama, an adaptation of a play by British playwright Patrick Marber, stars Julia Roberts as a photographer who beds both Jude Law's journalist character and Clive Owen's dermatologist. Natalie Portman plays a stripper who also gets sack time with both men.

While all the movies in the top five played in more than 3,100 theaters each, "Closer" was launched in just 476 to "give it some time to mature," said Rory Bruer, president of domestic theatrical distribution at the Sony Corp . -owned studio. "It's daring, it's provocative, people are going to talk about it."

The studio will add 150 runs next weekend, and hopes the film's momentum will be boosted as critics' groups start naming their top picks of the year.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Banky on December 05, 2004, 04:18:55 PM
i cant beleive that this thread is still going

how have you been macguffin?
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on December 12, 2004, 03:50:02 PM
On The Media this week has a great piece (http://www.onthemedia.org/stream/ram.py?file=raotm/otm121004f.ra) on the history and meaning of blockbusters.

There are two other film related pieces this week...

http://www.onthemedia.org/
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on December 19, 2004, 03:18:53 PM
'Lemony Snicket' Tops Box Office in Debut

"Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events" brought in $30.2 million of good fortune to debut in first place at the weekend box office.

The film based on the first three children's books by Lemony Snicket, who is actually author Daniel Handler, knocked the star-driven sequel "Ocean's Twelve" to second place, according to studio estimates released Sunday.

"Spanglish," a new Sony film starring Tea Leoni, Adam Sandler and Spanish actress Paz Vega, made its debut at third with an estimated weekend haul of $9 million.

Final figures were to be released Monday.

"Lemony Snicket" tells the story of a trio of orphans who try to defend themselves from greedy Count Olaf, played by Jim Carrey, who pursues the children by concealing himself as a variety of thinly veiled characters.

Playing in wide release at 3,620 theaters, "Lemony Snicket" averaged $8,343 a cinema.

"Jim Carrey and the books are really the primary driving forces behind it and the marketing seems to have worked very well," said Wayne Lewellen, president of distribution for Paramount.

"The Aviator" starring Leonardo DiCaprio as eccentric billionaire Howard Hughes, opened in 40 theaters in New York, Los Angeles and "resort towns" near ski resorts and in Hawaii and Palm Springs in an attempt to catch vacationing Academy Awards voters, said Mike Rudnitsky, head of domestic distribution at Miramax.

The film earned $831,124 with a per screen average of $20,778.

"The Aviator," which also features Cate Blanchett as Hughes' legendary love Katharine Hepburn, will expand to about 1,750 screens on Christmas Day.

Other films in limited release that have been receiving Oscar buzz include Bill Murray's quirky oceanography tale "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou," and "Million Dollar Baby," with Hilary Swank portraying a woman who tries to improve her life of hard knocks by training as a boxer.

In its second week, "Life Aquatic" played on two screens in New York and Los Angeles and brought in $100,595, a drop of only 11 percent from its debut weekend. "Million Dollar Baby" has brought in $233,230 since its opening Wednesday with a per screen average of $29,153.

The success of "Lemony Snickets" continues a trend that has seen family oriented films scoring well at the box office, said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations.

"It just seems the family market is insatiable in their need for new entertainment options," Dergarabedian said.

"The Polar Express," in particular, has continued to draw in family audiences, earning $8.6 million to bring its cumulative total over six weeks to $123.6 million. "Polar Express" saw only an 11 percent drop in its audience from the week before, while other top films had steeper falls, including "Ocean's Twelve," which lost 53 percent, and "Blade: Trinity," which lost 59 percent and dropped from second to fifth.

Revenues from the top 12 movies were down 25 percent compared to last year, but the numbers were skewed because "Lord of the Rings: Return of the King" made $72.6 million during its 2003 debut, Dergarabedian said.

1. "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events," $30.2 million
2. "Ocean's Twelve," $18.3 million.
3. "Spanglish," $9 million
4. "The Polar Express," $8.6 million.
5. "Blade: Trinity," $6.6 million.
6. "National Treasure," $6.1 million.
7. "Christmas With the Kranks," $5.7 million.
8. "The Flight of the Phoenix" $5.1 million.
9. "Closer," $3.5 million.
10. "The Incredibles," $3.3 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on December 26, 2004, 10:45:47 PM
'Fockers' Sets Christmas Day Record

Millions of Americans went shopping for comedy this weekend, giving the star-studded "Meet the Fockers" the record for the best single Christmas Day box office take. The sequel, reuniting Ben Stiller and Robert De Niro and adding Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand as Stiller's parents, earned $44.7 million over the holiday weekend according to studio estimates.

While not a weekend record, the film did set a record for Christmas Day, earning $19.1 million. The previous record was set last year when "The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King" earned $14 million on Christmas Day.

Still, the performance of "Meet the Fockers" was impressive when measured against the overall weekend box office, which was down 26.5 percent from last year.
 
"When Christmas falls on a weekend, it's bad for business," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations.

This weekend's top 12 films grossed an estimated $121.9 million, compared to last year's $165.8 million when Christmas fell on a Thursday. Last year's figure was skewed a bit by the third "Lord of the Rings" movie, which earned $50.6 million in its second weekend.

"Meet the Fockers" knocked last week's top film "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events" to third place, with $12.5 million. Second place was taken by the live-action version of "Fat Albert," which debuted Saturday with a two-day total of $12.7 million, according to studio estimates. Final figures were to be released Monday.

"Meet the Fockers" succeeded in part because of an aggressive ad campaign, including the release of the DVD of the original "Meet the Parents" as well as the return of Streisand to the big screen after an eight-year absence.

It also captured the clash between families, which resonates at the holidays.

"It's a clash of cultures," said Marc Shmuger, vice chairman of Universal Pictures. "It's about the coming together of completely different families, but that's exactly what the world is going through right now."

"Meet the Fockers" opened Wednesday, bringing its five-day total to $68.5 million.

"The Aviator" the epic tale of billionaire Howard Hughes, did well enough in limited release to take fourth place with $9.4 million. The movie, directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Leonardo DiCaprio, expanded from 40 theaters to 1,796 on Christmas Day.

The small budget horror flick "Darkness" went against the slew of family films on the market now and attracted $6.4 million in its opening weekend. The movie opened Saturday.

The lavish Andrew Lloyd Weber musical "The Phantom of the Opera" also debuted in limited release, bringing in $4.2 million from 622 theaters. It debuted Wednesday, bringing its five-day total to $6.5 million.


1. "Meet the Fockers," $44.7 million
2. "Fat Albert," 12.7 million.
3. "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events," $12.5 million
4. "The Aviator," $9.4 million.
5. "Ocean's Twelve," $8.6 million.
6. "Darkness," $6.4 million.
7. "The Polar Express," $6.3 million.
8. "Spanglish," $5 million
9. "The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou," $4.8 million.
10. "Andrew Lloyd Weber's The Phantom of the Opera," $4.2 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on January 02, 2005, 01:48:39 PM
'Fockers' Retains Crown at U.S. Box Office

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - "Meet the Fockers" was the most popular movie in North America for a second weekend, and has now earned almost as much as its 2000 predecessor, "Meet the Parents," did in its entire run, according to studio estimates issued on Sunday.

The broad family comedy, starring Robert De Niro, Ben Stiller and Dustin Hoffman, sold $42.8 million worth of tickets in the three days beginning Friday. Its total after 12 days rose to $163.4 million. "Meet the Parents," by contrast, ended its run with $166 million.

"Fockers" set two records over the weekend. Its Friday haul of $12.2 million was the best for New Year's Eve, beating "Castaway's" four-year-old record of $8.5 million. It continued its winning ways the next day with sales of $18 million, surpassing the New Year's Day record of $12.8 million set last year by "The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King."

As is the case for this time of the year, there were no new releases in the top 10, and the rankings were little changed. The children's comedy "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events" held steady at a distant No. 2 with $14.7 million, followed by the Howard Hughes biopic "The Aviator," which rose one place to No. 3 with $11.2 million.

The TV cartoon adaptation "Fat Albert" fell one to No. 4 with $10.7 million, and the all-star crime caper "Ocean's Twelve" was stable at No. 5 with $9.2 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Myxo on January 02, 2005, 03:48:01 PM
God, I guess this means we can expect a Meet the Parents 3.

:yabbse-undecided:
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on January 04, 2005, 06:17:27 AM
"Shrek 2" Rules Record '04

It was a monster year for Tinseltown.

DreamWorks' Shrek 2 not only gobbled up plenty of green--$436 million in ticket sales on its way to being crowned the top-grossing film of 2004--but the ogre-iffic sequel also finished its run as the third biggest film of all time at the North American box office.

Overall, according to figures released Monday by box-office tracking firm Exhibitor Relations, domestic movie receipts totaled $9.4 billion for 2004, an increase of 1.4 percent over 2003 and surpassing 2002's record tally of $9.3 billion.

Swinging into second place behind the mean green money machine was Sony's Spider-Man 2, which nabbed $373.4 million. That was followed by Mel Gibson's Jesus epic, The Passion of the Christ, which redeemed $370.3 million.

Rounding out the top five were Pixar's The Incredibles, with an incredible $251.7 million in receipts, and Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, which conjured up $249.4 million.

Despite the record haul for '04, attendance actually declined for the second year in a row by 1.7 percent. Exhibitor Relations reports 1.6 billion movie tickets were sold in 2002, 1.53 billion in 2003 and 1.51 billion last year.

"It's a record-breaking box office year. That's the good news. The bad news is attendance is down for the second straight year," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of Exhibitor Relations, noting that audiences may have been distracted by stiff competition from videogames and DVDs and the fact that it was an election year.

With fewer people spinning turnstiles at the local megaplex, higher prices accounted for the uptick in box-office revenue. The average ticket cost was up 3.1 percent to $6.22. By comparison, 2002's average movie cost was $5.80.

"Whenever we break a record it's almost always because of higher ticket prices," said Gitesh Pandya, editor of BoxOfficeGuru.com. "The higher ticket prices are what Hollywood should give thanks to for these new records. It's not really people going to more movies."

There's also the Rings factor. "One of the reasons for the drop [in attendance] was because for the first time in three years we did not have a Lord of the Rings movie to give us that big year-end surge," said Pandya. "Meet the Fockers stepped up to the plate and was a heavy hitter but did not compare to Hobbits and wizards."

But Hollywood definitely got more bang for its buck in 2004. While the studios didn't have nearly as many flicks crossing the coveted $100 million mark--only 22 by Pandya's count compared to the 30 hit films that had done so in 2003--this year's batch accounted for a bigger slice of the gross.

"All three of [the top] films, Shrek 2, Spider-Man 2 and The Passion were bigger [hits] than the previous years," said Pandya.

Here's a rundown of the top 20 films of 2004, according to Exhibitor Relations.


1. Shrek 2, $436 million
2. Spider-Man 2, $373 million
3. The Passion of the Christ, $370 million
4. The Incredibles, $251 million
5. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, $249 million
6. The Day After Tomorrow, $186 million
7. The Bourne Supremacy, $176 million
8. Meet the Fockers, $163.4 million
9. Shark Tale, $159 million
10. The Polar Express, $155 million
11. National Treasure, $154 million
12. I Robot, $144 million
13. Troy, $133 million
14. 50 First Dates, $120 million
15. Van Helsing, $120 million
16. Fahrenheit 9/11, $115 million
17. Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story, $114 million
18. The Village, $114 million
19. The Grudge, $110 million
20. Ocean's Twelve, $110 million
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Two Lane Blacktop on January 04, 2005, 08:38:42 AM
Opinions of these?  I didn't see Spiderman 2, even though I am a big Raimi fan, because the first one was just so flat.  Of the ones I did see:

Quote
4. The Incredibles, $251 million


Loved it.  Thought the voice acting, the art direction, and the music were brilliant.  The script was pretty great, too.  :yabbse-thumbup:


Quote
5. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, $249 million


I haven't read the books, only seen the movies, and this was the best so far, IMO.  Less episodic, didn't feel like an ad for the series, better atmosphere.


Quote
12. I Robot, $144 million


The changes in the story didn't bother me, but Will Smith killed it for me.  (I'm not a hater, but he was WRONG WRONG WRONG for that movie.)


Quote
16. Fahrenheit 9/11, $115 million


When I think of Moore as an essayist rather than a documentarian, I really enjoy his stuff.  I don't think it topped "Columbine" mostly because this will be outdated in a few years, and "Columbine" was a little broader and more universal in theme.


Quote
18. The Village, $114 million


I've never seen any of Shymaylyan's (sp??) movies, but the previews for this one intrigued me.  I was ready to see it till it got so soundly panned by the critics.  Did anyone here like it?  

2LB
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on January 09, 2005, 04:13:51 PM
'Fockers' Beats Horror Flick at Box Office

The horror of meeting the in-laws beat out the fright flick at theaters this weekend. "Meet the Fockers" took in $28.5 million to remain the top movie for the third straight weekend, holding off the horror newcomer "White Noise," which debuted a strong No. 2 with $24 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

The two movies paced Hollywood to a healthy start for the year, with the top 12 films grossing $98.3 million, up 8 percent from the same weekend in 2004.

That comes after a holiday surge sparked by "Meet the Fockers" lifted Hollywood to a record $9.4 billion domestic haul in 2004. Though the year's revenues were up, higher admission prices mean movie attendance was off about 1.7 percent, so the solid beginning positions the industry for a healthier 2005.

"The end of the year was stronger than expected, so headed into the first of the year, we have some momentum going," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "Studios just need to keep the momentum in the market place, because once you lose it, it takes a long time to get back."

Since opening just before Christmas, "Meet the Fockers" has taken in $204.3 million, topping the $166.2 million total of its predecessor, "Meet the Parents."

The comedy sequel reunites Ben Stiller and Robert De Niro as prospective in-laws with a shaky relationship, adding Dustin Hoffman and Barbra Streisand to the cast as Stiller's zany parents.

The superstar cast and the movie's universal theme has made "Meet the Fockers" an easy sell to audiences.

"It hits home, doesn't it? Conflicts between in-laws, everybody's been there," said Nikki Rocco, head of distribution for Universal, which released "Meet the Fockers" and "White Noise."

Critics hated "White Noise," which stars Michael Keaton as a man convinced his dead wife is trying to communicate with him through his television. Yet scary movies tend to have a built-in audience of horror fans, who turn out in huge numbers over opening weekend.

The box office often plunges for fright flicks in their second weekend, though some manage stronger staying power, such as last year's $100 million hit "The Grudge," which most critics also panned.

"White Noise" producer Paul Brooks said he hopes his movie can defy the critics, too, and hold up well beyond opening weekend.

"It's always fascinated me, the way critics work," said Brooks, who also produced "My Big Fat Greek Wedding." "They have a particular view of a film which sometimes can be significantly at odds with what the man on the street and the lady on the street and the kid on the street want to see."

Two films embraced by critics, Clint Eastwood's "Million Dollar Baby" and Terry George's "Hotel Rwanda," had strong showings as they expanded from limited release.

"Million Dollar Baby," starring Eastwood as mentor to a strong-willed boxer (Hilary Swank), took in $2 million in 109 theaters, up from nine theaters the previous weekend.

"Hotel Rwanda," featuring Don Cheadle as a real-life hotel manager who sheltered refugees during the 1990s Rwandan genocide, grossed $1.15 million in 105 theaters, up from seven the previous weekend.


1. "Meet the Fockers," $28.5 million.
2. "White Noise," $24 million.
3. "The Aviator" $7.6 million.
4. "Lemony Snicket's a Series of Unfortunate Events," $7.4 million.
5. "Fat Albert," $6 million.
6. "Ocean's Twelve," $5.4 million.
7. "National Treasure," $4.5 million.
8. "Spanglish," $4.4 million.
9. "The Phantom of the Opera" $3.4 million.
10. "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou," $2.7 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on January 16, 2005, 01:19:37 PM
'Coach Carter' Scores at Box Office

Samuel L. Jackson bounced "Meet the Fockers" from the top spot at the North American box office after three weekends with his basketball movie "Coach Carter," while Jennifer Garner dropped the first bomb of the year with her superheroine saga "Elektra."

According to studio estimates issued on Sunday, "Coach Carter" sold $23.6 million worth of tickets in the three days beginning Jan. 14, followed by "Fockers" with $19.0 million.

"Elektra," which was crushed by the critics, opened at No. 5 with $12.5 million. Even Halle Berry's unloved "Catwoman" did better, opening to $16.7 million last July.

Two other top-10 debutants were in a tight race for the Nos. 3 and 4 slots. The animated family movie "Racing Stripes" crossed the finish line with $14.0 million. The comedy-drama "In Good Company," starring Dennis Quaid, jumped 29 places to No. 4 with $13.9 million in its first weekend of wide release.

1. Coach Carter .............. $23.6 million
2. Meet the Fockers .......... $19.0 million
3. Racing Stripes ............ $14.0 million
4. In Good Company ........... $13.9 million
5. Elektra ................... $12.5 million
6. White Noise ............... $12.2 million
7. The Aviator ............... $ 4.8 million
8. Lemony Snicket ............ $ 4.0 million
9. The Phantom of the Opera .. $ 3.6 million
10. Ocean's Twelve ............ $ 2.9 million
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on January 16, 2005, 11:10:16 PM
oh god, its january alright.  :shock:
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on January 23, 2005, 01:46:44 PM
Quote from: themodernage02
oh god, its january alright.  :shock:


Rapper Ice Cube Hot at Frozen Box Office

Rapper-turned-filmmaker Ice Cube heated up the weekend box office in North America even as a blizzard blanketed large chunks of the U.S. Northeast and dampened overall ticket sales.

According to studio estimates issued on Sunday, Ice Cube's new comedy "Are We There Yet?" opened at No. 1 with sales of about $18.5 million in the three days beginning Jan. 21, exceeding the expectations of its distributor, Columbia Pictures.

Last weekend's champion, the Samuel L. Jackson basketball drama "Coach Carter" (Paramount), slipped to No. 2 with $11 million, followed by the Ben Stiller family comedy "Meet the Fockers" (Universal) with $10.2 million.

The workplace comedy-drama "In Good Company" (Universal) starring Dennis Quaid, held steady at No. 4 with $8.5 million, while the barnyard comedy "Racing Stripes" (Warner Bros.) fell two places to No. 5 with $7.1 million, narrowly ahead of new entry "Assault on Precinct 13" (Rogue Pictures) with $7.0 million.

All the studios said they were affected by the blizzard, which buried large parts of northeastern United States under several feet of snow, severely curbed road and air travel and cut power to thousands of customers. One studio estimated overall business was hit by as much as 25 percent.

"Are We There Yet?" could have made an extra $1 million if Saturday's matinee screenings had not been snowed out, said Tom Sherak, a partner at the film's producer, Revolution Studios. Nonetheless, the $32 million film still managed to exceed his expectations, which were in the $14 million-$15 million range.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on January 23, 2005, 06:17:45 PM
Ice Cube and Coach Carter top films... who goes to see that shit?

I'm surprised after the Golden Globes last week I thought The Aviator and Sideways were going to do better....

Havent seen Elektra and of course I'm not surprised... but a lot of these films suck and at least Jennifer Garner is hot... more teenagers should see that instead of Coach Carter!
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on January 28, 2005, 05:25:53 PM
Quote from: themodernage02
oh god, its january alright.  :shock:


Something rotten in the state of Hollywood: Taking statistical measure of the year in movies
Source: MSNBC

Let’s consider the question logically first. If a movie tests well it’s going to be released when people have money and time, which is during the summer months or winter holidays; and if a movie is award-worthy the studios will push it into theaters before December 31st. The holidays for Hollywood are like the holidays for you and me. They have to entertain a lot of people and by the end their cupboards are bare. What’s left? Just dusty stuff on the back shelf that never looked particularly appetizing in the first place. That’s what they serve in January. January, for moviegoers, is dried onion soup mix month.

Of course some people actually like dried onion soup mix. So is there any way to back this up statistically? Is there a way to quantify quality?

The closest thing we’ve got right now is rottentomatoes.com, a Web site which gathers movie reviews (100 or more for wide releases), assigns a thumbs up or down if the critic already hasn’t, and tabulates the results. If 60 percent or more critics like a film, it’s considered “fresh”; if 59 percent or lower don’t, it’s considered “rotten.”
 
There are obvious problems with this strategy. The “fresh” and “rotten” numbers are arbitrary. “I Heart Huckabees” got a 60 percent rating, so that’s considered a good movie. “Ocean’s Twelve” got a 58 percent rating, so that’s considered a bad movie. One or two percent, apparently, can make all the difference.

The site also includes too many online and marginal critics. (To my mind, you shouldn’t be included unless someone hires and pays you for your opinion.) Then there’s this thumbs up/down business. Most publications employ a four-star system or a letter grade. But what about those awkward B- or two-and-a-half star movies? Someone at rottentomatoes has to point our thumbs one way or the other, and, for me anyway, it’s often not the way I would point it. Did I really recommend “The Medallion,” for example? I wrote, “As special effects reveal how super Eddie Yang is, they also reveal how ordinary Jackie Chan has become.” That’s a recommendation?

Brother, can you spare a theater
Still, the site can tell us a lot about the recent year in movies. According to my calculations, 157 movies were released at least marginally in 2004. (A marginal release, for the purposes of this article, is 500 or more theaters; a wide release is 1000 or more theaters; a very wide release is 2000 or more theaters.) Of these 157 movies, 44 managed a “fresh” rating.
 
The best month was July, in which seven of 13 films were considered fresh. The worst month? A tie, between our old pal January, and (surprisingly) May, both of whom went one for 10. The good news for May is that its one hit was a grand slam, “Shrek 2,” with a 90 percent rating and $436 million U.S. box office, while January managed only a bloop single, “Disney’s Teacher’s Pet,” with its 76 percent rating and $6.2 million. So, yes, even statistically, January gets the worst movie month award. Congratulations.

But February can’t exactly pat itself on the back either. It went two for 13 (“Barbershop 2” and “Miracle”), while both August and September had just three winners each. March was the first of four months (April, October, and November were the others) to give us four good movies, while December had five, and June went six for 12. Add it to July’s totals and it’s obvious that summer ruled in 2004.

If these overall numbers seem low to you (44 for 157 is just a .280 batting average), please don’t assume movie critics are being elitist here. Among their recommended films? “Starsky & Hutch” (62 percent), “Hellboy (78 percent), “I, Robot” (61 percent), “The Terminal” (63 percent), “Wimbledon” (62 percent) and “Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow” (73 percent).
 
No, the numbers are low because many of the better-reviewed movies don’t manage even a marginal release and so haven’t been counted. Stuff like “Garfield” (13 percent), “Catwoman” (9 percent), and “Taxi” (9 percent) get dumped into over 3000 theaters opening weekend, and even middling fare like “Paparazzi” and “Wicker Park” (19 percent and 22 percent) will see 2000 or more theaters; but movies that critics rave about barely play.

In its best week, Richard Linklater’s “Before Sunset” (94 percent) was seen in only 203 theaters. “Touching the Void” (93 percent)? 137. One of my favorite movies of 2004, the surfing documentary “Riding Giants” (91 percent), had a high of 64 theaters one week. That’s it. Even the best week for the best-reviewed movie of the year, “Sideways” (96 percent), saw just 497 theaters, or about one-fifth of the theaters “Wicker Park” saw its opening weekend.
 
None of this is news, particularly, but it is a reminder of how marginalized quality is. It also raises a variety of complex issues. Do the majority of Americans go see crap because they like crap, or because it’s the only thing playing at the local cineplex?

Looked at one way, the stats blame the public. For 28 weeks last year, the number one movie in America was a rotten one. Looked at another way, the stats blame the movie distributors. For 29 weeks last year, the most widely distributed movie in America was a rotten one. Want to hear the scary part? Eleven of these weeks don’t match. That is, distributors blanketed America with a rotten movie, which America smartly side-stepped…only to go see a different rotten movie. It’s no wonder I’m cynical.

Wanted: The Bill James of movies
Twenty-five years ago Bill James helped create a revolution in the way we look at baseball statistics by asking simple questions. What’s the point of baseball? To win. How do you win? By scoring the most runs. How do you score runs? By getting on and moving around the bases. He concluded that the best measure for a hitter was not the traditional one — batting average — but on-base and slugging percentage. Eventually the baseball world agreed with him.
 
The movies need a Bill James. Every Monday we get a list of the Top 10 movies in terms of box office, but it only says what Hollywood wants to know ($$), not what we need to know. Which movie has the highest per-theater average? Which has the lowest? Are these films popular because people like them, or because they’re being pushed on us?
 
Sometimes you wonder if distributors even know what they’re doing. The most likable, date-friendly romantic comedy of 2004 was “Garden State” (88 percent), but it didn’t even earn a wide release (1000 or more theaters), let alone a very wide release (2000 or more theaters). Yet it still pulled in $26.7 million.

How many 2004 movies earned a very wide release and didn’t earn that much? Thirty-five: “Chasing Liberty,” “Disney’s Teacher’s Pet,” “Torque,” “Win a Date with Tad Hamilton!,” “The Perfect Score,” “The Big Bounce,” “Catch That Kid,” “Eurotrip,” “Welcome to Mooseport,” “Twisted,” “Havana Nights,” “Agent Cody Banks 2: Destination London,” “The Alamo,” “The Whole Ten Yards,” “The Girl Next Door,” “Godsend,” “Laws of Attraction,” “Envy,” “New York Minute,” “Around the World in 80 Days,” “Two Brothers,” “Sleepover,” “Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle,” “Thunderbirds,” “Little Black Book,” “Yu-Gi-Oh! The Movie,” “Paparazzi,” “Wicker Park,” “Mr. 3000,” “Wimbledon,” “First Daughter,” “Raise Your Voice,” “Surviving Christmas,” “Seed of Chucky,” and “Alfie.”
 
So why didn’t “Garden State” earn a wide release let alone a very wide release? Was its star, Zach Braff, too unknown? Too Jewish? Was the film too slow? Too quirky? Did it test poorly? Are these tests accurate? (Initially, remember, “Seinfeld” tested poorly.) By the way: Of the aforementioned 35 films, only four were considered “fresh” on rottentomatoes.com, and none of these came close to “Garden State’s” rating. Maybe there’s a lesson in there somewhere.

What’s the point of movies? To entertain us with stories. Is this being done? Well, 44 for 157 would indicate…not particularly.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on January 30, 2005, 01:24:49 PM
'Hide and Seek' No. 1 at Box Office

Robert De Niro's fright flick "Hide and Seek" had a strong debut in its opening weekend, taking in $22 million to become the top movie and fending off a rush of Academy Awards contenders.

The previous weekend's No. 1 movie, Ice Cube's road-trip comedy "Are We There Yet?", slipped to second place with $17 million, lifting its 10-day total to $39.1 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Director Clint Eastwood's "Million Dollar Baby" led Oscar hopefuls with $11.8 million, coming in at No. 3 during its first weekend of wide release and raising its total domestic gross to $21.1 million.
 
Cashing in on its seven Oscar nominations last week, the boxing drama expanded to 2,010 theaters, up about 1,800 the previous weekend.

"Million Dollar Baby" is in a neck-and-neck race for best picture and director at the Oscars with Martin Scorsese's "The Aviator" which was No. 6 for the weekend with $7.5 million, pushing its total to $68.2 million.

"The Aviator," a film biography of Howard Hughes that leads the Oscar field with 11 nominations, was in 2,503 cinemas, an increase of 242.

Eastwood won top honors over Scorsese Saturday from the Directors Guild of America. Eastwood also earned the Golden Globe directing prize, while "The Aviator" won for best dramatic film at the Globes.

In its 15th week of release, best-picture nominee "Sideways" broke into the top 10, coming in seventh with $6.3 million as it expanded to 1,694 theaters, up about 1,000. The road-trip comedy has taken in $40 million playing in relatively narrow release.

The weekend's only other new wide release, Tara Reid and Christian Slater's scary movie "Alone in the Dark," bombed with just $2.5 million, finishing well out of the top 10. Viciously trashed by critics, the movie stars Reid as an anthropologist and Slater as a paranormal investigator battling mutant monsters.

"Hide and Seek" also received harsh reviews, but like many other fright films, it drew the faithful horror crowd, which is rarely dissuaded by critics if a movie looks like it has some decent scares.

Horror films often nosedive in their second weekend, but De Niro's presence could give "Hide and Seek" more staying power, said Bruce Snyder, head of distribution for 20th Century Fox, which released the movie.

De Niro plays a father in the film coping with the potentially murderous "imaginary friend" of his daughter, played by Dakota Fanning.

"Because of the cache of De Niro, which makes it quite a bit above the normal things-that-go-bump-in-the-night movie, I think we'll fare well," Snyder said.


Among other key Oscar nominees:

_ The J.M. Barrie tale, "Finding Neverland," which earned seven nominations including best picture, grossed $2.7 million to raise its total to $35.9 million. The film widened to 1,258 theaters, up 389.

_ "Hotel Rwanda," with a best-actor nomination for Don Cheadle and supporting-actress nomination for Sophie Okonedo, took in $1.8 million in 417 theaters, 98 more locations than the previous weekend. The genocide drama lifted its total to $8.1 million.

1. "Hide and Seek," $22 million.
2. "Are We There Yet?", $17 million.
3. "Million Dollar Baby," $11.8 million.
4. "Coach Carter," $8 million.
5. "Meet the Fockers," $7.6 million.
6. "The Aviator," $7.5 million.
7. "Sideways," $6.3 million.
8. "In Good Company," $6.2 million.
9. "Racing Stripes," $6 million.
10. "Assault on Precinct 13," $4.2 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Myxo on February 02, 2005, 10:31:18 PM
Hide and Seek, as well as Are We There Yet #1 and #2 at the box office.

While a ton of Oscar hopefuls are in theaters.

For shame..
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on February 06, 2005, 03:07:38 PM
"Boogeyman" Scares Off "Date"

The thriller Boogeyman popped out of the closet and jumped to the top of the weekend box-office, with an estimated $19.5 million.

The romantic comedy The Wedding Date booked $11 million in second, but wasn't completely jilted as it earned a slightly higher per screen average - $6,494 at 1,694 sites, compared to $6,389 at 3,052 locations for the more widely released Boogeyman

These films were targeted at audiences considered to have limited interest in staying home to watch the Super Bowl - hard core teen scary movie fans and lovelorn females. The low budget Boogeyman, which wasn't screened for critics, managed to set a record for a Super Bowl weekend beating last year's hip hop dance drama You Got Served's $16.1 million.

However, as anticipated, it was a down weekend overall at the nation's theaters as football fans were apparently keener on looking at the TV or into the 'fridge for more beverages and beer, or nuzzling and guzzling at half-time over the cheese dip, than wondering what was lurked in Barry Watson's closet in Sony's PG-13 rated Boogeyman or how Debra Messing gets it on with Dermot Mulroney in Universal's PG-13 rated The Wedding Date.

Super Bowl weekend business is usually down over 60 percent on Sunday compared to Saturday and this year was no exception. Over all the top twelve movies grossed only an estimated $88.8 million from Friday through Sunday, down 14.9 percent from last weekend, and 2.4 percent from this time last year, although that was not the date of the Super Bowl.

Last week's top movie Fox's Hide and Seek, another creepy-things-lurking-out-there tale, dropped 59 percent to fourth place for $8.9 million, to bring its two week gross to $35.7 million. But Sony's road comedy Are We There Yet? only stalled 36 percent in its third week, dropping from second to third place but earning $10.4 million to bring its current gross to $51 million.

Three movies that picked up even more awards trophies this weekend at the SAG awards and are most highly favored in the Oscar race, remained in the top ten: Million Dollar Baby earned $8.7 million at 2,025 sites in fifth place, and has now grossed $34.6 million in eight weeks; The Aviator earned $5.4 million at 2,530 sites in sixth place, and has now grossed $75.9 million in eight weeks; Sideways earned $4.8 million at just 1,787 sites for eighth place, and has now grossed $46.8 million in sixteen weeks. (That's the best domestic gross ever for a Fox Searchlight release, surpassing the $45 million total for 1997's male stripper tale The Full Monty.


1. Boogeyman, $19.5 million
2. The Wedding Date, $11 million
3. Are We There Yet?, $10.4 million
4. Hide and Seek, $8.9 million
5. Million Dollar Baby, $8.7 million
6. The Aviator, $5.4 million
7. Meet The Fockers, $5 million
8. Sideways, $4.8 million
9. Racing Stripes, $4.42 million
10. Coach Carter, $4.4 million
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on February 13, 2005, 04:09:43 PM
Moviegoers Love "Hitch"

Audiences made Hitch their Valentine. The romantic comedy, in which Will Smith plays a matchmaker with love troubles of his own, captured an above expectations estimated $45.3 million, a record for a movie opening over Valentine's Day Weekend.

It's the seventh time that the popular Smith has headlined a movie opening that big. He's clearly a major attraction in what ever film genre he chooses to appear - action, sci-fi, serious drama, biopic, cartoon voice over, comedy, and now romance.

"He's one of those rare stars that just appeals to everyone, men, women and children. There's no doubt he's somewhat of a king of action, but he is every bit as good in comedy," Rory Bruer, head of distribution for Sony, remarked to the Associated Press.

Sony was feeling particularly star kissed. Not only did the studio have a winner with the PG-13 rated Hitch, which co-stars Kevin James and Eva Mendes, but it scored the top three slots in the box-office top ten. Their PG-13 rated horror tale Boogeyman, last week's number one, only dropped 43 percent, earning $10.8 million in second place to bring its current gross to $33.3 million, and their PG rated road comedy Are We There Yet? remained in third place with $8.5 million to reach a four week gross of $61.5 million.

Hitch, opening at 3,575 sites, where it averaged $12,671, didn't have any real opening wide competition where the only other entry was Pooh's Heffalump Movie, another adventure for the tubby bear and his Hundred Acre Wood pals, targeted at very small kids. The G rated Disney, released at 2,529 sites was essentially pooh-poohed, averaging just $2,377 for $6 million in fifth place.

The other romantic movie was Bride and Prejudice, Jane Austen's confused lovers tale transported and updated to modern India. The PG-13 Miramax release did manage a similar per screen average to Hitch - $12,127 - but the musical extravaganza, by Gurinder Chadha (director of the femme soccer romp Bend It Like Beckham), starring Bollywood beauty Aishwarya Rai and New Zealand bloke Martin Henderson, was only released at 32 sites, so earned only $388,076.

With the Oscars looming ever closer Million Dollar Baby continued to rack up dollars in fourth place, earning $7.5 million, moving up from fifth to fourth place in its ninth week to reach a gross of $45 million. The Aviator, considered its biggest rival for the top awards, was in ninth place with $4.6 million and has now grossed $82.2 million in its nine weeks of release.

Fox Searchlight remained very happy with their Oscar contender Sideways, which actually gained two percent in its 17th week, earning $4.7 million in eighth place at just 1,619 screens. The distributor says the current $53 million domestic gross for this independent release, which only cost around $15 million to produce, surpasses business for previous independent movies that earned a Best Picture nomination - including Lost in Translation, Gosford Park in 2002, and Four Weddings and a Funeral in 1995.

At mainstream Fox the good news was for the decent enough hold for their R rated thriller Hide and Seek, which, unlike rival scare trip Boogeyman, is rated R. In its third week the spooky tale, headlined by Robert De Niro and Dakota Fanning, only dropped 38 percent, earning $5.5 million in seventh place to bring its gross to $43.5 million.

Universal rationalized that the 50 percent drop off from second to sixth place for their romantic comedy The Wedding Date was only to be expected when Hitch entered the picture, so considered it okay that at just 1,704 sites the Debra Messing and Dermont Mulroney hitch-up earned another $5.6 million, though that only brings its two week gross to $19.5 million. The studio's good mood was no doubt helped by the fact that Meet the Fockers still registered in tenth place after eight remarkable weeks, earning $3.4 million to bring its overall gross to a fantastic $269.9 million. Additionally the studio's new NC-17 rated documentary Inside Deep Throat, which explores the phenomenon of the 1972 hard core porn movie, starring Linda Lovelace, busting into the popular culture in an era when no-one would have got away with calling a PG-13 movie Meet the Fockers, opened strongly. At just 12 sites the Brian Grazer production averaged $7,583 for $91,000, and next weekend its exposure will double in size.

The top twelve movies grossed a combined $107.4 million, up 22.7 percent from last weekend, and 2.1 percent from the same weekend last year, which was also President's Day Weekend when 50 First Dates debuted with $39.8 million, then a record for a romantic comedy.


1. Hitch, $45.3 million
2. Boogeyman, $10.8 million
3. Are We There Yet?, $8.5 million
4. Million Dollar Baby, $7.5 million
5. Pooh's Heffalump Movie, $6 million
6. The Wedding Date, $5.6 million
7. Hide and Seek, $5.5 million
8. Sideways, $4.7 million
9. The Aviator, $4.6 million
10. Meet the Fockers, $3.4 million
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Myxo on February 13, 2005, 06:27:20 PM
Did Polar Express make it's money back?

155 million.. Wasn't that around it's budget?
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: ©brad on February 13, 2005, 07:00:42 PM
alexander worldwide has grossed $154,297,191 according to boxofficemojo.com.

who knew.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on February 20, 2005, 03:44:53 PM
"Hitch" Holds Back "Constantine"

Over the first three days of this Presidents' Day weekend Will Smith's romantic comedy snagged $31.8 million, estimated to be just enough to tie down Constantine, which spirited up an above expectations $30.5 million in second place.

However Warners' R rated stylish horror fantasy, which stars Keanu Reeves as a demon slayer on a trip through heaven and hell, had the higher per screen average, $10,155 from 3,006 locations, compared to the $8,895 from remaining at 3,575 sites for Sony's PG-13 release. The how-to-get-hitched laugher, which co-stars Kevin James and Eva Mendes, appeals to a broad demographic. It has grossed a quick, slick $90.1 million in 10 days. Sony estimates it will pass the $100 million before next weekend, and eventually gross as much as $150 million.
 
Fox's PG rated Because of Winn-Dixie took third place, with an estimated $10.8 million. Starring AnnaSophia Robb, as the lonely young girl who finds joyous companionship with the stray dog, the family movie was marketed into 3,188 sites where it averaged $3,403. The studio estimates that by the time the holiday weekend ends Monday it will have earned back its modest around $14 million production budget.

New Line's PG rated Son of the Mask opened fourth, with an estimated $7.6 million. With Jamie Kennedy vainly trying to match the shape shifting skills of Jim Carrey, who starred in the 1994 original The Mask, the movie didn't fly, averaging only $2,588 at 2,966 sites.

The only new limited release was the dysfunctional family story Imaginary Heroes, starring Sigourney Weaver, Jeff Daniels and Emile Hirsch, which had a one week run at the end of last year in a failed bit for Oscar attention. The R rated Sony Picture Classic release, now slotted into just eight sites averaged $3,909 for $31,270.

Three movies considered hot favorites to nab some awards at next Sunday's Oscar ceremonies, remained in the top ten.

Million Dollar Baby in fifth place earned $7.1 million and has now grossed $54.6 million in ten weeks of release.

In the same time The Aviator has earned $88.1 million, including the $4.1 million picked up this weekend in ninth place.

Sideways, which has grossed $58.1 million in 18 weeks, sipped up $3.9 million in the tenth slot.

Presidents' Day is a week later this year. Final figures are not due until Tuesday, but for three days of the four days so far the gross for the top 12 movies is estimated to be $119 million, which may result in a second best ever total for this holiday's box-office.


1. Hitch, $31.8 million
2. Constantine, $30.5 million
3. Because of Winn-Dixie, $10.8 million
4. Son of the Mask, $7.6 million
5. Million Dollar Baby, $7.1 million
6. Are We There Yet?, $6.5 million
7. Boogeyman, $5.5 million
8. Pooh's Heffalump Movie, $4.4 million
9. The Aviator, $4.1 million
10. Sideways, $3.9 million
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Bethie on February 24, 2005, 04:11:47 AM
Quote from: MacGuffin
"Boogeyman" Scares Off "Date"


yeah, no shit
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: matt35mm on February 24, 2005, 09:12:25 AM
Goddamnit!  You made me laugh!  How dare you?
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on February 27, 2005, 03:11:21 PM
Strong opening for 'Diary' at weekend b.o.

In a surprising turn of events at the weekend boxoffice, Lions Gate's "Diary of a Mad Black Woman" debuted in first place, narrowly holding off Sony's "Hitch." "Diary," from Tyler Perry and based on his popular play, collected an estimated $22.7 million from 1,483 engagements for a stellar $15,306 average, according to Sunday's studio figures. "Diary" was playing in the fewest theaters of the top 10 films. Tracking had put the film's opening in the $10 million range.

The Will Smith romantic comedy "Hitch," in its third weekend, took in an estimated $21 million from 3,571 engagements. Its cume now stands at about $122 million. Warner Bros.' supernatural thriller "Constantine" dropped one spot to third place in its sophomore frame with an estimated $11.8 million. Dimension's horror flick "Cursed" opened at No. 4 with an estimated $9.6 million from 2,805 engagements. Sony's Tommy Lee Jones-Cedric the Entertainer comedy "Man of the House" debuted at No. 5 with an estimated $9 million from 2,422 locations.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on March 06, 2005, 07:21:01 PM
'The Pacifier' Tops Weekend Box Office

Vin Diesel's family-friendly comedy "The Pacifier" pulled in $30.2 million on its opening weekend to rank as the nation's top-grossing movie, turning his action-star image and box-office expectations upside down.

Proving he's more than biceps and tattoos, Diesel's performance as a Navy SEAL turned baby sitter easily outdistanced the weekend's other major opening, "Be Cool" with John Travolta.

"Be Cool," the sequel to the 1995 comedy "Get Shorty," took in $23.5 million for Travolta's largest weekend opening, according to studio estimates.

"'Pacifier' did better than anyone expected, but you can't underestimate the family audience," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of Exhibitor Relations Co., which tracks box-office figures. "I think people like to see a fish-out-of-water story an action star in a very unexpected role."

In the Disney comedy, Diesel plays a tough guy who's brought down to size when he's forced into the role of a father figure. The PG-rated makeover recalled another action star's detour into comedy Arnold Schwarzenegger in "Kindergarten Cop," in which the actor known for the violent "Terminator" and "Conan" roles played a police officer facing a classroom of kids.

Diesel proved "the old axiom that funny is money," said Chuck Viane, Disney's head of distribution. Moviegoers want "to laugh and escape for a few hours." The film earned an average $9,653 per theater, well ahead of "Be Cool," which averaged $7,307.

Holding the third spot was Will Smith's romantic comedy "Hitch," which took in $12.5 million to push its four-week total to $138 million.

"Diary of a Mad Black Woman," the top film last weekend, dropped to fourth place. Its $12 million box office was off 45 percent from the previous week. The drama-comedy is based on a script by Tyler Perry from his play of the same name and features him as a cross-dressed, gun-toting grandmother.

Big-studio films often plunge 50 percent or more in the second weekend.

In its 12th week, "Million Dollar Baby" appeared to get a lift from its haul of Academy Awards, including best picture. The film grossed $8.5 million to secure the fifth spot at the box office, up from $7.2 million and No. 6 in last weekend's rankings.

Miramax's "The Aviator" dropped out of the top 10, falling to 11th with $2.3 million.

Among film's with limited release, Warner Independent's "The Jacket," a time-travel story with Adrien Brody and Keira Knightley, was No. 10 with $2.7 million.

Revenue from the top 12 movies was estimated at $111 million, down 16 percent from the same weekend last year, when Mel Gibson's "The Passion of the Christ" banked $53 million in its second weekend.


1. "The Pacifier," $30.2 million.
2. "Be Cool," $23.5 million.
3. "Hitch," $12.5 million.
4. "Diary of a Mad Black Woman," $12 million.
5. "Million Dollar Baby," $8.5 million.
6. "Constantine," $6 million.
7. "Cursed," $3.9 million.
8. "Man of the House," $3.5 million.
9. "Because of Winn-Dixie," $3.4 million.
10. "The Jacket," $2.7 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: ©brad on March 06, 2005, 10:42:25 PM
okay i'm really moving to europe. i'm serious this time.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: cowboykurtis on March 06, 2005, 11:37:04 PM
Quote from: ©brad
okay i'm really moving to europe. i'm serious this time.


i know a brittsh woman seriosuly looking for a husband - her teeth are a little fucked up, but she sure can cook. let me know if you want her number - dual citizenship is the way to go.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Myxo on March 07, 2005, 12:25:47 AM
Quote
1. "The Pacifier," $30.2 million.
2. "Be Cool," $23.5 million.
3. "Hitch," $12.5 million.
4. "Diary of a Mad Black Woman," $12 million.
5. "Million Dollar Baby," $8.5 million.
6. "Constantine," $6 million.
7. "Cursed," $3.9 million.
8. "Man of the House," $3.5 million.
9. "Because of Winn-Dixie," $3.4 million.
10. "The Jacket," $2.7 million.


Awesome! A grand total of one movie on that list doesn't suck ass.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on March 14, 2005, 12:19:12 AM
'Robots' Rules the Box Office With $36.5M

"Robots" ruled the box office as the animated family flick debuted with $36.5 million a solid opening, but well below the $46.3 million premiere of the filmmakers' previous hit, "Ice Age."

While "Ice Age" opened with little competition for the family crowd, "Robots" faced Vin Diesel's hit "The Pacifier," the previous weekend's No. 1 movie. "The Pacifier" finished a strong second with $18.1 million, lifting its 10-day total to $54.4 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

The weekend's other new wide release, the Bruce Willis police thriller "Hostage," debuted at No. 4 with $9.8 million.

Mel Gibson's religious blockbuster "The Passion of the Christ," which grossed $370 million last year, made barely a ripple at theaters in a recut version that toned down the blood and violence. "The Passion Recut" played in 957 theaters but took in just $239,850.

In sharp contrast to the firestorm over the original film, the new version of "The Passion" arrived quietly, with little fanfare. The fact that the original is available on DVD limited theatrical prospects for the recut edition.

Gibson said he recut the movie for people who were put off by the brutality of the original, which explicitly depicted Christ's scourging and crucifixion.

"We certainly had higher expectations than what we got," said Rob Schwartz, head of distribution for Newmarket Films, which released "The Passion of the Christ" and the new cut. "We were trying to get the film out there hoping it would reach an audience that it didn't reach the first time around. It doesn't seem to have worked out quite as well as we had hoped."

Newmarket executives hope more movie-goers will turn out as Easter approaches, Schwartz said.

"Robots," featuring the voices of Ewan McGregor, Halle Berry, Robin Williams and Mel Brooks, is the second feature-length cartoon tale from "Ice Age" directors Chris Wedge and Carlos Saldanha. The movie tracks the adventures of an idealistic robot inventor who moves to the big city.

While "Robots" did not enter theaters with the profile of "Shrek 2" and "The Incredibles," which opened to sky-high numbers, it had been expected to rival the opening weekends for 2002's "Ice Age" and last year's "Shark Tale."

But competing with "The Pacifier," "Robots" fell about $10 million short of both those debuts.

"Those other movies didn't have anything that was working the families with this strength, so I am very, very pleased," said Bruce Snyder, head of distribution for Fox, the studio behind "Robots." "The holidays are coming up, kids are getting out of school, so it's positioned wonderfully."

In limited release, the Joan Allen-Kevin Costner comic drama "The Upside of Anger" opening strongly with $225,783 in nine theaters. The film, centering on a boozy mother embittered over the abrupt departure of her husband, expands to about 150 theaters this weekend.

"Millions," a British family film from director Danny Boyle ("Trainspotting," "28 Days Later") grossed $72,987 in five theaters. The movie follows two young brothers momentarily distracted from grief over their dead mother after a suitcase of cash lands in their laps. It expands gradually over the next six weeks.


1. "Robots," $36.5 million.
2. "The Pacifier," $18.1 million.
3. "Be Cool," $10.3 million.
4. "Hostage," $9.8 million.
5. "Hitch," $8.7 million.
6. "Million Dollar Baby," $5.1 million.
7. "Diary of a Mad Black Woman," $5 million.
8. "Constantine," $3.7 million.
9. "Man of the House," $1.8 million.
10. "Cursed," $1.6 million
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on March 20, 2005, 07:00:04 PM
'Ring 2' Grosses $36M to Top Box Office

Naomi Watts ran rings around the competition as her horror sequel "The Ring 2" took in $36 million to debut as the top weekend movie.

The movie's take was more than double the $15 million that the original surprise horror hit grossed at its 2002 opening.

"Robots," the previous weekend's No. 1 movie, slipped to second place with $21.8 million, lifting its 10-day total to $66.9 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Disney's family hit "The Pacifier" held up well in third place with $12.5 million, pushing its three-week total to $72.3 million.

But with those two child-friendly flicks remaining strong draws, Disney's new family movie "Ice Princess" had a tough time finding a toehold. "Ice Princess," starring Michelle Trachtenberg as a science geek who abandons the physics classroom to pursue a new dream as a figure skater, premiered at No. 4 with $7 million.

Trailers for "Ice Princess" ran before "The Pacifier," so audiences who caught that movie may be encouraged to see "Ice Princess" during spring break or over the Easter holiday, said Chuck Viane, Disney head of distribution.

"It's a double-edged sword. It helps you and it hurts you a little," Viane said.

For thrill seekers, "The Ring 2," offers Watts returning to her role as a journalist and single mom trying to save herself and her son from the curse of a killer videotape, whose viewers die horrible deaths within a week.

The original, based on a Japanese hit, became a word-of-mouth surprise success, holding strong as it steadily climbed to a $129 million total domestic gross. The sequel is expected to mirror the pattern of other horror hits, which open big, but take steep drops.

"Sequels just don't play the same way. You have to expect a good drop," said Jim Tharp, head of distribution for DreamWorks, which released both "Ring" flicks. "Obviously, we would hope to get that $100 million club, but we don't do any of those projections this early in the game."

Woody Allen's "Melinda and Melinda" — which stars Radha Mitchell in dual roles in a comic and tragic retelling of the same story — opened strongly with $74,048 on three screens at one New York City theater.

The film, which co-stars Will Ferrell, Chloe Sevigny and Amanda Peet, gradually expands into nationwide release through April 8.


1. "The Ring 2," $36 million.
2. "Robots," $21.8 million.
3. "The Pacifier," $12.5 million.
4. "Ice Princess," $7 million.
5. "Hitch," $6.6 million.
6. "Be Cool," $5.8 million.
7. "Hostage," $5.797 million.
8. "Million Dollar Baby," $4.1 million.
9. "Diary of a Mad Black Woman," $3.5 million.
10. "Constantine," $2.3 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on March 27, 2005, 02:57:23 PM
'Guess Who' Debuts As Top Movie With $21M

Two guesses on who topped the weekend box office. The Bernie Mac and Ashton Kutcher comedy "Guess Who," an update to the 1967 classic "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner," debuted at No. 1 with $21 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Sandra Bullock's sequel, "Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous," opened in second place with $14.5 million for Friday to Sunday. That brought the movie's total to $17.6 million since it opened Thursday to get a head start on Easter weekend.

The previous weekend's top flick, "The Ring 2," slipped to third with $13.8 million, lifting its 10-day total to $58 million.

It was a solid but unremarkable Easter weekend, generally a slow time at theaters because families are preoccupied with holiday gatherings. The top 12 movies took in $90.1 million, off 7 percent from Easter weekend last year, when "The Passion of the Christ" was No. 1.

"Guess Who" stars Mac as a black father who learns his daughter's boyfriend, Kutcher, is white. It is a reversal of the scenario of "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner," which starred Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn and Sidney Poitier in the story about a white woman engaged to a black man.

While the original was heavy on social commentary amid the civil-rights movement, "Guess Who" plays the interracial romance angle for slapstick laughs.

"'Guess Who's Coming to Dinner' is the inspiration, but this is very broad comedy that plays really well in kind of the buddy mode as well as the romantic comedy mode," said Rory Bruer, head of distribution for Sony, which released "Guess Who."

In "Miss Congeniality 2," Bullock returns to her role as a tomboy FBI agent who gets a fashion makeover. This time, she is teamed with a surly partner, Regina King, to track down a kidnapped beauty queen.

The sequel had a better opening weekend than the original, which debuted with just over $10 million on Christmas weekend 2000, then hung on through word of mouth to become a $100 million hit.

Woody Allen's comedy-drama hybrid "Melinda and Melinda" had a strong expansion from its debut at one New York City theater the previous weekend. The film, which stars Radha Mitchell in dual roles, widened to 95 theaters in 12 cities and took in $790,000.

"The Ballad of Jack and Rose," starring Daniel Day-Lewis, debuted well in limited release, taking in $60,461 in four theaters. Written and directed by Rebecca Miller, Day-Lewis' wife and the daughter of playwright Arthur Miller, the film centers on the relationship between a dying environmental idealist and his troubled teenage daughter.

The blood-soaked South Korean vengeance thriller "Oldboy," runner-up to "Fahrenheit 9/11" for the top prize at last spring's Cannes Film Festival, debuted solidly in limited release with $75,000 in five theaters.


1. "Guess Who," $21 million.
2. "Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous," $14.5 million.
3. "The Ring 2," $13.8 million.
4. "Robots," $13 million.
5. "The Pacifier," $8.5 million.
6. "Hitch," $4.3 million.
7. "Hostage," $4.1 million.
8. "Ice Princess," $3.7 million.
9. "Be Cool," $2.85 million.
10. "Million Dollar Baby," $2.6 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Two Lane Blacktop on March 28, 2005, 10:26:18 PM
Quote from: MacGuffin
The Bernie Mac and Ashton Kutcher comedy "Guess Who," an update to the 1967 classic "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner," debuted at No. 1 with $21 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.


I fucking weep for humanity.  

2LB
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on April 03, 2005, 02:57:42 PM
'Sin City' No. 1 at Weekend Box Office

"Sin City" proved an irresistible temptation for audiences as the highly stylized comic-book adaptation led the weekend box office with a $28.1 million debut.

Opening in second place was Queen Latifah's comedy "Beauty Shop," a spinoff of the "Barbershop" franchise, which took in $13.5 million for the weekend, according to industry estimates Sunday. Since opening Wednesday, "Beauty Shop" had grossed $17.3 million.

The comedy "Guess Who," the previous weekend's top-grossing movie, slipped to No. 3 with $13 million, lifting its 10-day total to $41.3 million.

Overall, movie revenues slipped for the sixth straight weekend. The top 12 movies took in $98.3 million, down 14 percent from the same weekend last year, when "Hellboy" and "Walking Tall" opened on top of the box office.

The slump follows a healthy start to 2005 in which movie revenues had surged about 10 percent ahead of 2004's. Revenues now are running even with last year's at about $2 billion heading into Hollywood's busy season.

"Summer's coming, and summer better save the day," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "Better to have a slow pre-summer than a slow summer, I guess."

"Sin City" is adapted from Frank Miller's noirish comics in a wicked town filled with tough guys and gorgeous dames. The movie's huge cast includes Bruce Willis, Mickey Rourke, Benicio Del Toro, Jessica Alba, Rosario Dawson, Clive Owen, Elijah Wood, Alexis Bledel and Brittany Murphy.

Director Robert Rodriguez, who had Miller on the set as co-director, shot the actors against green-screen backgrounds, adding the jutting buildings, shadowy interiors and other backdrops later through computer-generated imagery.

The movie is presented largely in stark black and white, with a few splashes of color to highlight such images as splatters of blood, a woman's blond hair or a red dress.

Rodriguez, whose films range from the "Spy Kids" family franchise to the violent thrillers "Once Upon a Time in Mexico" and "From Dusk Till Dawn," is a multitasking director who handles his own shooting, editing and many other duties. His economical work ethic produces movies that resemble big Hollywood productions costing $100 million or more, only at a fraction of the price.

Costing about $40 million to make, "Sin City" grossed nearly three-fourths of its production budget in just the first weekend, putting the movie on the fast track to profitability.

"That's the genius of Robert Rodriguez," said Josh Greenstein, head of marketing for Dimension Films, the Miramax banner that released "Sin City" and the "Spy Kids" flicks. "His way of working is very cost-effective."

"Beauty Shop" stars Latifah reprising the hairdresser role she originated in "Barbershop 2: Back in Business," this time opening her own salon filled with wacky employees and customers.

With females making up two-thirds of the audience, distributor MGM figured "Beauty Shop" would have some longevity in theaters.

"Females, they don't rush out to the movies the first weekend, so I think this one's going to hang around for a while," said Erik Lomis, MGM head of distribution.


1. "Sin City," $28.1 million.
2. "Beauty Shop," $13.5 million.
3. "Guess Who," $13 million.
4. "Robots," $10 million.
5. "Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous," $8.4 million.
6. "The Pacifier," $6.1 million.
7. "The Ring 2," $5.8 million.
8. "The Upside of Anger," $4.1 million.
9. "Hitch," $3 million.
10. "Ice Princess," $2.6 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on April 10, 2005, 07:28:43 PM
'Sahara' Tops 'Fever Pitch' at Box Office

LOS ANGELES - Matthew McConaughey's "Sahara" heated up the weekend box office, with the action flick set in the African desert debuting at the top with $18.5 million. Audiences gave a cooler reception to "Fever Pitch," the weekend's other new wide release. The Drew Barrymore and Jimmy Fallon baseball romance opened in third place with a so-so $13 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.    

The previous weekend's No. 1 movie, "Sin City," slipped to second place with $14.1 million, lifting its 10-day total to $50.7 million.

In limited release, Stephen Chow's raucous action comedy "Kung Fu Hustle" had a big opening with $293,025 in seven theaters, averaging a whopping $41,861 per cinema. "Sahara" averaged $5,866 in 3,154 theaters, and "Fever Pitch" reaped $3,979 in 3,267 locations.

Already a hit in Asia, "Kung Fu Hustle" features writer-director Chow as a two-bit crook in pre-revolution China whose antics land him in the middle of a showdown between mobsters and martial-arts heroes. "Kung Fu Hustle" expands to nationwide release April 22.

Hollywood's box-office slump continued as overall revenues remained down for the seventh-straight weekend. The top 12 movies took in $80.3 million, off 18 percent from the same weekend last year.

Revenues for the year have fallen slightly behind those of 2004, when Hollywood rang up record domestic grosses of $9.4 billion.

"Sahara," adapted from Clive Cussler's adventure novel, stars McConaughey, Penelope Cruz and Steve Zahn as adventurers who turn up a long-lost Civil War vessel in the desert and try to stop a plague spreading through Africa.

Distributor Paramount had expected the movie to debut in the $15 million range, said Wayne Lewellen, head of distribution.

"This is a good, solid opening I think for this film," Lewellen said. "It played well particularly in the middle of the country, which always bodes well for it holding up."

"Fever Pitch," directed by the Farrelly brothers from Nick Hornby's memoir about his sports obsession, stars Barrymore as a career woman who stumbles into a relationship with a man whose world revolves around the Boston Red Sox.

"It may have alienated guys with too much romance, and it may have alienated women with too much baseball," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations.

But women made up 58 percent of the audience for "Fever Pitch." That may bode well for the movie's long-term prospects, since films appealing to women often have a longer shelf life than movies aimed at men.

"These romantic comedies tend to leg out. They play on and on," said Bruce Snyder, head of distribution for 20th Century Fox, which released "Fever Pitch." Barrymore's "Never Been Kissed" had an $11.4 million opening weekend and held on to do a solid $52.4 million when its domestic run ended, he said.


1. "Sahara," $18.5 million.
2. "Sin City," $14.1 million.
3. "Fever Pitch," $13 million.
4 (tie). "Beauty Shop," $7.1 million.
4 (tie). "Guess Who," $7.1 million.
6. "Robots," $4.65 million.
7. "Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous," $4.1 million.
8. "The Pacifier," $3 million.
9. "The Ring 2," $2.9 million.
10. "The Upside of Anger," $2.6 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pubrick on April 10, 2005, 11:06:23 PM
haha what a shitty debut.

u know sumthing is wrong when american box office numbers are nearing australian figures.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Myxo on April 11, 2005, 08:19:16 AM
Sahara will be lucky to break 10 million next weekend. I'm guessing 8 is more likely.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pwaybloe on April 11, 2005, 09:39:40 AM
Quote from: MacGuffin
Hollywood's box-office slump continued as overall revenues remained down for the seventh-straight weekend. The top 12 movies took in $80.3 million, off 18 percent from the same weekend last year.


Don't worry.  Next month is May.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Ravi on April 11, 2005, 01:18:18 PM
Quote from: Pwaybloe
Quote from: MacGuffin
Hollywood's box-office slump continued as overall revenues remained down for the seventh-straight weekend. The top 12 movies took in $80.3 million, off 18 percent from the same weekend last year.


Don't worry.  Next month is May.


Yay!  Sequels and movies based on TV shows!  :yabbse-thumbdown:  :yabbse-thumbdown:  :yabbse-thumbdown:
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on April 17, 2005, 05:50:42 PM
'Amityville' Tops 'Sahara' at Box Office

"The Amityville Horror" returned from the dead with a vengeance, with the gory update of the 1970s fright flick taking in $23.3 million to top the weekend box office.

The previous weekend's No. 1 movie, the African desert adventure "Sahara," slipped to second place with $13.1 million, lifting its 10-day total to $36.4 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

"The Amityville Horror" stars Ryan Reynolds and Melissa George as a couple tormented by visions and voices in their new home, the scene of a grisly mass murder a year earlier.

The movie is the latest in a parade of successful horror remakes. With a built-in audience looking for scares and a string of hits such as "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" "The Grudge" and "Dawn of the Dead," horror movies have become almost a sure-thing in Hollywood.

Horror movies also typically cost far less than other big studio films, whose average budgets top $60 million. "The Amityville Horror" grossed more than its $19 million budget in just the first weekend.

"The Amityville Horror" received mostly bad reviews, yet the under-25 crowd that makes up the genre's core audience rarely heeds the critics.

"The only reviews that count are the public's reviews," said Erik Lomis, head of distribution for MGM, which released "The Amityville Horror."

In limited release, David Duchovny's directing debut, "House of D," opened strongly with $30,000 in two theaters. The coming-of-age tale features Duchovny, wife Tea Leoni, Robin Williams and Erykah Badu.

Todd Solondz's "Palindromes," featuring Jennifer Jason Leigh and seven others playing the same character in a series of vignettes, debuted well with $61,434 in seven theaters.

With overall revenues down for the eighth-straight weekend, Hollywood is limping into its busy summer season. The top 12 movies took in $73.9 million, off 13 percent from the same weekend last year.

"This is a major slump," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "I think the industry is holding its collective breath for the turnaround. What is going to be the movie that reverses this down trend? Thankfully, summer looks really good."

Sydney Pollack's United Nations thriller "The Interpreter," starring Nicole Kidman and Sean Penn, and the Ashton Kutcher-Amanda Peet romantic comedy "A Lot Like Love," open Friday as summer lead-ins.

Next week brings the action follow-up "XXX: State of the Union," starring Ice Cube, and the science-fiction romp "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy"

May could get Hollywood back on track, with "Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith" as the industry's centerpiece for early summer.

Other big May releases include Adam Sandler's football tale "The Longest Yard," Will Ferrell's soccer comedy "Kicking & Screaming," Ridley Scott's Crusades epic "Kingdom of Heaven," the animated adventure "Madagascar," the horror remake "House of Wax" and Jennifer Lopez and Jane Fonda's comedy "Monster-in-Law."


1. "The Amityville Horror," $23.3 million.
2. "Sahara," $13.1 million.
3. "Fever Pitch," $8.8 million.
4. "Sin City," $6.7 million.
5. "Guess Who," $4.9 million.
6. "Beauty Shop," $3.8 million.
7. "Robots," $3.55 million.
8. "Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous," $2.9 million.
9. "The Pacifier," $2.4 million.
10. "The Upside of Anger," $1.9 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on April 24, 2005, 03:34:08 PM
'Interpreter' Translates to Box-Office Win

Nicole Kidman and Sean Penn's "The Interpreter" translated into solid box-office as the United Nations thriller debuted with $22.8 million to top the weekend for Hollywood.

The weekend's other main debut, Ashton Kutcher and Amanda Peet's romantic comedy "A Lot Like Love," had a so-so opening of $7.7 million, coming in at No. 4, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Expanding nationwide after two weeks in limited release, Stephen Chow's action comedy "Kung Fu Hustle" was No. 5 with $7.3 million, lifting its total domestic gross to just over $8 million.

Anthony Anderson's kidnapping comedy "King's Ransom," so bad it was not screened beforehand for critics, finished in 10th place with just $2.4 million.

In limited release, the documentary "Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room" opened strongly with $70,000 at three theaters. The film offers an inside portrait of the corporate scandal at the energy company.

Overall business was down for the ninth-straight week, with the top 12 movies taking in $83.4 million, off a fraction from the same weekend last year.

"The Interpreter," directed by Sydney Pollack, stars Kidman as a U.N. translator at the center of an assassination plot after she overhears a death threat against an African dictator. Penn co-stars as a federal agent.

Reviews generally were positive, with critics calling "The Interpreter" an unusually brainy thriller.

"I think audiences were anxious for any good, solid story," said Nikki Rocco, head of distribution for Universal, which released "The Interpreter."

"The Interpreter" was a rare triumph for older audiences, with the over-35 crowd making up 60 percent of the film's viewers. The under-25 audience that drives most of the box office was divided among several movies, including "The Amityville Horror and "A Lot Like Love."

"You look at the demographic and go, how can 'The Interpreter' be No. 1? But if you put the right movie in the marketplace, the older audience will go," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations.

"A Lot Like Love," which received mixed reviews, fell short of distributor Disney's hopes that it would hit $10 million over opening weekend. Considering Kutcher's solid box-office history, including the current hit "Guess Who," the performance of "A Lot Like Love" was another sign of audience disinterest in what Hollywood has had to offer the last two months.

The slump has left the industry limping into its busy summer season, with such big titles as "Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith," "Kingdom of Heaven" and "The Longest Yard" due out in May.

"There hasn't been that breakout picture the public's jumping to see yet, but it'll happen. It's just around the corner," said Chuck Viane, Disney head of distribution.


1. "The Interpreter," $22.8 million.
2. "The Amityville Horror," $14.2 million.
3. "Sahara," $9 million.
4. "A Lot Like Love," $7.7 million.
5. "Kung Fu Hustle," $7.3 million.
6. "Fever Pitch," $5.45 million.
7. "Sin City," $3.7 million.
8. "Guess Who," $3.5 million.
9. "Robots," $3.3 million.
10. "King's Ransom," $2.4 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on May 01, 2005, 02:30:29 PM
'Hitchhikers Guide' Takes $21.7M in Debut

"The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" thumbed its way to the top of the box office, debuting at $21.7 million to beat out the explosive "XXX" brand.

Ice Cube's action tale "XXX: State of the Union" opened a weak third with $13.7 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

"XXX" came in behind the previous weekend's top movie, "The Interpreter," starring Nicole Kidman and Sean Penn, which slipped to No. 2 with $14.2 million, lifting its 10-day total to $43.6 million.

Hollywood's pre-summer slump continued, with overall revenues down for the 10th-straight weekend. The top 12 movies grossed $84.8 million, off 10 percent from the same weekend last year, when "Mean Girls" and "Man on Fire" led the box office.

Adapted from the first of the late Douglas Adams' comically philosophical books about the nature of our big, old goofy universe, "Hitchhiker's Guide" follows the adventures of an ordinary Brit who catches a ride with aliens moments before Earth is destroyed to make way for an interstellar bypass.

Adams' books have been cult favorites for decades, but the movie's mix of cheeky humor, oddball ideas and singular visuals clearly hooked a mainstream audience. Reviews were mixed, some critics calling the movie a fitful gag reel that sapped the essence of Adams' witty prose and others finding it a refreshing dose of whimsy and irreverence.

"Obviously, the thought process of the public was, 'That looks interesting. I want to see it. It's fresh and looks different,'" said Chuck Viane, head of distribution for Disney, which released "Hitchhiker's Guide."

Critics soundly trashed the new "XXX" flick, but they also disliked Vin Diesel's original, which did more than three times the business over opening weekend than the followup.

What went wrong?

"I wish I could say," said Rory Bruer, head of distribution for "XXX" studio Sony. "Certainly, we're disappointed, because it's a film we all believed in. We have Ice Cube, who is a big star, and I think he's one of those rare actors who really can do just about anything. So I really don't know."

Ice Cube, previously known for the R-rated "Friday" movies and the saucy "Barbershop" comedies, broadened into the family market with this year's hit "Are We There Yet?" But the absence of Diesel may have undermined the movie's appeal, while fans may not have bought into rapper Ice Cube as an action hero.

"Ice Cube doesn't seem like a sweethearted dad, either, but 'Are We There Yet?' did incredibly well," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "Maybe people just associated Vin Diesel more with that role than anybody thought."


1. "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy," $21.7 million.
2. "The Interpreter," $14.2 million.
3. "XXX: State of the Union," $13.7 million.
4. "The Amityville Horror," $8.1 million.
5. "Sahara," $6 million.
6. "A Lot Like Love," $5.2 million.
7. "Kung Fu Hustle," $3.8 million.
8. "Fever Pitch," $3.75 million.
9. "Robots," $2.65 million.
10. "Guess Who," $2.2 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on May 01, 2005, 10:02:25 PM
Quote from: MacGuffin
Critics soundly trashed the new "XXX" flick, but they also disliked Vin Diesel's original, which did more than three times the business over opening weekend than the followup.

What went wrong?

"I wish I could say," said Rory Bruer, head of distribution for "XXX" studio Sony. "Certainly, we're disappointed, because it's a film we all believed in. We have Ice Cube, who is a big star, and I think he's one of those rare actors who really can do just about anything. So I really don't know."

hmm.... my bullshit-o-meter is flashing red.  can Ice Cube really do JUST ABOUT ANYTHING as an actor?  he is of that rare breed?  does this man expect anyone to believe the words coming out of his mouth?  does he even listen to himself anymore?
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on May 08, 2005, 02:30:39 PM
"Kingdom" Barely Heavenly

Kingdom of Heaven ruled, but not strongly enough to oust the box-office from its current slump.

The Crusader epic debuted with an estimated $20 million, way below the $51.7 million sucked up this time last year by the vampire hunter saga Van Helsing.

House of Wax, yet another horror remake, debuted with $12.2 million in second place, not contributing enough to help overall business which continues in meltdown.

For an eleventh weekend in a row grosses were on the skids, the longest slump since the end of July through October in 2000. The total gross for the top 12 movies was just $76.8 million, a drop of 23.7 percent from this time last year, and 5 percent from last weekend.

Paul Dergarabedian, president of Exhibitor Relations, which tallies the studios' box-office, says the below expectations debut for Kingdom of Heaven, shouldn't be blamed on its distributor Fox because "the studio did a beautiful marketing job and the movie got pretty good reviews." He reasons the weak opening for Ridley Scott's expensive, philosophical religious wars adventure has more to do with the marketplace being depressed. "It's just laying there," Dergarabedian says, hoping that when the long-awaited Star Wars: Episode III: Revenge of the Sith finally opens May 19, there will be a much needed upturn in ticket sales.

Kingdom of Heaven, which reportedly cost around $150 million to produce, stars Orlando Bloom as a glamorous battler in the 12th Century Christian-Islamic conflict. Swept into 3,216 sites, the R rated spectacular averaged just $6,219, a dismal kick-off to what is now officially summer movie season. (In contrast Universal's Van Helsing, starring another glamorous guy Hugh Jackman, but rated PG-13, averaged $14,475 from 3,575 sites.)

Trying to be upbeat, Bruce Snyder, Fox's domestic distribution chief, noted that the two-thirds of the audience for Kingdom of Heaven, which also stars Jeremy Irons and Liam Neeson, was over 25, which suggests it was attracting a more sophisticated audience and hence might hold on well. Talking to Reuters, Snyder also mentioned the restrictive R rating and the film's lengthy running time, which would have made for fewer showings and hence fewer ticket sales, and mentioned the film had additionally grossed about $56 million overseas.

Back in the USA, House of Wax, Warner Bros. R rated slasher update of the camp '50s horror tale, with a young things cast that includes Elisha Cuthbert, Chad Michael Murphy and the ubiquitous Paris Hilton, was strewn across 3,111 sites where it only averaged $3,928.

Doing better on average in more limited release was Crash, the we-clearly-can't-all-get-along LA based conflict drama. Opening in fourth place, the R rated Lions Gate release - directed by Paul Haggis with a star ensemble that includes Sandra Bullock, Don Cheadle, Matt Dillon, Jennifer Esposito, Brendan Fraser, Thandie Newton and Ryan Phillippe - scored $9.12 million from a $4,882 averaged at just 1,864 sites.

Last week's top movie, the quirky space trip The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, suffered freefall, dropping 57 percent to third place, earning just $9.1 million to bring its two week gross to just $35.1 million.


Final figures are due Monday. The estimated top ten follows:

1. Kingdom of Heaven, $20 million
2. House of Wax, $12.2 million
3. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, $9.12 million
4. Crash, $9.1 million
5. The Interpreter, $7.5 million
6. XXX: State of the Union, $5.4 million
7. The Amityville Horror, $3.15 million
8. Sahara, $3.1 million
9. A Lot Like Love, $3 million
10. Fever Pitch, $2 million
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on May 08, 2005, 10:54:30 PM
yeah i cant believe i didnt see this.  but perhaps the ol' 'wait for the dvd' excuse has finally been applicable for me.  atleast because i think the movie might be better if there was the hour back in.  but who knows, i may see it this week.  i'm conflicted.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Tryskadekafobia on May 08, 2005, 11:44:01 PM
who would've thought we'd ever get to an age when an opening weekend of $20 million would was seen as a dissapointment?  certainly not I.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pubrick on May 10, 2005, 07:35:45 AM
Quote from: Tryskadekafobia
who would've thought we'd ever get to an age when an opening weekend of $20 million would was seen as a dissapointment?  certainly not I.

it's a disappointment when these pieces of crap are costing ten times that.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: meatball on May 10, 2005, 03:28:18 PM
Quote from: Pubrick
Quote from: Tryskadekafobia
who would've thought we'd ever get to an age when an opening weekend of $20 million would was seen as a dissapointment?  certainly not I.

it's a disappointment when these pieces of crap are costing ten times that.


Yeah, crap should be cheap.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Ravi on May 10, 2005, 05:00:46 PM
New York Times

Hollywood Worries as Decline Continues
By SHARON WAXMAN

Published: May 10, 2005

LOS ANGELES, May 9 - Now Hollywood is starting to get worried.

The poor box-office performance last weekend of the first major film of the summer, "Kingdom of Heaven," released by 20th Century Fox, made for 11 weeks in a row of declining movie attendance and revenue compared with last year, adding up to the longest slump since 2000 and raising an uncomfortable question: Are people turning away from lackluster movies, or turning their backs on the whole business of going to theaters?
   
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The historical epic about the Crusades, which stars Orlando Bloom and was directed by Ridley Scott, took in just $20 million at the domestic box office, a puny opening for a film that cost about $130 million to make and was supported by a major marketing push. The film was helped by a stronger performance abroad, where it took in $56 million in 93 territories.

To be sure, "Kingdom of Heaven" is not the first swords-and-sandals epic to miss the mark with American audiences; neither "Alexander" nor "King Arthur" nor "Troy" was embraced by audiences in this country last year. Analysts said that the "Crusader" movie's R rating contributed to its weak opening, along with reviews that declared Mr. Bloom's performance inadequate.

The weekend's top 12 films took in $77 million, the worst result for early May in at least five years, according to Exhibitor Relations, a company that tracks box-office results. Box-office revenue is down almost 6 percent compared with last year's, while attendance is down about 8 percent, Exhibitor Relations reported.

Since 2002, attendance is down about 10 percent for the comparable period, to about 433.7 admissions from about 485 million. The decline has provoked speculation that a rising DVD market and the advent of more elaborate home entertainment centers, along with the shrinking window of time between a theatrical release and the appearance of the DVD, is causing moviegoers to stay home and wait for discs.

"It does take more to get people out of the easy chair and to the theater; movies have to be so much more compelling," said the president of Exhibitor Relations, Paul Dergarabedian. "DVD's and home theater create more of an anchor to keep people at home. There's a little bit of that going on, and when there's more competition for eyeballs, it's a lot more of a challenge."

Still, some of Hollywood's most seasoned executives insist that this year's problem is a simpler one: The movies have not been good enough. Usually, they said, a sleeper hit comes along in late winter or early spring to wake up the box office, like last year's "Mean Girls" or "Starsky & Hutch" - or the crucifixion blockbuster "The Passion of the Christ."

"Nothing has turned on the audience yet," said Tom Sherak, a partner in Revolution Studios. "It's happened many times before, where the movies come out without great word of mouth. What's happening is the same people who usually come that first weekend have been coming, but they seem to go away quickly because the movies are not generating a broader audience."

Others blamed last weekend's raft of R-rated films, which cut out a major segment of the audience, for the continuing drop. Warner Brothers' "House of Wax," which also opened last weekend, was rated R.

"R-rated pictures aren't working in this marketplace like they used to," said John Fithian, president of the National Association of Theater Owners. "They still seem to work overseas, but they're not as easy to sell in the U.S. Parents are more concerned. We're enforcing the ratings really hard. Anytime you have an opening weekend with all the opening movies rated R, you don't have the same demographic potential as you do otherwise."

In the case of "Kingdom of Heaven," Fox labored to make a film about religious war that would offend neither Christians nor Muslims and trimmed some of Mr. Scott's more violent scenes, said a person who worked on the film and spoke on condition of anonymity to protect relations at the studio. But because the subject matter was religious war and not, as with "The Passion," resurrection, the studio could not count on a big Christian turnout, the person said. A spokesman for Fox said the film was actively marketed to Christians.

Mr. Sherak and others predicted a change once theaters carry a movie that people are excited to see. "The marketplace is obviously in a malaise, and it's going to take movies like 'Star Wars' to get us out of it," Mr. Dergarabedian said, referring to the highly anticipated final installment of the series "Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith," which opens on May 19.

Mr. Fithian, whose member companies have the most to lose from the rise of home viewing, did not agree that the current drop reflected a fundamental shift.

"We are obviously not happy with the 11-week rut that we've been in, but we don't view it as a long-term structural problem," he said. The long-term trends are still positive, he added, referring to an increase in theatrical admissions in the past three decades. "The overall admission trend is that it's growing faster than the population," he continued. "I caution people not to jump to - 'DVD's are killing theaters.' If you look at the numbers, it's not happening," he said.

Mr. Sherak agreed, saying the movie business is cyclical. "I have 35 years of history to prove it," he said. "If attendance drops, it'll drop 2 to 3 percent over all. If it goes up, it goes up 2 to 3 percent. If at the end of the year attendance is off 9 percent, then you have a problem. But right now, it's about the movies."
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on May 10, 2005, 11:30:55 PM
Quote from: Ravi
or the crucifixion blockbuster "The Passion of the Christ."

perhaps my favorite genre.  so few films, though.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on May 15, 2005, 02:39:39 PM
Fonda-Lopez Faceoff Tops at Box Office

LOS ANGELES - Moviegoers rewarded Jane Fonda's return to the big screen by making "Monster-in-Law" the weekend's top movie, though the comedy was short of a monster hit.

The total box office slump continued for a 12th straight week, but the force is expected to return next week when the final chapter in the Star Wars saga — "Star Wars: Episode III — Revenge of the Sith," — hits theaters.

"Monster-in-Law," which pits Jennifer Lopez against Fonda as her villainous prospective mother-in-law, took in $24 million, according to studio estimates Sunday. Fonda's first major film role in 15 years was also Lopez's strongest box office opening performance, ahead of 2002's "Maid in Manhattan," which opened with $18.7 million.

J.Lo versus J.Fo earned $3 million more than another comedic take on familial combat, "Kicking & Screaming," in which Will Ferrell faces off against his father and youth soccer coaching rival Robert Duvall.

The weekend's other major opener, the Jet Li action flick "Unleashed," took in a respectable $10.6 million. Last week's box office champ, the Orlando Bloom Crusades epic "Kingdom of Heaven," slipped to fourth place with $9.6 million, a 51 percent drop from its opening weekend.

The total box office take was down 6.7 percent from the same weekend last year, when "Troy" debuted with $46.8 million, but it was up 21.7 percent from last weekend.

"I'm encouraged by these numbers," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "This shows there is an audience out there. As we head into the week of 'Star Wars,' this is definitely a positive-looking marketplace."

Studio executives said they were not worried with the box office results so far. "Star Wars" will be followed by several big films, including the animated "Madagascar" and the Adam Sandler-Chris Rock remake of "The Longest Yard."

"There's nothing wrong with our business that a good movie won't fix," said David Tuckerman, head of distribution for New Line Cinema, which released "Monster-in-Law." "'Star Wars' will jump-start us."

None of the major studios are planning any wide releases next weekend, figuring that any new movie will be buried by the sixth and final episode of George Lucas' influential sci-fi saga.

"Because it's the final installment, it's going to go beyond the typical sci-fi audience. It's a cultural phenomenon. Virtually everyone has a vested interest in this movie," Dergarabedian said.

The only contest will be for second place.

"Hopefully we'll still be a choice for families," said Nikki Rocco, head of distribution for Universal, which released "Kicking & Screaming."


1. "Monster-in-Law," $24 million.
2. "Kicking & Screaming," $21 million.
3. "Unleashed," $10.6 million.
4. "Kingdom of Heaven," $9.6 million.
5. "Crash," $7.2 million.
6. "House of Wax," $6.3 million.
7. "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy," $4.8 million.
8. "The Interpreter," $4.4 million.
9. "XXX: State of the Union," $2.2 million.
10. "Mindhunters," $2 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: w/o horse on May 15, 2005, 02:48:55 PM
You know, I'm proud of America for not making XXX:  State of the Union a box office smash, but I'm dissapointed that more people didn't go see Kingdom of Heaven.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: RegularKarate on May 15, 2005, 09:27:29 PM
Quote from: Losing the Horse:
You know, I'm proud of America for not making XXX:  State of the Union a box office smash, but I'm dissapointed that more people didn't go see Kingdom of Heaven.


I'm not proud of them at all... it's because there was almost zero marketing for it... not because they chose not to see it.  

As far as disapointment over Kingdom of Heaven... why?  So we can make more boring to average films?
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: w/o horse on May 15, 2005, 09:41:38 PM
Quote from: RegularKarate
Quote from: Losing the Horse:
You know, I'm proud of America for not making XXX:  State of the Union a box office smash, but I'm dissapointed that more people didn't go see Kingdom of Heaven.


I'm not proud of them at all... it's because there was almost zero marketing for it... not because they chose not to see it.  

As far as disapointment over Kingdom of Heaven... why?  So we can make more boring to average films?


Alright so you're a pessimist, you win.

I guess maybe if XXX:  State of the Union had been 13.7 million and all the other movies had been $0 I would be able to understand your agument, but to me the fact that The Interpreter did better than XXX is a good thing, a good thing for us and for everyone.  If the next week XXX had dropped to 5.4 million and Kingdom of Heaven had not gotten 20 million, Crash had not gotten 9.1 million, and the Interpreter had not once again beaten the movie with 7.5 million I would be able to understand your argument.  Because honestly, those millions aren't coming from different marketing sects, they're coming from the XXX demographic choosing a different movie over XXX.  Plain and simple.

Also, Kingdom of Heaven may be "boring and average" I don't know, it's not the kind of movie I like and I haven't seen it, but you know, I'd prefer it get made to House of Wax ANY FUCKING DAY, and that happened.  It may not be a good historical epic, there may not have been a lot of good historial epics recently, but that doesn't mean the historical epic isn't fertile ground for filmmaking.  It's also an extremely expensive ground, and one that needs to be encouraged to keep it going.  Let's be honest:  they don't get made easily.

I wish the attacks I got here weren't so fucking typical.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: meatball on May 15, 2005, 09:43:08 PM
You're getting into the spirit of Xixax now, Horse.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: RegularKarate on May 15, 2005, 09:53:14 PM
Quote from: Losing the Horse:

I wish the attacks I got here weren't so fucking typical.


are you a nutter?  I wasn't attacking you... I was just stating my side of things (which you still haven't convinced me to drop).

and yes, I realize that THIS post is kind of attacking you.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: w/o horse on May 15, 2005, 10:03:43 PM
The ideological attacks.

Now, I don't want to generalize or assume anything, because then Pubrick would have to 'u' me, but it seems like a group of people that may or may not include any of the film fans here seem to be lacking perspective in the business side of things, the real-life side of things.  This week J-Lo took a shit and it landed her 24 million.  Will took a piss on a soccer field with Bob Dylan's son and it landed 21 million.  Both of these are a greater sum than Kingdom of Heaven mustered.

I can assume that Ridley Scott brought enough to the table to warrant more than both of those films, and because of his reputation he'll be allowed back, I just don't think that film fans, which may or may not post here, realize that they vote when they go the theater.  They make a vote to the studios about what kind of films they want made, and the studios fucking listen to those $10 votes.  Me, personally, I'm glad as fuck that they voted XXX out of office, and I would have liked to have seen them support a historical epic.

Is all I'm saying.  I would prefer to have the option of Kingdom of Heaven over, I don't know, Hitch.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: meatball on May 15, 2005, 10:31:13 PM
Why does the historical epic deserve more credit or respect than a pre-marital comedy or a soccer comedy?

America didn't cast it's vote for Kingdom of Heaven because it follows in the footsteps of Alexander and Troy, and the Lord of the Rings trilogy. There's only so much swordplay moviegoing audiences can take. It's also an Orlando Bloom vehicle, his first if you don't include a comedy he did in the UK. America just told the film biz that it's sick of historical epics. Do you want Orlando Bloom to star in another film?
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: w/o horse on May 15, 2005, 10:44:47 PM
Quote from: Meatball
Why does the historical epic deserve more credit or respect than a pre-marital comedy or a soccer comedy?


If you'd rather see those two than Kingdom of Heaven than you obviously don't agree with the Kingdom of Heaven > Hitch and you, also, would be in the majority.  We just disagree.  I'd rather see the studios go hog wild with the historical epics than hog wild with the romantic comedies.

Quote from: Meatball
America didn't cast it's vote for Kingdom of Heaven because it follows in the footsteps of Alexander and Troy, and the Lord of the Rings trilogy. There's only so much swordplay moviegoing audiences can take. It's also an Orlando Bloom vehicle, his first if you don't include a comedy he did in the UK. America just told the film biz that it's sick of historical epics. Do you want Orlando Bloom to star in another film?


This is true.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Myxo on May 21, 2005, 03:26:30 AM
'Sith' Destroys Single Day Record

by Brandon Gray
May 20, 2005

After starting the day with $16,912,367 from midnight shows alone, Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith closed Thursday with $50,013,859 from an estimated 9,400 screens at 3,661 theaters. That's the biggest day ever for a single movie in history.

Shrek 2 previously held the single day record with $44.8 million on its fourth day of release, a Saturday last May, while Spider-Man 2 had the opening day record at $40.4 million, posted on June 30 of last year. Revenge of the Sith soared past them both with a gross beyond the rosiest of industry expectations.

"When I consider it's a Thursday with kids in school, I'd figure it can't do that," distributor 20th Century Fox's head of distribution, Bruce Snyder, told Box Office Mojo. "I did not think we could do $50 million. I was thinking maybe we could catch up to Shrek 2 on Saturday. I'm as surprised as the rest of the world."

For further perspective, the biggest opening weekend of the year thus far had been Hitch's $43.1 million, and Revenge of the Sith blew past that in one day. Sith's gross is surprising, in part, because the previous Star Wars installment, Attack of the Clones, had an opening day on par with The Phantom Menace and ultimately made significantly less. In 2002, Clones grossed $30.1 million on its way to $310.7 million, while Phantom earned $28.5 million en route to $431.1 million.

Despite the immensity of its opening day, Revenge of the Sith is not a lock to break Spider-Man's $114.8 million opening weekend record.

"It's a tough call," Snyder noted. "I don't think that we'll have the 3-day weekend record. I guess if you take Thursday, Friday and Saturday, we'd be bigger. If we opened on Friday, we'd have the weekend record. But after this, you gotta drop. For the 4-day, we'll be the biggest ever."

The current four-day champ is The Matrix Reloaded, which nabbed $134.3 million in May 2003. That picture quickly burnt out and ended its run at $281.6 million.

Snyder noted several reasons for Revenge of the Sith's success. "For one, it was the culmination of the series," he explained. "The buzz on the picture has been extraordinary in stories and on television, and we were quite a bit wider than Attack of the Clones in terms of number of theaters and prints. And I do think we are getting the adults who had seen the original trilogy."

Revenge of the Sith has been seen as the jumpstart to get people back into the moviegoing habit after an uninspiring spring, but it will take more than just one movie. "The answer is if the movies behind it are good," Snyder said. "If there's something that's not interesting behind it, the box office will stall again."
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on May 30, 2005, 01:26:33 PM
'Sith' retains boxoffice force with $70 mil weekend

Payback for the Sith has meant a real payday at the boxoffice.

"Star Wars: Episode III -- Revenge of the Sith" beat two strong newcomers to remain the top movie with an estimated $70.75 million over the long Memorial Day weekend, though Hollywood again failed to climb out of a prolonged revenue decline.
 
Debuting in second place was the animated adventure "Madagascar" with about $61 million, while Adam Sandler's football remake "The Longest Yard" opened a close third with approximately $60 million, according to studio estimates Monday.

Despite the two big debuts and a strong hold for "Revenge of the Sith" in its second weekend, theatrical receipts overall were down for the 14th straight weekend. The top 12 movies grossed $225.5 million, an impressive four-day haul but still 5.5% behind last year's record Memorial Day weekend, when "Shrek 2" and "The Day After Tomorrow" combined for $181 million in grosses between them.

The final installment of George Lucas' "Star Wars" saga grossed $271.2 million domestically in its first 12 days, putting it on pace to soar beyond the $310 million total for its predecessor, "Star Wars: Episode II -- Attack of the Clones."

"Revenge of the Sith" may be on track to approach the $431 million domestic haul of "Star Wars: Episode I -- The Phantom Menace," said Bruce Snyder, head of distribution for 20th Century Fox, which released the "Star Wars" films.

As with "Titanic," the modern box-office champ that brought young girls back to the theater to see it again and again, "Revenge of the Sith" is drawing strong repeat business among young males.

"We've got a lot of kids who already have this picture four and five times," Snyder said.

Worldwide through Sunday, "Revenge of the Sith" had taken in $504.4 million since its almost simultaneous debut in most countries beginning May 18.

"Madagascar," featuring the voices of Ben Stiller, Chris Rock, Jada Pinkett Smith and David Schwimmer as pampered zoo animals cut loose in the wild, plugged a hole among parents eager for a movie to take the kids to see.

"There was a pent-up desire for family pictures," said Jim Tharp, head of distribution for DreamWorks, which released "Madagascar."

"The Longest Yard," an update of the 1970s tale of prison inmates taking on their sadistic guards in a football grudge match, was a key choice for young males, who make up the bulk of Sandler's audience.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: mogwai on May 30, 2005, 02:24:23 PM
in 2002 when punch-drunk love was released i said: "let's kick titanic's ass at the box office". i'm an optimist so i'll say it again. :yabbse-thumbup:
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on June 05, 2005, 02:34:09 PM
'Madagascar' Moves to No. 1 in Second Week

LOS ANGELES - A talking lion became king of the box office as the animated tale "Madagascar" climbed to the No. 1 spot with $28.7 million in its second weekend.
 
At No. 2 was Adam Sandler's football remake "The Longest Yard," which took in $26.1 million in its second weekend.

That left third place to "Star Wars: Episode III — Revenge of the Sith," which grossed $26 million in its third weekend, according to studio estimates Sunday.

"Madagascar," featuring the voice of Ben Stiller as a zoo lion returned to the wild, debuted at No. 2 a week earlier and took over first-place from "Revenge of the Sith," which had held the top spot for two weekends.

While those three holdovers remained strong draws, the weekend's new movies debuted quietly, contributing to Hollywood's 15th-straight weekend of declining revenues compared to last year.

The top 12 movies grossed a solid $128.3 million, yet that was off 30 percent from the same weekend in 2004, when "     Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" opened with $93.7 million.

Ron Howard's "Cinderella Man," starring     Russell Crowe and Renee Zellweger in the story of Depression-era boxer Jim Braddock, led the newcomers, debuting at No. 4 with $18.6 million.

The teenage gal-pal tale "The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants" opened in fifth place with $10.25 million, while the skateboarding saga "Lords of Dogtown" premiered at sixth with $5.7 million.

"Cinderella Man" distributor Universal is trying the same strategy it used successfully with another Depression-era sporting drama, 2003's "Seabiscuit," counter-programming the sober yet uplifting story amid the summer popcorn flicks. "Seabiscuit" had a $20.9 million opening weekend and held on to ring up $120.3 million domestically and score a best-picture Oscar nomination.

But Universal had counted on a better debut for "Cinderella Man," which reunites Howard, Crowe and producer Brian Grazer, the team behind the 2001     Academy Awards champion "A Beautiful Mind."

"Putting this human drama against these big summer behemoths may have proved too calculated a risk, but one we're going to support it all the way through summer and into Academy Awards season," Universal Pictures Chairman Stacey Snider said.

Topping the $300 million mark in its 17th day of release Saturday, "Revenge of the Sith" became the fastest film to hit that level, beating the record set last year by "Shrek 2," which passed $300 million in 18 days.

At $308.8 million through Sunday, "Revenge of the Sith" was just $2 million behind the total domestic haul of "Star Wars: Episode II — Attack of the Clones." 20th Century Fox expects it to top $400 million and possibly rival the $431 million domestic total of "Episode I — The Phantom Menace," said Bruce Snyder, the studio's head of distribution.

"Madagascar" lifted its domestic gross to $101 million, while "The Longest Yard" climbed to $95.8 million, both after 10 days in release.


1. "Madagascar," $28.7 million.
2. "The Longest Yard," $26.1 million.
3. "Star Wars: Episode III — Revenge of the Sith," $26 million.
4. "Cinderella Man," $18.6 million.
5. "The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants," $10.25 million.
6. "Lords of Dogtown," $5.7 million.
7. "Monster-in-Law," $5.3 million.
8. "Crash," $3.3 million.
9. "Kicking & Screaming," $2.1 million.
10. "Unleashed," $900,000.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: matt35mm on June 05, 2005, 02:53:18 PM
I didn't expect that.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on June 12, 2005, 12:28:46 PM
Amazing opening for Mr. And Mrs. Smith... they were projecting 35 mil... and Star Wars maintained very well

1 Mr. and Mrs. Smith Fox $51,050,000
2 Madagascar DW $17,100,000
3 Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith Fox $14,850,000
4 The Longest Yard Par. $13,500,000 -
5 The Adventures of Shark Boy and Lava Girl (3D) Dim. $12,505,000 -
6 Cinderella Man Uni. $9,546,000
7 The Honeymooners Par. $5,800,000
8 The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants WB $5,680,000
9 Monster-in-Law NL $2,625,000
10 Crash Lions $1,900,000
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: cron on June 12, 2005, 12:34:12 PM
Quote from: andykal

Mr. and Mrs. Smith Fox
Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith Fox
Crash Lions


 :laughing:
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Myxo on June 17, 2005, 07:00:22 PM
Check out Hollywood's most lucrative franchises according to Forbes magazine here.. (http://www.forbes.com/business/2005/06/15/cx_lr_franchiseslide.html?partner=yahoo)[/color]
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on June 17, 2005, 08:25:04 PM
I hate that they always use that slideshow for the lists
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on June 19, 2005, 11:40:47 AM
We can say that Batman 'tanked' in a way... they were expecting over $100 million in the first 5 days and they only got $71,000,000... less than Mr. and Mrs. Smith for the weekend only... not good for one of the biggest summer blockbusters and considering they spent billions in marketing

1 Batman Begins WB $46,935,0002
2 Mr. and Mrs. Smith Fox $27,300,000
3 Madagascar DW $11,100,000
4 Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith Fox $9,700,000
5 The Longest Yard Par. $8,000,000
6 The Adventures of Shark Boy and Lava Girl (3D) Dim. $6,633,000 -
7 The Perfect Man Uni. $5,478,000
8 Cinderella Man Uni. $5,233,000
9 The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants WB $3,170,000
10 The Honeymooners Par. $2,570,000
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on June 19, 2005, 11:02:39 PM
i shouldnt care, but i do.  A LOT.  i really want this to do well.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on June 19, 2005, 11:26:02 PM
me too... but it wont be so great... it will be 'ok'...

hollywood is in big trouble anyways, with the bo down this year big time, and they are starting to face the reality of home video as a major deal

yes they make so much money from home video that it seems like good news, but the investments in movie theatres and distribution are also a big deal... and they will lose control if theatrical is not the money making vehicle it was until now
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on June 26, 2005, 02:42:24 PM
'Batman Begins' Wins Box Office Amid Slide

"Batman Begins" took in $26.8 million to remain the top movie for the second straight weekend, but it could not keep Hollywood from sinking to its longest modern box-office slump.

Overall business tumbled despite a rush of familiar new titles "Bewitched," a "Love Bug" update and the latest zombie tale from director George Romero.

Revenues for the top 12 movies came in at $116.5 million, down 16 percent from the same weekend last year, when "Fahrenheit 9/11" opened as the top movie with $23.9 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

It was the 18th weekend in a row the box office declined, passing a 1985 slump of 17 weekends that had been the longest since analysts began keeping detailed figures on movie grosses.

"Batman" lifted its 12-day total to $121.7 million.

Nicole Kidman and Will Ferrell's sit-com update "Bewitched" debuted in second place with $20.2 million.

Audiences were lukewarm toward the weekend's other major premieres. "Herbie: Fully Loaded," with Lindsay Lohan behind the wheel of the speedy VW "Love Bug," was No. 4 with $12.75 million, raising its total since debuting Wednesday to $17.8 million.

"George Romero's Land of the Dead," the fourth installment of the flesh-munching zombie saga from the director of "Night of the Living Dead," debuted at No. 5 with $10.2 million.

In narrower release, the documentary "Rize," about the south-central Los Angeles dance form known as krumping, opened at No. 12 with $1.6 million.

In limited release, the nature documentary "March of the Penguins" had a strong debut of $121,788 in four theaters. "Yes," starring Joan Allen, Simon Abkarian and Sam Neill in a drama about an affair between an Irish-American married woman and a Lebanese man, opened with $29,437 in seven cinemas.

Theater revenues have skidded about 7 percent compared to last year. Factoring in higher ticket prices, movie admissions are off 10 percent for the year, according to box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations.

If the slump continues, Hollywood is on course for a third straight year of declining admissions and its lowest ticket sales since the mid-1990s.

"We're working with a pretty huge deficit that would take a lot of business to overcome," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "Just breaking the slump is not enough. We would have to reverse the trend and see attendance on a big uptick."

Even with a big Fourth of July weekend expected from Steven Spielberg and Tom Cruise's "War of the Worlds," which opens Wednesday, Hollywood still may not snap its losing streak. Over the same weekend last year, "Spider-Man 2" pulled in $180 million in its first six days, leading the industry to a record Fourth of July.


1. "Batman Begins," $26.8 million.
2. "Bewitched," $20.2 million.
3. "Mr. and Mrs. Smith," $16.75 million.
4. "Herbie: Fully Loaded," $12.75 million.
5. "George Romero's Land of the Dead," $10.2 million.
6. "Madagascar," $7.3 million.
7. "Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith," $6.25 million.
8. "The Longest Yard," $5.5 million.
9. "The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl in 3-D," $3.4 million.
10. "Cinderella Man," $3.3 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on July 04, 2005, 01:22:41 PM
Aliens overran the box office as War of the Worlds was the holiday weekend's expected champ with $77.6 million for the four-day frame. The Spielberg-Cruise action thriller made $64.5 million Friday through Sunday, for $113.3 million since Wednesday. While certainly a great opening, it didn't break any records for July -- all those would be held by Spider-Man 2, which took in an untouchable $115.8 million Friday through Sunday last year. Instead, War was the July bridesmaid, ranking second for the Fourth of July weekend and July three-day openers. And since Spidey Deux did so well last year, the box office was of course down again, 16% for Friday through Sunday and almost 25% for the four day frame.

A fair number of holdovers managed to do pretty decently, led by Batman Begins, which nabbed second with $18.7 million, only a 43% slide. Mr. and Mrs. Smith also held up nicely, dropping 39% for $12.7 mil; Bewitched, however, fell 55% for $10.8 mil. Kiddie flicks Madagascar and Herbie: Fully Loaded took the top ten's smallest drops, though new opener Rebound landed with a thud at seventh with only $6 million. And congratulations of a sort should go to Land of the Dead, which tumbled a huge 74% for $3.2 million and tenth place, the biggest slide we can remember since Hulk.

Sunday estimates for the weekend box office of July 1-4:


War of the Worlds ($77.6M)
Batman Begins ($18.7M)
Mr. and Mrs. Smith ($12.7M)
Bewitched ($10.8M)
Herbie: Fully Loaded ($10.5M)
Madagascar ($7M)
Rebound ($6M)
Revenge of the Sith ($5M)
The Longest Yard ($3.5M)
Land of the Dead ($3.2M)
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on July 11, 2005, 02:47:44 PM
"Fantastic Four" Foils Slump

Yoda couldn't do it. Batman failed, too. It finally took the heroics of Fantastic Four to stop that most nefarious of villains--the dastardly Box Office Slump.

Clobbering time, indeed!

The flick about a quartet of dysfunctional superheroes earned an incredible $56 million, leading the box office to its first up weekend after a record 19 straight downers, according to preliminary studio figures Sunday.
 
If estimates hold the top 12 movies will have grossed $140.9 million, a 2.2 percent gain over this time last year when fellow Marvel do-gooder Spider-Man 2 headlined the lineup.

The truly fantastic gross for Fantastic Four was a welcome surprise. Bruce Snyder, head of distribution for Fox, said he'd anticipated something in the high $30 million range, but "it exploded...and you know why? Because it's fun!"

"It's great. This shows that the right movie with the right marketing, will bring the people in," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations. He believes that Fox may even have slightly underestimated Sunday's numbers, so that when final figures are in Monday, the overall tally will be up even more--something sorely needed by a business that has been trashed week after week this year.

"It's what people want in a summer movie. It's popcorn. It's light-hearted," said Dergarabedian. The PG-13 action adventure, stars Ioan Griffudd, Jessica Alba, Chris Evans and Michael Chiklis as astronauts transformed into mutants who must save the day from megalomaniac baddie Dr. Doom, played by Julian McMahon.

Audiences ignored the critics, who mainly whined that the comic-inspired movie played, well, like a comic book. All demographics flocked to the 3,602 sites, generating a per-theater average of $15,547.

As creator Stan Lee might say: Excelsior!

The film was the fifth-best July opener ever on a list led by last year's Spider-Man 2's whopping $88.1 million during the first three days of the Fourth of July weekend.

Nearly 41 percent of those purchasing tickets for the top 12 attractions chose Fantastic Four, leaving the weekend's other wide release, Dark Water, barely treading water. Buena Vista's PG-13 frightfest, a remake of a Japanese horror flick, stars Jennifer Connelly as desperate mom who makes a very bad rental choice, managed to attract about 7 percent of the weekend business, grossing $10.1 million in fourth place. Its per-site average was $3,811 at 2,657 theaters.

Meanwhile, War of the Worlds dropped 52 percent from its first-place opening, with $31.1 million in second place. The PG-13 Paramount release, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Cruise, has grossed $165.8 million.

Batman Begins held steadier, dropping just 35 percent to $10.2 million in third place. After four weeks, the Christian Bale-fronted Caped Crusader origin tale has grossed $172.1 million for Warners.

But it was another Warners film that had the weekend's best per-screen average. The G-rated Warner Independent release March of the Penguins expanded to 64 sites and waddled up $16,094 per site for $1 million. The feel-good nature documentary has now totaled $1.9 million.

Among the newcomers in limited release, the best screen average belonged to Saraband, the great Swedish director Ingmar Bergman's latest--and possibly final--look at the troubles of marriage, starring Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson. The R-rated Sony Pictures Classic averaged $8,788 at four sites for $35,153.

Murderball, the documentary about wheelchair sport, also opened strongly. The R-rated ThinkFilm release averaged $7,650 at eight sites for $61,200.

Crònicas, an R-rated Palm thriller starring John Leguizamo, averaged $4,760 at nine sites for $42,838. Beautiful Country an R-rated Sony Pictures Classic about a child of the Vietnam conflict seeking his heritage, averaged $4,422 at six sites for $26,532.

Besides being "thrilled to death" by the Fantastic Four business, Snyder trumpeted the fact that Fox had three other films in the top 10 to help fuel the uptick in business. The Brangelina caper Mr. and Mrs. Smith was in fifth place in its fifth week, only dropping 26 percent to earn $7.8 million for a total of $158.6 million. Rebound, the hoops comedy starring Martin Lawrence that misfired in its opening last weekend, was off 43 percent, but managed to scrape up $2.8 million in ninth place for an $11.3 million gross. And the season's biggest blockbuster, Star Wars: Episode III--Revenge of the Sith, was still a force in its eighth week, earning $2.6 million for a total of $370.8 million.

Degarabedian says he's "very cautiously optimist" that this good weekend will lead to better box office ahead. Charlie & The Chocolate Factory, starring Johnny Depp as the eccentric candy man, opens next Friday, as does the anticipated comedy The Wedding Crashers with Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn. Even though its virtually impossible for this summer to match 2004, Dergarabedian says the "step in the right direction" this weekend is a good omen.

1. Fantastic Four, $56 million
2. War of the Worlds, $31.3 million
3. Batman Begins, $10.2 million
4. Dark Water, $10.1 million
5. Mr. and Mrs. Smith, $7.8 million
6. Herbie: Fully Loaded, $6.2 million
7. Bewitched, $5.5 million
8. Madagascar, $4.3 million
9. Rebound, $2.8 million
10. Star Wars: Episode III--Revenge of the Sith, $2.6 million
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on July 17, 2005, 12:17:47 PM
Box Office Analysis

It wasn't just a fluke -- the box office is definitely on the way back up, thanks to the one-two punch this weekend of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Wedding Crashers. Both movies outperformed expectations, with Charlie hauling in a monstrous $55.4 million (just shy of Fantastic Four's $56 mil) and Crashers going way beyond predictions with a stellar $32.2 million. As a result, the box office was up a healthy 7.5% from this time last year (when I, Robot debuted with $52.2 million) and 8.5% from last weekend.

However, because the two new debuts did so well, all the other movies this weekend took it in the shorts, most dropping around 50% or more. Fantastic Four did a fantastic 59% tumble for $22.7 million, while War of the Worlds slid by half again for $15 mil. The best holdover was stealth hit Mr. and Mrs. Smith, which dropped only 36% for $5.05 million; the worst, after F4, was Bewitched's 57% decrease.

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory ($55.4M)
Wedding Crashers ($32.2M)
Fantastic Four ($22.7M)
War of the Worlds ($15M)
Batman Begins ($5.6M)
Mr. and Mrs. Smith ($5.05M)
Dark Water ($4.4M)
Herbie: Fully Loaded ($3.35M)
Bewitched ($2.4M)
Madagascar ($2.1M)
Title: bocks off us anal us is
Post by: atticus jones on July 21, 2005, 06:39:09 PM
bee oh recaps and snaps

10.MADAGASCAR...coming in drunk at numb her tanker ray ten is the very upsetting mad ass gas car...this was a 502 from the get go...tagline:"someones got a zoo loose" should have been "sum exec vp's got a screw loose" or "sum movie goin fan has got to refuse"...plotline: "spoiled by their upbringing with no idea what good filmmaking is really about, four studio execs escape the asylum and go on an adventure to find their missing sense, only to find themselves on their way to the bottom of the box office list..."

9. BEWITCHED...will somebody just wiggle their nose and make this stinker go away please...be witched be bitched just be done with the lame remakes already...

8. HERBIE FULLY LOADED...which is what I would have to be in order to go see this one...maybe beer goggles could erase the wardrobe departments work on pretty miss thang and maybe the crack pipe could spark anutha exhaust ing remake...jonesin for dean...but i'm old school

7. DARKWATER...usually means we have sum poo poo contamination in the bowl...butt...me possibly smell this one soon...after all my girl is working with one of the actors from this one soon and the utha bruthas are family friends...gulp

6. MR AND MRS SMITH...if they were better assassins they could have killed eachother in the first act, called this a short film and saved us the drama...or lack thereof...plot line:"a bored married couple is suprised to learn they are both overpaid actors hired to keep pumping out below average flics while the paparazzi hound them in hopes of a picture of their genitals or sumthin..." i here it was bad...the pitts...angelie, i'm jolie i didnt waste my ten bucks on it...

5. BATMAN BEGINS...and I can't wait for it to ends because frankly I am wanting Chris Nolan to start working on some better junk...actually I know, this was supposed to be the best of the year so far...so...o.k.
i liked it...i loved it...i want some more of it...how's that for nice...you know i heard katie holmes sold her soul to scientology in order to boost the ratings on this one...and sold her snatch to tom to boost the ratings on her ca ca rear...what a bunch of shit heads the press ur...

4.  WAR OF THE WORLDS...tagline:"theyre already here"...just ask brooke shields...them evil scientologists are gonna eat you for lunch...you know, if speilberg would have let me ghost direct the last twenty minutes of each of his last five films then we...i mean he...would probably be the greatest director who ever lived...

3. FANTASTIC FOUR...tagline:"prepare for the fantastic"...o.k....i got the lights dimmed...the sexy music...the ky...a box of magnums...and only ONE jessica alba!...what happened to the other three hotties you promised...the lights went out in the theatre and I just fell asleep...chick less...

2. WEDDING CRASHERS...soon to be a hit reality tv series on FOX...where two xixax members are sent to a random wedding reception each week  to see how many babes they can score by the nights end...episode one features stefen vs...macmuffin...who ends up winning a million bucks for all the poon he starts stuffin...with bits of news and movie trivia...no one gets laid and the series gets cancelled...damn...i was looking forward to aj vs p...that would bee a phuck phest...

and numero uno at de boyo officiomente...

1. CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY...sad to say I do not hold a golden ticket to this one but if I did I would demand Noah Taylor play wonka...no offense to senor juannie deep...but nt is deserving...in my humble bumble oh pie onion...plot line:"a young boy wins a ten dollar ticket to this weeks most magnificent remake led by the worlds most unusual director...hear the ending is diff than the book tho...nice sour treat for the spoiled school children who attempt to turn in a shotty book report to their cinematic loving teachers this school year...

and thats that...thats that

its late in the dey and im feeling ghey...leyter

tnmftl...eecfo
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: NEON MERCURY on July 21, 2005, 10:16:45 PM
oh shit!

back on ya'lls ....get the fuck out of the way janet jackosn..

my mans is dropping sum real poetic justce....
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on July 24, 2005, 12:10:58 PM
Ouch! That was our first reaction upon looking at this weekend's box office, where none of the four new releases managed to crack the top three. It's full-on fiasco time for The Island which opened with a terrible $12.1 million, barely ahead of remake Bad News Bears, which pulled in $11.5 mil. Both films were trounced by last week's top three, which held the same spots this week as last. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory dropped exactly 50% for $28.3 million, and comedy hit Wedding Crashers dipped just 23% for $26.2 million; Fantastic Four declined 46% for $12.3. Though the holdovers held on decently (even Batman Begins and Mr. and Mrs. Smith held on strong at the bottom of the top ten), the box office was back down, almost 8% from this time last year and almost 18% (!) from last week.

That said, a handful of limited releases managed to perform solidly. Hustle and Flow, on just 1,013 screens, took in a healthy $8.1 million, and had the second-highest per-site average in the top ten after Wedding Crashers. Grisly horror flick The Devil's Rejects, on 1,757, did an expected $7 million, and March of the Penguins barely missed the top ten, nabbing $3.55 million, up 134% as it added 563 screens.

Sunday estimates for the weekend box office of July 22-24:

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory ($28.3M)
Wedding Crashers ($26.2M)
Fantastic Four ($12.3M)
The Island ($12.1M)
Bad News Bears ($11.5M)
War of the Worlds ($8.8M)
Hustle & Flow ($8.1M)
The Devil's Rejects ($7M)
Batman Begins ($4.7M)
Mr. and Mrs. Smith ($3.6M)
March of the Penguins ($3.55M)
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: GoneSavage on July 24, 2005, 12:24:33 PM
It's only 10:25, and granted it's the west coast, but the weekend isn't over.  Do they not count Sundays for these lists?
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on July 24, 2005, 02:47:03 PM
They do, but they take in consideration Friday and Saturday to predict Sunday. They are hardly ever wrong, except for 1 or 2 million at the most when it comes to a big movie (over 30 million). But if the movie made 5 million on Saturday it wont make more on Sunday, almost for sure.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: GoneSavage on July 24, 2005, 02:51:46 PM
Thanks!
(http://www.nbc.com/nbc/The_More_You_Know/images/logo.jpg)
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Myxo on August 07, 2005, 08:29:22 AM
Who thinks Stealth will break even?

It cost 100 million to make and after 6 days in release, it's at 20 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Ravi on August 07, 2005, 01:49:27 PM
Quote from: Myxomatosis
Who thinks Stealth will break even?

It cost 100 million to make and after 6 days in release, it's at 20 million.


There's overseas sales and DVD, cable, etc. to take into account.  A film doesn't necessarily have to recoup its cost in the US box office alone to be profitable in the end.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on August 07, 2005, 02:56:19 PM
Yeah but imagine that 100 million does not include marketing... so no they wont recoup the money... same as The Island... big losses for the studio

Box Office Analysis
Previous issue
Thanks to two pairs of good old boys -- that would be Bo and Luke Duke and Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn -- the box office was up again after two down weeks in a row. As expected, the big-screen version of The Dukes of Hazzard took the top slot, though its $30.6 million was slightly less than expected, and with that take the movie should do standard August business (ie, above $50 mil but nowhere near $100 mil). However, it was Wedding Crashers, aka the comedy that wouldn't quit, that performed most impressively, sliding only 18% for $16.5 million and $144 million after four weeks.
Overall, the box office was up almost five percent from this time last year (though down over 8% from last weekend -- shows you how much of a yawner August is), and accordingly most holdovers performed pretty well, aside from those big action movies. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory held on for third with $10.6 million, and two of last week's newbies, Sky High and Must Love Dogs, took dips in the 40% range. Stealth, however, lived up to its name by sliding over 50% for $5.8 million, and The Island tumbled down to tenth with just $3.1 million. Maybe if both those movies had featured penguins they might stand a chance, as docu-hit March of the Penguins added over 1000 screens and saw its fortunes rise 72% for $6.9 million and sixth place; its cumulative now stands at a very cool $26.2 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Ravi on August 08, 2005, 04:01:48 PM
I know I shouldn't be surprised, but it always disappoints me when people willingly gobble up shit like The Dukes of Hazzard.  Reminds me of Salo for some reason.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on August 21, 2005, 06:11:22 PM
'Virgin' Wins Box Office With $20.6M

Steve Carell scored in his maiden voyage as a leading man, with his comedy "The 40-Year-Old Virgin" taking in $20.6 million to debut at the top of the box office.

Opening in second place was Wes Craven's airplane thriller "Red Eye," which raked in $16.5 million in its first weekend, according to studio estimates Sunday.

The two new movies bumped the previous weekend's top flick, "Four Brothers," to third place with $13 million. "Four Brothers" lifted its 10-day total to $43.6 million.
 
The weekend's other wide releases tanked. Disney's "Valiant," an animated tale about the exploits of heroic homing pigeons during World War II, came in at No. 7 with $6.1 million.

"Supercross: The Movie," a motorcycle-racing flick so bad the studio did not screen it in advance for critics, opened well out of the top 10 with $1.3 million.

The overall box office was down slightly, with the top 12 movies grossing $98.8 million, off 3 percent from the same weekend last year. Hollywood receipts have sagged for most of the year, running about 7 percent behind 2004's revenues.

"The 40-Year-Old Virgin," which Carell co-wrote, casts him as a middle-aged electronics-store clerk whose co-workers discover he's never had sex and set out to find him an easy woman, only to see him begin dating a single mom (Catherine Keener) with a mutual a no-sex policy.

"Forty-year-old virgins everywhere are celebrating the No. 1 opening of their hero," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations.

Distributor Universal hopes "The 40-Year-Old Virgin" can muster the same good word of mouth that made another R-rated sex romp, "Wedding Crashers," one of summer's biggest successes.

"Our racy little R-rated comedies are making a hit this year," said Nikki Rocco, head of distribution for Universal.

Critics warmly embraced "The 40-Year-Old Virgin," a sign the movie could get talked up enough by audiences to hold up well in subsequent weekends.

"This is a movie that's a conversation piece. People are going to be telling other people, quoting different lines and scenes," Dergarabedian said. "That's what's going to sustain it in the marketplace."

"Red Eye" stars Rachel McAdams as a woman on an overnight flight who's forced to assist in an assassination plot by her seat mate (Cillian Murphy), a man threatening to have her father killed unless she complies.

An understated departure for horror master Craven ("A Nightmare on Elm Street" the "Scream" movies), "Red Eye" also received high marks from critics.

"What's most impressive to me was Wes' successful transition from horror films to the suspense genre," said Jim Tharp, head of distribution for DreamWorks, which released "Red Eye."


1. "The 40-Year-Old Virgin," $20.6 million.
2. "Red Eye," $16.5 million.
3. "Four Brothers," $13 million.
4. "Wedding Crashers," $8.3 million.
5. "The Skeleton Key," $7.4 million.
6. "March of the Penguins," $6.7 million.
7. "Valiant," $6.1 million.
8. "Dukes of Hazzard," $5.7 million.
9. "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," $4.5 million.
10. "Sky High," $4 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on August 21, 2005, 06:13:23 PM
Quote from: macage
'Virgin' Wins Box Office With $20.6M
Steve Carell scored in his maiden voyage as a leading man, with his comedy "The 40-Year-Old Virgin" taking in $20.6 million to debut at the top of the box office

good for apatow.   :bravo:
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: killafilm on August 21, 2005, 08:41:03 PM
And when you add this to those numbers...

Quote
Best Reviewed Films of the Year with Wide Release Debuts
-------------------------------------------------------------
(Does not include films with platform releases)

1. The 40-Year Old Virgin - 90%, 102 Reviews
2. Cinderella Man - 84%, 171 Reviews
3. Batman Begins - 83%, 217 Reviews
4. Red Eye - 83%, 101 Reviews
5. Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith - 82%, 229 Reviews
6. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - 82%, 185 Reviews
7. The Sisterhood of Traveling Pants - 82%, 105 Reviews
8. Hustle & Flow - 81%, 121 Reviews
9. Sin City - 78%, 212 Reviews
10. Crash - 77%, 154 Reviews
11. Pooh's Heffalump Movie - 76%, 68 Reviews
12. Wedding Crashers - 74%, 151 Reviews
13. George A. Romero's Land of the Dead - 73%, 146 Reviews
14. War of the Worlds - 72%, 218 Reviews
15. Hitch - 68%, 168 Reviews
16. Sky High - 67%, 103 Reviews
17. Unleashed - 66%, 109 Reviews
18. Coach Carter - 65%, 122 Reviews
19. Robots - 63%, 164 Reviews
20. Fever Pitch - 63%, 163 Reviews"



 :yabbse-thumbup:  :yabbse-thumbup:  :yabbse-thumbup:
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on August 28, 2005, 04:49:24 PM
'40-Year-Old Virgin' Retains No. 1 Spot

Steve Carell's second time at the top of the box office was almost as good as the first. "The 40-Year-Old Virgin," starring Carell as a middle-aged man who has never had sex, remained the No. 1 movie with $16.4 million, a strong hold from its opening weekend, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Terry Gilliam's "The Brothers Grimm," a fantasy starring Matt Damon and Heath Ledger as the 19th century fairy-tale siblings, debuted in second place with $15.1 million.

"The Cave," an underground monster movie featuring Morris Chestnut, Piper Perabo and Cole Hauser, opened weakly at No. 6 with $6.2 million.

The weekend's other new wide release the romance "Undiscovered," featuring Ashlee Simpson and Pell James as gal pals who fabricate media buzz to help a friend's music career flopped with just $690,000, finishing far out of the top 10.

A movie slump continued, with the top-12 films taking in $82.8 million, down 2.5 percent from the same weekend last year.

Hollywood is having its worst year since the late 1990s, with summer attendance expected to come in 12 percent behind last year, according to box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations.

There have been bright spots amid the slump, notably the racy R-rated comedies "The 40-Year-Old Virgin" and "Wedding Crashers," which are holding well on the strength of good reviews and word of mouth.

"Wedding Crashers," starring Owen Wilson and Vince Vaughn as buddies who intrude on strangers' nuptials to pick up women, remained the No. 5 film with $6.25 million, lifting its seven-week total to $187.7 million.

The release of "The Brothers Grimm" was delayed for a year as Gilliam feuded over the final version with brothers Harvey and Bob Weinstein, the heads of Miramax Films, whose Dimension banner released the movie.

"The Brothers Grimm" is among a rush of long-delayed Miramax movies now being released as the Weinsteins prepare to depart Disney-owned Miramax for a new film company they have formed.

For Gilliam ("The Fisher King" "Twelve Monkeys"), it was his first film since 1998's "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas." "Brothers Grimm" got mixed reviews at best, though.

"It's a respectable opening," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of Exhibitor Relations. "You can't underestimate the following that Terry Gilliam has."


1. "The 40-Year-Old Virgin," $16.4 million.
2. "The Brothers Grimm," $15.1 million.
3. "Red Eye," $10.4 million.
4. "Four Brothers," $7.8 million.
5. "Wedding Crashers," $6.25 million.
6. "The Cave," $6.2 million.
7. "March of the Penguins," $4.6 million.
8. "The Skeleton Key," $4.4 million.
9. "Valiant," $3.35 million.
10. "The Dukes of Hazzard," $3.05 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Ravi on August 28, 2005, 06:17:45 PM
Quote from: name deleted by modage

The weekend's other new wide release the romance "Undiscovered," featuring Ashlee Simpson and Pell James as gal pals who fabricate media buzz to help a friend's music career flopped with just $690,000, finishing far out of the top 10.


I guess Ashlee will be locked up in the basement again.  Or fed to Jessica for sustenance.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: NEON MERCURY on August 28, 2005, 09:00:39 PM
(http://wizbangblog.com/images/ashlee_simpson04_c.jpg)

"hey guys, did any of ya'll see my movie..[tee-hee]"
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Reinhold on October 08, 2005, 02:54:19 PM
theonion.com

Citing Slow Summer Box Office, Hollywood Calls It Quits
October 5, 2005 | Issue 41•40

BURBANK, CA—Universal Studios joined DreamWorks SKG, Sony Pictures, Warner Bros., Paramount, and Fox Monday, when CEO Ron Meyer announced that the company is shutting down operations and ceasing all film production, effective immediately.

"In their hearts, every studio chair would like to be a patron of the arts," said a candid and reflective Meyer, speaking from his New York office on the 69th floor of Manhattan's Rockefeller Plaza. "But this is a business, not an artists' charity ward."

According to Hollywood insiders, summer 2005 dealt the death blow to an already ailing industry. With box-office receipts 9 percent lower than those of 2004, the few successes, such as The 40-Year-Old Virgin and War Of The Worlds, could not carry the industry.

Regarding the decision to liquidate Paramount, Viacom CEO Sumner Redstone said, "It was a simple choice: cling to an outdated business model or cut the pictures loose."

To better protect their stockholders' interests, Hollywood will be shifting its focus to safer, more reliable profit models, including real estate, life insurance, and the sale of hygiene products.

Said Meyer: "The mortuary industry also seems like a good bet. No matter what happens in the economy, there's always a market for funeral homes. People are always dying. That doesn't go unpredictably out of fashion with the public's taste, like, say, historical costume epics or Russell Crowe."

Monday, construction crews quietly dismantled the storied Hollywood Walk of Fame.

"This is a real shame," said foreman Kevin McKnight, directing members of his crew to pry the brass stars from Hollywood Boulevard and transfer them to a nearby freight crate destined for a Japanese smelting plant. "I love movies. My whole family does. All my life, I loved movies."

With each studio's decision to cease operations, dozens of films in various stages of production will quietly die, some going to DVD, others disappearing entirely, amounting to little more than tax write-offs. Assets are being sold for pennies on the dollar, and hastily liquidated prop houses and set rooms have flooded an already deluged eBay resale market. An original Indiana Jones flight jacket was sold Tuesday for $1.49 plus shipping.

Figures from the California Labor Department reflect the industry's sudden collapse. As of Tuesday, some 700 directors, 15,000 producers, 2,900 entertainment lawyers, 14,000 writers, and 72,000 actors—not to mention countless gaffers, tour guides, production designers, publicists, souvenir sellers, and personal assistants—were reportedly out of work.

"I feel a little betrayed," said Stealth director Rob Cohen. "After the summer season ended, I had hoped that people would start coming back to theaters, or maybe the industry would cook up some new concepts."

Cohen added: "Now it looks like I'll have to go back to directing TV ads."

"I don't know how my family will get by without a steady source of income," said 43-year-old Los Angeles resident Kirk Ferguson, a third-generation set carpenter. "Making facades that get blown up is all I know."

The absence of films is creating a ripple effect far beyond Southern California. Movie ushering has become an obsolete trade overnight, as first-run theaters shut down, convert to loft apartment space, and force hundreds of thousands of adolescents into the already crowded lawn-mowing and car-washing professions.

"A lot of movie history was made on the Warner Bros. lot, but not a lot of money," Warner Bros. CEO Barry Meyer said. "We've been sitting on valuable land at the height of a booming real-estate market. We could have sold it off months ago instead of making Must Love Dogs. We acted irresponsibly, and for this I apologize to our stockholders."

With little hope of getting a job in Hollywood, ex-film-industry employees are understandably reacting with anger and despair. Some, however, are more philosophical.

"I can always go back to Wisconsin and tend bar," actor Mark Ruffalo said. "Maybe do some community theater. The folks you should really feel sorry for are Jack Nicholson and Tom Cruise. They're fucking nuts. I have no idea what they'll do without Hollywood."

The void is not likely to remain for long, with heavy hitters such as Bollywood producer Aamir Khan ready to swoop in.

"We are very excited to be entering the American entertainment market," Khan said. "Our first release, timed to coincide with the American holiday entertainment rush, is a remake of Mahabharata, a five-hour retelling of the ancient Hindu epic, filled with thrilling synchronized dance numbers and much romance."
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: matt35mm on October 09, 2005, 02:27:44 PM
Wallace & Gromit is #1 = YAY!

LOS ANGELES - Clay paid off at the box office for "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit." The clay-animated family film debuted as the top weekend movie with $16.1 million.

Distributor DreamWorks is counting on the film's stellar reviews and strong word of mouth to give "Wallace & Gromit" a long run in theaters. Though popular in the United States through the TV shorts, the characters have been far better known in their native Britain.

"In the U.S., they weren't as well-known as people might imagine," said Jim Tharp, head of distribution for DreamWorks. "I think they certainly will be after this weekend."

1. "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit," $16.1 million.

2. "Flightplan," $10.8 million.

3. "In Her Shoes," $10 million.

4. "Two for the Money," $8.4 million.

5. "The Gospel," $8 million.

6. "Tim Burton's Corpse Bride," $6.5 million.

7. "Waiting," $5.7 million.

8. "A History of Violence," $5.1 million.

9. "Serenity," $4.9 million.

10. "Into the Blue," $4.8 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Ravi on October 23, 2005, 10:44:45 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20051023/ap_en_mo/box_office

'Doom' No. 1 in Another Slow Movie Weekend
By DAVID GERMAIN, AP Movie Writer Sun Oct 23, 6:35 PM ET


LOS ANGELES - The Rock did not meet his doom at the box office, but his latest action flick came in with a light pop instead of a bang during another slow weekend at movie theaters.

"Doom," adapted from the sci-fi video game, debuted as the top movie with a modest $15.4 million, according to studio estimates Sunday. The movie led a lackluster lineup that continued Hollywood's box-office slump, with the top 12 movies taking in $71.3 million, down 27 percent from the same weekend last year.

"Dreamer: Inspired by a True Story," a horse racing family film starring
Kurt Russell and
Dakota Fanning, opened in second place with $9.3 million.

Charlize Theron's blue-collar drama "North Country," based on the real-life story of a woman who led a sexual-discrimination lawsuit against male co-workers at a mining company, premiered a weak No. 5 with $6.5 million.

"Stay," starring Ewan McGregor, Naomi Watts and Ryan Gosling in a thriller about a psychiatrist racing to save a suicidal patient, flopped with a $2.15 million debut.

Films in limited release opened strongly. The romance "Shopgirl," starring
Steve Martin, Claire Danes and Jason Schwartzman in an adaptation of Martin's own novella, debuted in eight theaters with $236,000. The comic crime thriller "Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang," starring Robert Downey Jr. and
Val Kilmer, took in $174,300 in eight theaters.

Both films expand to more theaters over the next couple of weeks.

Hollywood has been in a box-office slide for most of the year, with admissions running about 8 percent below 2004 levels.

Though distributor Universal expects to make its money back on "Doom," the studio had hoped for a bigger opening weekend, said Nikki Rocco, head of distribution.

"I'm very concerned about the marketplace," Rocco said. "There are so many movies out, so much to choose from, yet the marketplace continues to fall, and not just by little amounts."

Other studio executives are sticking to the idea that the industry has simply had a prolonged run of movies that failed to pack in crowds.

"I've been telling people for a long time that I think it's content-driven. I don't think we had a film that jumped out for people this weekend," said Dan Fellman, head of distribution for Warner Bros., which released "North Country."

Warner has a certain blockbuster coming in mid-November with "
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire." Other big films scheduled through the holidays include "King Kong," "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" and "The Producers."

October typically is a slow time for movies. Over the same weekend a year ago, though, the box-office shot up on the unexpectedly strong debut of the ghost story "The Grudge," which opened with $39.1 million.

"In all fairness, this was more of a typical late-October weekend, as opposed to a year ago, when `The Grudge' surprised everyone and made this weekend look pale by comparison," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations.

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Exhibitor Relations Co. Inc. Final figures will be released Monday.

1. "Doom," $15.4 million.

2. "Dreamer: Inspired by a True Story," $9.3 million.

3. "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit," $8.7 million.

4. "The Fog," $7.3 million.

5. "North Country," $6.5 million.

6. "Elizabethtown," $5.7 million.

7. "Flightplan," $4.7 million.

8. "In Her Shoes," $3.9 million.

9. "A History of Violence," $2.7 million.

10. "Two for the Money," $2.4 million.
Title: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on October 30, 2005, 08:13:26 PM
"Saw II" Much for Competition

Saw II promised lots of blood; it delivered lots of bucks.

The grisly horror sequel, in which the determined Jigsaw picks up where he hacked off in Saw, delivered the box office's fourth-biggest October opening ever, per estimates from Exhibitor Relations Co.

Its $30.5 million take was more than enough to top the weekend competition, but not quite enough to shake Hollywood of its fall slump. Overall, the top 12 films combined to gross $86.3 million, down about 6 percent when compared to this time last year.

It was during Halloween weekend 2004 that the original Saw opened with an eye-opening $18.3 million--a quick return and then some on the flick's $1 million or so budget. Production costs on Saw II, starring The More Affordable Wahlberg (aka, Mark's big brother Donnie), remained on the low end, but quadrupled to an estimated $4 million, per IMDb.com.

If Saw II was an amplified version of its forerunner (bigger budget, bigger box office), then The Legend of Zorro is looking like a diminished version of its predecessor.

Seven years after The Mask of Zorro became Catherine Zeta-Jones' first big hit, The Legend of Zorro became just another of 2005's underachievers.

Legend, reuniting Zeta-Jones with Antonio Banderas, bowed in second place with $16.5 million, or $6 million less than Mask made on 1,000 fewer screens several inflationary cycles ago, per the stats at BoxOfficeMojo.com.

The Weather Man, meanwhile, wasn't the worst opening of Nicolas Cage's career, but suffice to say even Captain Corelli's Mandolin saw better weekends. The grownup, character-driven drama of a TV weather forecaster in crisis debuted with a tepid $4.2 million (sixth place).

The weekend's other major new release, the Meryl Streep and Uma Thurman therapy comedy, Prime, didn't rate all that highly with audiences--third place, $6.4 million.

Doom, last weekend's champ, was this weekend's chump. Business plummeted 74 percent, down to $4.1 million ($22.9 million overall) and seventh place.

Falling out of the top 10 were: Elizabethtown (11th place, $2.4 million--$22.7 million overall); In Her Shoes (13th place, $1.8 million--$29.3 million overall); A History of Violence (14th place, $1.4 million--$28.5 million overall); and Two for the Money (weekend box office unknown).

The Passenger, a reissue of the 1975 Michelangelo Antonioni drama starring Jack Nicholson, was the prize of the art-house circuit, scoring $27,649 in two theaters, for a weekend-best screen average of $13,825.


1. Saw II, $30.5 million
2. The Legend of Zorro, $16.5 million
3. Prime, $6.4 million
4. Dreamer: Inspired by a True Story, $6.3 million
5. Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit, $4.4 million
6. The Weather Man, $4.2 million
7. Doom, $4.1 million
8. North Country, $3.7 million
9. The Fog, $3.3 million
10. Flightplan, $2.6 million
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on November 06, 2005, 12:20:48 PM
Not bad at all... exceded all expectations... wasnt The Incredibles, but still good for Disney. I wanted them to do good, or else Steve Jobs would feel even more than he is the master of the universe. He had enough satisfactions this year!

Name, Dist, Weekend, Theatre Count, Avg, Total Box Office, Budget, Weeks

1 Chicken Little BV $40,086,000 - 3,654 - $10,970 $40,086,000 $60 1
2 Jarhead Uni. $28,751,000 - 2,411 - $11,924 $28,751,000 $72 1
3 Saw II Lions $17,200,000 -45.8% 2,949 - $5,832 $60,468,000 $4 2
4 The Legend of Zorro Sony $10,000,000 -38.8% 3,520 - $2,840 $30,288,000 $75 2
5 Prime Uni. $5,263,000 -15.4% 1,837 +10 $2,864 $13,456,000 $22 2
6 Dreamer: Inspired by a True Story DW $4,800,000 -21.7% 2,617 +126 $1,834 $23,827,000 $32 3
7 Good Night, and Good Luck. WIP $3,100,000 +54.7% 657 +385 $4,718 $11,007,000 $7 5
8 The Weather Man Par. $2,935,000 -30.9% 1,510 - $1,943 $8,704,000 $22 2
9 Shopgirl BV $2,524,000 +444.5% 493 +451 $5,119 $3,486,000 - 3
10 Flightplan BV $2,330,000 -14.6% 1,445 -321 $1,612 $84,452,000 - 7
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on November 06, 2005, 12:30:45 PM
well this just puts another nail in the coffin of traditionally animated films for a while. 

thats a pretty huge opening for Jarhead too.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on November 06, 2005, 12:56:25 PM
Yeah... I'm happy for Jarhead cause a lot of people was excited to see it but the reviews tried to kill it... still did more than double expectations, so it was great.

Im gonna go see it tonight
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on November 20, 2005, 02:38:25 PM
HARRY POTTER

Harry Potter burned up the box office with a monstrous $101.4 million take -- the fourth-highest opening of all time. Not only that, it was by far the best opening for a Potter movie ever, as the first three films all had three-day grosses in the $88-$93 million range, proving that a 2 1/2-hour runtime and PG-13 rating weren't detriments in any way; guess the Potter franchise won't be slowing down anytime soon! In second, as expected, was Walk the Line, which did solid business with $22.4 million, just a couple mil above last year's fave music biopic, Ray. The rest of the top ten was not so pretty, as the opening of Goblet of Fire meant all the holdovers took it in the shorts, dropping anywhere from 47% (Derailed) to 64% (Get Rich or Die Tryin'). The lone bright spot in tenth place was Pride & Prejudice, which slid only 26% and boasted the second-best per-site average in the top ten. Nonetheless, the box office was up, up, up -- 19.5% from last year, and over 53% from last week's lackluster proceedings.

Sunday estimates for the weekend box office of Nov. 18-20:


Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire ($101.4M)
Walk the Line ($22.4M)
Chicken Little ($14.8M)
Derailed ($6.5M)
Zathura ($5.1M)
Jarhead ($4.8M)
Get Rich or Die Tryin' ($4.38M)
Saw II ($3.9M)
The Legend of Zorro ($2.3M)
Pride & Prejudice ($2.1M)
 

Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on January 08, 2006, 02:25:23 PM
Horror Fans Welcome 'Hostel'

The weekend box office was sheer torture as the bloody "Hostel," a tale of buddies who stumble into a den of violent depravity, debuted at No. 1 with $20.1 million.

Lionsgate's "Hostel" bumped off the previous weekend's No. 1 film, Disney's "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe," which came in second with $15.4 million to lift its domestic total to $247.6 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Universal's "King Kong" was third with $12.5 million, raising its domestic total to $192.5 million.
 
The weekend's only other new wide release, 20th Century Fox's "Grandma's Boy," flopped with just $2.9 million. The comedy from Adam Sandler's production company stars Allen Covert as a video-game tester forced to move in with his grandmother.

After a slump that saw movie attendance fall 7 percent in 2005, Hollywood was off to a good start this year. The top 12 movies grossed $106.7 million, up 9 percent from the same weekend a year ago.

"Hostel" follows two Americans (Jay Hernandez and Derek Richardson) whose European pleasure jaunt turns nightmarish when they end up captives in a chamber of torture after a brothel visit.

"The track record of horror films tells you maybe Hollywood should just release horror movies to be successful. I can't think of a more consistently performing genre at the box office," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations.

Though it was approaching the $200 million mark domestically, "King Kong" continued to perform below industry expectations. Hollywood had pegged the epic remake from "The Lord of the Rings" mastermind Peter Jackson as a potential billion-dollar smash worldwide.

Still, "King Kong" was climbing steadily internationally, its worldwide total hitting $464.5 million. "King Kong" is expected to top out in the $600 million range worldwide.

Expanding to more theaters in anticipation of Academy Awards season, Focus Features' acclaimed "Brokeback Mountain" finished at No. 9 with $5.75 million, raising its total to $22.5 million.

Playing in 484 theaters, up about 200 from the previous weekend, "Brokeback Mountain" averaged a healthy $11,881 a cinema, compared to $9,157 in 2,195 theaters for "Hostel."

"Brokeback Mountain" seems to be dashing speculation that its subject matter a homosexual romance between two old sheepherding pals would turn off audiences outside of urban markets.

"We're very squarely in middle America, all the way to Duluth, Minn., Portland, Maine, El Paso, Tulsa, Wichita. We're in the heartland," said Jack Foley, head of distribution for Focus Features. "I think that's no longer the real issue. The real issue is how much the film is being seen by people all over the country."

"Brokeback Mountain" star Heath Ledger had a second film expanding to wider release, Disney's "Casanova," in which he plays the legendary womanizer. "Casanova" went into 1,004 theaters, up from 37, and took in $4 million for an average of $3,998 a cinema.

Also doing well as it expanded to wider release was DreamWorks' "Match Point," Woody Allen's tale of infidelity that stars Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Scarlett Johannson and Emily Mortimer.

"Match Point" widened to 304 theaters, up from eight the previous weekend, and took in $2.8 million for an average of $9,243 a cinema.


1. "Hostel," $20.1 million.
2. "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe," $15.4 million.
3. "King Kong," $12.5 million.
4. "Fun With Dick and Jane," $12.2 million.
5. "Cheaper by the Dozen 2," $8.3 million.
6. "Munich," $7.5 million.
7. "Memoirs of a Geisha," $6 million.
8. "Rumor Has It," $5.9 million
9. "Brokeback Mountain," $5.75 million.
10. "The Family Stone," $4.6 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: matt35mm on February 08, 2006, 09:45:02 PM
I am so disappointed in America for making When A Stranger Calls the #1 movie with $21.6 million (not to mention Big Mamma's House 2 as #2).

Go home, America.  Just get out of my face.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Ravi on February 08, 2006, 11:16:11 PM
You won't be disappointed if you consistently expect the worst of people.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: matt35mm on February 08, 2006, 11:59:30 PM
I know, I know.  I usually live by that philosophy.

Maybe America's response to Brokeback Mountain fooled me into thinking that it's not totally stupid.  Of course, America has nothing to do with it.  I just felt like making a very broad generalization.  For kicks.

It's just that now all the kids with money are going to the theater again now that the "boring movie season" is over.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: godardian on February 09, 2006, 12:44:11 AM
My worst-ever box-office champion is Kangaroo Jack. It was at that point that I was like, "This is it. The End of Cinema, and not in the good Weekend way."
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Fernando on February 09, 2006, 05:27:13 PM
My worst-ever box-office champion is Kangaroo Jack. It was at that point that I was like, "This is it. The End of Cinema, and not in the good Weekend way."

Haha, Deja Vu, you're not the first to complain about it, thanks for bringing it up, just did a search with 'kangaroo jack' and had a blast from the plast.

:sigh: good times...

and for the lazy...link (http://xixax.com/index.php?topic=6643.0)
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on February 27, 2006, 02:58:18 PM
I am so disappointed in America for making When A Stranger Calls the #1 movie with $21.6 million (not to mention Big Mamma's House 2 as #2).

Go home, America.  Just get out of my face.

Hey, matt, America just got back in your face...

'Madea's Family Reunion' Tops Box-Office

Tyler Perry fans reunited at theaters for another tale of mad black women. "Tyler Perry's Madea's Family Reunion," a comic drama in which writer-director Perry also stars in three roles, debuted as the weekend's No. 1 movie with $30.25 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

It was a second gold mine for Lionsgate Films, which also released Perry's "Diary of a Mad Black Woman," the movie that opened as No. 1 with $21.9 million on the same weekend last year.

Lionsgate hopes to have a third Perry movie out over the same weekend next year, said Steve Rothenberg, the company's president of distribution.

"It's a time when we can really dominate the box office," Rothenberg said. "If we were out at Christmas, we'd be competing with the big holiday and Oscar films, but late February with Black History Month and less competition is a great time period for us."

This weekend's other new wide releases flopped. The Weinstein Co. animated tale "Doogal," a fairy-tale adventure with a voice cast that includes Whoopi Goldberg, Kylie Minogue and Jimmy Fallon, debuted at No. 8 with $3.6 million.

New Line's crime thriller "Running Scared," starring Paul Walker as a mobster scrambling to recover a gun used in the slaying of a cop, opened at No. 9 with $3.1 million.

Walker also stars in last weekend's No. 1 movie, Disney's dog tale "Eight Below," which slipped to second place with $15.7 million. "Eight Below" grossed $45.1 million in 10 days.

Though "Madea's Family Reunion" opened more strongly than "Diary of a Mad Black Woman," the overall weekend box office declined. The top 12 movies took in $99.8 million, down 4.4 percent from the same weekend last year.

Based on Perry's stage play, "Madea's Family Reunion" depicts a variety of domestic crises as a clan prepares for a reunion. Among the characters Perry plays is the heavyset, pistol-packing Grandma Madea, whom he also played in "Diary of a Mad Black Woman."

The film was shot for just $6 million.

Perry's stories about empowerment of women set among Madea's family have a built-in following among black audiences familiar with his plays and video versions of the tales. Black women 35 and older made up 52 percent of the movie's audience, according to Lionsgate.

"The themes Tyler Perry presents resonate very strongly with the black community," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "It reminds me of 'My Big Fat Greek Wedding.' It has elements of comedy and drama and community that just definitely works."

The South African film "Tsotsi," a nominee for best foreign-language film at the Academy Awards, opened strongly in limited release with $78,000 at six theaters, for a healthy $13,000 average.

By comparison, "Madea's Family Reunion" averaged $13,788 in 2,194 theaters, "Doogal" did $1,557 in 2,318 cinemas, and "Running Scared" averaged $1,909 in 1,611 theaters.


1. "Tyler Perry's Madea's Family Reunion," $30.25 million.
2. "Eight Below," $15.7 million.
3. "The Pink Panther" $11.3 million.
4. "Date Movie," $9.2 million.
5. "Curious George," $7 million.
6. "Firewall," $6.3 million.
7. "Final Destination 3," $5.35 million.
8. "Doogal," $3.6 million.
9. "Running Scared," $3.1 million.
10. "Freedomland," $2.9 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: hedwig on February 27, 2006, 04:00:44 PM
1. "Tyler Perry's Madea's Family Reunion," $30.25 million.
2. "Eight Below," $15.7 million.
3. "The Pink Panther" $11.3 million.
4. "Date Movie," $9.2 million.
5. "Curious George," $7 million.
6. "Firewall," $6.3 million.
7. "Final Destination 3," $5.35 million.
8. "Doogal," $3.6 million.
9. "Running Scared," $3.1 million.
10. "Freedomland," $2.9 million.

Hahah, the only movies I want to see are the bottom two.

For the record: Lars Von Trier's Medea > Tyler Perry's Madea. oh shit, take THAT America.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: polkablues on February 27, 2006, 05:13:19 PM
New Line's crime thriller "Running Scared," starring Paul Walker as a mobster scrambling to recover a gun used in the slaying of a cop, opened at No. 9 with $3.1 million.

Just shows to go you what happens when you don't advertise at all on TV.  There were about ten people, including myself and my brother, seeing this at the 1:30 Saturday afternoon showing I went to.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Ravi on February 27, 2006, 05:31:25 PM
Doogal had little advertising, and what little there was showcased the stars more than the movie's characters or story.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: picolas on February 27, 2006, 07:10:45 PM
i saw the tv spot for Running Scared like 40 times and i only saw one tv spot for Medea. i lost almost a million HSX Dollars on that investment..
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Cecil on February 28, 2006, 06:33:43 AM
(http://wizbangblog.com/images/ashlee_simpson04_c.jpg)

"hey guys, did any of ya'll see my movie..[tee-hee]"

i have seen this, but i will not give my opinion because it is far, faaaar too controversial. the time is not right. at any rate, theres an amazing performance by peter weller at the end that should be seen by everyone.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on March 05, 2006, 05:08:55 PM
Hey, matt, America just got back in your face... AGAIN.

'Madea' Earns $13M, Stays Atop Box Office

"Tyler Perry's Madea's Family Reunion," a comic drama from the creator of "Diary of a Mad Black Woman," held off a rush of new releases to maintain the top spot at the weekend box office.

The Lionsgate Films movie raked in $13 million in its second weekend, bringing its gross to $48 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

It edged out the cop thriller "16 Blocks," which debuted at No. 2 with $11.7 million. The Warner Bros. film stars Bruce Willis as an NYPD detective trying to shuffle a star witness from a precinct lockup to a grand jury session 16 blocks away.

Overall, it was a lackluster weekend performance for Hollywood, where attention was focused on the Academy Awards on Sunday. The top 12 movies took in $83.8 million, down 23 percent from the same weekend last year.

"Not every weekend can be a blockbuster. This weekend definitely was not," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations.

Other new wide releases this weekend had mediocre showings. Screen Gems' sci-fi flick "Ultraviolet," starring Milla Jovovich as exacting revenge on the government after being infected with a blood disease, debuted at No. 4 with $9 million.

The 20th Century Fox teen mermaid tale "Aquamarine" opened at No. 5 with $7.5 million. Focus Features' star-studded comedy "Dave Chappelle's Block Party" came in at No. 7 with $6.5 million.

"Madea's Family Reunion," which was shot for just $6 million, is a comic drama about a slew of domestic hijinks that occur as a family prepares for a reunion. Perry wrote and directed the film and starred in three roles including the overweight, pistol-packing matriarch Madea, whom he also played in last year's "Diary of a Mad Black Woman."

Foreign-language Oscar nominee "Joyeux Noel" opened strongly in limited release, grossing $50,133 in six theaters, for a healthy $8,356 average.

By comparison, "16 Blocks" averaged $4,307 in 2,706 theaters; "Ultraviolet" did $3,518 in 2,558 theaters; "Aquamarine" averaged $2,986 in 2,512 theaters and "Dave Chappelle's Block Party" did $5,430 in 1,200 theaters
.

1. "Tyler Perry's Madea's Family Reunion," $13 million.
2. "16 Blocks," $11.7 million.
3. "Eight Below," $10.3 million.
4. "Ultraviolet," $9 million.
5. "Aquamarine," $7.5 million.
6. "The Pink Panther" $7 million.
7. "Dave Chappelle's Block Party," $6.5 million.
8. "Date Movie," $5.1 million.
9. "Curious George," $4.4 million.
10. "Firewall," $3.6 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: polkablues on March 05, 2006, 05:09:43 PM
That sound you just heard was me killing myself.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on March 10, 2006, 12:17:01 PM
So should we all just assume Shaggy Dog will be number 1 and guess how much it'll make?
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on March 10, 2006, 12:21:04 PM
i dunno.  i tried to see a screening of The Hills Have Eyes last night and we walked by the theatre 2 hours before the show on our way to get something to eat and there was already a line wrapped around the block!  so, you know, don't underestimate the drawing power of a horror remake with good advertising.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Fernando on March 10, 2006, 12:35:28 PM
What I want to know is why neither of you two have made a thread of this first 2006 masterpiece.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on March 11, 2006, 10:28:29 PM
Dont underestimate the power of Mathew McConaughey...  and Sarah Jessica Parker... i think thats the #1 movie this weekend!

Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Ravi on March 12, 2006, 07:37:33 PM
UGH
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on March 12, 2006, 08:46:54 PM
Dont underestimate the power of Mathew McConaughey...  and Sarah Jessica Parker... i think thats the #1 movie this weekend!



I'm the best...

box office guestimations, stock tips, whatever you need... call me!
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pubrick on March 15, 2006, 03:35:50 AM
I'm the best...

box office guestimations, stock tips, whatever you need... call me!
i just sent you a link to my amazon wishlist. be sure to sort by priority. :yabbse-smiley:
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on March 26, 2006, 09:28:50 PM
wow, way to go spike...

Inside Man Holds Box Office Hostage

Source: Box Office Mojo March 26, 2006

The ComingSoon.net Box Office Report has been updated with studio estimates for the weekend. Be sure to check back on Monday for the final figures based on actual box office.

Universal Pictures crime-drama Inside Man, starring Denzel Washington, Clive Owen and Jodie Foster, topped the box office with an impressive $28.97 million. The Spike Lee-directed feature opened in 2,818 theaters and averaged a strong $10,279 per location. In the film, budgeted at about $45 million, Owen plays a crafty bank robber who creates the perfect heist, which puts him at odds with Detective Keith Frazier (Washington) and a New York power broker (Foster).

Last week's champ, Warner Bros. Pictures' V For Vendetta, starring Natalie Portman and Hugo Weaving, dropped to the second spot and 51.9% in ticket sales. The graphic novel added $12.3 million in its second weekend for a total of $46.2 million. The film cost $54 million to make.

Disney's Hollywood Pictures took third place with the horror, suspense thriller Stay Alive. Starring Jon Foster, Samaire Armstrong, Frankie Muniz, Sophia Bush and Adam Goldberg, the movie beat expectations with a debut of $11.2 million from 2,009 theaters, for an average of $5,578.

Paramount's Failure to Launch again performed well in its third weekend, making another $10.8 million and bringing its total to $63.9 million. The $50 million-budgeted romantic comedy, starring Matthew McConaughey and Sarah Jessica Parker, dipped just 30.8% in sales.

Tim Allen comedy The Shaggy Dog dropped just 31.7% for the fifth spot and $9.1 million. The Disney release has collected $47.9 million in three weeks.

DreamWorks' She's the Man, starring Amanda Bynes, also did well in its second weekend, making $7.4 million for the three days. The $20 million romantic comedy has earned $20.5 million so far.

Lionsgate's Larry the Cable Guy: Health Inspector opened to $7.1 million from 1,710 theaters in the seventh spot.

Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on March 26, 2006, 11:40:55 PM
Go home, America.  Just get out of my face.

Hey, matt, it's not just America...

"Panther" leads foreign box office for 3rd weekend

"The Pink Panther" led the foreign box office for a third weekend with estimated ticket sales of $10.6 million, a $1 million lead over new domestic champ "Inside Man."

The remake of Blake Edwards' 1964 original, starring Steve Martin as Inspector Clouseau, added eight territories, notably Italy ($1.3 million) and Thailand, where it finished first. Its foreign total stands at $61 million from 53 markets.

The bank-heist drama "Inside Man," the fifth pairing of actor Denzel Washington and director Spike Lee, opened in 18 territories, simultaneous to its domestic bow. It was No. 1 in seven of them: the U.K. ($3.2 million), Germany ($2.3 million), Austria, Greece, the Netherlands, German-speaking Switzerland and Brazil. In Mexico, it booked $820,000, the biggest opening for a Washington-Lee title.

"V for Vendetta" grossed an estimated $5.5 million in its second weekend in 24 territories. The Andy and Larry Wachowski production, starring Natalie Portman as a terrorist, raised its international box office total to $17.7 million.

The Oscar-pedigreed "Brokeback Mountain" continues to draw well overseas, logging an estimated $4 million during the weekend and raising its international total to $83 million. "Capote" yielded $1.4 million in 37 markets for an international total of $13.8 million. "Pride & Prejudice" moved up to $76.4 million, boosted by a $1.2 million weekend in South Korea, where it opened at No. 2 behind a local-language title.

Other international totals: "Nanny McPhee," $61.2 million; "Date Movie," $21.7 million; "Hostel," $16.1 million; "Firewall," $14.7 million; "Failure To Launch," $9 million; "The Hills Have Eyes," $7.6 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on April 02, 2006, 03:19:41 PM
Ice Age Sequel Sets New March Record
Source: Box Office Mojo April 2, 2006

The ComingSoon.net Box Office Report has been updated with studio estimates for the weekend. Be sure to check back on Monday for the final figures based on actual box office.

20th Century Fox's Ice Age: The Meltdown set a new record for a March opener with a massive $70.5 million from 3,964 theaters for an average of $17,785 per location. The animated-comedy beat the original Ice Age, which previously held the March record with $46.3 million and went on to earn $176 million. If the numbers hold when final figures are released Monday, it would tie The Incredibles for second-best animated debut ever behind the $108 million first weekend of Shrek 2. "The Meltdown" marks the biggest debut of 2006 so far at the North American box. The film features the voices Ray Romano, John Leguizamo, Denis Leary, Seann William Scott, Will Arnett, Josh Peck, Jay Leno and Queen Latifah.

Universal Pictures crime-drama Inside Man, starring Denzel Washington, Clive Owen and Jodie Foster, dropped 46% and to the second spot with $5.7 million. Budgeted at about $45 million, the film has collected $52.8 million in two weeks.

Newcomer ATL, from Warner Bros. Pictures, debuted in the third spot with an estimated $12.5 million. The dramedy averaged a strong $7,830 in 1,602 theaters.

Paramount's Failure to Launch remained in the fourth spot, adding $6.6 million in its fourth weekend. The $50 million-budgeted romantic comedy, starring Matthew McConaughey and Sarah Jessica Parker, has earned an impressive $73.2 million so far.

Warner Bros.' V For Vendetta, starring Natalie Portman and Hugo Weaving, rounded out the top five with $6.5 million. The $54 million-budgeted graphic novel has made $56 million in three weeks.

Two other wide releases bombed out of the gate. Universal's Slither, written and directed by James Gunn, earned just $3.7 million from 1,945 theaters for an average of $1,889, while Sharon Stone sequel Basic Instinct 2 made only $3.2 million from 1,453 locations, an average of $2,202.

The 2005 Sundance Film Festival hit Brick opened strongly in limited release, with $87,524 in two theaters. Focus Features plans to expand the Rian Johnson-directed film to more theaters this Friday.

Click here for the full box office estimates of the top 12 films.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on April 23, 2006, 04:01:00 PM
Silent Hill Draws in Moviegoers
Source: Box Office Mojo April 23, 2006

The ComingSoon.net Box Office Report has been updated with studio estimates for the weekend. Be sure to check back on Monday for the final figures based on actual box office.

TriStar Pictures' Silent Hill topped the box office with an estimated $20.2 million from 2,926 theaters. Directed by Christophe Gans (Brotherhood of the Wolf) and written by Roger Avary, the film stars Radha Mitchell as a mother who has to search for her daughter in an eerie and deserted ghost town. "Hill" is based on the popular Konami video game. Sony's TriStar paid $14 million for the rights to distribute the movie in North America, and will break even in the mid-$20 million range.

Last week's champ, Dimension's Scary Movie 4, dropped 57.7% in ticket sales and to the second spot, adding $17 million for a two-week total of $67.7 million. The fourth installment in the spoof comedy franchise cost about $45 million to make.

Fox thriller The Sentinel, starring Michael Douglas, Kiefer Sutherland, Eva Longoria and Kim Basinger, debuted in the third spot with $14.7 million from 2,819 theaters.

The studio's Ice Age: The Meltdown dipped two spots in its fourth weekend to fourth place, earning another $12.8 million for an impressive total of $167.9 million domestically so far. The animated-comedy sequel was made for $80 million.

Disney's less-successfull The Wild rounded out the top five with $8.1 million, dropping just 16.9% in sales. The animated film, also made for $80 million, has collected $21.9 million in two weeks.

Sony comedy The Benchwarmers earned $7.3 million in its third weekend and is up to $47.1 million total.

Another wide release, Universal's American Dreamz, didn't receive much interest from moviegoers as it opened in the eighth spot with just $3.7 million from 1,500 theaters.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: polkablues on April 23, 2006, 05:39:48 PM
Thanks to Silent Hill, The Benchwarmers, Underworld 2, and Medea's Family Reunion, I suspect we're going to see lots more movies not screened for critics prior to release.   :yabbse-sad:
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: matt35mm on April 30, 2006, 03:43:05 PM
"United 93," the first Hollywood movie to deal with the events of September 11, was No. 2 at the weekend box office in North America with respectable ticket sales of $11.6 million, according to studio estimates issued on Sunday.

The new Robin Williams comedy "RV" drove off with the top prize, selling about $16.4 million worth of tickets for the three days beginning Friday, while the teen gymnast drama "Stick It" opened at No. 3 with $11.3 million.

"United 93" is a dramatization of the events surrounding the flight that crashed in a Pennsylvania field after passengers fought back against the hijackers.


Budgeted at just $15 million, and filmed with a cast of relative unknowns away from the U.S. media spotlight in Britain, the Universal Pictures release was directed by English filmmaker Paul Greengrass, who shot the 2004 Matt Damon hit "The Bourne Supremacy." It premiered on Tuesday at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York, and has drawn rave reviews from critics.

But its tough subject matter made it difficult to forecast how the film would open and there were reports that pre-release surveys indicated that female filmgoers had little interest in it. As it turned out, women slightly outdrew men, 52 percent to 48 percent, according to exit surveys.

"LOUD AND CLEAR"

"I think Americans have spoken loud and clear, that they were ready for a film like this," said Nikki Rocco, president of domestic theatrical distribution at Universal, a unit of General Electric Co.'s NBC Universal Inc.

Rocco said the studio had had no expectations for the film's box office performance. It "wasn't the first and foremost aspect of producing the film," she said.

The film did skew old, though, with exit surveys showing that 71 percent of viewers were aged 30 and above. The film received a grade of "very good" or "excellent" from 95 percent of respondents (the norm is 80 percent), while 76 percent would definitely recommend it (the norm is 55 percent), the studio said.

About 51 percent of people showed up with their spouse while 11 percent of viewers showed up on a date.

"RV," released by Sony Corp.'s Columbia Pictures, marks an increasingly rare foray into family comedy for Williams, who has focused in recent years on modestly budgeted dramas such as "Insomnia" and "One Hour Photo." He plays the beleaguered head of a family on a cross-country trip in a recreational vehicle with plumbing problems.

The $16.4 million opening was "as good as we'd hoped it would be," said Rory Bruer, Columbia's president of domestic theatrical distribution.

Walt Disney Co.'s "Stick It" handily exceeded expectations, which had been in the $6 million-$9 million range. Teen girls turned out en masse for the story of a troubled young gymnast.

The top-10 contained one other new release, "Akeelah and the Bee," which opened at No. 8 with just $6.3 million. While the haul came in at the low end of its expectations, distributor Lionsgate said it was happy with the figure, and it hoped word-of-mouth would buoy the film in coming weeks. The audience skewed black and female, it said.

The acclaimed film revolves around an inner-city girl who defies the odds to get to the national spelling bee. Lionsgate, a unit of Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. partnered on the project with Starbucks Corp., which promoted the film in its coffee stores in return for a share of any profits.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on May 07, 2006, 12:59:14 PM
Not the best number for Mission Impossible...

The box office may be up for a seventh week, but that was the only good news this weekend, as Mission: Impossible III opened with a stunningly bland $48 million. That's far below most estimates, which ranged from the high fifties to the low seventies, and fingers will be pointing everywhere -- most likely (though not necessarily accurately) at Tom Cruise and his erratic behavior of the past year. Though there may be a certain amount of "Cruise fatigue," it's also worth noting that this time last year, Kingdom of Heaven tanked with $19.6 mil -- is pre-summer movie fatigue manifesting itself? Either way, M:I3 should have the next weekend to itself, until The Da Vinci Code comes along on May 19th. As for the week's other new releases, there wasn't anything to get excited about: An American Haunting scared up $6.38 million, while Hoot flopped with only $3.4 million. M:I3's dominance meant all the holdovers took drops of 40%-60%, with the exception of R.V., which surprisingly held its own with just a 32% slide to $11.1 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on May 07, 2006, 01:01:08 PM
its so crazy when $48 million opening weekend is a flop.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Ravi on May 09, 2006, 12:45:18 AM
its so crazy when $48 million opening weekend is a flop.

M:I2 opened on a 3-day weekend, which is one factor why it grossed more than M:I3.  I'm shedding no tears for Paramount.  Their "flop" already made about $118 million worldwide.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: grand theft sparrow on May 09, 2006, 10:51:23 AM
its so crazy when $48 million opening weekend is a flop.

M:I2 opened on a 3-day weekend, which is one factor why it grossed more than M:I3.

Another factor is that people actually LIKED the previous film in the series when MI2 came out.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on May 14, 2006, 01:42:59 PM
looks like this will help with the MI:III flops talk somewhat...

Summer Box Office: No Time for a Cruise
Source: Box Office Mojo, Edward Douglas May 14, 2006

The ComingSoon.net Box Office Report has been updated with studio estimates for the weekend. Be sure to check back on Monday for the final figures based on actual box office.

Just when it seemed like the box office was picking up, three new releases hit theatres with none of them doing nearly as much business as one might expect based on past performances.

The most disturbing of these is the failure by Wolfgang Petersen's Poseidon, a remake of Irwin Allen's 1972 disaster flick to wrestle the top spot away from Tom Cruise and Mission: Impossible III, which made an estimated $24.5 million in its second weekend, a drop of just under 50% from its summer kick-off last week.

Still, that was enough to keep one Cruise afloat while the other one sank, and Petersen's epic, made for a reported $160 million, grossed just over $20 million in 3,555 theatres, an average of $5,717 per theatre. This amount is roughly half of Petersen's last two big movies, the similarly-themed 2000 blockbuster The Perfect Storm starring Geroge Clooney and 2003's Troy starring Brad Pitt.

While the ship sank, Robin Williams' road trip comedy, RV, continued to hold water, earning approximately $9.5 million in its third weekend, a minor drop of 14% from last week. Directed by Barry Sonnefeld, the PG comedy has grossed $42.8 million to date, and is on its way to making back its $50 million production budget.

Lindsay Lohan's luck may have finally run out, as she joins Hilary Duff and Mandy Moore in the ranks of former teen stars who have not been able to maintain their box office success. Lohan's new romantic comedy Just My Luck, released by 20th Century Fox, debuted at #4 with roughly $5.3 million in its opening weekend.

The ghost movie An American Haunting, starring Sissy Spacek and Donald Sutherland, did decently in its second weekend, dropping down to #5 with $3.7 million and a total of $10.9 million.

Touchstone Pictures gymnastic comedy Stick It and Paul Greengrass' 9/11 drama United 93 continued to go neck and neck, with the latter pulling ahead in their third weekend. United 93 dropped down one notch to #6 with $3.6 million and Stick It went from #4 to #7 with $3.2 million. The former has grossed $25 million compared to the latter's $22 million.

In eighth place, Fox's animated hit Ice Age: The Meltdown continues its run in the Top 10, adding another $2.9 million to bring its total gross to $187.4 million. Its attempts at being the first movie of 2006 to cross the $200 million mark may be thwarted by next week's DreamWorks comedy Over the Hedge.

Rounding out the Top 10 were the movie version of the video game Silent Hill , directed by Christophe Gans, and the New Line/Walden Media teen drama Hoot, both making just over $2 million. Silent Hill has grossed $44.5 million in four weeks.

Barely making it into the Top 12, Touchstone Pictures' soccer drama Goal! The Dream Begins fared poorly in its opening weekend, despite early weekend reports of sold out shows in certain areas. It ended up grossing just $1.8 million in just over 1,000 theatres, which doesn't bode well for the second and third installments of the planned trilogy.

After opening in limited release last week, Terry Zwigoff and Daniel Clowes' Art School Confidential expanded nationwide into 762 theatres, where it earned an estimated $1.2 million. Averaging just $1,500 per theatre may prove that Sony Classics might have expanded the dark comedy too wide too soon.

Miramax Films introduced its own family comedy Keeping Up with the Steins, directed by Scott Marshall, son of famed producer/director Gary Marshall (who also stars in the film). It grossed $621 thousand in 138 theatres.

After a stronger summer debut than last year, this weekend sees a drop of nearly 13% from the same weekend last year where two comedies, Monster-in-Law with Jennifer Lopez and Jane Fonda, and Will Ferrell's Kicking and Screaming, topped the box office. Things should pick up again next week with the anticipated summer films, The Da Vinci Code and Over the Hedge


1  Mission: Impossible III Para  $24,514,000 4,059 $84,365,000 
2  Poseidon WB $20,325,000 3,555 $20,325,000
3  RV Sony $9,500,000 3,536 $42,821,000
4  Just My Luck Fox $5,500,000 2,541 $5,500,000
5  An American Haunting Freestyle  $3,689,000 1,703 $10,938,000 
6  United 93  Univ $3,583,000 1,871 $25,630,000
7  Stick It Touch. $3,239,000 2,009 $22,218,000
8  Ice Age: The Meltdown Fox $2,975,000 1,879 $187,395,000
9  Silent Hill TriStar $2,200,000 1,888 $44,507,000
10  Hoot NL $2,125,000 3,018  $6,213,000 
11  Scary Movie 4 Dim $2,080,000 1,793 $86,582,000
12  Goal! The Dream Begins Touch $2,003,000  1,007   $2,003,000

Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on May 21, 2006, 02:04:36 PM
BOX OFFICE RESULTS FOR MAY 19-21

Amidst a swirl of controversy and middling reviews, The Da Vinci Code rose above the fracas to open with $77 million -- a figure far above Sony's expectations of $60 mil. While it didn't crack the top ten of weekend openings (it ranked 13th), Da Vinci did rate the year's highest opening thus far, and record debuts for director Ron Howard and star Tom Hanks. It also was a happy ending for Sony, which played a tenacious game of chicken with both the media and the public, holding the movie from advance screenings until the last minute, and (theoretically) wringing its hands over the controversy the film had wrought. If you ask us, the studio was lowballing its estimates in the extreme, and even hedged its bets a little by putting the flick on just 3,735 screens, compared to rival Over the Hedge's 4,059. Speaking of Hedge, the DreamWorks animated flick nabbed an impressive $37.2 million, the fifth-highest opening of the year, and a third newcomer, See No Evil, faltered in sixth with just $4.35. The Da Vinci/Hedge onslaught insured that all holdovers would drop precariously, with slides ranging from 40% (Just My Luck) to 60% (United 93). Also of note, Mission: Impossible III, falling to third, finally broke the $100 million mark in its third weekend. Interestingly, the box office was down almost 3% from this time last year -- but then again, the previous May brought us the long-long-long anticipated Star Wars, Episode III: Revenge of the Sith.
Up next week: It's Mutant -- er, Memorial! -- Day weekend as everybody shoves aside for X-Men: The Last Stand and waits to see what director Brett Ratner makes of the lucrative franchise.

Sunday estimates for the weekend box office of May 19-21:


The Da Vinci Code ($77M)
Over the Hedge ($37.2M)
Mission: Impossible III ($11M)
Poseidon ($9.2M)
R.V. ($5.1M)
See No Evil ($4.35M)
Just My Luck ($3.38M)
An American Haunting ($1.66M)
United 93 ($1.4M)
Akeelah and the Bee ($1M)
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: polkablues on May 21, 2006, 05:27:39 PM
We should get a pool going for Da Vinci Code second-week-dropoff.

I'm down for 65%.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on May 21, 2006, 09:52:51 PM
No way. Remember its Memorial Weekend. And now that the blockbuster audience saw it opening weekend (and they are all going to see XMEN 3) there is still a large group of people left that are waiting to see Da Vinci.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on May 30, 2006, 11:40:32 AM
"Da Vinci," starring Tom Hanks, was the second-highest grossing film of the four-day weekend with $43 million, down 56 percent from last week's impressive opening weekend.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: ©brad on May 30, 2006, 05:15:54 PM
I'm down for 65%.

damn, you were close!
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: polkablues on May 30, 2006, 05:37:16 PM
I'm down for 65%.

damn, you were close!

If it hadn't been a four-day weekend I might have nailed it.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on July 17, 2006, 10:36:13 AM
'Pirates' Loots Box Office, Grosses $258M

"Pirates of the Caribbean" is looking more like "Treasure Island." Already a record-shattering blockbuster, Johnny Depp's sequel "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest" dug up $62.2 million in its second weekend, raising its 10-day total to $258.2 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

The movie has quickly become the year's top-grossing film, rocketing past "X-Men: The Last Stand," which has taken in $232 million in eight weeks. The "Pirates" sequel has grossed an additional $125 million overseas.

"It's really fun when you're riding a comet like this," said Chuck Viane, head of distribution for Disney, which based the "Pirates of the Caribbean" movies on its theme park attraction. "This thing is just unbelievable. It creates its own wake."

Sony's "Little Man," the Wayans brothers' slapstick farce about a pint-size thief masquerading as a baby, opened as the No. 2 movie with $21.7 million. The tale stars Shawn and Marlon Wayans, who co-wrote it with brother Keenen Ivory Wayans, the director.

Universal's comedy "You, Me and Dupree," starring Owen Wilson as a houseguest causing chaos for a buddy and his new bride (Matt Dillon and Kate Hudson), debuted at No. 3 with $21.3 million.

Hollywood's business dipped for the first time in two months. After eight straight weekends of rising revenues, overall receipts totaled $156 million, down 5 percent from the same weekend last year, when Depp also was at the top of the box office with "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory."

Still, the second weekend gross for "Dead Man's Chest" topped the debut of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," which opened with $56.2 million. "Dead Man's Chest" had the third-best second weekend ever, behind "Shrek 2" ($72.2 million) and "Spider-Man" ($71.4 million).

By next weekend, "Dead Man's Chest" should climb past the $305 million domestic total rung up by its predecessor, 2003's "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl," Disney's Viane said.

"Dead Man's Chest" debuted with $135.6 million over the opening weekend, beating the previous record of $114.8 million set by "Spider-Man" in 2002.

Ending with a cliffhanger, "Dead Man's Chest" will be closely followed by a third "Pirates" movie due out next May, with Orlando Bloom, Keira Knightley and other co-stars on a voyage to rescue Depp's rakish pirate Capt. Jack Sparrow.

"Huge expectations. 'Pirates 2' is maybe the toughest act in box-office history to follow," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "'Pirates 3' is the definition of a predestined blockbuster."

After a strong start in narrow release the previous weekend, Warner Independent's sci-fi drug-addiction tale "A Scanner Darkly" expanded to more theaters and broke into the top 10 with $1.2 million. The movie, featuring Keanu Reeves, Winona Ryder and Robert Downey Jr., was shot in live action then painted over with digital animation. 

1. "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest," $62.2 million.
2. "Little Man," $21.7 million.
3. "You, Me and Dupree," $21.3 million.
4. "Superman Returns," $11.6 million.
5. "The Devil Wears Prada," $10.45 million.
6. "Cars," $7.5 million.
7. "Click," $7 million.
8. "The Lake House," $1.6 million.
9. "Nacho Libre," $1.5 million.
10. "A Scanner Darkly," $1.2 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on July 23, 2006, 11:50:07 AM
'Pirates' rules at box office, as 'Lady' flops

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The "Pirates of the Caribbean" sequel logged a third weekend as the most popular movie in North America, while the latest films from directors M. Night Shyamalan and Ivan Reitman both bombed, according to studio estimates issued on Sunday.

Shyamalan's mystical fantasy "Lady in the Water" opened at No. 3 with $18.2 million, amid a critical pasting that got personal at times. The New York Post described Shyamalan as "a crackpot with a messianic delusions."

His last movie, "The Village," opened to $50 million in 2004 and stalled at $114 million -- half of what 2002's "Signs" finished up with. Shyamalan's 1999 breakthrough, "The Sixth Sense," earned $293.5 million.

The new movie was distributed by Time Warner Inc.'s Warner Bros. Pictures, which said it had hoped for an opening in the mid-$20 million range. It cost in the mid-$50 million range to make.

Reitman's romantic comedy "My Super Ex-Girlfriend," which received only marginally better reviews, opened at No. 7 with $8.7 million. The Uma Thurman vehicle marked Reitman's first directing effort since the 2001 flop "Evolution."

"Girlfriend" was distributed by News Corp.'s 20th Century Fox, which had hoped for an opening in the mid-teens.

Walt Disney Co.'s "Pirates," meanwhile, was No. 1 with $35.0 million, as its total rose to $321.7 million after three weekends. It set a new speed record hitting $300 million, taking 16 days -- one day faster than last year's "Star Wars: Episode III -- Revenge of the Sith."
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on July 30, 2006, 02:45:03 PM
'Miami Vice' Takes $25.2M, Sinks 'Pirates'

The "Miami Vice" speedboat overtook the "Pirates of the Caribbean" juggernaut to capture the top spot at the weekend box office.

The film, which pairs Colin Farrell and Jamie Foxx as the iconic TV characters Sonny Crockett and Ricardo Tubbs, took in $25.2 million, compared to $20.5 million for "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest," according to studio estimates Sunday.

"It's nice to be number one," said Nikki Rocco, president of distribution at Universal Pictures.
 
The gritty, dark action film was directed by Michael Mann, who created the 1980s TV show. The movie was especially attractive to older audiences, with 62 percent of the audience over 30, according to the studio's exit polling.

The audience was pretty evenly split between men and women, the polling showed.

"It's what our expectations were," Rocco said. "We tried to do something different. There has been a lot of criticism regarding unoriginal product. We took a TV series and made it very different."

The news was not necessarily bad for The Walt Disney Co., which produced "Pirates."

In its third week, "Pirates" has earned $358.4 million to become the highest grossing film in Disney's history, passing the $339.7 million earned by the Pixar Animation Studios film "Finding Nemo."

"After posting the biggest opening weekend of all time, it is living up to the promise created that opening weekend," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of Exhibitor Relations.

"Pirates" is on track to break the $400 million mark in the coming weeks, Dergarabedian said.

The Pixar film "Cars" has also raked in $234.6 million to date. And while the film is no longer in the top 10 at the box office, its cumulative gross makes it the second highest grossing film of the year, giving Disney the top two spots so far.

"It's a very happy weekend," said Chuck Viane, Disney's head of distribution.

The teen flick "John Tucker Must Die" from 20th Century Fox debuted in third place with a respectable $14 million.

The film, with a budget of about $18 million, attracted a predominantly young female audience with its story of four high school girls who seek revenge against an unfaithful boyfriend.

"The Ant Bully," an animated film from Warner Bros., opened with a mere $8.1 million.

The film featured the voice talents of Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts and Nicolas Cage and was produced by Tom Hanks. But it just couldn't compete against a crowded field of family pictures.

"It's much less than what we had wanted," said Jeff Goldstein, general sales manager at Warner Bros. "The marketplace is crowded. The kids have been bombarded."

The independent film "Little Miss Sunshine" opened strongly in limited release.

The quirky film starring Greg Kinnear and Steve Carell, took in $356,863 in only seven theaters in New York and Los Angeles for a per screen average of $50,980.

Overall, box office revenue was up 6.3 percent and attendance was up 3 percent.

1. "Miami Vice," $25.2 million.
2. "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest," $20.5 million.
3. "John Tucker Must Die," $14 million.
4. "Monster House," $11.5 million.
5. "The Ant Bully," $8.2 million.
6. "Lady in the Water," $7 million.
7. "You, Me and Dupree," $7 million
8. "Little Man," $5.1 million.
9. "The Devil Wears Prada," $4.8 million.
10. "Clerks II," $3.9 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on August 04, 2006, 11:31:00 AM
"The Ant Bully," an animated film from Warner Bros., opened with a mere $8.1 million.

The film featured the voice talents of Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts and Nicolas Cage and was produced by Tom Hanks. But it just couldn't compete against a crowded field of family pictures.

"It's much less than what we had wanted," said Jeff Goldstein, general sales manager at Warner Bros. "The marketplace is crowded. The kids have been bombarded."
um, WB, i'd never even HEARD of this movie until a month ago.  and i visit xixax EVERY DAY!  so you really have no one to blame but yourselves.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on August 13, 2006, 03:39:06 PM
'Talladega' Leads Box Office Pack Again

The Will Ferrell comedy "Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby" raced ahead of the competition to remain the box office champ for a second weekend with $23 million in ticket sales, according to studio estimates released Sunday.

Last week's news of another terror plot against airliners apparently did not dampen audience appetite for Oliver Stone's "World Trade Center." The Paramount Pictures release beat expectations by earning $19 million over the weekend to place it third at the weekend box office.

The shocker of the weekend was the high-school dance film "Step Up" from The Walt Disney Co., which placed second with a box office take of $21 million.

"It stepped up out of nowhere and surprised everyone," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "It was totally unexpected."

Disney flooded the Internet and music television networks with dance videos from the film, a strategy that broadened the audience from the target female teen demographic. While 70 percent of the audience was female, about one-quarter was in the 18-24 age range, according to exit polling.

The performance of the top 12 films was up 6.35 percent from the same weekend last year, making it the fourth weekend in a row that the box office has outpaced last year's levels.

Diversity played a big role in generating attendance, analysts said.

"There is so much variety. You pick a genre and you can find a movie," Dergarabedian said.

"World Trade Center" turned in the best weekend debut ever for director Stone, whose previous controversial films such as "JFK and "Nixon" made many wonder how he would portray events in the aftermath of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

The film has earned $26.8 million since it opened nationwide Wednesday.

News of a foiled terrorist plot allegedly targeting planes heading to the United States had prompted speculation that moviegoers might shun the film, recounting efforts to rescue two police officers caught under the rubble of the Twin Towers.

"We really don't know the answer" to whether current events affected attendance, said Jim Tharp, president of distribution at Paramount. "Word of mouth got out very quickly and impacted the weekend in a positive manner."

"World Trade Center" is the second film this year to revisit 9/11. April's "United 93" from Universal opened in far fewer theaters and brought in $11.5 million in its opening weekend.

In its third week, the independent film "Little Miss Sunshine" continued its impressive run.

The film, released by Fox Searchlight, brought in an average of $16,993 per screen in 29 cities for a total of $2.6 million over the weekend. It is set for wider release at the end of the month.

1. "Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby," $23 million.
2. "Step Up," $21 million.
3. "World Trade Center," $19 million.
4. "Barnyard," 10.1 million.
5. "Pulse," $8.5 million.
6. "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest," 7.2 million.
7. "Zoom," 4.6 million.
8. "The Descent," $4.6 million.
9. "Miami Vice," $4.5 million.
10. "Monster House," $3.3 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: polkablues on August 13, 2006, 06:39:02 PM
The shocker of the weekend was the high-school dance film "Step Up" from The Walt Disney Co., which placed second with a box office take of $21 million.

...70 percent of the audience was female

And the other thirty percent was equal parts bored teenage boyfriends and middle-aged perverts.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on August 20, 2006, 02:02:58 PM
'Snakes' Crawls in Box Office Debut

The Internet buzz over "Snakes on a Plane" turned out to be nothing to hiss about. The high-flying thriller preceded by months of unprecedented Web buildup technically debuted as the No. 1 movie, but with a modest $15.25 million opening weekend, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Distributor New Line Cinema included $1.4 million that "Snakes on a Plane" raked in during 10 p.m. screenings Thursday to get a head start on the weekend. Without those revenues, the movie's weekend total would be $13.85 million, putting it just behind "Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby," which took in $14.1 million in its third weekend.

David Tuckerman, New Line's head of distribution, said it was customary for studios to include late-night previews in a movie's opening-weekend total.

"It's an industry standard to do that, to roll that in," Tuckerman said. "Also, with this kind of picture, I would tell you unequivocably that at least 90 percent of that business would have gone to see it Friday night if not Thursday."

Rory Bruer, head of distribution at "Talladega Nights" studio Sony, declined to comment.

Box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations ranks movies according to numbers provided by studios, putting "Snakes on a Plane" in first place based on New Line's figures, said company president Paul Dergarabedian.

Starring Will Ferrell as a NASCAR driver obsessed with winning, the comedy "Talladega Nights" was No. 1 at the box office the previous two weekends and raised its three-week total to $114.7 million.

With its campy, tell-it-like-it-is title and the star power of lead actor Samuel L. Jackson, "Snakes on a Plane" became an online phenomenon, prompting endless Web chat and parodies long before anyone saw the movie.

That buzz proved fairly hollow when it came to showtime, with the debut weekend a respectable but unremarkable return for a movie with a production budget of just over $30 million.

New Line's Tuckerman said "Snakes on a Plane" would turn in a solid profit but that he did not know why the movie failed to live up to its Internet hype.

"I think people were more excited about the marketing than the actual movie," said Dergarabedian of Exhibitor Relations. "New Line did not set out to create this Internet buzz. That's actually a marketer's dream, but when marketing translates into awareness but does not inspire people to get out from behind their computers and into the theater, that's a problem."

The movie stars Jackson as an FBI agent battling killer snakes that have been put on a red-eye flight to do away with a witness about to testify in a murder trial.

Universal Pictures' comedy "Accepted," about slackers who start their own college, had the next-best showing among new movies, debuting at No. 4 with $10.1 million. MGM's "Material Girls," starring Hilary and Haylie Duff as cosmetics heiresses, opened at No. 9 with $4.6 million.

The year's biggest hit, "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest," was No. 8 with $5 million, lifting its domestic total to $401 million. 

1. "Snakes on a Plane," $15.25 million.
2. "Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby," $14.1 million.
3. "World Trade Center," $10.8 million.
4. "Accepted," $10.1 million.
5. "Step Up," $9.9 million.
6. "Barnyard: The Original Party Animals," $7.5 million.
7. "Little Miss Sunshine," $5.7 million.
8. "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest," $5 million.
9. "Material Girls," $4.6 million.
10. "Pulse," $3.5 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: polkablues on August 20, 2006, 06:12:59 PM
"Snakes on a Plane," $15.25 million.

Ouch.  Kicked in the asp.  Now imagine how poorly it would have done without all the hype.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on September 04, 2006, 01:28:42 PM
'Invincible' Repeats As No. 1 Movie

Mark Wahlberg remained invincible at the box office over the long Labor Day weekend. Disney's "Invincible," with Wahlberg as a pro football rookie who makes the team in open tryouts, was the No. 1 movie for the second straight weekend, taking in $15.2 million from Friday through Monday, according to studio estimates. The movie lifted its 11-day total to $37.8 million.

Lionsgate's action tale "Crank," with Jason Statham as a hitman out for revenge while racing to find an antidote after he's poisoned, opened at No. 2 with $13 million.

Nicolas Cage's "The Wicker Man" a Warner Bros. remake of a 1973 thriller about a cop tracking a missing child on an eerie island, took in $11.7 million to debut in third place.

The weekend's other new wide release, Sony's basketball tale "Crossover," opened outside the top 10 with $4.5 million.

Two acclaimed films continued to expand to more theaters and scored again with audiences. Fox Searchlight's road-trip comedy "Little Miss Sunshine," starring Greg Kinnear, Toni Collette and Steve Carell, was No. 4 with $9.7 million.

Yari Film Group's "The Illusionist," starring Edward Norton and Paul Giamatti in a drama about a mysterious magician in early 1900s Vienna, expanded into wide release and broke into the top 10 with $8 million.

After gradually rolling out following debuts in a handful of theaters, the two films maintained the best per-theater averages among the top-10 movies. Playing in 1,602 locations, "Little Miss Sunshine" averaged $6,071 a cinema, while "The Illusionist" did $8,261 in 971 theaters.

In limited release, IFC Films' documentary "This Film Is Not Yet Rated" opened strongly with $41,664 in two theaters for a $20,832 average. The film, a harsh critique of Hollywood's movie ratings system, expands to more theaters through September.

Hollywood closed the summer with a solid Labor Day weekend, typically a slow time at movie theaters as students prepare to head back to school and families squeeze in last-minute barbecues and other outdoor activities. The top 12 movies took in $98.7 million, up slightly from the same weekend last year.

After domestic revenues went into a tailspin in 2005, Hollywood has rebounded with a sturdy year, with movie attendance rising about 3 percent compared to last summer.

"This was a summer that I think reflected the fact that people still want to go to the movies," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "We didn't break any records, but the box office is alive and well." 

1. "Invincible," $15.2 million.
2. "Crank," $13 million.
3. "The Wicker Man," $11.7 million.
4. "Little Miss Sunshine," $9.7 million.
5. "The Illusionist," $8 million.
6. "Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby," $7.7 million.
7. "Barnyard: The Original Party Animals," $6.4 million.
8. "Accepted," $5.9 million.
9. "World Trade Center," $5.8 million.
10. "Step Up," $6.2 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: RegularKarate on September 05, 2006, 05:22:30 PM
Idiocracy: Fifty bucks
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on September 10, 2006, 03:32:48 PM
'Covenant' leads weakest box office in three years

The new supernatural thriller "The Covenant" conjured up the lead at a sluggish weekend box office in North America with the lowest sales for a No. 1 movie in three years.

The Sony Corp . release sold $9 million worth of tickets in the three days beginning September 8, followed by another new film, "Hollywoodland," with $6 million and previous champ "Invincible" with $5.8 million.

The last movie to open at No. 1 with less than $10 million was the David Spade comedy "Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star" with $6.7 million exactly three years ago.
 
Overall box office sales also were the lowest since then, according to tracking firm Exhibitor Relations. The top 12 films earned $54 million this weekend, just ahead of the $50.5 million haul when "Dickie Roberts" ruled. A year ago, the top 12 earned $73.5 million.

Both "The Covenant" and "Dickie Roberts" opened after the U.S. Labor Day holiday weekend, the last hurrah of the lucrative summer moviegoing season. For the next couple of weeks, sales will be weak as the studios dump likely under-performers on the market and lay the groundwork for their prestigious Oscar contenders.

"The Covenant," which cost about $20 million to make, opened within expectations, Sony said. Directed by Finnish filmmaker Renny Harlin, the movie revolves around four studly warlocks at a prep school. The target audience appeared to skip the film, though, since three-quarters of the audience for PG-13-rated movie was aged 18 and older, Sony said.

Sony released the film through its mid-budget Screen Gems unit, which already topped the charts this year with "When a Stranger Calls" and "Underworld Evolution." "The Covenant" ranks as Sony's ninth No. 1 film of the year, a feat last accomplished by a studio -- Sony also -- in 2003.

With its $6 million opening, "Hollywoodland" opened about $1 million below the expectations of its distributor, Focus Features. The film centers on the mysterious death of "Superman" TV star George Reeves, played by Ben Affleck, whose surprise victory in the best-actor category at the Venice International Film Festival on Saturday night perplexed critics and journalists. Adrien Brody and Diane Lane also star. Focus Features is the art-house unit of General Electric Co.'s NBC Universal Inc.

The other new release in the top 10 was "The Protector" at No. 4. Thai martial arts director Tony Jaa's follow-up to the popular "Ong-Bak: The Thai Warrior" earned $5 million. The film was released by the Weinstein Co., the closely held entity run by former Miramax Films chiefs Harvey and Bob Weinstein.

After three weeks, Walt Disney Co.'s third-ranked football drama "Invincible," starring Mark Wahlberg, has earned $45.7 million.

The real-time thriller "Crank" fell two places to No. 5 with $4.8 million in its second weekend. The Jason Statham vehicle, released by Lions Gate Entertainment Corp.'s Lionsgate, has earned $19.9 million to date.

1. The Covenant, $9 million
2. Hollywoodland, $6 million
3. Invincible, $5.7 million
4. The Protector, $5 million
5. Crank, $4.8 million
6. The Illusionist, $4.6 million
7. Little Miss Sunshine, $4.4 million
8. The Wicker Man, $4.1 million
9. Talladega Nights, $3 million
10. Barnyard, $2.5 million
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: matt35mm on September 10, 2006, 03:47:04 PM
'Covenant' leads weakest box office in three years

Self-explanitory.

Studios deliberately release their low-box-office-expectation-movies on or around Labor Day because few people generally go around this time of the year.  And people don't go to the movies at this time because studios release the movies not that many people want to see around this time of the year.  Who can be surprised?
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on September 11, 2006, 08:10:32 AM
i love it. its like the mid-nineties again with those numbers.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on September 17, 2006, 02:29:53 PM
'Gridiron Gang' Scores at the Box Office

It was another down weekend at the box office, although moviegoers helped Sony Pictures and Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson score with the football flick "Gridiron Gang."

The drama about a football team at a Los Angeles juvenile detention center took in an estimated $15 million in ticket sales to claim the top spot for the weekend. The debut gave distributor Sony its 10th top opener this year, setting an all-time industry record.

Overall, box office revenues for the top 12 films dipped 12.3 percent from the same weekend last year. That makes for two down weekends in a row, cutting into the single-digit revenue gains the studios has enjoyed so far this year.
 
Studio revenues are still up 6.2 percent over last year and attendance is also up 3 percent, according to box office tracker Exhibitor Relations Inc.

Despite high expectations from director Brian De Palma and a cast including Josh Hartnett and Scarlett Johansson, the gruesome murder mystery "The Black Dahlia" opened in the second spot with $10.4 million.

The film, from Universal Pictures, fared better than last week's debut of "Hollywoodland," which sank from the number two spot to ninth place this week. Both films deal with real-life Los Angeles mysteries.

Similarly, there are two football-themed films in theaters, including "Invincible," which brought in $3.9 million over the weekend for distributor Disney.

"With two L.A. noir films and two football movies, audiences may be feeling like they've seen some of this before and may not be coming out in bigger numbers," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of Exhibitor Relations.

The animated film "Everyone's Hero" took in $6.2 million. The 20th Century Fox movie was originally directed by the late Christopher Reeve, and his wife Dana served as producer of the film until her death in March.

The other major film opening was Paramount's "The Last Kiss" which took in $4.7 million for fourth place. The movie stars Zach Braff of "Scrubs" and Rachel Bilson of "The O.C."

But the weekend belonged to "The Rock," who scored his fifth No. 1 opening in his career, helping to further his reputation as an action movie star.

1. "Gridiron Gang," $15 million.
2. "The Black Dahlia," $10.4 million.
3. "Everyone's Hero," $6.2 million.
4. "The Last Kiss," $4.7 million.
5. "The Covenant," $4.7 million.
6. "Invincible," $3.9 million.
7. "The Illusionist," $3.8 million.
8. "Little Miss Sunshine," $3.4 million
9. "Hollywoodland," $2.7 million.
10. "Crank," $2.7 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on September 24, 2006, 09:13:40 PM
'Jackass' Sequel Wins Weekend Box Office

Johnny Knoxville and his pals pulled another prank on Hollywood as their sequel of crazy stunts, "Jackass Number Two," beat a rush of serious movies to take the top spot at the weekend box office.

Paramount's "Jackass Number Two" debuted with $28.1 million, with Focus Features' "Jet Li's Fearless," featuring the martial-arts master in a saga set in China a century ago, opening in second place with $10.6 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

The weekend's other new wide releases debuted weakly, with MGM's World War I tale "Flyboys" opening at No. 4 with $6 million and Sean Penn's political drama "All the King's Men" from Sony premiering at No. 7 with $3.8 million.
 
Overall box office receipts declined for the third-straight weekend, the top-12 movies taking in $81.9 million, down 7 percent from the same period last year. That follows a solid summer for Hollywood, whereas movie attendance began picking up this time last year after a prolonged summer slump.

"After a weak summer last year, we had a fairly strong fall," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "This year, we're seeing a reversal of what happened last year."

Based on the MTV show that featured Knoxville and his gang doing reckless stunts and dares, "Jackass Number Two" outstripped the opening weekend of 2002's "Jackass," which debuted with $22.8 million.

"Jackass Number Two" cost just $11.5 million to make and took in slightly more than that on Friday alone. Males accounted for two-thirds of the movie's audience, with 71 percent of the crowd younger than 25, according to Paramount.

Van Toffler, president of MTV's music and film group, said Knoxville and his "Jackass" cohorts were elated by the sequel's success.

"I think it was, 'Holy blank, we've done it again. What is wrong with the country?'" Toffler said.

"All the King's Men" stars Penn as a Southern demagogue inspired by Louisiana political kingpin Huey Long in a new adaptation of Robert Penn Warren's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. The film co-stars Jude Law, Kate Winslet, Anthony Hopkins, James Gandolfini and Patricia Clarkson.

Sony originally scheduled "All the King's Men" for release last December amid Academy Awards season but postponed it. Studio executives said the filmmakers would have had to rush to finish the film.

The extra time did not help the film, which generally was trashed by critics, with some reviewers calling Penn's flamboyant performance too over-the-top.

With such a luminous cast and pedigree (the 1949 version of "All the King's Men" won the best-picture Oscar and best-actor prize for Broderick Crawford), what went wrong with the new adaptation?

"I'm not sure," said Rory Bruer, head of distribution for Sony. "It's a movie that we love and believe in, and we hoped that it would perform better."

Warner Independent's whimsical fantasy "The Science of Sleep" opened strongly in limited release with $347,000 in 14 theaters.

Directed by Michel Gondry ("The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind"), "The Science of Sleep" stars Gael Garcia Bernal and Charlotte Gainsbourg in the story of a young man whose weird dream life spills over into his waking world. The film expands to about 200 theaters this Friday.

1. "Jackass Number Two," $28.1 million.
2. "Jet Li's Fearless," $10.6 million.
3. "Gridiron Gang," $9.7 million.
4. "Flyboys," $6 million.
5. "Everyone's Hero," $4.75 million.
6. "The Black Dahlia," $4.4 million.
7. "All the King's Men," $3.8 million.
8. "The Covenant," $3.3 million.
9. "The Illusionist," $3.28 million.
10. "Little Miss Sunshine," $2.9 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on September 29, 2006, 09:43:42 PM
Cinema Owner Closes Over 'Jackass 2'

A small-town theater owner says he wasn't trying to send Hollywood a message when he shut down for two weeks rather than show box-office leader "Jackass 2" or other new releases that he calls "drivel."

But even if not purposeful, Greg Boardman's blank-screened protest is getting a thumbs up from moviegoers who long for family fare and jeers from others who say his theaters are one of the few diversions especially for children in this farming town of about 6,000 people.

"They're not appropriate for really anybody, but I sure wouldn't let my kids go into one of them ... Those are his convictions and he needs to stand by them," Steve Lloyd, 59, of nearby Rossville said of offerings such as "Beerfest" and the "Jackass" sequel that briefly landed a "Closed" sign on the marquee outside Boardman's Lorraine Theatre.

"Jackass" features Johnny Knoxville and his gang performing crazy stunts often involving self-inflicted pain; "Beerfest" revolves around fictional siblings who participate in an Olympics-style drinking competition.

The 84-year-old, 500-seat Lorraine in downtown Hoopeston reopened Friday, showing Disney's football biopic "Invincible," while an 85-seat sister theater down the street relit its screen with Sony's animated kids movie "Open Season."

Hoopeston native P.J. Clingenpeel said the projectors should never have been turned off in the first place. He said the two-week shutdown only hurt children in this town where Boardman's movie houses and a skating rink are about all they have to do outside of school and sports.

"All he did was ruin a lot of kids' weekends. That's why I think he's a crybaby," said Clingenpeel, a 30-year-old welder.

Boardman says he's sorry that darkened screens cut into the town's limited entertainment options. But he says he'll shut down again if faced with a similar batch of films, adding that contractual issues with the studios such as guarantees on first-week receipts sometimes limit his options.

"The movies are so bad and I don't need the money ... I just didn't think I should use my high-quality facilities to show people vomiting on screen," said Boardman, whose theaters boast a high-tech, eight-channel digital sound system.

Boardman grew up near Hoopeston but now runs his theaters from his home near Fresno, Calif. He says shutting down the theaters was based strictly on his personal standards, not censorship or an effort to shelter people in the small town.

Over the years, his theaters have screened controversial films such as "Brokeback Mountain" and plenty of action movies, he said. And during the shutdown, the Lorraine's customer hot line told callers they could catch "Jackass 2" at theaters in nearby Danville.

"There are enough theaters carrying movies like "Jackass" that if people want to see them they can. ... The problem now is that there are too few good movies, movies that transplant you to another place," Boardman said in a telephone interview.

Yvonne Green, who manages the Lorraine, said the shutdown sent a ripple of anxiety through Hoopeston because Boardman has been trying to sell the theaters and many townspeople thought they were closing for good.

Most were understanding when she explained the shutdown was temporary, said Green, who was paid during the two weeks the theaters were closed. She also said she backs Boardman's decision, based on the movies he had to chose from.

"They're just not good. I just don't know how to say it and not say anything nasty," Green said. "They just weren't appropriate for anyone to see."

Paramount Pictures, which produced the "Jackass" sequel, did not immediately return a call for comment Friday.

Boardman said the shutdown wasn't a veiled message to moviemakers and he doubts studios will take notice, despite national media attention that followed the temporary closing.

"I think I'm way too small to make any kind of statement to Hollywood," Boardman said.

His supporters around Hoopeston agree, though some still held onto a glimmer of hope.

"I think it was a good idea to close until he had something worth seeing," said Myra Goodrum, 51, a bus driver for Hoopeston schools. "If they made more good movies, more families would go. But I doubt Hollywood's going to notice us. We're just kind of a hole in the wall."
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pubrick on September 30, 2006, 02:08:03 AM
whatever, the only statement he's making is that he's an idiot.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: polkablues on September 30, 2006, 02:43:58 AM
His main problem is this whole premise that it's either Jackass or nothing... if he wants to show more worthwhile films, go out and get some worthwhile films to show.  If he really wants to send Hollywood a message, start supporting independents.  Otherwise you're just being a self-righteous prick.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: grand theft sparrow on October 02, 2006, 09:21:16 AM
The 84-year-old, 500-seat Lorraine in downtown Hoopeston reopened Friday, showing Disney's football biopic "Invincible," while an 85-seat sister theater down the street relit its screen with Sony's animated kids movie "Open Season."

So kids, the moral of the story is: if it's stupid and it's rated R, it's vulgar.  If it's stupid and it's rated G, it's $8 for adults and $5 for kids.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on October 08, 2006, 02:07:20 PM
Departed Returns Scorsese to the Top
Source: Box Office Mojo, Edward Douglas
October 8, 2006

The ComingSoon.net Box Office Report has been updated with studio estimates for the weekend. Be sure to check back on Monday for the final figures based on actual box office.

Score one for director Martin Scorsese this weekend, as his latest crime drama The Departed, a remake of the Hong Kong film Infernal Affairs starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, Jack Nicholson and more, topped the weekend box office with an estimated $27 million in 3,017 theatres, an average of just slightly less than $9,000 per theatre.

Its predominantly older male audience was presumably enticed by Scorsese's return to the gangster world of earlier favorites combined with predominantly favorable reviews. It is Scorsese's first #1 opening movie since the 1991 remake of Cape Fear, which was also Scorsese's highest opening movie with just $10.2 million in 924 theatres. The Departed made more than that amount on Saturday alone, and based on estimates, it's the #8 highest opening October movie, though it will have some heavy competition in coming weeks if it hopes to cross the $100 million mark like Scorsese's last movie The Aviator.

Even with the huge amount of business for Scorsese's latest, the other two new wide releases also did well, making this the first weekend in two months where three new movies in wide release each made over $10 million. The weekend also was up 20% from the same weekend in October last year when five new movies opened, but only Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit made more than $15 million.

The Departed's prime competition came from The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning, a sequel to the 2003 horror remake starring Jordana Brewster, which opened with approximately $19.1 million, compared to the $28 million opening of the original movie.

In third place, Sony's animated family comedy Open Season, featuring the voices of Martin Lawrence and Ashton Kutcher, took advantage of the lack of other family movies, adding another $16 million to its gross of $44.1 million. With many schools taking off Monday for Columbus Day, it only dropped 32% from its #1 opening weekend.

Opening in fourth place, Dane Cook and Jessica Simpson teamed up for the Lionsgate comedy Employee of the Month, which made a respectable $11.8 million in its debut, an average of $4,575 in 2,579 theatres.

The Kevin Costner-Ashton Kutcher Coast Guard drama The Guardian dropped down to #5 with a second weekend take of $9.6 million. So far, it has grossed $32.3 million.

Paramount-MTV Films' Jackass Number Two took a bigger tumble in its third weekend, making $6.4 million to bring its total to $62.7 million. It should pass the total box office gross of the original movie sometime this week.

MGM/Dimension Films' comedy School for Scoundrels took a nasty 60% plunge from its opening to 7th place, bringing in $3.4 million for a total of $14 million.

The Rock's football drama Gridiron Gang ended up at #8 with $2.3 million and a box office total of $36.6 million and Jet Li's Fearless fell just below with $2.2 million.

The period mystery The Illusionist, starring Edward Norton, Paul Giamatti and Jessica Biel, continues to do well, adding another $1.8 million in its 6th consecutive week in the Top 10. In two months of release, it has grossed over $34 million, and it's a definite hit for fledgling distributor, Yari Film Group.

Samuel Goldwyn Films' football drama Facing the Giants lost 20 theatres but added another $979 thousand, a 27% drop, to bring its total to $2.7 million. Not bad for a movie that only cost $100 thousand.

The Top 12 was rounded off with the hit Fox Searchlight comedy Little Miss Sunshine and Roland Emmerich's WWI epic Flyboys with $1.3 million and $1 million respectively.

John Cameron Mitchell's controversial sex-drama Shortbus, released by THINKFilm without a rating due to its graphic real sex, took in $121 thousand in just six theatres, a respectable average per theatre of $20 thousand.

Opening in one less theatre, Todd Field's drama Little Children, starring Kate Winslet and Patrick Wilson, made $108 thousand its opening weekend.

Last week's royal duo, The Queen starring Helen Mirren and The Last King of Scotland with Forest Whitaker, each added theatres with the former making $400 thousand in 11 theatres and the latter adding $300 thousand in 30. Both films were written by Peter Morgan.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on October 15, 2006, 09:06:03 PM
'Grudge 2' Scares Up $22M at Box Office

Early Halloween spirit gripped movie audiences as the fright flick "The Grudge 2" debuted at No. 1, taking in $22 million during its first weekend.

Sony's horror sequel bumped the previous weekend's top film, the Warner Bros. release "The Departed," to second place. "The Departed," a mob epic from Martin Scorsese, took in $18.7 million, lifting its 10-day total to $56.6 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Universal's "Man of the Year," with Robin Williams as a political comic who's elected president, opened at No. 3 with $12.55 million.

Sarah Michelle Gellar, who starred in the 2004 hit "The Grudge," returns for a cameo in the sequel, which features Amber Tamblyn as her sister, haunted by the same angry spirits introduced in the first movie.

"The Grudge 2" was not screened for critics beforehand, and those who did review it on opening day generally trashed the movie. Fright flicks tend to have a built-in audience of horror fans who show up opening weekend regardless of reviews.

"These movies are not critics' darlings. They rarely are," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "But audiences love horror. We've said it time and again, this is maybe the most consistently performing genre in the marketplace, especially right before Halloween."

With a strong hold from its opening weekend, "The Departed" is on its way to becoming Scorsese's biggest hit. The film is expected to surpass the $102.6 million gross of his 2004 drama "The Aviator" said Dan Fellman head of distribution for Warner Bros.

Two other new movies debuted in the top 10. The 20th Century Fox action thriller "The Marine," starring pro wrestler John Cena, was No. 6 with $7 million. "One Night With the King," Gener8xion Entertainment's saga of the biblical story of Esther, came in at No. 9 with $4.3 million.

The overall box office soared, with the top 12 movies taking in $100.8 million, up 41 percent from the same weekend last year, when "The Fog" debuted at No. 1 with $11.8 million.

In narrower release, Warner Independent's Truman Capote tale "Infamous" opened weakly with $435,000 in 179 theaters. The film averaged just $2,430 a cinema, compared to an average of $6,851 in 3,211 theaters for "The Grudge 2."

The movie, starring British actor Toby Jones as Capote on his quest to write the true-crime classic "In Cold Blood," received good reviews but was lost in the wake of last year's acclaimed "Capote," which covered the same period in the author's life and earned the best-actor Academy Award for Philip Seymour Hoffman.

"Unfortunately, the audience couldn't differentiate between the two," said Steven Friedlander, head of distribution for Warner Independent. "We're hoping if this one doesn't pick up theatrically, it can find a really solid video life so people can compare the two films."

1. "The Grudge 2," $22 million.
2. "The Departed," $18.7 million.
3. "Man of the Year," $12.55 million.
4. "Open Season," $11 million.
5. "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning," $7.75 million.
6. "The Marine," $7 million.
7. "The Guardian" $5.85 million.
8. "Employee of the Month," $5.6 million.
9. "One Night With the King," $4.3 million.
10. "Jackass Number Two," $3.3 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on October 22, 2006, 02:28:12 PM
'Prestige' Conjures $14.8M at Box Office

The magic act "The Prestige" debuted as the weekend's No. 1 movie with $14.8 million, outperforming Clint Eastwood's World War II saga, which opened at No. 3 with $10.2 million.

Holding strong in second place was Martin Scorsese's "The Departed," which took in $13.7 million and raised its three-week total to $77.1 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

The previous weekend's No. 1 movie, Sony's horror sequel "The Grudge 2," tumbled to fifth-place with $7.7 million, lifting its 10-day total to $31.4 million.

Box-office analysts had viewed the weekend as a three-way race among well-reviewed films: Disney's "The Prestige," starring Hugh Jackman and Christian Bale as rival magicians in a blood feud; Paramount's "Flags of Our Fathers," dramatizing the Iwo Jima invasion; and the Warner Bros. mob tale "The Departed."

"I'm not surprised that we won the weekend," said Chuck Viane, head of distribution for Disney. "It's just when everybody has such quality films as `Flags' and `Prestige' and `Departed,' that's a great crowd to be running in."

"The Prestige" debuted in 2,281 theaters, 400 more than "Flags." "The Departed" is playing wider, in 3,005 cinemas.

With 70 percent of its viewers under 35, "The Prestige" drew a younger crowd that tends to turn out in bigger numbers over opening weekend. Eighty percent of the audience for "Flags" was older than 30.

"We felt the movie was going to play to the older crowd. It takes time usually for that group to show up," said Jim Tharp, head of distribution for Paramount.

Among other new movies, 20th Century Fox's family film "Flicka" tied "The Grudge 2" for No. 5 with $7.7 million. Based on the children's book "My Friend Flicka," the movie stars Alison Lohman as a teen who adopts a wild mustang.

Sony's "Marie Antoinette," with Kirsten Dunst in director Sofia Coppola's chronicle of the 18th century queen beheaded during the French Revolution, premiered at No. 8 with $5.3 million.

The 1993 animated tale "Tim Burton's the Nightmare Before Christmas" returned to theaters in a three-dimensional version and rang up a strong $3.3 million in limited release of 168 theaters.

"Running With Scissors," featuring Joseph Cross, Annette Bening and Alec Baldwin in an adaptation of Augusten Burroughs' best-seller, opened strongly with $225,000 in eight theaters.

"The Prestige" pits two big-screen superheroes against each other, "Batman Begins" star Bale vs. Jackman, who plays Wolverine in the "X-Men" flicks. The film reunited Bale with his "Batman Begins" director, Christopher Nolan.

"Flags of Our Fathers" lacked that star power, its ensemble cast led by Ryan Phillippe, Adam Beach and Jesse Bradford.

Eastwood's last two movies, 2003's crime drama "Mystic River" and 2004's Academy Awards champ "Million Dollar Baby," both debuted in a handful of theaters. The debut for "Flags of Our Fathers" was in line with the first wide-release weekends for those films, $10.4 million for "Mystic River" and $12.3 million for "Million Dollar Baby."

"I don't think it was a movie that was destined to make a huge opening-weekend splash," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations. "`Flags' is a film that definitely has more appeal to older audiences, so I think over time, it'll do well."

1. "The Prestige," $14.8 million.
2. "The Departed," $13.7 million.
3. "Flags of Our Fathers," $10.2 million.
4. "Open Season," $8 million.
5 (tie). "Flicka," $7.7 million.
5 (tie). "The Grudge 2," $7.7 million.
7. "Man of the Year," $7 million.
8. "Marie Antoinette," $5.3 million.
9. "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning," $3.9 million.
10. "The Marine," $3.7 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pubrick on October 23, 2006, 07:15:29 AM
"`Flags' is a film that definitely has more appeal to older audiences, so I think over time, it'll do well."
cos everyone will get older? i don't get it. does a film that appeals to young children do better in reverse time? i think i'm missing a crucial bit of his logic here.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on October 29, 2006, 03:35:43 PM
'Saw III' Takes $34.3M Cut at Box Office

Halloween came early at movie theaters as "Saw III" sliced up the competition with a $34.3 million debut, the best opening yet for the gory horror franchise. Lionsgate's "Saw III" easily took over as No. 1 at the box office, bumping off Disney's dueling-magicians saga "The Prestige," which slipped to third place with $9.6 million, according to studio estimates Sunday. "The Prestige" raised its 10-day total to $28.8 million.

Martin Scorsese's mob tale "The Departed" held strongly again, taking in $9.8 million to place second for the third-straight weekend. The Warner Bros. film lifted its total to $91.1 million.

Revenues for "The Departed" were down just 27 percent from the previous weekend, compared to 35 percent for "The Prestige" and 38 percent for Clint Eastwood's World War II epic "Flags of Our Fathers," which was No. 4 with $6.35 million.

Paramount's "Flags of Our Fathers," which cost $90 million to produce, has gotten off to a slow start, raising its 10-day total to $19.9 million. The acclaimed film still could follow the pattern of Eastwood's last two movies, "Mystic River" and "Million Dollar Baby," which became hits on the strength of Academy Awards buzz.

Focus Features' South African drama "Catch a Fire" premiered weakly with $2 million in 1,306 theaters, averaging $1,541, compared to $10,830 in 3,167 cinemas for "Saw III."

"Catch a Fire" stars Derek Luke and Tim Robbins in the story of a black family man driven to rebel against South Africa's apartheid system in the 1980s.

The far-flung drama "Babel," whose ensemble cast includes Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett, had a huge opening in limited release, grossing $365,801 in seven theaters. The film traces the consequences of a tragedy in the desert on families in Africa, Mexico and Japan.

Distributor Paramount Vantage plans to open "Babel" nationwide on Nov. 10.

The Dixie Chicks documentary "Shut Up & Sing" debuted solidly in limited release, taking in $50,798 in four theaters. Released by the Weinstein Co., the film explores the furor after lead singer, Natalie Maines, told a London concert crowd on the eve of the Iraq war in 2003 that the music trio was ashamed President Bush was from Texas, their home state.

Hollywood remained on a box-office roll, with business up for the fifth straight weekend. The top 12 movies took in $89.1 million, up 2.4 percent from the same weekend last year, when "Saw II" opened at No. 1 with $31.7 million.

Since the low-budget "Saw" debuted with $18.3 million over the same weekend two years ago, Lionsgate has turned the franchise into an annual ritual with quickly produced sequels each Halloween.

The movies follow the diabolical schemes of psycho killer Jigsaw (Tobin Bell), who stages elaborate, bloody games to test the moral fiber of his victims. Lionsgate plans to have "Saw IV" in theaters over Halloween weekend next year.

"It's the biggest no-brainer of the century to put these movies out on Halloween weekend and wait for the money to roll in," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Exhibitor Relations.

1. "Saw III," $34.3 million.
2. "The Departed," $9.8 million.
3. "The Prestige," $9.6 million.
4. "Flags of Our Fathers," $6.35 million.
5. "Open Season," $6.1 million.
6. "Flicka," $5 million
7. "Man of the Year," $4.7 million.
8. "The Grudge 2," $3.3 million.
9. "Marie Antoinette," $2.85 million.
10. "Running With Scissors," $2.55 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on November 05, 2006, 04:33:20 PM
Borat: Bigger Than Santa Clause!
Source: Box Office Mojo

The ComingSoon.net Box Office Report has been updated with studio estimates for the weekend. Be sure to check back on Monday for the final figures based on actual box office.

This weekend, the guy bringing presents wasn't wearing a red suit, he was wearing a gray one, as Sacha Baron Cohen's acclaimed comedy Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan took on two new family films for a surprising victory as the king of the box office with an estimated opening weekend take of $26.4 million!

That amount wouldn't be nearly as impressive, if not for the fact that the comedy opened in almost a third as many theatres as the other two new wide releases, after a controversial decision by distributor 20th Century Fox to cut back its opening weekend release to 837 theatres. As of Friday, it looked like "Borat" would surpass Michael Moore's 2004 documentary Fahrenheit 9/11 as the highest per theatre average for a film opening wide in less than 1,000 theatres. Actually, "Borat's" stunning per-theatre average of $31,511 (estimated) is the third highest per theatre average for a wide release EVER, just behind the summer hit Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest and the original Spider-Man. It averaged more per theatre than Star Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith just to give some idea how huge this movie is. 20th Century Fox plans on expanding the movie into over 2,200 theatres next weekend, although after such a huge opening, one can expect that number will increase by Friday.

Settling for second place, the Disney threequel The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause, once again starring Tim Allen, grossed an estimated $20 million in 3,458 theatres, $9 million less than The Santa Clause 2 earned in the same weekend four years ago.

Part of that reduced opening might be blamed on its competition for the family market, DreamWorks' Flushed Away, the first computer animated comedy from England's Aardman Studios, featuring the voices of Hugh Jackman and Kate Winslet. Continuing this year's declining trend for the CG animated genre, it only grossed $19 million despite its ultra-wide release into over 3,700 theaters. That may be a disappointing opening for a DreamWorks animated film, but it's slightly higher than the opening for Chicken Run in 2000 and quite a bit higher than the opening of Aardman's 2005 offering Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit.

As far as the returning movies, last week's Lionsgate #1, Saw III, dropped nearly 54% to make $15.5 million in its sophomore slot, bringing its total gross to $60 milion, while dropping to fourth place.

Both Martin Scorsese's crime drama The Departed and Christopher Nolan's period mystery The Prestige had neglible drops of less than 20%, though The Departed ended up just slightly ahead for fifth place with $8 million to The Prestige's $7.8 million. This weekend, Scorsese's critical and commercial success crossed the $100 million mark on its way to passing The Aviator as his highest grossing film ever; The Prestige has accumulated $39 million to date.

Clint Eastwood's WWII drama Flags of Our Fathers continued to add theatres, as it dropped three more places to #7 with $4.5 million. So far, the $90 million movie has only taken in $26.6 million domestically.

At #8, Universal's political comedy Man of the Year, starring Robin Williams, brought in $3.8 million to take its own total to $34 million.

With two new family films, Sony's computer-animated comedy Open Season took its biggest hit, dropping 47%, but adding another $3.1 million to its total gross of $81.4 million.

Miramax's The Queen, starring Helen Mirren, entered the Top 10 for the first time, earning $3 million in 387 theatres. The Oscar-ready movie has grossed $10 million to date.

Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette, starring Kirsten Dunst, rounded out the Top 12 with $2.3 million.

After its platform debut last weekend, Alejandro Gonzalez Iñarittu's global drama Babel, starring Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett, added 28 theatres, grossing $918 thousand in its second weekend. On Friday, it expands nationwide into over 1,000 theatres.

Opening in five theatres in New York and L.A., Pedro Almodóvar's Volver, which reunited the Spanish director with Penélope Cruz and Carmen Maura, grossed $202 thousand, an average of $40 thousand per site. It's the filmmaker's biggest first weekend, although it also opened in twice as many theatres as his last two films.

Click here for the full box office estimates of the top 12 films.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on November 12, 2006, 01:50:49 PM
'Borat' banks $29 mil to stay on top of b.o.

A make-believe son of the glorious nation of Kazakhstan continues to rule the American boxoffice.

Sacha Baron Cohen's "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan" took in $29 million to remain the No. 1 movie for a second-straight weekend, distributor 20th Century Fox said Sunday. "Borat" raised its 10-day total to $67.8 million.

The top three movies remained unchanged from the previous weekend, with Disney's "The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause" still in second place with $16.9 million and the Paramount-DreamWorks animated tale "Flushed Away" in third with $16.7 million.

None of the new wide releases could climb past the holdover movies. Sony's Will Ferrell comedy "Stranger Than Fiction" debuted as the best of newcomers, placing fourth with $14.1 million. Ferrell plays a meek tax auditor suddenly able to hear the voice of a narrator (Emma Thompson) chronicling his life and impending death.

While 20th Century Fox could crow about "Borat," the studio's Russell Crowe-Ridley Scott reunion "A Good Year" flopped, coming in at No. 10 with $3.8 million. "A Good Year" was a departure for the star and director of "Gladiator," a soft romance with Crowe as a London investment shark seduced by the laid-back life at a French vineyard he inherits.

The movie generally was panned by critics, and audiences apparently were not willing to accept actor Crowe in a romantic lead, said Bruce Snyder, head of distribution for 20th Century Fox.

Audiences were willing to accept Cohen as Borat, the Kazakh TV journalist he originated on "Da Ali G Show," who jumps to the big screen in a mock documentary about his journey across America.

Crudely funny and raucously satiric, "Borat" was a surprise winner at the boxoffice with a $26.5 million opening weekend, though it played in only 837 theaters, fewer than one-fourth the number of cinemas for "The Santa Clause 3" and "Flushed Away."

Some boxoffice analysts had questioned whether 20th Century Fox missed the boat by launching "Borat" in so few theaters, saying the movie could have rung up millions more on opening weekend if it had gone wider.

But Snyder said the buzz from the movie's huge debut proved a great prelude to a wider release over the second weekend, when it expanded to 2,566 theaters.

"When a picture takes off like this, you can do it anyway you want and you can't screw it up, quite honestly, when a picture becomes a part of the culture like this," Snyder said.

Expanding nationwide after two weekends in limited release, Paramount Vantage's drama "Babel" was No. 6 with $5.65 million. With an ensemble cast that includes Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett, "Babel" traces the repercussions of a shooting in the African desert on families around the globe.

Sarah Michelle Gellar's supernatural thriller "The Return" opened weakly with $4.8 million to come in at No. 8. Released by Focus Features, the movie was not screened beforehand for critics, generally a sign the distributor expects bad reviews.

MGM's "Harsh Times," a gritty street drama starring Christian Bale and Freddy Rodriguez, also had a poor debut of $1.8 million, finishing out of the top 10.

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Exhibitor Relations Co. Inc. Final figures will be released Monday.

1. "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan," $29 million.
2. "The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause," $16.9 million.
3. "Flushed Away," $16.7 million.
4. "Stranger Than Fiction," $14.1 million.
5. "Saw III," $6.6 million.
6. "Babel," $5.65 million.
7. "The Departed," $5.2 million.
8. "The Return," $4.8 million.
9. "The Prestige," $4.6 million.
10. "A Good Year," $3.8 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pubrick on November 13, 2006, 03:51:59 AM
Some boxoffice analysts had questioned whether 20th Century Fox missed the boat by launching "Borat" in so few theaters, saying the movie could have rung up millions more on opening weekend if it had gone wider.

But Snyder said the buzz from the movie's huge debut proved a great prelude to a wider release over the second weekend, when it expanded to 2,566 theaters.
Snyder you idiot, not only would the film have still had that buzz, it would have resulted in an even bigger opening AND second weekend.

Sarah Michelle Gellar's supernatural thriller "The Return" opened weakly with $4.8 million to come in at No. 8.
GOOD
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on November 19, 2006, 05:50:50 PM
Birds Beat Bond in Bitter Box Office Battle!
Source: Box Office Mojo, Edward Douglas November 19, 2006

Actor Daniel Craig may do a lot of running around as the latest James Bond in Casino Royale, but that didn't help the highly-publicized franchise relaunch stay atop the fancy footwork of Warner Bros' dancing penguin movie Happy Feet, as it eeked out a win for the golden #1 spot, according to Sunday morning estimates. The George (Babe) Miller directed computer-animated musical comedy-adventure grossed an estimated $42.3 million in three days compared to Sony's first James Bond movie, which took in $40.6 million after opening $3 million ahead of the penguins on Friday. (Note: Other sources have the amounts earned by the two movies to be much closer, within a few hundred thousand dollars.) Both movies averaged over $11 thousand per theatre, although Happy Feet had the clear advantage having opened in 400 more theatres.

Only once before have two movies opened over $40 million, that being Memorial Day weekend 2005, though once actual box office receipts are counted, this could end up being one of the tightest box office battles between two movies since the legendary face-off between Steven Spielberg's Minority Report and Disney's Lilo & Stitch in 2002.

Meanwhile, 20th Century Fox's comedy Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan, starring Sacha Baron Cohen, dropped down to third place with $14.3 million, having grossed $90.5 million after three weekends.

The two family films already in theatres moved aside to make way for the new animated movie, as Disney's The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause and DreamWorks' Flushed Away dropped 51% and 59% respectively from Veterans' Day weekend. The Tim Allen holiday comedy crossed $50 million over the weekend with an additional $8.2 million for fifth place, while the animated movie is close behind with an additional $6.8 million in fifth place.

The Will Ferrell comedy Stranger Than Fiction also fell over 50%, dropping to #6 with $6.8 million to bring its total to $22.9 million, while Alejandro Gonzalez Iñarittu's global drama Babel, starring Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett, earned $2.9 million in its second weekend of wide release to bring its total to $12 million.

Lionsgate's Saw III took another hit in its fourth weekend, earning $2.8 million after losing nearly 1,000 theatres, to end up with $74.8 million after four weeks.

Still holding a spot in the Top 10 after seven weeks, Martin Scorsese's The Departed grossed an additional $2.6 million with a total box office gross of $113.8 million.

In one of the most inventive ideas of the year, indie horror distributor After Dark teamed with Lionsgate to release 8 horror films into 488 theatres for one weekend only, and the resulting After Dark Horrorfest resulted in a cumulative $2.5 million for the weekend, enough to get into the Top 10.

Miramax's The Queen, starring Helen Mirren, added 122 theatres and an additional $2.3 million to its gross of $17.2 million, moving up one spot to #11.

The only other new movie in wide release, Bob Odenkirk's Universal-distributed comedy Let's Go To Prison barely made a mark, rounding out the top 12 with $2.1 million in 1,495 theatres.

Opening in limited release, Christopher Guest's For Your Consideration grossed roughly $394 thousand in 23 theatres in select cities, while Richard Linklater's Fast Food Nation, based on the best-selling non-fiction book, barely made that amount in 321 theatres nationwide, averaging a pitiful $1,200 per theatre.

Emilio Estevez's star-studded drama Bobby opened in a single theatre in New York and L.A.to bring in $67 thousand its first weekend before expanding nationwide on Thanksgiving Day.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on November 26, 2006, 04:11:12 PM
Happy Feet & Casino Royale Have Turkey Legs
Source: Box Office Mojo November 26, 2006

The ComingSoon.net Box Office Report has been updated with studio estimates for the weekend. Be sure to check back on Monday for the final figures based on actual box office.

Newcomers were no competition for Happy Feet and Casino Royale over the five-day Thanksgiving holiday weekend, as the two hits remained firmly in first and second, respectively.

Warner Bros. Pictures' animated Happy Feet reached the $100 million mark after just 10 days. The $100 million-budgeted film earned $39.9 million from Friday to Sunday, while making $51.5 million during the five days, for a total of $100.1 milllion so far.

Casino Royale collected $45.1 million in five days, and $31 million in the three-day portion. With a total of $94.2 million after 10 days, the 21st James Bond installment will likely become the highest-grossing 007 film in the franchise's history. It cost about $150 million to make.

Out of the newcomers, Touchstone Pictures' Déjà Vu fared best with an estimated $29 million from 3,108 theaters over the five days, and $20.8 million in three. Produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, directed by Tony Scott and starring Denzel Washington, the thriller averaged $6,703 per location.

Fox's holiday comedy Deck the Halls, starring Danny DeVito and Matthew Broderick, debuted in fourth with $16.9 million for the five days and $12 million in three. The film played in 3,205 theaters.

Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan dropped two spots to fifth, adding $10.4 million from Friday to Sunday for an impressive total of $109.3 million after four weeks. The Sacha Baron Cohen comedy cost only $18 million to make.

What's become the norm for the "Santa Clause" franchise, The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause increased its sales over the Thanksgiving holiday and was up 20.6% from last weekend. The Tim Allen comedy made $10 million over the three day frame for a four-week total of $67.2 million.

Moviegoers didn't show much interest in the other two new wide releases. Darren Aronofsky's The Fountain, starring Hugh Jackman and Rachel Weisz, earned just $5.4 million over the five days from 1,472 theaters, and New Line's Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny, featuring Jack Black and Kyle Gass, opened outside of the top 10 with $5.2 million in five days from 1,919 locations.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pubrick on November 27, 2006, 07:04:33 AM
i wish i had $5.4million  :(
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on December 11, 2006, 12:25:17 AM
Gibson Delivers Another Box Office Win

Mel Gibson's bloody epic "Apocalypto" debuted as the No. 1 weekend movie, proving the filmmaker still can deliver a winner despite his drunken-driving arrest and anti-Semitic rant last summer.

"Apocalypto," a Disney release set in the Mayan civilization and told in an obscure Mayan language, opened with $14.2 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

It was a modest haul compared to the $83.8 million opening weekend of Gibson's last movie, the 2004 religious blockbuster "The Passion of the Christ," which went on to do $370 million domestically.

But "Apocalypto" overcame the baggage of Gibson's personal troubles as well as its difficult subject matter, which features a no-name cast in a hyper-violent tale that includes beheadings and images of hearts ripped from people's chests.

"The movie obviously succeeds on its own level. I think people probably are a bit on the surprised side around town that it's No. 1," said Chuck Viane, head of distribution for Disney. "Two months ago, nobody would have bet on that."

Sony's romance "The Holiday" debuted at No. 2 with $13.5 million. Directed by Nancy Meyers, the movie stars Cameron Diaz, Kate Winslet, Jack Black and Jude Law in the story of American and British women who swap homes for the holidays and find love in the process.

The Warner Bros. thriller "Blood Diamond," starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Jennifer Connelly and Djimon Hounsou, opened at No. 5 with $8.5 million. Set against Sierra Leone's civil war in the 1990s, the film follows a mercenary pursuing a rare diamond.

Also from Warner Bros., the holiday comedy "Unaccompanied Minors," about a group of kids run amok while stranded at an airport Christmas Eve, premiered at No. 6 with $6.2 million.

The Warner Bros. animated hit "Happy Feet" and Sony's James Bond adventure "Casino Royale," which had been the top-two movies for three-straight weekends, slipped to Nos. 3 and 4, respectively.

"Happy Feet" took in $12.7 million, raising its total to $137.7 million. "Casino Royale" grossed $8.8 million, lifting its total to $128.9 million.

The overall box office fell sharply, with the top-12 movies grossing $86.8 million, down 25 percent from the same weekend last year, when the blockbuster "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" opened with $65.6 million.

Disney reported that Gibson's "Apocalypto" drew solid crowds across-the-board, with movie-goers equally split between men and women and the core of the audience ranging from 18 to 45.

The publicity over Gibson's problems and his contriteness since last summer may have stoked interested in "Apocalypto," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Media By Numbers.

"Whenever I tell people I saw the movie, they'd be like, `You saw it? How was it?' There was a huge curiosity factor," Dergarabedian said. "A movie about Mayan civilization was never destined to be a big hit, let alone a No. 1 movie. But through Disney's marketing, which highlights Mel Gibson I believe they associated him very closely with the movie I think that strategy paid off." 

1. "Apocalypto," $14.2 million.
2. "The Holiday," $13.5 million.
3. "Happy Feet," $12.7 million.
4. "Casino Royale," $8.8 million.
5. "Blood Diamond," $8.5 million.
6. "Unaccompanied Minors," $6.2 million.
7. "Deja Vu," $6.1 million.
8. "The Nativity Story," $5.6 million.
9. "Deck the Halls," $3.9 million.
10. "The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause," $3.3 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on December 18, 2006, 11:46:13 AM
'Happyness' Pays Off at Box Office

Not even a dragon or the world's most-beloved spider could deny Will Smith another first-place finish at the box office.

Sony's father-son drama "The Pursuit of Happyness," starring Smith and his own son, Jaden Christopher Syre Smith, debuted as the No. 1 movie with $27 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Smith's latest topped 20th Century Fox's dragon fantasy "Eragon," which opened in second place with $23.45 million, and Paramount's children's tale "Charlotte's Web," which premiered a distant third with $12 million. 
 
The previous weekend's No. 1 movie, Mel Gibson's Mayan saga "Apocalypto," fell to sixth place with $7.7 million, raising its 10-day total to $27.9 million.

The story of a struggling dad who becomes homeless along with his young son, "Pursuit of Happyness" joins a long line of No. 1 openings for Smith, including the action tales "Independence Day" and "I, Robot."

"Audiences around the world love him," said Rory Bruer, head of distribution at Sony, whose past hits with Smith include the "Men in Black" flicks and last year's romantic comedy "Hitch."

"Everyone who sees Will Smith or meets Will Smith feels like he could be their best friend," Bruer said. "He has that type of charisma that resonates throughout whatever room he's in."

Combining live action and computer animation, "Charlotte's Web" had a soft opening despite an all-star voice cast including Julia Roberts, Robert Redford and Oprah Winfrey in E.B. White's classic about a spider that befriends a lonely pig.

Don Harris, executive vice president of distribution at Paramount, said the studio hopes "Charlotte's Web" will follow the pattern of other pre-Christmas family releases such as "Stuart Little" and "The Prince of Egypt" which opened in the same range but held on through the holidays to become hits.

"The movie has every chance to get to $100 million off of this opening," Harris said.

Paramount's musical "Dreamgirls," starring Jamie Foxx, Beyonce Knowles, Eddie Murphy and Jennifer Hudson in an adaptation of the stage hit, opened to big numbers at three theaters in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Premiering with reserved seating and special programs at a premium ticket price of $25, the film took in $360,000, a healthy start to its nationwide release on Christmas.

George Clooney and Steven Soderbergh's latest collaboration, "The Good German," debuted solidly with $78,572 at five theaters. Clooney stars with Cate Blanchett and Tobey Maguire in a black-and-white tale of murder and intrigue in Berlin just after World War II.

Overall business was off, with the top 12 movies taking in $112.3 million, down 8.3 percent compared to the same weekend last year, when two blockbusters "King Kong" and "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" were Nos. 1 and 2.

This weekend's holdover films retained strong audiences, though, a sign that many current movies may have a long shelf life, said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Media By Numbers.

"It's hard to say this is a positive thing that this is a down weekend. But the strength of this weekend has been the holdovers," Dergarabedian said. "There is a lot of depth to the marketplace. It's a direct reflection of audience satisfaction. That's more important I think than beating last year's competition." 

1. "The Pursuit of Happyness," $27 million.
2. "Eragon," $23.45 million.
3. "Charlotte's Web," $12 million.
4. "Happy Feet," $8.5 million.
5. "The Holiday," $8.2 million.
6. "Apocalypto," $7.7 million.
7. "Blood Diamond," $6.3 million.
8. "Casino Royale," $5.7 million.
9. "The Nativity Story," $4.7 million.
10. "Unaccompanied Minors," $3.7 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on January 06, 2007, 11:47:49 PM
Online 'Zyzzyx' gate
Low grosser gets attention through Net buzz
Source: Variety
 
Anyone wondering how to drum up buzz for a film that sells a grand total of six tickets should consider the case of "Zyzzyx Road."

The film grossed $30 in a week-long stint in one Dallas theater, the lowest tally of any pic since modern record-keeping began in the 1980s. The stunningly feeble gross figure was first noted Dec. 31 by online film site Chud, following a reader's tip. A Daily Variety story followed and the online crowd started weighing in -- getting the film much more attention than it got in theaters.

Leo Grillo, who exec produced and starred in the film along with Tom Sizemore and Katherine Heigl, called Daily Variety on Jan. 5, in the wake of the online buzz. He admitted, "We definitely set the world record for box-office futility. Six people bought tickets at five dollars each - and two of them were crew people.'" For a modest fee, he hired the releasing arm of Regent Entertainment, the L.A.-based outfit known for helping back films like "Gods and Monsters" as well as producing film and TV content, to distribute for a week to satisfy Screen Actors Guild rules dictating pay levels. But he neither wanted to four-wall the theater nor have Regent distribute it with any splash, for fear of driving away any interested suitors. "The idea was to stay out of the game entirely and just avoid the guild penalties. We worked with Regent to pick the worst times - 11 a.m. shows in February - and there was no advertising at all."

"I didn't want anyone to have the idea that we had just rented the theater ourselves because you can shoot yourself in the foot as far as getting a domestic deal," he said. Regent also sold the film overseas, where the film has been distributed theatrically and on DVD in several territories.

The $30 tally was mentioned in a Jan. 4 Daily Variety article, which neglected to credit Chud. That throwaway non-mention became an online Zyzzyx-gate. The perception of malicious literary thievery spawned numerous fulminations, initially on Chud but soon linked to by several other entertainment sites eager to decry the establishment's alleged disdain for the Net. Rarely has a low-grosser stirred up so much excitement.

Grillo said he had been out of town during the flurry of Web activity and admitted he doesn't often go online anyway. But when alerted to the stir, he called Variety to set the record straight.

There is, as of yet, no U.S. homevid deal, though surely all of these Internet hits must add up to something. Perhaps Grillo will address the homevid issue when he talks to Chud.com on Saturday, as was promised Friday afternoon on the site.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on March 11, 2007, 01:04:04 PM
300... and 70 Million Dollars!
Source: Box Office Mojo March 11, 2007

The ComingSoon.net Box Office Report has been updated with studio estimates for the weekend. Be sure to check back on Monday for final figures based on actual box office.

Director Zack Snyder's adaptation of Frank Miller's epic graphic novel 300 set a new March record with an estimated opening of $70 million from 3,103 locations. Starring Gerard Butler as King Leonidas who leads the Spartans against the massive Persian army, the movie surpassed previous March record holder Ice Age: The Meltdown, which collected $68 million its first weekend last year. Budgeted in the mid-$60 million range, the Warner Bros. release also marks the third-highest debut ever for an R-rated movie, trailing just The Matrix Reloaded ($91.8 million) and The Passion of The Christ ($83.8 million). It is now also the top opening of 2007 so far, beating Ghost Rider's $45.4 million from February.

Touchstone's Wild Hogs dropped a spot and just 29.4% in ticket sales for an impressive second weekend of $28 million. The comedy, starring Tim Allen, John Travolta, Martin Lawrence and William H. Macy, has reached $77.4 million.

In third, Disney's family fantasy Bridge to Terabithia climbed a spot and added $6.9 million for a total of $67 million after four weeks.

Sony's Ghost Rider, with Nicolas Cage and Eva Mendes, made $6.8 million in its fourth weekend and has earned $104.1 million domestically so far.

David Fincher's crime thriller Zodiac rounded out the top five with $6.77 million. The Paramount film has collected $23.7 million in two weeks.

Jim Carrey's The Number 23 and Eddie Murphy's Norbit took the sixth and seventh spots, earning $4.33 million and $4.31 million, respectively. The former is at $30.5 million after three weeks and the latter at $88.3 million after five weeks.

The only other movie opening in wide release was the Fox Faith drama The Ultimate Gift, which garnered $1.2 million from 797 theaters, good for 13th place.

In limited release, Bong Joon-ho's monster movie The Host took in $320,000 from 71 theaters, an average of $4,507, while Mira Nair's The Namesake earned $251,000 from six theaters, a strong average of $41,833.

1  300 WB $70,030,000 / $70,030,000
2  Wild Hogs BV/Touch $28,021,000 / $77,437,000
3  Bridge to Terabithia Disney $6,865,000 / $67,020,000
4  Ghost Rider Sony $6,800,000 / $104,142,000
5  Zodiac Para. $6,773,000 / $23,727,000
6  The Number 23 New Line $4,330,000 / $30,481,000
7  Norbit P/DW $4,314,000 / $88,331,000
8  Music and Lyrics WB $3,830,000 / $43,847,000
9  Breach Universal $2,611,000 / $29,127,000
10  Amazing Grace IDP $2,525,000 / $11,439,000
11  Black Snake Moan PVan. $1,862,000 / $7,272,000
12  Reno 911!: Miami Fox $1,390,000 / $19,120,000
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pubrick on March 12, 2007, 07:59:44 AM
300... and 70 Million Dollars!
300 set a new March record with an estimated opening of $70 million from 3,103 locations.
...
Budgeted in the mid-$60 million range,
someone already said it in the 300 thread but shit movie or not, this is really great for Watchmen in that it is certainly going to be made soon and he will get to spend as much money as he needs to get it done right (meaning he will shoot as many frames per second as he feels like :yabbse-undecided: ).

Mira Nair's The Namesake earned $251,000 from six theaters, a strong average of $41,833.
that's unbelievable really. those six theatres must all be near thousands of her relatives or something.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on April 08, 2007, 01:08:57 PM
Ferrell & Disney Pull Out Easter Repeat
Source: Box Office Mojo, Edward Douglas
April 8, 2007

The ComingSoon.net Box Office Report has been updated with studio estimates for the weekend. Be sure to check back on Monday for final figures based on actual box office.

Although the Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez B-movie double feature Grindhouse seemed to have the most buzz going into the Easter weekend, there didn't seem to be an audience willing to sit through three plus hours of the filmmakers' tribute to B-exploitation movies, as it failed to dethrone last week's returning movies and a new comedy sequel starring Ice Cube.

Instead, the Will Ferrell-Jon Heder comedy Blades of Glory and Disney's Meet the Robinsons remained on top for a second week in a row. Blades brought in an estimated $23 million over Easter weekend to bring its total to $68.3 million, while Robinsons added roughly $17 million to its box office total of $52.2 million. Each movie dropped rougly 30 - 32% from their opening weekend thanks to the added boost of Good Friday.

The holiday also helped Sony's family comedy sequel Are We Done Yet?, once again starring Ice Cube, to gross just over $19 million in its first five days after opening on Wednesday in 2,877 theatres. Its three-day weekend take of $15 million was 20% less than the original movie Are We There Yet? made in January '05.

Despite an abundance of media coverage, Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez's double feature Grindhouse opened with just $5 million on Friday struggling to $11.5 million over the weekend, less than half what many expected the movie to make based on Tarantino and Rodriguez's past track record. Opening in fourth place, Grindhouse is unlikely to make back its reported $53 million production budget in theatres, at least not in the U.S.


It may have lost some of its R-rated horror business to Dark Castle's horror-thriller The Reaping, starring Hillary Swank, which tied its biblically-influenced premise of plagues striking a small town into the Easter and Passover holidays to make an estimated $10.1 million over the weekend, following its $2 million opening day on Thursday.

Dropping to #6, Zack Snyder's 300 continued to hold up strong over the holiday frame with an additional $8.8 million, bringing its total to $193.9 million. It's very likely to pass the $200 million mark by this time next week.

Touchstone Pictures' Wild Hogs also did well, grossing $6.8 million in seventh place and bringing its own total to $145.4 million.

Dropping to eighth place, the Mark Wahlberg action-thriller Shooter took in $5.8 million over the weekend, a 30% drop from last week, to bring its total to $36.6 million. That was enough for it to pass Warner Bros' computer animated TMNT, which grossed just under $5 million in its third weekend for a total of $46.7 million.

Just squeaking into the Top 10 with a measly $4 million after making $1.2 million on Wednesday and Thursday, the Fox family comedy Firehouse Dog had trouble finding an audience with so many stronger family movie choices.

On Friday, Miramax Films released Lasse Hallström's crime drama The Hoax, starring Richard Gere, into 235 theatres in select cities where it made $1.5 million over the weekend, an average of $6,300 per theatre. It's scheduled to open nationwide on Friday.

Paul Verhoeven's WWII drama Black Book opened on Wednesday in 9 theatres in New York and L.A., and it grossed roughly $145 thousand in its first five days, an average of $13 thousand per theatre for the weekend.

THINKFilm's The TV Set, written and directed by Jake Kasdan ("Freaks and Geeks"), opened in one less theatre in New York and L.A., but only brought in $40 thousand over the three days.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on May 20, 2007, 03:50:14 PM
Hawking everything from Happy Meals to PC's paid off for Shrek the Third this weekend -- big time. The ugly green ogre from Far Far Away came pretty close to beating Spider-Man 3's recent record-breaking opening weekend, hauling in $122 million over three days to became the third top opener of all time. The DreamWorks 'toon ranks only behind Spidey's $151 million debut and Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, which raked in $135 million during its opening weekend last year. It also bested Shrek 2's previous record ($108 million) for best opening ever for an animated film. Despite the lack of any other major studio releases, Hollywood enjoyed another up weekend, its third in a row, with an 11% boost over the same time last year when The Da Vinci Code topped the charts. Box office holdovers averaged about a 40% drop in sales overall, with Spider-Man 3 sliding from the top spot with $28 million, zombie sequel 28 Weeks Later lumbering into third place with $5.1 million, teen thriller Disturbia holding steady at number four with $3.6 million and Georgia Rule rounding out the top five with $3.49 million. Spider-Man's meager take was enough to bring its total to $281 million and is on target to reach the $300 million domestic mark within the week. That is, unless, Shrek stays strong and early screenings of Pirates of the Caribbean: At Worlds End plunders the webslinger's booty.

Up next week: Three is the magic number as the third installment of Pirates of the Caribbean hopes to become the third film this summer to shatter box-office records.

Sunday estimates for the weekend box office of May 18-20:


Shrek 3 ($122M)
Spider-Man 3 ($28M)
28 Weeks Later ($5.1M)
Disturbia ($3.6M)
Georgia Rule ($3.49M)
Fracture ($2.3M)
Delta Farce ($1.8M)
The Invisible ($1.3M)
Hot Fuzz ($1.25M)
Waitress ($1.135M)
Next ($1.131M)
Blades of Glory ($1M)
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Ravi on December 10, 2007, 04:40:29 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/7135957.stm

Compass not so golden in US chart

Fantasy film The Golden Compass has topped the North American box office despite disappointing ticket sales.

The $180m (£89m) movie starring Nicole Kidman and Daniel Craig took $26.1m (£12.8m) in its opening weekend.

But distributor New Line Cinema said it was disappointed the film had not pulled in the $30-40m (£15-20m) it had hoped for.

Fairytale Enchanted fell to number two taking $10.7m (£5.3m), and comedy This Christmas took third with $5m (£2.5m).
   
NORTH AMERICAN BOX OFFICE
1. The Golden Compass - $26.1m (£12.8m)
2. Enchanted - $10.7m (£5.3m)
3. This Christmas - $5m (£2.5m)
4. Fred Claus - $4.66m (£2.3m)
5. Beowulf - $4.4m (£2.2m)
Source: Media By Numbers

With cinemagoers in the festive spirit, Vince Vaughn comedy Fred Claus rose two places to number four.

Fantasy epic Beowulf fell two places to five, in its fourth week on the chart.

Takings for the Golden Compass plus a generally weak field of films saw overall year-on-year sales down for the fifth consecutive weekend, according to tracking firm Media By Numbers.

The top 12 films in the chart earned $73m, (£36m) down 12% from last year.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: polkablues on December 10, 2007, 09:26:01 PM
In a perfect world, this would teach the studios a lesson on the dangers of fucking with your source material.  The people who would be offended by the atheistic themes were still not persuaded by the studio watering them down, and the people who loved the books were discouraged by the lack of faithfulness to them, leaving only the eight-to-twelve-year-old kids who will see any movie with talking polar bears in the commercials.  As it turns out, there are only about (26.1 mil divided by $10)  2,610,000 of those kids.  Not enough to tie to a tentpole, unfortunately.

The moral of the story is, if you're making an atheist fantasy epic, just make an atheist fantasy epic.  Maybe for less than 180 million dollars, though.   :yabbse-undecided:
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on May 04, 2008, 01:38:21 PM
Amazing... 104 MIL for Iron Man? I did not expect something that huge... good for them.


   Title    Weekend     Gross
    Iron Man    $101M    $104M
    Made of Honor    $15.5M    $15.5M
    Baby Mama    $10.3M    $32.3M
    Forgetting Sarah Marshall    $6.13M    $44.8M
    Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay    $6.01M    $25.3M
    The Forbidden Kingdom    $4.2M    $45.1M
    Nim's Island    $2.75M    $42.5M
    Prom Night    $2.5M    $41.4M
    21    $2.1M    $79.1M
    88 Minutes    $1.6M    $15.4M
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Fernando on May 05, 2008, 11:14:35 AM
This kind of sets the standards for the 2008 summer movies I think

For instance, if Indy does less than that or less than 90mill it'll be a flop unless it has legs for the upcoming weeks, as for other flicks this summer Hancock will do very well I'm sure and TDK should do better than Begins, hard to predict Speed Racer, Hulk and even WALL·E (that lovable fucker).
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on May 05, 2008, 11:29:19 AM
This kind of sets the standards for the 2008 summer movies I think

For instance, if Indy does less than that or less than 90mill it'll be a flop unless it has legs for the upcoming weeks, as for other flicks this summer Hancock will do very well I'm sure and TDK should do better than Begins, hard to predict Speed Racer, Hulk and even WALL·E (that lovable fucker).

Indy will break records... its on memorial weekend, parents taking their kids, new hero vs. old school... Shia Labeuf has more fans than U2... it should be one of the biggest of the year.

Speed Racer will do good but not as great as Iron Man... TDK has the Ledger factor, plus marketing is a lot more commercial than the first one... I dont know overall it seems like a boring summer for movies.. I'm excited about WALL-E
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: cinemanarchist on May 09, 2008, 10:09:29 PM
What are we guessing for Speed Racer's opening weekend? Tracking seems to show 30-35 million and I'm inclined to agree. Will this be the biggest bomb of the summer?
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on May 09, 2008, 11:14:19 PM
Not sure if it will be the biggest, but I'm sure it will bomb. I read it's the worst movie ever made. It has 35% on Tomato meter, but some of the reviews really destroy it. The Wachowskis were lucky and it seems obvious it was true that they stole the whole story for the Matrix from someone else.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on May 11, 2008, 02:32:52 PM
TW   LW   Title (click to view)   Studio   Weekend Gross   % Change   Theater Count / Change   Average   Total Gross   Budget*   Week #
1   1   Iron Man   Par.   $50,500,000   -48.8%   4,111   +6   $12,284   $177,134,000   $140   2
2   N   Speed Racer   WB   $20,210,000   -   3,606   -   $5,604   $20,210,000   -   1
3   N   What Happens in Vegas   Fox   $20,000,000   -   3,215   +2,915   $6,220   $20,000,000   $35   1
4   2   Made of Honor   Sony   $7,600,000   -48.5%   2,734   +5   $2,779   $26,275,000   $40   2
5   3   Baby Mama   Uni.   $5,766,000   -42.7%   2,627   +79   $2,194   $40,377,000   $30   3
6   5   Forgetting Sarah Marshall   Uni.   $3,778,000   -37.7%   2,376   -496   $1,590   $50,772,000   $30   4
7   4   Harold and Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay   NL   $3,155,000   -48.4%   2,264   -281   $1,393   $30,716,000   $12   3
8   6   The Forbidden Kingdom   LGF   $1,900,000   -54.6%   1,724   -1,236   $1,102   $48,261,000   -   4
9   7   Nim's Island   Fox   $1,325,000   -50.5%   1,601   -877   $827   $44,257,000   $37   6
10   41   Redbelt   SPC   $1,140,000   +1,699.2%   1,379   +1,373   $826   $1,237,000   -   2
11   8   Prom Night (2008)   SGem   $1,050,000   -56.3%   1,465   -969   $716   $42,822,000   $20   5
12   9   21   Sony   $835,000   -58.3%   978   -1,264   $853   $80,418,000   $35   7
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: cinemanarchist on May 13, 2008, 12:06:36 PM
FINAL NUMBERS

1 1 Iron Man Par 51,190,629 -48% 4111 177,825,024 2
2 New What Happens in Vegas Fox 20,172,474 - 3215 20,172,474 1
3 New Speed Racers WB 18,561,337 - 3606 18,561,337 1
4 2 Made of Honor Sony 8,116,323 -45% 2734 26,791,494 2
5 3 Baby Mama Uni 6,225,790 -38% 2627 40,836,370 3
6 5 Forgetting Sarah Marshall Uni 3,837,240 -37% 2376 50,781,745 4
7 4 Harold & Kumar Escape Guantanamo WB 3,106,424 -49% 2264 30,667,308 3
8 6 Forbidden Kingdom Lions Gate 2,169,323 -48% 1724 48,530,104 4
9 7 Nim's Island Fox 1,463,622 -45% 1601 44,395,857 6
10 8 Prom Night Sony/Alliance 1,012,986 -58% 1465 42,785,107 5
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Kal on May 13, 2008, 01:16:20 PM
Amazing that the studio lied before to get the #2 spot, but of course they couldnt hold on to it.

Embarrassment to open at #3 and after Ashton Kuchner.


Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on October 05, 2008, 10:46:51 PM
Audiences adopt 'Chihuahua' with $29M weekend

"Beverly Hills Chihuahua" was barking up the right tree with movie-goers, who put the Disney comedy at No. 1 for the weekend with a $29 million debut, according to studio estimates Sunday.

Featuring a talking Chihuahua with Drew Barrymore's voice, the family flick about a pampered pooch lost in Mexico led a surge of new movies that boosted Hollywood business, which generally has slumped the last two months.

The top-12 movies hauled in $95.4 million, up 42 percent from the same weekend a year ago, when "The Game Plan" was No. 1 with $16.6 million.
 
"We had a huge weekend," said Paul Dergarabedian, president of box-office tracker Media By Numbers. "That's really due to the little Chihuahua. The little dog made a big difference."

The previous weekend's No. 1 movie, the DreamWorks-Paramount thriller "Eagle Eye," slipped to second-place with $17.7 million, raising its total to $54.6 million.

The PG-rated "Beverly Hills Chihuahua" took advantage of a long drought for movies aimed at families, who found the idea of a chatty Chihuahua irresistible.

"They're so cute, and they seem to have great facial expressions, so that adds to all the fun of the whole thing," said Chuck Viane, Disney's head of distribution.

Hollywood's other new wide releases had fair to poor premieres.

Sony's "Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist," starring Michael Cera and Kat Dennings as teens who fall for each other on a wild New York City night, had a sturdy No. 3 debut of $12 million.

The Warner Bros. Western "Appaloosa," which had played two weeks in a handful of theaters, expanded solidly to come in at No. 5 with $5 million. "Appaloosa" was directed by Ed Harris, who stars with Viggo Mortensen and Renee Zellweger.

Vivendi Entertainment's "An American Carol" a satire of Hollywood's liberal politics from director David Zucker ("Airplane!"), debuted at No. 9 with $3.8 million. The movie stars Kevin Farley as a Michael Moore-type filmmaker aiming to abolish the Fourth of July holiday.

Universal's "Flash of Genius," starring Greg Kinnear as the engineer who invented intermittent windshield wipers then spent decades suing automakers over the innovation, opened weakly with $2.3 million, finishing at No. 11.

Two other movies, the comedy "How to Lose Friends and Alienate People" and the apocalyptic "Blindness," both bombed.

Miramax's "Blindness," featuring Julianne Moore, Danny Glover and Mark Ruffalo in a nightmare tale about a plague of sightlessness, took in just $2 million, averaging an anemic $1,185 in 1,690 theaters.

"How to Lose Friends and Alienate People," released by MGM and starring Kirsten Dunst and Simon Pegg in a celebrity satire set at a slick magazine, did $1.4 million in 1,750 theaters for a feeble $801 average.

By comparison, "Beverly Hills Chihuahua" averaged $9,020 in 3,215 theaters; "Nick and Norah" pulled in $4,957 in 2,421 locations; "Appaloosa" did $4,799 in 1,045 cinemas; "An American Carol" took in $2,325 in 1,639 sites; and "Flash of Genius" did $2,120 in 1,098 theaters.

In narrower release, Bill Maher's documentary "Religulous" opened well, placing No. 10 with $3.5 million in 502 theaters, averaging $6,972. The Lionsgate release follows Maher as he travels the world to mock one of his favorite topics, organized religion.

Anne Hathaway's "Rachel Getting Married" had a strong start in limited release, taking in $302,934 in nine theaters for a whopping $33,659 average. The Sony Pictures Classics drama stars Hathaway as an addict who leaves rehab to come home for her sister's wedding and forces her family to relive the anguish of past tragedy.

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Media By Numbers LLC. Final figures will be released Monday.

1. "Beverly Hills Chihuahua," $29 million.
2. "Eagle Eye," $17.7 million.
3. "Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist," $12 million.
4. "Nights in Rodanthe," $7.4 million.
5. "Appaloosa," $5 million.
6. "Lakeview Terrace," $4.5 million.
7. "Burn After Reading," $4.08 million.
8. "Fireproof," $4.07 million.
9. "An American Carol," $3.8 million.
10. Religulous, $3.5 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: MacGuffin on October 12, 2008, 11:22:45 PM
`Chihuahua' fetches $17.5M to win another weekend

An adorable talking dog remained just the sort of escapist movie hero audiences wanted after a week of awful economic news.

Disney's family comedy "Beverly Hills Chihuahua," with Drew Barrymore providing the voice of the pooch, was the No. 1 flick for the second-straight weekend with $17.5 million, raising its 10-day total to $52.5 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.

"Beverly Hills Chihuahua" is the only light comedy in a market heavy on drama. Chuck Viane, Disney's head of distribution, said movie-goers may be turning to the perky pooch to help forget the market free-fall on Wall Street.

"This is only word-of-mouth coming back to us from theaters. I don't have any statistical proof. But they're telling us we're getting more unaccompanied-by-children adults coming on their own. They're looking for a little entertainment," Viane said. "The axiom we've always lived by is funny is money. People come out for comedy. They love to sit back and let someone give them a couple of hours of escapism."

The weekend's No. 2 flick the fright film "Quarantine," which debuted with $14.2 million filled the escapism needs for the horror crowd. The Sony Screen Gems release centers on a contagion that turns an apartment building's tenants into flesh-hungry monsters.

"It's probably the perfect kind of movie for today's climate," said Rory Bruer, Sony head of distribution. "Let's just get away from the news, from all that's going on, and go someplace else, and this is something that'll take you someplace else."

The marquee trio of Leonardo DiCaprio, Russell Crowe and director Ridley Scott had to settle for third-place with their terrorism thriller "Body of Lies," which had a $13.1 million debut. The Warner Bros. film centers on a CIA operative hunting the terrorist responsible for bombings around the world.

"Body of Lies" may have dealt with too sober a topic after all the disastrous financial news, said Dan Fellman, head of distribution for Warner Bros.

"I think we ran into really difficult timing. The nation suffered such an economic loss this week that the mood of our audience was such that they were probably looking for a little more escapism than to see a movie on terrorism," Fellman said.

The weekend's other new wide releases, Universal's football drama "The Express" and 20th Century Fox's family fantasy "City of Ember," opened weakly.

"The Express" starring Rob Brown and Dennis Quaid in the story of Ernie Davis, the first black player to win the Heisman Trophy came in at No. 6 with $4.7 million.

"City of Ember," with Tim Robbins and Bill Murray in a post-apocalyptic adventure set in an underground realm, took in $3.2 million to finish at No. 10.

Keira Knightley's historical saga "The Duchess" climbed into the top 10 as it expanded nationwide after three weekends in limited release. The Paramount Vantage drama, which stars Knightley as an 18th century aristocrat stuck in a loveless marriage, pulled in $3.32 million to place No. 9.

Two British movies started well in limited release. Guy Ritchie's London crime romp "RocknRolla" opened with $141,000 in seven theaters. The Warner Bros. release features Gerard Butler, Thandie Newton and Tom Wilkinson heading an ensemble cast.

Mike Leigh's "Happy-Go-Lucky," a Miramax release starring Sally Hawkins as a woman whose eternal optimism is continually challenged, premiered with $80,000 in four theaters.

Estimated ticket sales for Friday through Sunday at U.S. and Canadian theaters, according to Media By Numbers LLC. Final figures will be released Monday.

1. "Beverly Hills Chihuahua," $17.5 million.
2. "Quarantine," $14.2 million.
3. "Body of Lies," $13.1 million.
4. "Eagle Eye," $11 million.
5. "Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist," $6.5 million.
6. "The Express," $4.7 million.
7. "Nights in Rodanthe," $4.6 million.
8. "Appaloosa," $3.34 million.
9. "The Duchess," $3.32 million.
10. "City of Ember," $3.2 million.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: atticus jones on May 31, 2009, 03:28:24 AM
nice thread dread warning...speaks to reel progress

and sew im off with another top ten from this weak at the moovies

#10...17 again...wait...how many other movies would i rather watch this week than a rehash of the im young again but with my adult mind intact? seventeen?  how about a remake called "10 again" starring lil fanning and bo derek?  now there's a movie for the reel pedophiliacs

#9...monsters vs aliens...in 3D no less...shiiiit...shoulda thrown sum double d in there for the grown ups...reese scares me and zelwegger from another planet so they got that right...seth rogen as b.o.b. (bring yo own bong) cuz aint nothing funny bout watching overpaid undertalented screen actors gettin rich on the planet v.o.

#8...obsessed...hmm...maybe they shoulda obsessed a bit more on casting, directing, script development, etc....if i wanna see jerry oconnel or beyonce cant i just watch the mtv music awards or sum shit...jungle fever meets fatal attraction meets sum junk i filmed on me 8mm camera back in 82

#7...ghosts of girlfriends past...i still think this woulda played better as a reality tv series where michael drug less and matthew mc con man hey compete to bang all the women jennifer garner's ex's dumped before getting stuck on her

#6...x men origins...if u are interested in reading this u are an ass wipe...only origins u should be concerned about are your "i used to get my ass kicked in grade school and beat off to comic books in my step dads basement" origins...spew jack man's meat massage mania is a magnificent magical masturbatory mess

#5...dance flick...flick it like a booger...from sum dead crack ho's nose...just another reason to pray that n koreas first u.s. bound miss by a mile hits oakland...wayans are way past they ilc love...now just plain shame...got so many generations my generations gonna have to watch them shit 4eva

#4...angels and demons...least they dint call it angels vs demons...dint see it but i figure the angels pitching and defense should be nuff to win...t hanks said theres no crying in baseball but i do shed a tear for him...this was sad tommy boy...you need to cast away these projects and remember philly

#3...star trek...made for people who hate the original by people who disguise unoriginal as original...jj not so dyno mite...kirk and spock shoulda battled naked arnold terminator in california prop 8 debate whilst sean penn rallied the inhabitants of lost series...including a naked neve cambell cameo as matt fox's sister who explains the metaphor of the island through interpretive dance

#2...terminator salvation...tag line: the end begins...ooooooooh...i just wanted the beginning to end...and the middle to end...and the end to end...get the picture?  mc g whiz u nutz kid

#1...night at the museum...went to this movie the other night and a museum broke out...lights went out...i kept shouting, "ben, you stiller?...ben you still here?"...i like him more when he's funny...rob and williams too...owen wilson shoulda sick finned himself while he was funny and getting laid by playmates...no he's just plain alive and dodging skank hudson...that was mean...didnt mean it...i meant to say hate hudson

luv ya all like alan ball...6 ft under
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pas on May 31, 2009, 11:01:58 AM
 :bravo: :bravo: hahaha
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: ©brad on May 31, 2009, 04:18:16 PM
Awesome. Can't wait for next weak's.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Reinhold on June 16, 2010, 01:30:25 AM
I can't post the link correctly from my phone since BBC has a mobile app and a mobile site, but I just saw that stock market speculators are now going to be able to trade on expectations of box office results.

Speculators betting on movie success
Page last updated at 13:20 GMT, Tuesday, 15 June 2010 14:20 UKBox office hits could provide money-making opportunities to speculators
Market traders who usually speculate on the price of oil or the value of the pound have found something new to bet on - movie releases.
Following US regulatory approval, a new exchange is to begin offering traders the chance to bet on the success of the latest cinematic productions.
Investors will enter into contracts betting on how much money a given film will make in its opening weekend.
But film studios and cinema owners have condemned the idea.
They argue that letting investors bet on whether or not their films are successful could be open to manipulation.
Rival studios could even bet against films in an attempt to sabotage them, some industry figures have argued.
'Popcorn predictions'
But the Commodity Futures Trading Commission has rejected those concerns, saying that box office earnings meet the law's definition of a commodity - meaning that futures contracts can be opened on them.
The Trend Exchange, operated by Veriana Networks, plans to start offering box office futures from August, though the industry is lobbying the US Congress to ban them.
"Takers", a film about a bank-robber starring Matt Dillon that opens in the US on 20 August, is due to be the first release to be speculated on.
Democratic commissioner Bart Chilton warned that "popcorn prediction markets would serve no national public interest".
But investors have defended the plans, pointing out that they could give finance companies a way of reducing the risk of investing in films.
Investors will be able to guard against making a big loss at the box office by betting some money against their film.
The move also signals increasing investor interest in the film industry, with global box office receipts reaching a record $30bn (£20bn) last year.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: polkablues on June 16, 2010, 01:53:24 AM
My message to anyone who derives their income from speculative investment: die in a fire. You're taking up valuable space, sucking up valuable oxygen that could be used by people who actually contribute something to society. You've failed at the basic fundamentals of humanity, now kindly remove your name from the rolls.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Pas on June 16, 2010, 07:18:14 AM
Is this anything more than gambling. Why do these imbeciles study finance if they're just gonna go at the casino.

These fuckers who play the futures market for speculations, man, they are destroying this world. I am truly wondering if they realize they are actually, litteraly killing people. They are the direct cause of violence, starving and destruction in the third world.

I long for a reckoning.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: polkablues on July 25, 2010, 04:41:35 PM
With Inception, Salt, and Despicable Me as the top movies this weekend, there are actually three original, non-remake, non-adaptation, non-sequel (or god forbid, squeakquel) movies leading the box office.  No matter what you think of any of those movies, that has to be viewed as a good thing.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: 72teeth on July 25, 2010, 06:21:08 PM
 :bravo: good job movie-makers? or good job movie-goers?
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Stefen on July 25, 2010, 06:50:47 PM
I think people are just starved for something new and original.

Inception doing well is the biggest good news, I think. I hope it means more original projects will get funding.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: modage on July 25, 2010, 06:55:28 PM
I hope it means more original projects will get funding.

ThePlaylist had a good quote.

"We'd like to believe it would also be a game-changer, but it's less likely Hollywood will say, "We need to greenlight more original ideas!" than, "Greenlight anything with dreams in it!""

But I'm really thrilled about this news.  Good job, America.  :bravo:
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Ravi on July 26, 2010, 06:02:32 PM
But I'm really thrilled about this news.  Good job, America.  :bravo:

Don't worry, Remake Part II in 3D will top the box office soon enough, and everything will be back to normal.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: pete on December 30, 2010, 08:12:10 PM
interactive box office chart of 2010!
http://xach.com/moviecharts/2010.html
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: RegularKarate on January 03, 2011, 02:02:47 PM
Neat!
I love how "How to Train your Dragon" put up such a fight.   Coming back to number one after 4 weeks.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: OrHowILearnedTo on January 03, 2011, 02:28:51 PM
The Tarantino bump!
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: jenkins on June 07, 2015, 12:31:29 PM
I just keep wanting to ask if everyone is aware of this (I wasn't aware of this):

1   American Sniper   $350,066,882

Everyone else already knew that? I didn't know/couldn't've guessed that American Sniper was 2014's #1 grossing movie in the US.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: BB on June 07, 2015, 02:46:27 PM
Flyover states, homie. God's Not Dead grossed $62.6 million. Having seen God's Not Dead, I can confirm: it is INSANE that that movie made that much.
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on June 07, 2015, 03:22:13 PM
Flyover states, homie. God's Not Dead grossed $62.6 million. Having seen God's Not Dead, I can confirm: it is INSANE that that movie made that much.

The Flop House has an excellent episode on that movie:

http://www.flophousepodcast.com/2014/09/episode-160-gods-not-dead/
Title: Re: Box Office Guesstimations
Post by: jenkins on March 18, 2018, 02:49:45 PM
Black Panther is currently the world's highest grossing movie, here in March.

number 2 is Operation Red Sea, which is a war movie so it doesn't interest me.

number 3 is Detective Chinatown 2, this is its trailer

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0pqp1uXcJs

number 4 is Fifty Shades Freed, which doesn't interest me.

number 5 is Monster Hunt 2, this is its trailer

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cE4vHoHrv-U

number 6 is Maze Runner: The Death Cure, which doesn't interest me.

number 7 is Paddington 2, which i'll eventually see.

number 8 is Insidious: The Last Key, and really at this point it's clear that it's not necessarily the best movies which make the most money.

i want to see Detective Chinatown 2 though, maybe #1 too