XIXAX Film Forum

The Director's Chair => Stanley Kubrick => Topic started by: Duck Sauce on February 06, 2003, 12:49:06 AM

Title: The ones that never were
Post by: Duck Sauce on February 06, 2003, 12:49:06 AM
Coming complementary with my Kubrick box set was the Kubrick HBO doc and in it, his wife expresses Stanley's regret of not being able to make more movies. I know he had some in the pipeline like AI and his holocaust movie (title?) but what else did he have, and why didnt it get made?
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: life_boy on February 06, 2003, 11:15:45 AM
The project was called The Aryan Papers and it was based on Louis Begley's novel Wartime Lies.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Gold Trumpet on February 06, 2003, 11:33:54 AM
The most famous is the Napolean movie he started to make in 1969 but lost financing when a movie on Napolean was released at the time and tanked at the box office so his financers got scared and backed out.

Also, there was the adaptation of the horror novel, Perfume: A Story of a Murderer, in the early 1980s that would have kinda mixed ideas of A Clockwork Orange with the horror of The Shining.

He wanted to adapt a holacaust novel in the late 1950s called Burning Secret.

There was also a biography on a female writer of the early 1900s, the name of her eludes me at the moment though.

Another was the very very very ambitious science fiction novel called Foucault's Pendulum, which was the tale of three editors who had read too many manuscripts based on ideas of fanatics and decided to have some fun and rewrite history to how a fanatic would have seen it. This came about in the late 1980s but talks didn't go through as the author of the book wanted to write the screenplay himself.

Also, in the early 1980s, Kubrick toyed with the idea of doing what would become Schindler's List, but he dropped the project.

in 1960, he almost directed Marlon's Brando's western, One Eyed Jacks, but Brando opted to direct it himself.

thats all i can remember off the top of my head.

~rougerum
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Pubrick on February 06, 2003, 12:31:09 PM
he was also thinking of renovating the house.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Duck Sauce on February 06, 2003, 01:49:07 PM
Quote from: The Gold Trumpet
The most famous is the Napolean movie he started to make in 1969...


How far into it did he get?
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Gold Trumpet on February 06, 2003, 03:45:15 PM
He had locations scouted for the shooting, someone agreeing to play Napolean and consensus was that it likely would have been Jack Nicholson and also had oxford students hired for looking into the history of Napolean, basically getting every single fact they could find of him, doesn't matter how trivial. Kubrick also searched the globe for different artifacts on Napolean and even was as lucky to obtain his death mask. Also reports he had an army of a country hired to play extras, but i am not confident which country though i want to say belguim's or some other country in that area. So basically, they were well into pre production and near ready to begin shooting.

And a great fact is that when it was all said and done, Kubrick had amassed the greatest library on Napolean in the world just in his personal collection, collecting over 18,000 books on him.  It was basically the subject Kubrick wanted to film most of any movie he did or didn't make.

~rougerum
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: RegularKarate on February 06, 2003, 04:21:27 PM
Quote from: P
he was also thinking of renovating the house.

How far into it did he get?
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Gold Trumpet on February 06, 2003, 09:14:24 PM
he finished that but it took him a few good years in the early part of the 1980s

~rougerum
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Duck Sauce on February 06, 2003, 09:38:08 PM
Quote from: The Gold Trumpet
he finished that but it took him a few good years in the early part of the 1980s

~rougerum


Lots of rock work around the chimney, couldnt get it right. He was a perfectionist you know.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: MacGuffin on February 07, 2003, 02:22:02 AM
Screenplay for "The German Lieutenant" by Kubrick and Richard Adams:

http://www.fortunecity.com/tattooine/clarke/38/scripts/TheGermanLieutenant.txt
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: BrainSushi on March 09, 2003, 02:05:03 PM
What about Kubrick's A.I.? I've heard rumors that he was holding off on this because he wanted an actual robot to play David :shock:  

Also, at one point, I don't know if it was before or after the animated films, but well before the existence of good computer effects, and when Peter Jackson was going through puberty, Kubrick had been offered to direct The Lord of the Rings. He declared that the books were "unfilmable," or something to that extent.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Gold Trumpet on March 09, 2003, 02:21:28 PM
He was holding off A.I. due to reasons that he wanted to wait for computer technology to advance. His plans was to begin filming A.I. right after completion of Eyes Wide Shut. There are rumors though, that Kubrick never really did complete the story for A.I., that he never found the story he really wanted to film. There is some truth to this in all the different science fiction writers he went through in trying to collabarate and all the unsuccesses. And then there is the starting point of what he concieved the story to be, in that it would be a focus on three different natural elements: fire, water and ice. The finished product, by Speilberg, feels like an ode to the life career of Kubrick with how so many different things in the film feel like they are borrowed from a previous Kubrick film so there definitely may be more truth to this than possible.

In the late 1960s, the Beatles approached Kubrick to adapt Lord of the Rings into a movie and he declined calling it "unfilmmable."

There is one project though, that I hear faint things about right after he died, that I never heard of any since. All I remember from the rumor is that Kubrick, in inspiration from Kieslowski, was going to write, or help adapt, or help finance a french movie that was going to be made. The story was said to be a very basic one dealing with just today's world and was said to be inspired by Kiewslowski films. I completely forget the storyline, but I remember it was a story and project Kubrick had his name to.

~rougerum
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Cecil on March 10, 2003, 03:39:40 PM
i think that the whole "a.i." thing is a conspiracy. a lie created by spielberg to take over kubricks project without being called a thief. i think kubrick inteaded to make this film when the technology had advanced enough to his liking, not told spielberg that he should make it cause its more his "type of movie." but then he, well... he unfortunately left this world. spielberg then didnt skip a beat by moving in on his project. who knows, maybe spielberg is even responsible for kubricks... MURDER. yeah i said it. spielberg STOLE a.i. from kubrick.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: AlguienEstolamiPantalones on March 10, 2003, 03:53:31 PM
Quote from: cecil b. demented
maybe spielberg is even responsible for kubricks... MURDER. yeah i said it. spielberg STOLE a.i. from kubrick.


this may be true, its a little known fact that kubrick was hard at work on his next project which would of followed a.i, and that too was stolen from him, and turned into the movie " snow dogs"

he had the script done and everything, i fear also that james coburn caught wind of this and well we know what happened to him.

kubrick was a HUGE fan of Rnb singer Sisqo, and in his original notes it says " Get me sisqo" for this film"
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Ghostboy on March 10, 2003, 08:42:31 PM
That reminds me of a great April Fools scoop from Coming Attractions. Raja Gosnell, director of Scooby Doo, claimed that he had received authorization from Kubrick before his death to remake 2001 with Matthew Lillard and Freddie Prinze, Jr.

On a more serious note, has anyone read Brian Aldiss' original short story that inspired AI? It's great.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Duck Sauce on March 11, 2003, 12:24:52 AM
Quote from: Ghostboy


On a more serious note, has anyone read Brian Aldiss' original short story that inspired AI? It's great.


I have and I agree. What was the title of it again? Something lasts all something?
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Ghostboy on March 11, 2003, 12:32:14 AM
Super Toys Last All Summer Long.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: adolfwolfli on August 12, 2003, 08:59:15 AM
Quote from: Cecil B. Demented
i think that the whole "a.i." thing is a conspiracy. a lie created by spielberg to take over kubricks project without being called a thief. i think kubrick inteaded to make this film when the technology had advanced enough to his liking, not told spielberg that he should make it cause its more his "type of movie." but then he, well... he unfortunately left this world. spielberg then didnt skip a beat by moving in on his project. who knows, maybe spielberg is even responsible for kubricks... MURDER. yeah i said it. spielberg STOLE a.i. from kubrick.


Demented, you're being ironic and sarcastic, right?  It is well documented that the two were mutual admirers of each other's work, had many long discussions on the phone well into the night, and at one point Kubrick decided he would only produce A.I. for Spielberg after Kubrick saw "Jurassic Park", thinking that Steven had a better handle on the digital effects techniques needed to pull off A.I.  Kubrick was a fan of all of Spielberg's films with the exeption of Schindler's List - he said that the Halocaust was about the millions of people that died and Spielberg had made a movie about the couple hundred that lived...anyway, Spielberg took over A.I. with Stanley's full blessing, and was allowed total access to all the pre-production materials he had amassed since he first began super-toying with the idea.

That being said, I am not a fan of how the movie turned out...
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Cecil on August 12, 2003, 10:29:05 AM
Quote from: adolfwolfli
Demented, you're being ironic and sarcastic, right?


sar-what? no, i honestly believe that spielberg murdered kubrick and then sold his beard to jackson. how many times do i have to say this? kubrick was just humoring spielberg with those phone calls. "so spielberg," giggles" "whats your opinion on the auteur theory?"  "well, q-brick..."
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: ᾦɐļᵲʊʂ on August 12, 2003, 10:54:15 AM
I really wonder how it would've been if Kubrick did it all.  Damn you Speilberg.  Damn you.  Why did you have to kill Kubrick?  But watch out, Cecil is on to you.  And he hates mainstream cinema.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: modage on February 20, 2004, 03:03:26 PM
from the new Entertainment Weekly...

CATCHING UP WITH STANLEY KUBRICK
Like Tupac and Jim Croce, Stanley Kubrick- who directed just three movies in the last two decades-is slowly becoming more prolific in death than he was in life.  First came Eyes Wide Shut, which opened four months after Kubricks passing.  Then there was A.I., a longitme project ultimately made by Steven Spielberg.  And now two more movies are on their way.  One, a 50's thriller called "Lunatic at Large", emerges from an arcane corner of teh filmmakers legend having to do with a treatment he commisioned from his Paths of Glory co-screenwriter, pulp author Jim Thompson, and then misplaced.  For some 40 years the manuscript was considered MIA-until producer Phillip Hobbs (who, as Kubricks son-in-law, worked closely with him on Full Metal Jacket and other projects) dug it up recently while sifting through some old papers.  According to Hobbs, Lunatic will, "with luck...be in production in late 2004."  Ditto "God Fearing Man", an early 20th centruy drama that would be the first original Kubrick-pened script produced since 1955's Killers Kiss.  No word on who'll star or direct.  "Stanley was involved in both projects in 1956 and 1957," says Hobbs, "and he never forgot either."
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: The Disco Kid on February 20, 2004, 03:31:07 PM
I remember reading that Kubrick had something like 1500 storyboards done for AI. Has anyone seen these? Does anyone know where I would be able to find them?
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: ono on February 20, 2004, 07:27:59 PM
I read he burned/destroyed everything even remotely related to 2001 so that no one could make a sequel even after he died.  Sadly, his efforts failed.  At least I'm told the sequel still sucks.  Haven't seen it myself, though.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: modage on February 20, 2004, 07:48:43 PM
but he was alive when 2010 came out?

also, i'm shocked that the news that a kubrick script being made by someone else hasnt lit the board afire with controversy.  i'm both ecstatic and terrified about it.  i guess it depends on whos doing it.  my interest is piqued though either way.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Fernando on February 20, 2004, 08:31:00 PM
Quote from: themodernage02
from the new Entertainment Weekly...

CATCHING UP WITH STANLEY KUBRICK
"God Fearing Man", an early 20th centruy drama that would be the first original Kubrick-pened script produced since 1955's Killers Kiss.  No word on who'll star or direct.  "Stanley was involved in both projects in 1956 and 1957," says Hobbs, "and he never forgot either."


Quote from: themodernage02

i'm shocked that the news that a kubrick script being made by someone else hasnt lit the board afire with controversy. i'm both ecstatic and terrified about it. i guess it depends on whos doing it. my interest is piqued though either way.



DITTO.

 :shock:  :shock: GOD HELP US ALL   :shock:  :shock:
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Pubrick on February 21, 2004, 03:39:20 AM
sigh.

- original screenplays were not his thing. they will be less than great.
- if they didn't get made it was for a reason.
- who the EFF will direct them anyway? tom tykwer probably *falls asleep*
- really. his thing was that he adapted books and totally raped them to create sumthing amazing.

bad good news.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: LostEraser on June 19, 2004, 10:24:19 PM
Quote from: Cecil
i think that the whole "a.i." thing is a conspiracy. a lie created by spielberg to take over kubricks project without being called a thief.


I actually agree with this and always have (though I'm hesitant to say so since I see how many people here disagree with it). I remember following the progress of both EWS and A.I. obsessively many years ago. And it was only after Kubricks death that I heard all this stuff about how he was planning to give the project to Speilberg the whole time.

It may be true that Kubrick suggested to Spielberg that he direct the film, and I do know that they both did admire each others work. But Kubrick has been known to suggest a lot of things that never ended up happening (i.e. hiring composers or writers that he never ended up working with). So I think that if Kubrick had lived he most defintly would have directed A.I. himself.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on June 20, 2004, 05:49:17 AM
Quote from: LostEraser
So I think that if Kubrick had lived he most defintly would have directed A.I. himself.


Who cares? He didn't.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Big Owl on June 20, 2004, 05:48:43 PM
KUBRICK LIVES . But sadly could only fulfill his ambitions to create "Spy Kids" under a different identity. He was also in hiding for several years as an austrian shepard -farming goats and other livestock ....in austria
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: LostEraser on June 20, 2004, 06:03:06 PM
Quote from: ElPandaRoyal
Quote from: LostEraser
So I think that if Kubrick had lived he most defintly would have directed A.I. himself.


Who cares? He didn't.


Well, I guess I can't argue with that.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: ono on September 24, 2004, 12:30:16 AM
Quote from: About a year and a half ago, The Gold Trumpet
In the late 1960s, the Beatles approached Kubrick to adapt Lord of the Rings into a movie and he declined calling it "unfilmmable."

A year and a half later I remembered that Kubrick is quoted as saying: "If it can be written, or thought, it can be filmed."

Don't know what to make of it.  Either someone misquoted him, or he contradicted himself.  Which, you know, happens.  Especially if you're a famous person whose words get recorded for posterity.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: NEON MERCURY on September 24, 2004, 10:55:53 AM
oh, he was just stoned.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: mutinyco on September 24, 2004, 08:10:27 PM
At the time he said it, he was right. It was a question of technology. Understand, the reason he took so long to get AI going was because he was waiting for the effects to reach his vision. So, yes, while it CAN be filmed, it's just a question of when.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: cowboykurtis on May 24, 2005, 04:22:26 PM
Quote from: themodernage02

CATCHING UP WITH STANLEY KUBRICK
Two more movies are on their way.  One, a 50's thriller called "Lunatic at Large", emerges from an arcane corner of teh filmmakers legend having to do with a treatment he commisioned from his Paths of Glory co-screenwriter, pulp author Jim Thompson, and then misplaced.  For some 40 years the manuscript was considered MIA-until producer Phillip Hobbs (who, as Kubricks son-in-law, worked closely with him on Full Metal Jacket and other projects) dug it up recently while sifting through some old papers.  According to Hobbs, Lunatic will, "with luck...be in production in late 2004."  Ditto "God Fearing Man", an early 20th centruy drama that would be the first original Kubrick-pened script produced since 1955's Killers Kiss.  No word on who'll star or direct.  "Stanley was involved in both projects in 1956 and 1957," says Hobbs, "and he never forgot either."


any development with either of these?
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Pubrick on November 06, 2007, 06:04:33 AM
those who have the new edition of EWS: have any of you seen the extra feature on his unfinished projects?

i would really like to know what they say/show about Eric Brighteyes. also how much time is devoted to each project, and if there's anything like the great interview with Johanna ter Steege (star of aryan papers) that was posted by fernando a while ago:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8573044396498461503&q=kubrick&hl=en

dvdbeaver doesn't say how long the featurette runs for, only that napoleon is covered, and i havn't read any other reviews so i hav no idea how much detail they get into.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: MacGuffin on November 06, 2007, 06:25:47 AM
those who have the new edition of EWS: have any of you seen the extra feature on his unfinished projects?

i would really like to know what they say/show about Eric Brighteyes. also how much time is devoted to each project, and if there's anything like the great interview with Johanna ter Steege (star of aryan papers) that was posted by fernando a while ago:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8573044396498461503&q=kubrick&hl=en

dvdbeaver doesn't say how long the featurette runs for, only that napoleon is covered, and i havn't read any other reviews so i hav no idea how much detail they get into.

That featurette is about 30 minutes and only really covers Napoleon and Aryan Papers, with each project sharing the running time. No interview with Johanna; only one with Joseph Mazzello, along with the production designer, the costumer, Jan, etc. They talk about what Kubrick liked about the project, how far in he was to filming it, and why it was eventually halted.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Pubrick on November 06, 2007, 06:59:42 AM
thanks mac.

that's kinda disappointing actually.

then again, realistically i wouldn't be satisfied until i got a call from Jan himself.

Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: MacGuffin on May 01, 2008, 01:15:05 AM
Uma Thurman Confesses to Kubrick’s ‘Wartime Lies’
Source: MTV

The other day we brought you news that Uma Thurman declined a role in “Lord of the Rings,” a choice she now says was a huge mistake.

But in her storied career of more than two decades, there is one project that trumps even J.R.R. Tolkien’s fabled legendarium in Thurman’s own personal game of career What if … what if she had gotten to work with Stanley Kubrick?

“I was going to make a film with him — for a long time I was scheduled to make a film with him,” she said of “Wartime Lies,” a movie she was signed on to make with Kubrick in the early 90s. “I was contracted to do it and things happened and he shelved the film. He never made the film.”

The story of two Jewish family members, a young woman and her nephew, who disguise themselves as devout Catholics in order to avoid Nazi persecution, “Wartime Lies” was scrapped by the mercurial director after Steven Spielberg’s “Schindler’s List.” At the time, he was reputed to have concluded that an accurate film about the Holocaust was impossible — that the horrors of the era could never be captured on film.

His decision to move on to other projects was “devastating,” said Thurman.

“It was devastating because it was an incredible part,” she confessed. “It would have been the part of my career, the best part I ever had been offered or had written for me, or anything.”

Those are some big words for an actress who’s played Mia Wallace and the Bride. A new draft of “Wartime Lies” is being written by “The Departed” screenwriter William Monahan.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: ©brad on May 01, 2008, 10:57:12 AM
“It was devastating because it was an incredible part,” she confessed. “It would have been the part of my career, the best part I ever had been offered or had written for me, or anything.”

take that quentin.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: OrHowILearnedTo on May 02, 2008, 02:21:50 AM
A new draft of “Wartime Lies” is being written by “The Departed” screenwriter William Monahan.

Take that Kubrick.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Fernando on May 02, 2008, 09:21:53 AM
and now I monahang myself..
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: modage on January 10, 2011, 01:09:19 PM
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_AFY8ecYdL4A/TSXwh0gv1uI/AAAAAAAAAVk/EvaGjTYptks/s1600/napoleansm.jpg)

http://www.slashfilm.com/cool-stuff-ones-away-posters/

http://frodesignstore.blogspot.com/2011/01/ones-that-got-away-napolean.html
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Brando on August 30, 2012, 12:37:08 PM
For another tirade: http://www.deadline.com/2012/08/entertainment-one-to-produce-tv-movie-mini-based-on-stanley-kubrick-scripts/ (http://www.deadline.com/2012/08/entertainment-one-to-produce-tv-movie-mini-based-on-stanley-kubrick-scripts/)
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Pubrick on August 30, 2012, 06:18:15 PM
No, that's fine.

Making them tv productions means they'll get the attention they deserve, which is very little.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: wilder on March 28, 2013, 10:02:00 PM
Stanley Kubrick's Unmade Film About Jazz in the Third Reich
by James Hughes
25 March 2013
via The Atlantic

(http://i.imgur.com/cd2cOge.jpg)


Kubrick wanted to tell the tale of Dietrich Schulz-Koehn, a swing-loving Luftwaffe officer who wrote about the music scenes in Nazi-occupied cities using the pen name "Dr. Jazz."


In 1985, Stanley Kubrick was handed a book on the survival of jazz in Nazi-occupied Europe. A snapshot of a Luftwaffe officer casually posing among black, Gypsy, and Jewish musicians outside a Paris nightclub caught his eye. It looked like something out of Dr. Strangelove, he said. He'd long wanted to bring World War II to the screen, and perhaps this photograph offered a way in.

"Stanley's famous saying was that it was easier to fall in love than find a good story," says Tony Frewin, Kubrick's longtime assistant (and, for the purpose of disclosure, an editor-at-large at my former magazine, Stop Smiling). "He was limitlessly interested in anything to do with Nazis and desperately wanted to make a film on the subject."

Kubrick has long been associated with creating arresting visions of warfare. When it was announced this month that Steven Spielberg will produce Kubrick's screenplay Napoleon as a television miniseries, the initial speculation was largely about how the ambitious battle scenes, originally conceived to maximize tens of thousands of extras, will be achieved.

However, it's Kubrick's interest in jazz-loving Nazis that represents his most fascinating unrealized war film. The book that Kubrick was handed, and one he considered adapting soon after wrapping Full Metal Jacket, was Swing Under the Nazis, published in 1985 and written by Mike Zwerin, a trombonist from Queens who had performed with Miles Davis and Eric Dolphy before turning to journalism. The officer in that Strangelovian snapshot was Dietrich Schulz-Koehn, a fanatic for "hot swing" and other variations of jazz outlawed as "jungle music" by his superiors. Schulz-Koehn published an illegal underground newsletter, euphemistically referred to as "travel letters," which flaunted his unique ability to jaunt across Western Europe and report back on the jazz scenes in cities conquered by the Fatherland. Kubrick's title for the project was derived from the pen name Schulz-Koehn published under: Dr. Jazz.

"Stanley was fond of titles in search of screenplays," Frewin says. "And Dr. Jazz was such a rich subject—the contrast of what was going on in the camps, on the Eastern front, and yet here was a German officer who was having a good time listening to jazz. Stanley was also drawn to what this said about music and its ability to unify people and transcend even rigid political differences."

While a script for Dr. Jazz never materialized—and the project was later shelved, in part due to Aryan Papers, a film set in occupied Poland that Kubrick abandoned in the mid-'90s despite an intensive preproduction—Zwerin's research remains engrossing today.

Though stationed in Paris for more than 20 years as the jazz critic for the International Herald Tribune, Zwerin never acclimated. "I consider myself on loan, like a Picasso," he writes in Swing. "One year led to another and now I find myself without a place to hang." Parisian loneliness had become "literally breathtaking, a gasp not a gas." Seeking refuge, Zwerin traveled the continent collecting interviews with the jazz preservationists who gathered in basements and backrooms during occupation, and filed their reminiscences in the IHT, among other publications. (Swing is a collection of his columns that reads like a collage, with digressions upon digressions.)

Zwerin is at his best when conversing with musicians—at one point he even brandishes his horn for a post-interview blowing session—but the more surreal findings come from encounters with the occasional toe-tapping retired Nazi officer. In the skies over London, we learn that a Luftwaffe ace tuned into the BBC while crossing the Channel, hoping to catch a few bars of Glenn Miller before bombing the radio antenna. On the ground, when the Royal Air Force rained bombs on Vienna, a trombonist in a Nazi swing band "would stick his trombone out the window and play 'St. Louis Blues' instead of hiding in the cellar." (In order for that particular jazz standard to pass muster in Vienna, the title was first changed to "Sauerkraut.")

Throughout the book's mere 200 pages, Zwerin unearths lost notes from the underground. A Django Reinhardt record was worth two kilos of butter on the black market. A German objector fondly recalls scoring the plum assignment of tracking down the cream Louis Armstrong preferred for his chapped lips; the brand was available only at pharmacies in Berlin. Upon receiving the shipment of lip salve, which was smuggled Stateside through a Paris club owner, Louis mailed his unknown German aid a personal letter of thanks.

Not all accounts are as lighthearted. Zwerin mourns the Jewish musicians who clung to life by entertaining guards in concentration camps, and those on the run, like Eric Vogel, a Czech jazz trumpeter who soaked his valves in sulfuric acid when Nazis invaders began confiscating instruments. The acid served "to keep anyone from playing military marches on a jazz trumpet." In a 1961 article for Down Beat, Vogel claims his life was spared during a ghetto roundup when an SS officer who had eavesdropped on one of his jam sessions recognized him at headquarters and escorted him home, borrowing some of his jazz records and books as compensation. In Frankfurt, musicians wandered the streets whistling "Harlem"—if a fellow musician recognized the tune, he whistled back.

These clandestine cues and back-alley trysts were a draw for Kubrick. "Stanley thought there was a kind of noir side to this material," says Frewin. "Perhaps an approach like Dr. Mabuse would have suited the story. Stanley said, 'If only he were alive, we could have found a role for Peter Lorre.'"

One intriguing character to cast would have been the German musician Ernst Hollerhagen, who one of Zwerin's interview subjects claims "played the clarinet as good as Benny Goodman, but he had not been born black or Jewish or American." (Goodman records could be purchased in Germany until 1938, Zwerin writes, "then somebody must have realized he was Jewish. After that you could buy Artie Shaw records because they did not know his real name was Arshawsky.") As an act of defiance one night after a show in Frankfurt in 1942, Hollerhagen walked up to a table of musicians at the club, "clicked his heels, raised his right arm, and said in a loud voice so everyone could hear: 'Heil Benny!'"

"Stanley was a great swing-era jazz fan," Frewin says, citing Goodman as one of his favorites. "He had some reservations about modern jazz. I think if he had to disappear to a desert island, it'd be a lot of swing records he'd take, the music of his childhood: Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Harry James." Kubrick had long wanted to use a particular Harry James track in a film, and felt Dr. Jazz afforded the perfect opportunity. When it appeared in Woody Allen's Hannah and Her Sisters, according to Frewin, "it really miffed Stanley that Woody beat him to it." The title, ironically, was "I've Heard That Song Before."

When Mike Zwerin died in 2010, Swing Under the Nazis remained underreported in tributes and appreciations, which is perhaps fitting, given Zwerin's allegiance with artists whose best takes didn't always make it to tape. "I started out to explore a neglected corner of history but it ended up exploring me," he writes in the book's introduction. That his exploration never reached a wider audience is hardly a fault. He whistled a tune down an empty street and Stanley Kubrick whistled back.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: SailorOfTheSeas on October 29, 2014, 05:54:57 AM
What would Kubrick have made after Eyes Wide Shut, had he stayed alive? Is there any accurate info on this?
As far as i know, mostly from the bluray of ews, he passed A.I. onto spielberg and aryan papers was cancelled. I wonder if he would hav just stopped there.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Gold Trumpet on October 31, 2014, 10:24:42 PM
Intention was to go back to working on A.I. He didn't pass A.I. onto Spielberg during his lifetime. He just admitted to Spielberg may have been a film better suited for him but he still had plans to do it.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: BB on November 01, 2014, 10:49:12 AM
I'm pretty sure that's not true. Kubrick had intended to produce A.I. for Spielberg to direct (presented him with a Produced-by-Directed-by title card) and so would have been working on it in that sense, but I don't think it's publicly known what he would have next directed.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: Gold Trumpet on November 01, 2014, 11:06:54 PM
Yea, I was mistaken. I think I was remembering an old article but I just rewatched the Stanley and Me documentary and it basically said what you said.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: OpO1832 on May 13, 2015, 10:36:25 PM
I am totally buying that book about jazz under the third reich. Thanks for the heads up and the guy who wrote is from Queens!
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: wilder on June 22, 2015, 04:15:08 PM
Stanley Kubrick’s ‘The Downslope’ Will Be Film Trilogy From Filmmaker Marc Forster
via Deadline

The Downslope, Stanley Kubrick’s original screenplay written in 1956, is being developed as a feature trilogy with Marc Forster (Finding Neverland, Monster’s Ball, World War Z) attached to direct and produce the first in the series. He also will produce the subsequent features. The Downslope is said to be “a sweeping, historical action-drama” that Kubrick penned following the release of his allegorical war film Fear And Desire and prior to directing his seminal WWI period piece Paths Of Glory.

Kubrick — who died in 1999 — was, of course, one of the most notable filmmakers of our time. This is not the first time that one of his ideas has come to the screen after his death. In 2001, Steven Spielberg brought Kubrick’s vision of A.I. Artificial Intelligence to the screen via Kubrick’s longtime home, Warner Bros. This, however, is something that Kubrick had given to Spielberg after developing the story with numerous screenwriters over decades.

As only Kubrick could, the late filmmaker had spent years before his death studying, developing and writing the story for The Downslope. He even created maps and notes as to how he planned to shoot the movie. It is based on historical events and originally developed with renowned Civil War historian Shelby Foote. The project is said to have the full support from the Kubrick family.

An anti-war story, The Downslope focuses on a bitter, strategic series of Civil War battles in the Shenandoah Valley between young Union General George Armstrong Custer and Confederate Colonel John Singleton Mosby (known as the Gray Ghost for his stealth strategies). His cavalrymen, known as Mosby’s Rangers, continually outsmarted the much-larger enemy forces in a sequence of raids, which enraged Custer and eventually created a fierce cycle of revenge between the two men.

The films after that will expand upon the master filmmaker’s original story and journey west, as postwar Americans settled the new frontier, delivering on the country’s unbending ambitions and dreams of Manifest Destiny.

Lauren Selig — a producer on Lone Survivor and also the upcoming Everest — Barry Levine (Hercules, Oblivion) and Reneé Wolfe (All I See Is You) are developing the material with Forster. Selig initiated the project with producers/rights holders Phil Hobbs (Full Metal Jacket) and Steve Lanning, who are also serving as producers on the project.
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: OpO1832 on June 27, 2015, 12:22:34 PM
Marc Forester is such a shitty director. He fucked up World War Z did an awful job with James Bond.

Monsters Ball was pretentious crap, its only saving grace was halle berry's nude scene and heath ledger's tormented performance.

how the fuck does this guy get the Kubrick property...?
Title: Re: The ones that never were
Post by: 03 on June 28, 2015, 04:00:52 AM
easy cowboy