XIXAX Film Forum

The Director's Chair => Quentin Tarantino => Topic started by: ShanghaiOrange on October 14, 2003, 07:46:40 AM

Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: ShanghaiOrange on October 14, 2003, 07:46:40 AM
I noticed some! Did YOU?

- The samurai code VO and perhaps the RZA soundtrack are similar to Ghost Dog

- When O-Ren kills the yakuza boss in the anime sequence, she slides under the bed, shoots the henchman in the leg then in the head. That rhymes AND it was done in Miller's Crossing.

- The clip-art plane was the same one as in Jackie Brown
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: coffeebeetle on October 14, 2003, 08:13:19 AM
Apple ciggies ad in the airport (in that profile shot of her walking through the terminal--same brand that Vincent Vega smokes....)
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: ono on October 14, 2003, 10:30:17 AM
Rather obvious, but The Bride telling Copperhead "that'd be kinda SQUARE."
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: coffeebeetle on October 14, 2003, 10:49:45 AM
Yesssss.....I was waiting for the dashed/animated square...I heard a couple of chuckles from the audience too, so that was great.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: MacGuffin on October 14, 2003, 10:58:06 AM
Go-Go's ball weapon is a variation on the guillotine in "Master Of The Flying Guillotine"

Daryl Hannah's character, Elle Driver, is based on the character from this film. (http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0072285/)

The DiVAS are based on the Fox Force Five reference in "Pulp Fiction".

Michael Parks also played the Ranger cop in "From Dusk Til Dawn".

The close-ups into the eyes when we hear the "Ironside" theme and go into a flashback is very Sergio Leone.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Duck Sauce on October 14, 2003, 11:01:10 AM
Quote from: coffeebeetle
Yesssss.....I was waiting for the dashed/animated square...I heard a couple of chuckles from the audience too, so that was great.


I laughed out loud, everybody looked at me.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: edison on October 14, 2003, 11:43:48 AM
Quote from: MacGuffin
Michael Parks also played the Ranger cop in "From Dusk Til Dawn".


I read somewhere that this is actually the same character and it also said that his son was the same character from the sequel


Quote from: MacGuffin
The close-ups into the eyes when we hear the "Ironside" theme and go into a flashback is very Sergio Leone.


This is probably my favorite moment in the film, well at least in the top 5 or so.

Heres some more:

The Kato masks from Green Hornet
The yellow jumpsuit from "Game of Death"
Title: ...
Post by: Myxo on October 14, 2003, 01:53:14 PM
- The mass gore in the anime sequence is pretty similar to lots of stuff but the Kenshin films stand out. Samurai X.

- I love the Lucy beheading and the subsequent blood spray as his head falls off. Nothing like taking a total anime shot and carrying it over into an actual SE shot for a film.

- That table also reminded me a lot of the first Batman movie where the Joker goes a little crazy.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: bonanzataz on October 14, 2003, 03:47:22 PM
anybody see the billboard reading "Go! Go!" when uma's on the plane?
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: eward on October 14, 2003, 05:35:39 PM
michael bowen was in jackie brown.  and at the beginning of the blood spattered bride chapter, the radio plays a quick snippet of something that was played as a quick snippet in reservoir dogs, at the beginning of the torture scene.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: pete on October 14, 2003, 06:31:50 PM
hattori hanzo was an actual guy, leader of a ninja clan back in the 1500s.  He's been in a couple of shows and movies and videogames--but by no coincidence Sonny Chiba played Hattori Hanzo in an old 70s/ 80s tv show.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Ravi on October 14, 2003, 08:58:21 PM
Quote from: EEz28

The Kato masks from Green Hornet
The yellow jumpsuit from "Game of Death"


Isn't that the Green Hornet music we hear on the plane?

I found the slo-mo walk of Lucy Liu and her men to be reminiscent of Reservoir Dogs.  Did City on Fire have such a shot?

It would be cool if the DVD had a subtitle track that pointed out all the refs.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: pete on October 14, 2003, 09:24:18 PM
nope the guys in city on fire never walked together like that.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: modage on October 14, 2003, 10:36:03 PM
i'm not sure if its the lines or the delivery but lucy liu's

"if any of you sunsabitches got anything else to say, nows the fucking time!"

reminds me of "if any of you fucking pigs move, i'll execute every motherfucking last one of you!"
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: edison on October 15, 2003, 09:40:18 AM
Quote from: Ravi
Isn't that the Green Hornet music we hear on the plane?


Yes it is
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: ᾦɐļᵲʊʂ on October 15, 2003, 04:49:45 PM
I kind of niticed that Fox Force 5 vibe going on...everyone having their specialties and what not.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Pozer on October 15, 2003, 09:01:41 PM
Quote from: eward
and at the beginning of the blood spattered bride chapter, the radio plays a quick snippet of something that was played as a quick snippet in reservoir dogs, at the beginning of the torture scene.


yeah, yeah. that little "donde esta" snippet. I noticed that too. I love that shit! Don't you wanna make movies just so you could do little things like that? so cool.
this kinda really isn't a reference, but when we first see The Bride driving the Pussy Wagon in passadena -- before it's explained why she would be driving that truck -- this totally reminded me of when I first saw Pulp Fiction and we see Jules and Vincent go from their black suits in the apt. to shorts and t-shirts at the bar. remember that? it was like, why the hell are these guys in beach clothes all of a sudden, and then it's of course explained later.
I LOVE THAT SHIT!
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: pete on October 15, 2003, 11:54:34 PM
when gordon flew up to the second floor to fight uma--he flew up in a very similar way in jet li's "last hero in china" if I remember correctly.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: SHAFTR on October 15, 2003, 11:57:18 PM
this is interesting...

http://www.hkflix.com/coupons/hkflix_03-10-10/
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: ©brad on October 16, 2003, 11:06:21 AM
how bout the reservoir dogs shot when uma is in the hospital, and the rapist dude gets on top, and it pans to the left just as she is about to big his lip. oh yeah.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Gamblour. on October 16, 2003, 02:03:11 PM
Quote from: ©brad
how bout the reservoir dogs shot when uma is in the hospital, and the rapist dude gets on top, and it pans to the left just as she is about to big his lip. oh yeah.


Gosh I totally missed that one! It's weird, now it just seems so obvious, but I never would've noticed it before, heh.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: godardian on October 16, 2003, 03:59:40 PM
The buildup/split-screen with Daryl Hannah is VERY Brian De Palma. As is much of the film. As is much of Tarantino. Cartoonish, sick, cheesy, "bad" (quotation marks intact)... and great.

Glieberman is the only one (besides myself) I've seen acknowledge the very specific de Palma moment mentioned above.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: edison on October 16, 2003, 05:30:51 PM
What do you think of the House of Blue Leaves being a sorta new version of Jackrabbit Slims? camera goes around place with music playing just like in PF, seems like he tried to one-up himself
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: ShanghaiOrange on October 17, 2003, 09:53:54 AM
The scene where Buck comes back into the hosipital room and sees the dead guy seems like it's out of any slasher film ever.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: SHAFTR on October 17, 2003, 11:20:18 AM
when Vivica Fox shoots at Uma, the bullethole on the next shot.  Atleast I didn't see it....anti-pulp fiction?
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: TheVoiceOfNick on October 17, 2003, 12:28:01 PM
The anime sequence's blood splatters very much reminded me of that old PSX game "Bushido Blade"
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: pete on October 17, 2003, 03:24:58 PM
the movie "lady snowblood" that was mentioned several times was baesd on a japanese manga titled "shuriyuki hime", they just had another adaptation of that film that's currently circulating in American indie theaters, the american name for the movie is "The Princess Blade."
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Mesh on October 20, 2003, 05:22:03 PM
Quote from: poser

this kinda really isn't a reference, but when we first see The Bride driving the Pussy Wagon in passadena -- before it's explained why she would be driving that truck -- this totally reminded me of when I first saw Pulp Fiction and we see Jules and Vincent go from their black suits in the apt. to shorts and t-shirts at the bar. remember that? it was like, why the hell are these guys in beach clothes all of a sudden, and then it's of course explained later.
I LOVE THAT SHIT!


Actually, I see The Pussy Wagon as a more specific riff on Pulp Fiction.  It's exactly like Zed's motorcycle: it's souped up, has a "personalized keychain," and was owned by a macho pervert before that pervert was vengefully slaughtered by the sword-wielding hero/heroine of the film (who subsequently makes the vehicle his/her own).

Another similar Pulp Fiction riff:  In both films, a comatose Uma Thurman is revived when she's penetrated by a sharp, syringe-like foreign object.  In PF, it's actually an adrenaline-filled syringe; in KB, it's a mosquito.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Ravi on October 20, 2003, 07:27:51 PM
Quote from: Mesh
Actually, I see The Pussy Wagon as a more specific riff on Pulp Fiction.  It's exactly like Zed's motorcycle: it's souped up, has a "personalized keychain," and was owned by a macho pervert before that pervert was vengefully slaughtered by the sword-wielding hero/heroine of the film (who subsequently makes the vehicle his/her own)


In PF Bruce Willis finds the sword in the pawn shop, and in KB Uma takes the knife from Buck.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: edison on October 20, 2003, 07:35:07 PM
Wonder if all these Pulp Fiction references are because he came up for the idea for this film during the making of, ta-da!!!!!.........PULP FICTION!!!!!!
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: samsong on October 20, 2003, 09:58:30 PM
the ultraviolence kept reminding me of Kurosawa... the blood spraying (end of Sanjuro) and one person taking on a larger group and kicking their asses quickly and beautifully (Mifune in Red Beard among other films).  The showdown in the snow between the Bride and O-Ren was reminiscent of Kurosawa as well.

obvious reference to Tokyo Drifter during the scene at the House of Blue Leaves (blue set).

The whole knife-fight bit and the dialogue following thereafter ("...we'll have ourselves a knife fight") sounded like something that would've come from Switchblade Sisters, a film i havent seen but know that Tarantino loves... more Jack Hill.

O-Ren's assassin subplot/character background seemed VERY La Femme Nikita
Tension marked by the sirens (from Ironside) preceding action or drama was a tactic directly taken from 5 Fingers of Death... put it on my queue for Netflix the day after I saw Kill Bill.. havent seen the whole thing but what I've seen so far is fucking great.

The music used in the action sequence at the House of Blue Leaves seems to be maybe a tiny homage to his "brother" Robert Rodriguez, but I'm not sure.

just a few i noticed/thought were references...
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: ShanghaiOrange on October 21, 2003, 08:57:35 AM
Quote from: samsong
the ultraviolence kept reminding me of Kurosawa... the blood spraying (end of Sanjuro)

Actually, in that scene, Kurosawa was parodying the hyperbloody yakuza films. All his other films are basically bloodless.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: SHAFTR on October 21, 2003, 11:27:53 AM
Quote from: samsong


O-Ren's assassin subplot/character background seemed VERY La Femme Nikita
...


in what way?  I just saw La Femme Nikita this weekend and I didn't notice anything.  ORen became an assassin because of revenge and Nikita became an assassin b/c she killed a cop and was forced too.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: samsong on October 21, 2003, 04:45:17 PM
Quote from: ShanghaiOrange
Quote from: samsong
the ultraviolence kept reminding me of Kurosawa... the blood spraying (end of Sanjuro)

Actually, in that scene, Kurosawa was parodying the hyperbloody yakuza films. All his other films are basically bloodless.


Didn't know Kurosawa was parodying yakuza flicks with that scene but that doesn't change anything for me.  I've seen Sanjuro, none of the yakuza movies of that time.

The bloodshed is inconsequential though, I was still reminded of Kurosawa and the way he used/shot violence.  And as for his movies being "basically bloodless," what about Ran  I don't remember but I think Kagemusha was pretty bloody, too.


Quote from: SHAFTR
Quote from: samsong


O-Ren's assassin subplot/character background seemed VERY La Femme Nikita
...


in what way?  I just saw La Femme Nikita this weekend and I didn't notice anything.  ORen became an assassin because of revenge and Nikita became an assassin b/c she killed a cop and was forced too.


I take that one back... O-Ren's history didnt remind me of La Femme Nikita but rather, O-Ren herself (namely the part of the anime where she's in that leather jumpsuit with the sniper rifle... brought the scene where Nikita is sniping from the bathroom to mind.  Strangely enough it also reminded me of Besson's other great, Leon: The Professional (rooftop sniping).  I don't know, they may not have been actual references but these are things that came to mind while I was watching... that's all.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: ShanghaiOrange on October 21, 2003, 06:50:06 PM
You're right about Ran. :( But I think the style Tarantino references is just a general Japanese style, not just Kurosawa.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: samsong on October 22, 2003, 12:39:13 AM
agreed
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: mr_boz on November 28, 2003, 01:06:05 PM
Quote from: MacGuffin
Michael Parks also played the Ranger cop in "From Dusk Til Dawn".


It's the same character:  Earl McGraw.  Leads me to believe that Kill Bill and Dusk till Dawn take place in the same universe.  If so, Kill Bill had to come first since Earl dies at the very beginning of DtD.

p.s.  If you have the DVD for DtD, watch the documentary "Full Tilt Boogie".  Not only is it an awesome doc, but the short segments with Michael Parks are absolutely great.

--CCB
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: NEON MERCURY on November 28, 2003, 01:15:04 PM
the beginning kinnda reminded me of 70's ish kung-fu movies.....
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: SoNowThen on November 28, 2003, 01:19:30 PM
Quote from: MacGuffin
Daryl Hannah's character, Elle Driver, is based on the character from this film. (http://us.imdb.com/title/tt0072285/)


Coolest one so far.


but, um.... how did you know that, Mac?
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: MacGuffin on November 28, 2003, 02:22:31 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
but, um.... how did you know that, Mac?


(http://i.timeinc.net/ew/covergallery/img/2003/oct32003_731_lg.jpg)
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: SoNowThen on November 28, 2003, 02:41:10 PM
oh
I thought you liked Swedish b-movie soft core...
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: penfold0101 on December 04, 2003, 07:11:51 AM
The sun glasses Buck has are the same as Clarence’s in true romance

Also Buck says to the client "re we absolutely clear about rule number one" the same as Seth in FDTD
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: prophet on December 27, 2003, 01:56:14 PM
even steven/
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: MacGuffin on April 13, 2004, 10:50:34 AM
Charting the Tarantino Universe
Source: NY Times

*READ AT OWN RISK*

EVER since "Kill Bill Vol. 1" was released last October, Internet movie message boards have been buzzing about the numerous references that Quentin Tarantino's action revenge film makes to the rich tradition of Asian genre filmmaking — both Hong Kong kung fu movies and the Japanese swordfight flicks. With the release on Friday of "Kill Bill Vol. 2," Mr. Tarantino's grand design becomes clear: where the first part of his epic took place under the sign of the East, the second is largely devoted to the West — that is, the American and European traditions of revenge movies, particularly the American western.

With the dense network of references in "Kill Bill," Mr. Tarantino is at once playing a game and making a point, demonstrating how Eastern and Western popular culture have so strongly influenced each other over the years that the new style in action filmmaking is an inseparable blend of the two. Just as the Japanese director Akira Kurosawa acknowledged borrowing from John Ford's American westerns for his 1954 epic "The Seven Samurai," so did the Italian director Sergio Leone borrow from Kurosawa's 1961 swordplay film "Yojimbo" for "A Fistful of Dollars," the film that gave rise to the spaghetti western. "Kill Bill" closes the circle, bringing Asian, European and American influences together into a glorious, crazy, rousing and finally quite poignant meta-movie.
 
It isn't necessary to get all of Mr. Tarantino's references — many quite esoteric — to enjoy "Kill Bill," but a little background information does enhance the experience. The notes below are meant to suggest a few points of entry into Mr. Tarantino's sprawling work. They are by no means exhaustive.

THE EAST ("Vol. 1")

SONNY CHIBA In Mr. Tarantino's screenplay for "True Romance," Christian Slater's character sneaks off to a double feature of Sonny Chiba films — "The Streetfighter" and "The Return of the Streetfighter," two of the most violent gangster movies ever to come out of Japan. Mr. Tarantino has matured since then, and Mr. Chiba's glowering presence in "Kill Bill" — played brilliantly for comedy as well as menace — now seems more of a reference to Mr. Chiba's long association with the Japanese director Kinji Fukasaku, who discovered him and with whom he made several dozen samurai dramas (a snatch of music from one of the best, "The Yagyu Clan Conspiracy," can be heard in "Kill Bill"). Mr. Chiba's character in "Kill Bill," the master swordmaker Hattori Hanzo, who provides the Bride (Uma Thurman) with her weapon of vengeance, is named after a real-life samurai of the Tokugawa shogunate, first played by Mr. Chiba in a 1970's series for Japanese television.

GORDON LIU A gifted and popular star of the Shaw Brothers' kung fu films, Mr. Liu rose to fame under the direction of his brother, Liu Chia Liang, in favorites like "The 36th Chamber of Shaolin." "Kill Bill" references "36th Chamber" by casting Mr. Liu, not as the pupil he played in that film, but as the fighting master — Pai Mei, who teaches the Bride the "five point exploding heart technique." With his outrageously long white facial hair that is as firmly associated with fighting masters in kung fu films as black mustaches are with the villains in American cowboy movies, Mr. Liu is barely recognizable in "Vol. 2" — though he also appears in Vol. 1 with his familiar shaved head as the leader of Lucy Liu's Yakuza army, the Crazy 88.

LUCY LIU As O-ren Ishii, former member of the Deadly Viper Assassination Squad and current ruler of the Tokyo underworld, Lucy Liu plays a character of mixed Japanese, Chinese and American ancestry — which is, of course, the genealogy of "Kill Bill" itself. The look of her character seems based on "Lady Snowblood," a stylish Japanese swordplay film of 1973 directed by Toshiya Fujita, whose heroine is a young woman born in prison and sworn to avenge the death of her family at the hands of a group of swindlers. The haunting imagery that concludes "Vol. 1" — blood spilled in softly falling snow — comes directly from Mr. Fujita's film, as does the use of chapter titles and a cartoon sequence (Mr. Tarantino's is animated; Mr. Fujita uses the still frames of a Japanese manga comic book).

KINJI FUKASAKU The Japanese prints of "Kill Bill Vol. 1" carried a dedication to Mr. Fukasaku, a major figure in Japanese genre filmmaking who died in January 2003 after directing some 60 features. Mr. Fukasaku's work ranged from courtly period dramas (like "The Yagyu Clan Conspiracy") to outrageously violent and anarchic gangster films, like his masterpiece "Battles Without Honor and Humanity." The pounding theme music from "Battles" introduces the Crazy 88 in "Vol. 1," and feeds into the spectacular massacre that is "Vol. 1's" finale. Chiaki Kuriyama, who played a murderous Japanese schoolgirl in Mr. Fukasaku's last completed film, "Battle Royale," appears in "Kill Bill" in virtually the same role, the teenage killer, Go Go Yubari.

'LONE WOLF AND CUB' "Kill Bill" represents a rare attempt to blend the Chinese and Japanese styles of martial arts, and if Gordon Liu represents the bare-handed Chinese kung fu tradition, Sonny Chiba stands for the Japanese tradition of swordfighting, as practiced by the warriors of the samurai class. Much of the highly stylized violence in "Kill Bill" — the surgically clean decapitations, the thin, fizzy blood that sprays out from wounded bodies like cherry soda from a shaken can — comes from the ultraviolent tradition of Japanese series like "Lone Wolf and Cub" (six titles to date) and "Zatoichi, the Blind Swordsman" (25 films, not including Takeshi Kitano's recent remake of the first installment, "Zatoichi"). "Lone Wolf and Cub," about a masterless samurai who wanders the countryside, pushing his infant in a booby-trapped baby carriage, resonates in "Kill Bill" with the repeated theme of innocent children bound to violent adults. And "Shogun Assassin," a 1980 dubbed digest of the first two "Lone Wolf" movies, makes a surprise appearance in "Vol. 2" as one character's dubious choice for bedtime viewing.

THE WEST ("Vol. 2")

JOHN FORD The director of "Stagecoach," "My Darling Clementine" and "The Searchers" is an important presence in "Vol. 2" from the opening minutes, in which Mr. Tarantino lovingly recreates one of Ford's favorite shots: a vast, blindingly bright Western landscape as framed through the doorway of a dark interior. As one of the creators of the classic American western, Ford established many of the thematic concerns and visual tropes that Mr. Tarantino builds on in the second installment of "Kill Bill." The wedding chapel where the attempted murder of the Bride takes place recalls many of Ford's lonely outposts of civilization, like the white frame church in "Clementine." It is also possible that the eye patch worn by Elle Driver (Darryl Hannah) is a reference to the eye patch Ford wore in his later years, though this image (see below) has multiple sources.

BUDD BOETTICHER A protégé of Ford, Budd Boetticher brought the American western into its ironic, absurdist phase with a series of westerns he made in the 1950's with Randolph Scott — the first of which, "Seven Men From Now" (1956), provides the model for the serial-revenge plot structure of "Kill Bill." The rocky desert landscape around Barstow, Calif., the backdrop for many of Boetticher's films, is in "Kill Bill" the natural habitat of Michael Madsen's fallen swordfighter, whose name, of course, is Budd. Like many Boetticher heroes, Budd is a disillusioned fighter who has tried to retire into a solitary, private life, only to be forced into action again by unfinished business.

SERGIO LEONE Leone admitted that he was influenced by Boetticher's black humor and mercenary heroes when he created "A Fistful of Dollars" (1964), the cynical, violent and often very funny western that established Clint Eastwood as a star. The Leone work most often referenced in "Kill Bill" is "Once Upon a Time in the West," Leone's 1968 epic. Henry Fonda played a mysterious, all-powerful gunman not unlike Bill; Charles Bronson played a vengeful character named Harmonica (so called because he's always playing one) who stands behind many of the Bride's actions (themselves underlined by the harmonica theme composed by Luis Bacalov for the 1972 Italian western "Il Grande Duello"). Apparently a passionate cinephile, Budd has a poster from Richard Fleischer's 1974 Bronson vehicle, "Mr. Majestyk," hanging in his trailer.

DAVID CARRADINE Cast as the master assassin Bill, a phantom presence in "Vol. 1" who gradually materializes into an all-too-human figure in "Vol. 2," David Carradine provides a link to both of the great traditions behind "Kill Bill." His father, John Carradine, was a member of John Ford's stock company, playing smooth-talking Southern politicians and riverboat gamblers. And of course, Mr. Carradine's initial fame was as Kwai Chang Caine, a half-American, half-Chinese Shaolin monk wandering the American West in the 1970's television series "Kung Fu" (itself the subject of a Samuel L. Jackson soliloquy in Mr. Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction"). He also starred in the oddball 1978 movie "The Silent Flute" (a k a "Circle of Iron"), in a role that Bruce Lee had written for himself before his death. In "Kill Bill," Mr. Carradine is seen playing a flute, much like the one that accompanied Caine on his journeys.

DARYL HANNAH As Elle Driver, the professional assassin who is one of the targets of the Bride's campaign for revenge, Ms. Hannah introduces references outside the western framework. Her eye patch comes from "They Call Her One Eye," a 1974 Swedish (!) revenge film by Bo Arne Vibenius, a former assistant to Ingmar Bergman. Her nurse disguise in "Vol. 1" is a reference to a similar costume in Brian De Palma's "Dressed to Kill." The imposing Ms. Hannah nevertheless recalls the heroines of surreal 1950's female-centered westerns like Allan Dwan's "Woman They Almost Lynched" and Nicholas Ray's "Johnny Guitar." Though the name Elle Driver suggests a reference to Walter Hill's terse 1978 chase classic, "The Driver," Mr. Tarantino has said that it's an inside reference to Sarah Kelly, an assistant nicknamed El Driver on the Tarantino-scripted 1996 vampire western, "From Dusk Till Dawn."


(http://graphics7.nytimes.com/images/2004/04/11/movies/11KEHR.1.300.jpg)
THE LONE PRAIRIE
Quentin Tarantino quotes one of the best-known western scenes: John Wayne framed in a doorway at the end of John Ford's "Searchers" becomes Uma Thurman framed in a doorway at the beginning of "Kill Bill Vol. 2."
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: cron on April 13, 2004, 10:53:44 AM
8)
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Born Under Punches on April 15, 2004, 10:45:30 AM
I know QT's more of a Star Trek fan, but during the whole Man from Okinawa chapter, all I could think was "This is meeting Yoda in Episode V!"  Also, I wouldn't call it a reference, but I noticed a whole lot more formal-balanced compositions in the movie more than any other QT.  Surprisingly it was shot by Robert Richardson, who did Casino, which PTA ripped off a lot (in a good way) for BN.  Just a "what-d'ya-know" kind of thing.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: NEON MERCURY on April 17, 2004, 07:18:55 PM
not a reference but "something cool that you can look for the next time you watch vol. 2".

-the "paula grave scene".her open casket reveals her decayed body w/ an outstreched are doing a shadow puppet of a rooster/chicken



that is all i noticed.........i suck..
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: tpfkabi on April 17, 2004, 11:45:24 PM
i noticed the hand gesture, but i thought it was a peace sign
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: pete on April 18, 2004, 12:21:39 AM
bill said "once upon a time...in china", and Jet Li's comeback film in hong kong was titled "once upon a time in china."
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: El Duderino on April 18, 2004, 02:55:16 AM
Bill said "I'll shoot you in the kneecap, and i hear that's the worst place to get shot."

Mr. White said "The kneecap and the belly are the two worst places someone could get shot."
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: eward on April 18, 2004, 10:59:07 AM
Quote from: NEON MERCURY
not a reference but "something cool that you can look for the next time you watch vol. 2".


also - the bag for the loaf of bread david carradine makes BBs sandwich with says BIMBO on it....thought that was kinda funny
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Sleuth on April 18, 2004, 11:09:23 AM
that's a real brand
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: rustinglass on April 18, 2004, 11:09:55 AM
Bimbo is an actual brand of bread in Portugal. They make the most pitiful comercials ever.

edit: wow?you have that bread over there too?
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: eward on April 18, 2004, 11:10:24 AM
really?  didnt know that...thought it was a blonde joke, given bill's love of blondes...nevermind then
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: El Duderino on April 18, 2004, 11:56:19 AM
Admin edit for *SPOILERS*



also, i thought it was cool to see that when the bride was in her couffin, and she got the razor out of Budd's boot, Mr. Blonde takes out the same type of razor out of his boot in Reservoir Dogs.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: nix on April 18, 2004, 05:52:54 PM
Budd's boss says, "I need you like I need an asshole, right here", then points to his elbow.

The same dialouge occurs in Rules of Attraction, directed by Quentin's buddy Roger Avary. Wonder if he'll be pissed?
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Born Under Punches on April 19, 2004, 09:06:07 PM
Quote from: nix
Budd's boss says, "I need you like I need an asshole, right here", then points to his elbow.

The same dialouge occurs in Rules of Attraction, directed by Quentin's buddy Roger Avary. Wonder if he'll be pissed?


Funny how I thought the exact same thing.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Kal on April 20, 2004, 12:48:04 AM
Bimbo is everywhere... and I think the same company owns a big company in the USA but they didnt use the same name for the product for obvious reasons...
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: eward on April 20, 2004, 07:54:38 AM
never heard of it before...it aint widely distributed in my area
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: A Matter Of Chance on April 20, 2004, 08:17:34 AM
I just noticed this in volume 1, but during the anime when O-Ren is under the bed and the two guys are shooting at her, there are some false light leaks like in Pulp Fiction
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: ©brad on April 20, 2004, 01:18:06 PM
false light what?
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: A Matter Of Chance on April 20, 2004, 01:23:38 PM
light leaks
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: ©brad on April 20, 2004, 01:42:11 PM
Quote from: A Matter Of Chance
light leaks


yeah i can read. what i meant was, what is a false light leak?
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: A Matter Of Chance on April 20, 2004, 02:53:25 PM
You know what I light leak is, I assume, so they just added them in the anime. It's not a real light leak, it's just animated in.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: eward on April 20, 2004, 05:47:05 PM
maybe it was just gunfire.....or quick cuts to the bullets hitting matzumotos back
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: A Matter Of Chance on April 20, 2004, 07:26:07 PM
Yeah, I am probably just being an idiot
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: NEON MERCURY on April 20, 2004, 09:00:50 PM
Quote from: A Matter Of Chance
Yeah, I am probably just being an idiot



 :cry: ..never say bad things about yourself
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: tpfkabi on April 20, 2004, 09:08:34 PM
Quote from: eward
never heard of it before...it aint widely distributed in my area


look in the mexican food section that has all of the labels in actual Spanish........i think even my little town gets some Bimbo stuff.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: eward on April 20, 2004, 11:14:58 PM
Quote from: A Matter Of Chance
Yeah, I am probably just being an idiot


no, no, i didn't mean that......i could be wrong, i am judging from memory....
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: eward on April 20, 2004, 11:15:46 PM
Quote from: bigideas
Quote from: eward
never heard of it before...it aint widely distributed in my area


look in the mexican food section that has all of the labels in actual Spanish........i think even my little town gets some Bimbo stuff.


maybe it was still a joke to use the BIMBO brand tho..huh?  eh?  okay, maybe no....
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: El Duderino on April 20, 2004, 11:58:29 PM
does anyone else get a "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon" feel from the Hatori Hanzo sword and also during the big fight scene when Uma and Gordon Liu fly to the balcony? maybe i'm alone, anyone else?
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: SoNowThen on April 22, 2004, 09:42:18 AM
Pretty sure this hasn't been mentioned yet...

and even though I've never seen this movie, I walked by the library and read the back, and it would seem that QT got his starting point from it:

The Bride Wore Black by Truffaut.

Lady wronged on her wedding day seeks bloody revenge. I've been meaning to, but haven't got around to watching it yet. Anybody seen? Confirm/deny as a reference point?
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: modage on April 22, 2004, 04:12:10 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
The Bride Wore Black by Truffaut?

i read that mentioned in a few reviews so i looked up the thing on amazon a few months ago, but havent heard QT confirm it as a reference point.  (although imagining he's never seen it is unlikely, since hes, well Quentin Tarantino).
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Born Under Punches on April 23, 2004, 10:09:46 AM
Quentin's said that he's aware of the film but hasn't seen it, claiming that he's more of a Godardian and not a Truffautian.  The movie is based on the novel by Cordell Woolrich, who wrote a few of the pulp novels that somewhat inspired Pulp Fiction.  I'm thinking he may have read the book and not seen the movie.  (QT not seeing a movie?  Blasphemy!)
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: (kelvin) on April 26, 2004, 04:25:04 PM
At the end of vol. 2, in the daughter's room, you see a toy figure of a horse beside the bed on a small table. I noticed that I still have EXACTLY the same horse from my childhood days. I just wondered if there is anything special about it.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Raikus on April 26, 2004, 04:47:18 PM
Quote from: kelvin
At the end of vol. 2, in the daughter's room, you see a toy figure of a horse beside the bed on a small table. I noticed that I still have EXACTLY the same horse from my childhood days. I just wondered if there is anything special about it.

My wife has about a hundred of them in her parent's attic. There supposed to be worth a bit of cash for collectors. I think they're called "Breyer's" but I could be mistaken.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: pete on April 26, 2004, 06:41:13 PM
there's a part in the house of blue leaves in the first one when Gordon Liu's Johnny Mo flies up onto the second floor, Gordon Liu has flown up to a very similarly-structured restaurant in another Yuen WoPing-choreographed film, Deadly China Hero.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: LostEraser on May 09, 2004, 03:57:28 PM
Can anyone name all the movies Quentin used the Ennio Morricone music from? In both Vol 1 & 2. I'm lazy and I don't feel like looking them up right now. lol!
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Pubrick on May 10, 2004, 12:33:43 AM
then look them up urself when u DO feel like it. u obviously don't care that much if u can't be bothered.

laugh out loud.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: LostEraser on May 10, 2004, 03:17:47 AM
Quote from: Pubrick
then look them up urself when u DO feel like it. u obviously don't care that much if u can't be bothered.

laugh out loud.


LMAO! Good point. Though I'm one step ahead of you, I've already looked 'em all up. I just thought I'd see if anyone else did it first.  :wink:  :P
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: cine on May 10, 2004, 08:11:54 AM
Quote from: LostEraser
LMAO! Good point. Though I'm one step ahead of you, I've already looked 'em all up. I just thought I'd see if anyone else did it first.  :wink:  :P

Boy, you sure fooled everyone, didn't you?

..laughing my ass off.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: LostEraser on May 10, 2004, 09:08:21 PM
Quote from: Cinephile
Quote from: LostEraser
LMAO! Good point. Though I'm one step ahead of you, I've already looked 'em all up. I just thought I'd see if anyone else did it first.  :wink:  :P

Boy, you sure fooled everyone, didn't you?

..laughing my ass off.


 :?: Hey I wasn't trying to fool anyone. Just thought I'd see if anyone had looked it up before me.  :)

Sorry you felt fooled there.  :wink:  :P
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: MacGuffin on May 10, 2004, 09:16:02 PM
(http://www.classic45s.com/images/thewho4.gif)

Rolling On The Floor Laughing My ass Off
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Bethie on May 11, 2004, 01:02:26 AM
Quote from: Pubrick
then look them up urself when u DO feel like it. u obviously don't care that much if u can't be bothered.

laugh out loud.



That turned me on.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: MacGuffin on May 23, 2005, 01:12:43 PM
The Horror Geek Speaks: Thriller: A Cruel Picture
One of the many films that served as an inspiration for Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill. Source: IGN.FilmForce
 
(http://ffmedia.ign.com/filmforce/image/article/615/615564/thriller-dvd_160_1116381873.jpg)

To be totally honest, the main reason people will see Bo Arne Vibenius' 1974 film, Thriller: A Cruel Picture is because it was one the numerous inspirations for Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill. Christina Lindberg's character One Eye is the clear inspiration for Darryl Hannah's Elle Driver. It's unfortunate that this is the only reason people will see Thriller, because, truth be told, it's a really great little exploitation film.

Lindberg is One Eye, a mute young woman who hasn't spoken a word since being raped in a park by a pedophile as a young girl. She lives on a farm with her parents and things seem to be pretty good – until she meets up with a slick-talking pimp who kidnaps her, hooks her on heroine, and turns her out. One Eye's life changes dramatically: she has an eye cut out for disobedience, her parents (who think she left because she hated them – another of the pimp's cruel machinations) kill themselves, and the young woman is forced to fulfill any and every kind of sexual perversion imaginable. This is a movie that definitely lives up to its A Cruel Picture subtitle.

However, since One Eye is hopelessly hooked on heroin (which the pimp doles out to her daily as long as she behaves), she has a certain amount of freedom on her day off. She can actually wander the city since she's sure to be back in time for her next fix. One Eye uses this time to learn how to shoot, drive a car, and kick ass in hand to hand combat. Once she's acquired these skills, it's time for payback – the ruthless and bloody kind.

One astute observer of the film remarked that Thriller was more "Michael Haneke and Sam Peckinpah than Jess Franco." This is a great way of describing the film. It definitely falls well into the realm of sleazy exploitation cinema, but there's an art to the presentation that's missing in a lot of the more base films of the genre. I'd not only mention Haneke and Peckinpah, but also Abel Ferrara as there are a number of striking similarities between this film and Ferrara's seminal Ms. .45. A mute heroine who's been raped is pushed to revenge and becomes a goddess reborn in both films – yet each stands as a unique piece of cinema in its own right.

Lindberg is right up there with Zoe Tamerlis as far as lead actresses go. Both play the mute victim role with a surprising amount of depth and nuance. Lindberg's performance is far better than Hannah's spoofing of the role in Tarantino's film as well. This is yet another example of the problems I have with Tarantino's handling of that particular film – if he genuinely loves these movies like Thriller, then why borrow elements from them and treat them as cheap jokes? Elle Driver is a poor caricature of One Eye – and if Tarantino wanted to pay homage to the character, he could have done so in a more serious fashion.

The film itself is a heady mix of sex and violence, complete with numerous hardcore insert shots. If pornographic sex bothers you, there are a few parts of this film you'll want to skip. Yet, in this regard, it's more like Baise Moi than Tinto Brass' Caligula – Caligula used sex like a typical porn film, while Thriller and Baise Moi use it as a story element that exists in the film because it's an organic outgrowth of the plot. In this regard, it's still exploitative, but it does serve at least something of a higher purpose.

The violence is pretty tame overall – Vibenius loves to shoot each murder in slow motion, which is sort of cool at first, but tends to drag things out as the film progresses. There are lots of exploding blood squibs, but not much else in terms of gore – the film's one decapitation is kept entirely offscreen, implied more through sound than any sort of visual.

Speaking of the sound, the film has one of the oddest, most jarring soundtracks I've come across – and it complements the film perfectly. Again, you can sort of see its influence in the music Tarantino chose for Kill Bill.

In the end, Thriller wasn't the first film to be banned in Sweden – but it was the first homegrown film to be banned there. It's hard to imagine it inspiring that sort of reaction today since it's almost quaint in comparison to some of the other films out there. Even the sex is your garden variety porn – not anything resembling legitimate rape or things of that nature. Yet, it's still a mean little film – and one worth checking out if you're at all interested in cult exploitation cinema or if you're just curious about some Quentin Tarantino's cinematic influences.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Reinhold on June 10, 2005, 08:38:55 PM
Quote from: Duck Sauce
Quote from: coffeebeetle
Yesssss.....I was waiting for the dashed/animated square...I heard a couple of chuckles from the audience too, so that was great.


I laughed out loud, everybody looked at me.


me too.
Title: References in Kill Bill
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on June 20, 2005, 12:15:43 PM
Quote from: MacGuffin
The Horror Geek Speaks: Thriller: A Cruel Picture
One of the many films that served as an inspiration for Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill. Source: IGN.FilmForce
 
(http://ffmedia.ign.com/filmforce/image/article/615/615564/thriller-dvd_160_1116381873.jpg)

To be totally honest, the main reason people will see Bo Arne Vibenius' 1974 film, Thriller: A Cruel Picture is because it was one the numerous inspirations for Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill. Christina Lindberg's character One Eye is the clear inspiration for Darryl Hannah's Elle Driver. It's unfortunate that this is the only reason people will see Thriller, because, truth be told, it's a really great little exploitation film.

Lindberg is One Eye, a mute young woman who hasn't spoken a word since being raped in a park by a pedophile as a young girl. She lives on a farm with her parents and things seem to be pretty good – until she meets up with a slick-talking pimp who kidnaps her, hooks her on heroine, and turns her out. One Eye's life changes dramatically: she has an eye cut out for disobedience, her parents (who think she left because she hated them – another of the pimp's cruel machinations) kill themselves, and the young woman is forced to fulfill any and every kind of sexual perversion imaginable. This is a movie that definitely lives up to its A Cruel Picture subtitle.

However, since One Eye is hopelessly hooked on heroin (which the pimp doles out to her daily as long as she behaves), she has a certain amount of freedom on her day off. She can actually wander the city since she's sure to be back in time for her next fix. One Eye uses this time to learn how to shoot, drive a car, and kick ass in hand to hand combat. Once she's acquired these skills, it's time for payback – the ruthless and bloody kind.

One astute observer of the film remarked that Thriller was more "Michael Haneke and Sam Peckinpah than Jess Franco." This is a great way of describing the film. It definitely falls well into the realm of sleazy exploitation cinema, but there's an art to the presentation that's missing in a lot of the more base films of the genre. I'd not only mention Haneke and Peckinpah, but also Abel Ferrara as there are a number of striking similarities between this film and Ferrara's seminal Ms. .45. A mute heroine who's been raped is pushed to revenge and becomes a goddess reborn in both films – yet each stands as a unique piece of cinema in its own right.

Lindberg is right up there with Zoe Tamerlis as far as lead actresses go. Both play the mute victim role with a surprising amount of depth and nuance. Lindberg's performance is far better than Hannah's spoofing of the role in Tarantino's film as well. This is yet another example of the problems I have with Tarantino's handling of that particular film – if he genuinely loves these movies like Thriller, then why borrow elements from them and treat them as cheap jokes? Elle Driver is a poor caricature of One Eye – and if Tarantino wanted to pay homage to the character, he could have done so in a more serious fashion.

The film itself is a heady mix of sex and violence, complete with numerous hardcore insert shots. If pornographic sex bothers you, there are a few parts of this film you'll want to skip. Yet, in this regard, it's more like Baise Moi than Tinto Brass' Caligula – Caligula used sex like a typical porn film, while Thriller and Baise Moi use it as a story element that exists in the film because it's an organic outgrowth of the plot. In this regard, it's still exploitative, but it does serve at least something of a higher purpose.

The violence is pretty tame overall – Vibenius loves to shoot each murder in slow motion, which is sort of cool at first, but tends to drag things out as the film progresses. There are lots of exploding blood squibs, but not much else in terms of gore – the film's one decapitation is kept entirely offscreen, implied more through sound than any sort of visual.

Speaking of the sound, the film has one of the oddest, most jarring soundtracks I've come across – and it complements the film perfectly. Again, you can sort of see its influence in the music Tarantino chose for Kill Bill.

In the end, Thriller wasn't the first film to be banned in Sweden – but it was the first homegrown film to be banned there. It's hard to imagine it inspiring that sort of reaction today since it's almost quaint in comparison to some of the other films out there. Even the sex is your garden variety porn – not anything resembling legitimate rape or things of that nature. Yet, it's still a mean little film – and one worth checking out if you're at all interested in cult exploitation cinema or if you're just curious about some Quentin Tarantino's cinematic influences.


Damn, I'd love to see this movie right now. It sounds like one hell of a brutal ride.
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Reinhold on April 11, 2006, 11:17:12 PM
the notes that start the "verses" in Twisted Nerve are similar to the tones in the party scene in Midnight Cowboy.
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: hedwig on April 11, 2006, 11:37:12 PM
the notes that start the "verses" in Twisted nerve are similar to the tones in the party scene in Midnight Cowboy.
WHOA WHOA WHOA, SPOILERS.


another reference:
-the coffee pot that appears in the Vivica A. Fox fight scene is the same coffee pot that Judge Reinhold used to splash coffee on the face of the convenience store robber in Fast Times at Ridgemont High.
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: I Don't Believe in Beatles on April 11, 2006, 11:54:15 PM
And the "Kill" in the title is a reference to this movie:  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0063186/
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: JG on April 12, 2006, 01:41:02 PM
And "Bill" is of course a reference to this little-know gem:  http://imdb.com/title/tt0082075/
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Pozer on April 13, 2006, 12:57:55 AM
I thought we killed Bill.
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: cine on April 13, 2006, 01:17:37 AM
Quote from: Hedwig (deleted 1 minute later)
another reference:
-Kill Bill Vol. 2 was directed by Quentin Tarantino, who also directed Kill Bill Vol. 1, which was directed by the same person who directed Pulp Fiction, which was directed by Quentin Tarantino, whose last name is an anagram of Tarnation, which was directed by Jonathan Caouette, who was recently at an event with Werner Herzog, who directed Grizzly Man, which wasn't nominated for a Best Documentary Oscar, unlike March of the Penguins, whose director walked onstage making penguin jokes, which was the same thing Roger Avery also did when he won for Pulp Fiction, which starred Uma Thuman, who was also the star of She's Gotta Have It, which was directed by Rob Reiner.


that's THE most obscure film-geek reference in the movie. now everyone listen to pozer. Bill is dead and so is this thread.

worst post EVER.  :bravo:
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: hedwig on April 13, 2006, 01:25:15 AM
Quote from: Hedwig (deleted 1 minute later)
another reference:
-Kill Bill Vol. 2 was directed by Quentin Tarantino, who also directed Kill Bill Vol. 1, which was directed by the same person who directed Pulp Fiction, which was directed by Quentin Tarantino, whose last name is an anagram of Tarnation, which was directed by Jonathan Caouette, who was recently at an event with Werner Herzog, who directed Grizzly Man, which wasn't nominated for a Best Documentary Oscar, unlike March of the Penguins, whose director walked onstage making penguin jokes, which was the same thing Roger Avery also did when he won for Pulp Fiction, which starred Uma Thuman, who was also the star of She's Gotta Have It, which was directed by Rob Reiner.


that's THE most obscure film-geek reference in the movie. now everyone listen to pozer. Bill is dead and so is this thread.

worst post EVER.  :bravo:

oh very funny.

GUYS I DIDNT ACTUALLY WRITE THAT, CINEPHILE'S TRYING TO BE FUNNY  :yabbse-thumbdown:
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: cine on April 13, 2006, 01:27:36 AM
oh very funny.

GUYS I DIDNT ACTUALLY WRITE THAT, CINEPHILE'S TRYING TO BE FUNNY  :yabbse-thumbdown:

second worst post EVER.  :bravo:
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: hedwig on April 13, 2006, 01:42:31 AM
:bravo:

you won't be applauding when i kill you in your sleep tonight    (http://elouai.com/images/yahoo/32.gif)
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Pozer on April 13, 2006, 10:54:08 AM
Quote from: Hedwig (deleted 1 minute later)
another reference:
Bill is dead and so is this thread.
And that's a reference to QT's little rhyme lines.  ex: "My name's Paul and this shit's between ya'll."
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Reelist on December 18, 2010, 10:16:09 AM
And that's a reference to QT's little rhyme lines.  ex: "My name's Paul and this shit's between ya'll."

"My name's Pit, and your ass ain't talking your way out of this shit."

I was watching this Tobe Hooper movie last night called Eaten Alive and in the very first scene there's a close up of Robert Englund's zipper and he goes "My name's Buck, and I like to fuck" and then he proceeds to try and rape a girl. I knew Tarantino didn't come up with that on his own!
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: modage on February 05, 2011, 01:25:14 PM
MUST WATCH: http://hollywood-elsewhere.com/2011/02/kill_bill_remix.php

Everything in Kill Bill is stolen.
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Gold Trumpet on February 05, 2011, 02:48:02 PM
It's a good video. It should make people who like Tarantino and Kill Bill more impressed with the film.
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: jerome on February 05, 2011, 06:07:09 PM
One I thought of recently watching the Green Hornet (tv show) is if the crazy 88 masks are referencing that?

indeed. if i remember correctly, thurman's description of liu's boadyguard/main crazy 88 dude goes something like "the bald guy with the kato mask..."
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: Pubrick on February 07, 2011, 01:47:29 AM
they missed the biggest one:

the whole film is a reference to a steaming turd.
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: pete on February 07, 2011, 11:34:39 AM
I said this on GT's facebook page already - I think the film sometimes confuses genre conventions with homages to a single film. for example, all the sword stuff came from the chanbara, or samurai b-movies, as opposed to a kurosawa film. and I think QT, in an interview, said put some Goddard in there that was entirely missed, and the whole film is dedicated to Chang Cheh, as it said in the opening credits, but the guy did not pick up a single chang cheh reference.

I think he did a good job with the editing. that was fun. still he reminds me of a thing tarantino said at a Q&A - critics love to project.
Title: Re: References in Kill Bill
Post by: RegularKarate on February 07, 2011, 01:23:20 PM
I don't know what it is, but I started watching the Everything is a remix series last week and it rubs me the wrong way.

I feel like it's a non-statement.  Everything has always borrowed from something else.  Art influences art.
Is he trying to call things like this out?  Is he expecting us to be surprised?  When Kill Bill first came out, most of these things were discussed to no end.  QT is pretty proud of this stuff.

I don't know... just seems like a pointless project... information that most people already know presented in a rather uninteresting way.