XIXAX Film Forum

The Director's Chair => Paul Thomas Anderson => Topic started by: velociraptor on November 27, 2017, 11:50:34 AM

Title: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: velociraptor on November 27, 2017, 11:50:34 AM
Mild to medium SPOILERS

http://www.indiewire.com/2017/11/phantom-thread-daniel-day-lewis-interview-filming-paul-thomas-anderson-1201901065/

A majority of “Phantom Thread” takes place inside the fictional House of Woodcock, Reynolds’ home and designer studio located in a Georgian townhouse in London. In order to successfully capture the atmosphere of a living, breathing London fashion studio in the 1950s, Anderson moved production into one of the actual Georgian townhouses. The director’s hope was that the tight space would create an insular world for the film’s production, but it was a decision that proved to be challenging for everyone, especially Day-Lewis.

“It was awful,” Day-Lewis said bluntly of filming, noting that production started off wonderful in the countryside before becoming difficult when the bulk of filming had to take place inside the townhouse. “We had hoped to find that way of working again where we would be self-contained, beholden to no one, and uninterrupted. We built a world we could create and just stay in and no one could get into it. But in this townhouse, which was very beautiful, it was a nightmare.”

According to Day-Lewis: “We were living on top of each other. It was an enormous unit. There was no space. The way it works if it’s helpful is that these rooms belong to you. These rooms are yours, they are part of your life. But of course these rooms for us become storage spaces. You work in a room then you have to move all that shit into another room, and that space becomes a storage space. That entire house was like a termite nest.”

Krieps echoed Day-Lewis’ thoughts on the matter, saying the crowded rooms even gave her a panic attack on set one day. “Suddenly, I couldn’t breathe,” she remembered. “In every room there were just cables, there’s an energy to it and it’s taking the breath away of your character.”

Day-Lewis is famous for his Method acting tendencies, but clearly staying in character was tough in such a small space. The actor even teased that the crew grew unhappy with the film’s tight-knit production, joking, “You see, it’s hard to work with a crew that really hates you…We must be fairly stupid because we didn’t realize it was going to be like that.”

Anderson agreed the filming of the movie was “hard,” especially because the townhouse required the crew to carry all of the heavy film equipment up long and tall staircases. The layout of the set prevented Anderson from shooting in sequence because it proved too difficult to keep bringing the equipment up and down. But the struggle was worth it for the director, who wanted the close quarters to create an intimacy for the movie that would’ve been lost had he shot on a soundstage.

“They lived like mice, like miniature people in these tiny rooms,” Anderson said of the real designers. “They’re all on top of each other working. Whatever life they had, it’s the same thing as their work. There was nowhere for them to go. It was good. It’s the tradition of all those great films that we all love: ‘Rebecca,’ ‘Brief Encounter.’ They take place in real intimate places.”

“We’re all okay now,” Anderson concluded. “But it was hard, it was really hard. There were struggles, but it was struggles that were worth it.”
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilder on November 27, 2017, 01:27:57 PM
Quote
The “There Will Be Blood” director named some of his favorite films with insular confines, including Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rebecca,” David Lean’s “Brief Encounter”, “The Passionate Friends” and Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s “I Know Where I’m Going.” “They all usually take place in intimate spaces,” the filmmaker explained.

https://theplaylist.net/phantom-thread-paul-thomas-anderson-qa-20171127/#cb-content
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Lewton on November 29, 2017, 04:07:20 PM
From a W Magazine interview wth DDL (https://www.wmagazine.com/story/exclusive-daniel-day-lewis-giving-up-acting-phantom-thread), which I'm carefully jumping around in order to seek out quotes, while still avoiding potential spoilers (this has worked out poorly in the past and yet I always convince myself that I can satisfy my curiosity without having anything spoiled; years ago, I ended up accidentally learning the last line in TWBB):

Quote from:
Similarly, for his role as Bill “the Butcher” Cutting in Martin Scorsese’s Gangs of New York, Day-Lewis learned to throw cumbersome knives with pinpoint accuracy; he built a kitchen table when he played an iconoclast living off the grid in The Ballad of Jack & Rose; and he practically rigged a turn-of-the-century oil well for There Will Be Blood.

Comments about his process can sometimes vaguely annoy, as they can seem like distractions from the actual nuances of the performances themselves, which are always more interesting than the preparation, or the tiring "you were a...cobbler?!" myth-making. Given the embargo and the nature of the article, though, I can understand having to curtail more specific references to his acting. I just think DDL's legacy should be more frequently framed in terms of the onscreen results rather than the oft-repeated remarks about preparations. It might be an unstoppable cliche at this point.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: KJ on November 30, 2017, 10:01:31 PM
Still waiting on another 2 hour PTA interview with Maron.

"What does this guy want from me!? Now I have to see it again!"
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on December 08, 2017, 03:12:59 PM
Mark Bridges on designing the costumes for Phantom Thread.

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/behind-screen/phantom-thread-costume-designer-creating-look-a-fictional-fashion-house-1065665

Quote
Some of them will be on display at the ArcLight and at the upcoming Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising's "Annual Art of Motion Picture Costume Design" exhibition.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Lewton on December 08, 2017, 08:04:08 PM
I wonder if PTA will show up on Stephen Colbert's show. I think Colbert would probably handle that interview in a dull way, but still, I have this hunch that it's more likely than any other show.

That reminds me that he went on Jon Stewart's show during The Master's press tour. I didn't expect that.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on December 11, 2017, 03:36:17 PM
There Will Be Greenwood: The Radiohead Rocker on Scoring ‘Phantom Thread’

http://variety.com/2017/film/news/jonny-greenwood-radiohead-phantom-thread-1202636131/

Quote
Greenwood reasoned that if Reynolds listened to music, it would have been Gould. “Lots of slightly obsessive, minimal baroque music,” says Greenwood of the sound the picture called for.

Quote
All told, some 90 minutes of music ended up in the final cut. Says Greenwood: “When I told [this to] Robert Ziegler, who conducted the score, he said, ‘That’s not a soundtrack, that’s a musical!’
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: modage on December 11, 2017, 03:46:10 PM
Guessing there is a great PTA interview coming up on the Channel 33 podcast as host Sean Fennessey (a legit PTA-head) tweeted a photo (https://twitter.com/SeanFennessey/status/938817698317791232) of the two of them recently. 👌🏻
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: modage on December 13, 2017, 08:13:18 AM
http://www.vulture.com/2017/12/director-paul-thomas-anderson-on-phantom-thread-mortality.html
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on December 13, 2017, 11:24:25 AM
http://www.vulture.com/2017/12/director-paul-thomas-anderson-on-phantom-thread-mortality.html

Quote
How many more films do I have left to make? Time’s running out.

That was a wonderful read.  I could hear PTA's voice in my head as I was going thru it.   And I think we should hold a lottery on who gets to use "Arthur Dapple, Jr." as a handle.  He and I haven't seen (and want to see) a lot of the same films.  (Paul, if you see this, I'm available as a plus-one.)
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: d on December 13, 2017, 04:07:40 PM
https://soundcloud.com/thedirectorscut/phantom-thread-with-paul-thomas-anderson-and-rian-johnson-ep-120

Great conversation. I am halfway through it but so far seems not too spoilery. Nice to see Johnson found some time to do that now.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: modage on December 13, 2017, 04:15:03 PM
PTA still loves star wars. The self deprecation is pretty great too. Ha.

https://www.fandango.com/amp/movie-news/heres-what-paul-thomas-andersons-star-wars-movie-would-be-like-752856

"I really need to know who Rey’s parents are," writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson said when we asked why his name was at the top of the list of those in attendance at the premiere of Star Wars: The Last Jedi. "That’s the most pressing question to me about that story. Who are the parents?"

Fandango had a chance to chat with Anderson about his new film Phantom Thread (tickets for an exclusive set of 70MM screenings are now on sale), starring Daniel Day-Lewis in what the notoriously elusive actor is billing as his final performance. The film tracks the meticulous life of a dressmaker (Day-Lewis) in London post-World War II, and what happens when a woman (Vicky Krieps) enters his life and challenges every aspect of his self-absorbed persona.

And while we spoke extensively about Phantom Thread – which, among other things, digs into that love/hate relationship we all have with the universal need to share our lives with another person – we also touched on another universal need: the desire for more Star Wars stories.

"There's a lot of theories around my house," he added. "The kids have a lot of theories, and everybody's really excited. I can't wait to go [to the premiere]. I haven't really been to a premiere in about a billion years, but I love Rian [Johnson’s] work, so I’m really looking forward to what he’s done."

Of course we had to ask the Inherent Vice and Boogie Nights filmmaker what his Star Wars movie would look like.

Anderson smirked, leaned back in his chair and gave it a moment of thought. "F**king over-long and depressing, probably," he said, laughing. "Moody. Obtuse. And look, you know… if it ticks the box of rebels vs. empires, in any form, I’m in. That story never gets old for me. And particularly right now, it’s a really good time for a nice rebel alliance story again. So not only am I a fan of those, but a gigantic fan of Star Wars. I can't wait to see what they've done."
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilder on December 13, 2017, 06:21:59 PM
^ In the interview with Rian Johnson above, he mentions David Lean's The Passionate Friends again. It's streaming right now on Filmstruck.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on December 13, 2017, 07:17:10 PM
Mark Bridges ('Phantom Thread' costume designer) talks illustrating 'characters inner lives'

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2J9QE_Kbjk
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Lewton on December 13, 2017, 07:17:16 PM
http://www.vulture.com/2017/12/director-paul-thomas-anderson-on-phantom-thread-mortality.html

Kind of unsure if this interview really and substantially delves into spoilers, but one of the interviewer's questions about Alma and Reynolds' relationship kind of struck me as a spoiler, minor or otherwise? I might change my mind once I see the film, as what's being described could just be another spin on the basic premise...but I don't know. It's just that the question gets rather specific about the relationship and how it develops throughout the film, and I kind of wish I hadn't read that. It's my own fault for my curiosity leading me to skim the interview.

Just throwing this out here to warn others who are trying to tread carefully.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: jenkins on December 14, 2017, 12:43:20 PM
Phantom Thread with Paul Thomas Anderson and Rian Johnson (Ep. 120) (https://soundcloud.com/thedirectorscut/phantom-thread-with-paul-thomas-anderson-and-rian-johnson-ep-120)
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: jenkins on December 14, 2017, 01:10:12 PM
"I know that you have romance in you," is what PT said to Jonny Greenwood <3
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: csage97 on December 14, 2017, 04:18:21 PM
Phantom Thread with Paul Thomas Anderson and Rian Johnson (Ep. 120) (https://soundcloud.com/thedirectorscut/phantom-thread-with-paul-thomas-anderson-and-rian-johnson-ep-120)

Really nice interview!
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Tdog on December 14, 2017, 06:57:30 PM
Is it spoilery? the movie isnt out until Feb in my country.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: modage on December 15, 2017, 02:09:41 PM
PTA loved La La Land
https://theplaylist.net/paul-thomas-anderson-phantom-thread-20171215/
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on December 15, 2017, 02:35:15 PM
PTA loved La La Land
https://theplaylist.net/paul-thomas-anderson-phantom-thread-20171215/

And directed Inherent Vice.  (But I'm trying not to hold either against him.)   :yabbse-wink:

Another interview with Mark Bridges:

Clothes Make The Characters In ‘Phantom Thread’ – The Contenders Video
https://deadline.com/2017/12/paul-thomas-anderson-phantom-thread-costumes-video-1202227537/
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: modage on December 18, 2017, 11:50:00 AM
http://www.indiewire.com/2017/12/paul-thomas-anderson-interview-biggest-challenge-daniel-day-lewis-1201908492/amp/?__twitter_impression=true
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on December 18, 2017, 10:37:15 PM
Paul Thomas Anderson on How Daniel Day-Lewis Has Helped Make Him a Better Filmmaker

https://www.fandango.com/movie-news/paul-thomas-anderson-on-how-daniel-day-lewis-has-helped-make-him-a-better-filmmaker-752874

Quote
It’s that quality – the act of being meticulous – that Anderson mentions first when we asked what he’s learned from Day-Lewis that’s helped him become a better filmmaker.

“You know, a lot has been made of his meticulousness and all that kind of stuff, and I think it matches up well with my desire to understand everything going into film as best you can in the time that you have,” he said. “I love the way that he works, and the temperature that there is on the set.”

Anderson continued, “It's very focused. It's very quiet. It's all about the work. There's no chit-chat about anything else. People aren't on their phones. There's no f**king around, you know?”
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on December 19, 2017, 03:55:12 PM
[MAJOR SPOILERS!]

Paul Thomas Anderson: Why I Needed to Make 'Phantom Thread'

https://www.rollingstone.com/movies/features/paul-thomas-anderson-on-phantom-thread-daniel-day-lewiss-retirement-w514196

(On Jonathan Demme):
Quote
He was the first filmmaker who made me feel it was within reach. What I mean by that is: He didn't, he didn't over shazam it, but he put some spit on it too. So it's cinematic but it's grounded as well.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: eward on December 19, 2017, 09:01:17 PM
Hm. Not sure how I feel about the new close-shave PTA style. Makes him look...kind of odd. Just me?
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on December 19, 2017, 09:37:48 PM
Hm. Not sure how I feel about the new close-shave PTA style. Makes him look...kind of odd. Just me?

Yeah, I had a twinge when I saw it--but I think most of us who wear beards look 'weird' without them.  It's just a "this-is-different!" reaction.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: STB on December 19, 2017, 10:11:24 PM
Did anyone catch this full Sirius XM interview or know where one could find a recording of the entire thing?

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6H7uDR5JhPo
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on December 19, 2017, 10:15:11 PM
Did anyone catch this full Sirius XM interview or know where one could find a recording of the entire thing?

I listened to this earlier today.  I'm considering offering sexual favors to anyone who can come up with the entire interview. 
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Something Spanish on December 20, 2017, 08:24:26 AM
If you have Sirius you can listen to it On Demand from Radio Andy show (12/13/17)

I’m listening right now, PTA has a new DVD recommendation: Skyscraper (1996) starting Anna Nicole Smith.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: csage97 on December 20, 2017, 09:45:19 AM
It makes me happy to know that PTA was reading (rereading?) Against The Day.

https://www.gq.com/story/the-dark-optimism-of-paul-thomas-anderson
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Drenk on December 20, 2017, 09:54:47 AM
It makes me happy to know that PTA was reading (rereading?) Against The Day.

https://www.gq.com/story/the-dark-optimism-of-paul-thomas-anderson

When we were talking about literary references in the other topic...I don't know if the past lives of Dodd and Freddy are an oblique reference to Against the Day, but maybe...

EDIT: I was thinking "oh, that's a great profile" while reading it, then I saw that it had been written by Zach Baron. He's a very talented writer. And he's able to write a profile without making it about himself. Which is nice sometimes.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: ©brad on December 20, 2017, 10:25:27 AM
It makes me happy to know that PTA was reading (rereading?) Against The Day.

https://www.gq.com/story/the-dark-optimism-of-paul-thomas-anderson

When we were talking about literary references in the other topic...I don't know if the past lives of Dodd and Freddy are an oblique reference to Against the Day, but maybe...

EDIT: I was thinking "oh, that's a great profile" while reading it, then I saw that it had been written by Zach Baron. He's a very talented writer. And he's able to write a profile without making it about himself. Which is nice sometimes.

That GQ interview was fantastic.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Sleepless on December 20, 2017, 11:00:48 AM
Hm. Not sure how I feel about the new close-shave PTA style. Makes him look...kind of odd. Just me?

PTA looks beautiful in a beard. This clean shaven look is madness.

I'm still trying to reconcile that's Burt Reynolds without the 'tache.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6H7uDR5JhPo
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Rooty Poots on December 20, 2017, 12:42:56 PM
Hm. Not sure how I feel about the new close-shave PTA style. Makes him look...kind of odd. Just me?

PTA looks beautiful in a beard. This clean shaven look is madness.

I'm still trying to reconcile that's Burt Reynolds without the 'tache.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6H7uDR5JhPo

Are you talking about the man in that photo with PTA? Because that’s Andy Cohen.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Something Spanish on December 20, 2017, 02:59:26 PM
I ripped and posted the Andy Cohen interview for ya'll. audio is pretty shoddy. enjoy.

https://youtu.be/wjZ9AfTJeeQ
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: STB on December 20, 2017, 03:52:50 PM
 :yabbse-grin:
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on December 20, 2017, 03:58:24 PM
I ripped and posted the Andy Cohen interview for ya'll. audio is pretty shoddy. enjoy.
Awesome! 

If this is allowed, here's an .mp3 (https://mega.nz/#!KgxyyZJD!ARh8skGgWqJRUTx3mgXRTwnXevkLvxlg6TG53Jw_6-o) (with some very quick-n-dirty EQ thrown on). 

(Don't ever let it be said that PTA has no patience for fawning fan interviews.  I had to grit my teeth to get thru this one.)
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on December 20, 2017, 06:25:08 PM
The Dark Optimism of Paul Thomas Anderson

https://www.gq.com/story/the-dark-optimism-of-paul-thomas-anderson

Quote
I don't want to talk about myself any fucking more," he said at one point.

But, of course, he does...
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Rooty Poots on December 21, 2017, 05:36:54 AM
He sure does.

He looks like Freddie Quell here.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Sleepless on December 21, 2017, 07:54:47 AM
Are you talking about the man in that photo with PTA? Because that’s Andy Cohen.

Yes. It was a joke.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: eward on December 21, 2017, 09:06:17 AM

(Don't ever let it be said that PTA has no patience for fawning fan interviews.  I had to grit my teeth to get thru this one.)

Entertaining though! The "gay" line of questioning was particularly amusing. PTA's a good sport. Though he does seem to intentionally drop pens from time to time.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Rooty Poots on December 21, 2017, 10:10:48 AM
Are you talking about the man in that photo with PTA? Because that’s Andy Cohen.

Yes. It was a joke.

Haha sorry to ruin it then. I can’t believe I just Paul-said-not-to-mention-the-crossfades-ed myself.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on December 22, 2017, 01:34:47 AM
Dylan Tichenor on Editing 'Phantom Thread'

http://ew.com/movies/2017/12/21/phantom-thread-daniel-day-lewis-editor/
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Drenk on December 22, 2017, 04:43:32 PM
Wow. Great moment with Mark Bridges and Krieps and Manville where we learn how DDL in character was able to influence the costumes of the movie.

https://youtu.be/RXDgWxapEhQ?t=1962

(It's around 32:50 if the link doesn't go there immediately for you.)



Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Something Spanish on December 22, 2017, 04:49:40 PM
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/la-ca-mn-phantom-thread-paul-thomas-anderson-20171221-story.html
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Fuzzy Dunlop on December 26, 2017, 12:56:51 AM
http://www.vulture.com/2017/12/phantom-threads-lesley-manville-q-and-a.html
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Something Spanish on December 26, 2017, 08:55:43 PM
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/26/movies/daniel-day-lewis-and-paul-thomas-anderson-on-how-they-created-phantom-thread.html
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: modage on December 27, 2017, 07:01:55 AM
Guessing there is a great PTA interview coming up on the Channel 33 podcast as host Sean Fennessey (a legit PTA-head) tweeted a photo (https://twitter.com/SeanFennessey/status/938817698317791232) of the two of them recently. 👌🏻

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-bill-simmons-podcast/id1043699613?mt=2#episodeGuid=gid%3A%2F%2Fart19-episode-locator%2FV0%2FurTV2-nk63CeDl-brDqaOAszkgj60zzosrG1ud5NPPo
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Something Spanish on December 27, 2017, 10:41:08 AM
Guessing there is a great PTA interview coming up on the Channel 33 podcast as host Sean Fennessey (a legit PTA-head) tweeted a photo (https://twitter.com/SeanFennessey/status/938817698317791232) of the two of them recently. 👌🏻

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-bill-simmons-podcast/id1043699613?mt=2#episodeGuid=gid%3A%2F%2Fart19-episode-locator%2FV0%2FurTV2-nk63CeDl-brDqaOAszkgj60zzosrG1ud5NPPo

this is great.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: ©brad on December 27, 2017, 10:41:33 AM
Guessing there is a great PTA interview coming up on the Channel 33 podcast as host Sean Fennessey (a legit PTA-head) tweeted a photo (https://twitter.com/SeanFennessey/status/938817698317791232) of the two of them recently. 👌🏻

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-bill-simmons-podcast/id1043699613?mt=2#episodeGuid=gid%3A%2F%2Fart19-episode-locator%2FV0%2FurTV2-nk63CeDl-brDqaOAszkgj60zzosrG1ud5NPPo

Oooh this one has some great stuff in it.

Are we reaching peak PTA fandom? I'm amazed at how many mainstream media personalities and outlets are fawning over him, especially considering his last two films aren't his most accessible...
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Lewton on December 27, 2017, 06:44:23 PM
It makes me happy to know that PTA was reading (rereading?) Against The Day.

https://www.gq.com/story/the-dark-optimism-of-paul-thomas-anderson

I know others enjoyed this, and maybe I'm just feeling cranky today, but, with the exception of PTA's quotes, I wasn't a huge fan. The descriptive wrapping thrown around those quotes seems to overly mythologize Anderson in a way that doesn't even necessarily correspond to his public appearances. Kind of reminds me of how Amy Adams said she expected to meet someone who was very aloof and serious prior to filming The Master and then she met PTA and he was warm, friendly, etc.

I mean, for instance, do we really know enough about this person -- a stranger who makes some movies we all enjoy -- to call him "paranoid"? Or a "recluse"? The latter word, at least, is heavily qualified in the article, which leaves me to wonder why it was even brought up at all. He is one of the most visible, voluble, and candid directors out there -- always ready to promote his work in an interesting and communicative way. We have a trove of PTA interviews. He promotes his colleagues' work, even (i.e., showing up in that Tarantino video during The Hateful Eight's press tour). He's not Terrence Malick...which is not to say there's anything wrong with Malick being reclusive -- or seeming more like one than Anderson, anyway.

The parallels drawn between whatever is going on with Day-Lewis' character in PT, and Anderson himself, also feels...kind of flimsy, or at least overstated. Then again, I haven't seen the new film. Still, Anderson has never come across as maladjusted as his characters, but, of course, we don't really know what he's actually like, so whatever people say is just...blah. I just dislike the armchair psychoanalysis of public figures outside of cases where it's warranted and substantiated (as opposed to nosy and speculative). Just stick to the films.

I should be more charitable. It's still an interesting and mostly well-done profile.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: ©brad on December 27, 2017, 07:07:53 PM
I should be more charitable. It's still an interesting and mostly well-done profile.

Yes.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Just Withnail on December 27, 2017, 07:12:30 PM
That podcast was great. What an incredible promo round this is.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on December 27, 2017, 07:42:41 PM
[POSSIBLE SPOILERS]

Here's the post-screening discussion I recorded with PTA, Vicky Krieps, and Leslie Manville at the end of the first public guild screening back on Nov 24th (in Beverly Hills).  (Thanks to csage97 for his audio wizardry in cleaning up the file.)

Phantom Thread Post-Screening Discussion, Nov 24, 2017, Beverly Hills, CA (https://mega.nz/#!uxgTVY4L!OGvZZ55e1QmEa14Jb_ACqXSVVK1OtDrT__yp5Z7TDaY)
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: csage97 on December 27, 2017, 08:38:40 PM
[POSSIBLE SPOILERS]

Here's the post-screening discussion I recorded with PTA, Vicky Krieps, and Leslie Manville at the end of the first public guild screening back on Nov 24th (in Beverly Hills).  (Thanks to csage97 for his audio wizardry in cleaning up the file.)

Phantom Thread Post-Screening Discussion, Nov 24, 2017, Beverly Hills, CA (https://mega.nz/#!uxgTVY4L!OGvZZ55e1QmEa14Jb_ACqXSVVK1OtDrT__yp5Z7TDaY)

Hey, wildberfan, I'm happy to contribute any small difference it made. :) I still need to send you a further explanation of the things I did (I haven't forgotten! It's been a combo of being busy and then laziness leading to procrastination).
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: modage on January 04, 2018, 09:45:49 AM
https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/arts/film/why-director-paul-thomas-anderson-may-be-the-best-hope-for-mature-hollywoodmovies/article37473794/

The Golden Globes burn is  :bravo:
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Drenk on January 04, 2018, 10:10:03 AM
"Unlike so many of his peers, Anderson has managed to extricate himself from the ravelled web of reference and transcend the anxiety of influence."

Good line.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Fuzzy Dunlop on January 04, 2018, 02:27:15 PM
The Bill Simmons podcast is an all-time great PTA interview. The best in many years, better then WTF. It's great to see PTA out of his cagey, vague answers mode.

The real bombshell: He uses fucking Microsoft Word to write his scripts  :shock:
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: ©brad on January 04, 2018, 04:27:26 PM
The Bill Simmons podcast is an all-time great PTA interview. The best in many years, better then WTF. It's great to see PTA out of his cagey, vague answers mode.

The real bombshell: He uses fucking Microsoft Word to write his scripts  :shock:

Haha I couldn't believe that either. How does he write dialogue? I assume he doesn't center align at all?


Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on January 04, 2018, 05:03:12 PM
I think there are screenplay templates for Word.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Fernando on January 04, 2018, 05:27:57 PM
https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/arts/film/why-director-paul-thomas-anderson-may-be-the-best-hope-for-mature-hollywoodmovies/article37473794/

The Golden Globes burn is  :bravo:

And so another myth has been clarified:

...one whiz kid up-and-comer finishing just his third feature spoke with confidence bordering on wild arrogance, saying he wasn't yet sure if he was "the type of guy who'd want to run the world like Spielberg or retreat to a mansion in London like Kubrick. I haven't got it figured out yet."

"I didn't say that," Paul Thomas Anderson clarifies, nearly 20 years later, now on the cusp of his eighth feature, the gothic romance Phantom Thread.

"I was being led on by a certain reporter doing the story saying, 'What future do you see? Would you like to be like Stanley Kubrick? Or would you like to be like Steven Spielberg?' And then I go, 'I don't know!'"



haha I actually pictured him saying that.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on January 07, 2018, 01:29:27 PM
Quote
So be a proper person. Treat everybody equally. That’s something that Paul Thomas Anderson does. Everyone on the set is treated equally. He’ll talk to the supporting artists to the runners to the costume assistants—he’ll talk to them with the same respect and friendliness that he talks to me and Daniel. But that’s something that you either are or you’re not: You’re either a good human being or you’re not a good human being.

Lesley Manville Has Choice Words for Actors Who ‘Behave Like an Ass’ (https://www.backstage.com/interview/lesley-manville-has-choice-words-actors-who-behave-ass/)
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: STB on January 08, 2018, 07:14:59 AM
Does anyone have audio/video of the recent Q&A he did with Alan Parker?
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Fernando on January 08, 2018, 12:42:13 PM
According to the link below, PTA will be on Kimmel on the 11th.

Th 1/11: Annette Bening, Paul Thomas Anderson, Sylvan Esso

https://www.interbridge.com/lineups.html
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Lewton on January 08, 2018, 03:25:29 PM
According to the link below, PTA will be on Kimmel on the 11th.

Th 1/11: Annette Bening, Paul Thomas Anderson, Sylvan Esso

https://www.interbridge.com/lineups.html

I predicted an appearance on Colbert's show, but I'm still surprised that something like this is actually happening. He had that quick interview on Jon Stewart's show a while back, but IIRC, nothing else in the late night realm.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on January 08, 2018, 10:40:25 PM
[Possible Spoilers]

Backbone of the Business: Lesley Manville on "Phantom Thread"

Quote
Paul doesn't like to rehearse and that suits me fine. So you get on the set, everything's there. You're in these costumes. Everything's right. The look of it all was very considered: getting my hair right, the color, the shape of it, the severity of it, all of that. The pristine-ness of it, the lips. You do all of that, and then you just start doing it, and you do lots of takes (because that's when Paul really comes alive). That's what he likes. That's his bread and butter. And Daniel and I, we'd do stuff. And then you hit on something. I obviously somewhere, through all of that time, hit on this kind of stillness. And of course Paul spots that and he loves it, so you push it a bit further.

https://www.rogerebert.com/interviews/lesley-manville
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilder on January 09, 2018, 06:41:59 PM
Lots of shots not in the trailer in this, for those avoiding them

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7hRA6IHcvxg
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Drenk on January 11, 2018, 03:31:49 PM
PTA — NERDIST PODCAST


https://nerdist.com/nerdist-podcast-paul-thomas-anderson/
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on January 11, 2018, 03:40:13 PM
PTA — NERDIST PODCAST
https://nerdist.com/nerdist-podcast-paul-thomas-anderson/

I don't see anything there to stream or download.  Grabbed it via my Android podcatcher, tho...
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Something Spanish on January 11, 2018, 04:52:18 PM
https://youtu.be/wvmQkS-tg6g
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: modage on January 11, 2018, 06:33:55 PM
http://www.vulture.com/2018/01/who-is-phantom-thread-actress-vicky-krieps.html

Interesting bit I hadn't read before. Potential Spoilers (for a deleted scene)

Quote
Do you remember what you shot on your first day?
Yes, very much. It’s not in the movie anymore, but the movie used to begin with a church where Reynolds would discover Alma by chance, and it was so weird and so scary. Because we didn’t have trailers, I was sitting in this little pub somewhere in the English countryside knowing, “Okay, this is my first day, my first scene.” Then I got a letter from [Day-Lewis as] Reynolds, and flowers, and it was just too much. I did exactly what I just told you now: I just went very quiet and very small. I became this creature that doesn’t need much and doesn’t have much. She just is, and tries to just be.

I wonder if the restaurant scene was part of additional shooting later on after they decided to ditch the Church meeting scene. OR -- and this is the more interesting option -- if they just snipped this Church scene in the edit and the restaurant scene is actually their second meeting, but plays like their first. That would be fascinating and also give a totally different read on their behavior in that restaurant scene, maybe to explain why they're acting kinda puppy-dog-ish around each other is because they already met in Church. (Can anyone with the script confirm?)

Also interesting to note that The Master had a handful of different introductions between Freddie and The Master and the initial one where Joaquin sneaks on the boat and kinda meets Dodd got cut so that he doesn't meet him until he wakes up the next morning.

Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: eward on January 11, 2018, 07:29:08 PM
That would be fascinating and also give a totally different read on their behavior in that restaurant scene, maybe to explain why they're acting kinda puppy-dog-ish around each other is because they already met in Church. (Can anyone with the script confirm?)

The script I have is very close to the finished film, and the church scenes are unfortunately not in it.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: modage on January 12, 2018, 09:05:25 AM
PTA — NERDIST PODCAST
https://nerdist.com/nerdist-podcast-paul-thomas-anderson/

Listening to this now. So far the biggest bombshell is that PTA hasn't even heard Aimee Mann's last album. 😳😢

Also: SPOILERS

Quote from: PTA
Wanting to make a movie about a relationship, that really focused on that, and having [DDL] involved in that was just one of the couple things you have on a piece of paper. And so we talked about ideas. We had a character that was strong-willed and self-contained and possessed and cranky and was artistic by nature so it would be...The idea was about need. It was about what happens when somebody like that finds himself in a position where they find they're really in love and that they need that love."
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: greenberryhill on January 12, 2018, 10:09:12 AM
New Interviews with Jimmy Kimmel!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YJ4x5UfyLM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9Cu7Otn9Io
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Drenk on January 12, 2018, 10:12:53 AM
A-and new new interview with PTA.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/movies/ct-mov-paul-thomas-anderson-phantom-thread-interview-0110-story,amp.html?__twitter_impression=true
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: jenkins on January 12, 2018, 12:41:08 PM
(the c+p of the interview)

Paul Thomas Anderson is the stitcher behind 'Phantom Thread' (http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/movies/ct-mov-paul-thomas-anderson-phantom-thread-interview-0110-story,amp.html?__twitter_impression=true)

Q: Daniel Day-Lewis has talked about the preparation and the writing of “Phantom Thread,” and how it was a lighthearted process with a lot of laughter between the two of you. And then, maybe typical for him, after shooting had finished he was profoundly sad and basically wanted to leave the profession.

A: Right. (laughs) Right. Well, I hope of course that it’s a temporary feeling of melancholy or exhaustion. It’s really hard for me to believe he’s not going to do it again. While we worked on this movie we had a lot of ideas we thought were funny, but then at some point we stopped laughing. What we were laughing at, initially, was the character’s own preposterousness. Just the kinds of things he’d say in a fight with Alma at the dinner table, for example. When he’s put in a corner he doesn’t want to be in, Reynolds starts fighting like a child. He’s ridiculous. But when you place the character in three dimensions, and have someone else there, a real person, Alma, those words change. They become mean. And that’s something else entirely, isn’t it?

Q: My favorite line in that regard is when he’s faced with Alma’s breakfast: “I’m admiring my own gallantry for eating it the way you’ve prepared it.”

A: Yeah. Yeah, that line is still funny to me.

Q: Also, I didn’t feel “Phantom Thread” was letting Reynolds off the hook, ever. I feel as though you’re well aware of just what a pill this guy is in some scenes.

A: Absolutely. A lot of the editing of the film became: How much of a (jerk) is too much of a (jerk)? It’s a tricky question when you have a character like this, who puts clear boundaries around himself, and announces that he will not change, and good luck to anyone who tries to change him. We really had to keep an eye on just how alienating he can be, and make sure we never tipped an audience into checking out.

Q: The counterweight to all that is the elegance of this man’s world.

A: The world these guys lived in … it was like factory showroom living. Everything looks straight out of a magazine, or a fairy tale. The martinis they get, they’re never without a coaster. That’s part of the theatrics of this world. It was like being on stage, and that was very good for our story. When our heroine comes in, real flesh and blood, she doesn’t want to behave like she’s in a play. And that’s when the story starts cooking.

Q: In the Directors Guild of America podcast you did with director Rian Johnson (“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”), you talked about the time you were laid up with the flu, at home, watching a lot of Turner Classic Movies. And that, indirectly, led to “Phantom Thread”?

A: People deal with illness in different ways. My initial response to getting sick is, (a) I’m angry, because I don’t want to be slowed down, I want to have all my wits about me. And (b), pretend I’m not sick and refuse any kind of help, because to admit I need help would be admitting I was sick. Anyway. I got sick. I stayed in bed for three days, and the movies I watched were really helpful: “Rebecca,” “The Story of Adele H.,” the old Jean Cocteau “Beauty and the Beast.” And I remember seeing how much my wife was enjoying having me relatively helpless. Then I started thinking, wouldn’t it kind of … suit her to keep me this way, you know, from time to time? (laughs)

(WARNING: SPOILERS BELOW)

Q: What I love about the first strategic poisoning in the film is that you don’t really know what Alma’s intentions are — if they’re lethal, or just punitive.

A: Exactly right (laughs). You, know, it’s just a thimbleful, so … we shot some good close-ups we ended up taking out that made her intentions a little clearer. She’s looking at the mushroom book and you see the words “not lethal,” and “extreme stomach pain,” that kind of thing.

(END OF SPOILERS)

Q: I know you considered David Lean’s “The Passionate Friends” to be a big influence on the movie, especially the New Year’s Eve scene and the scenes set in the Alps. I also caught more than a little Max Ophuls in the way you move the camera, and activate all these tight, claustrophobic physical locations.

A: Well, Ophuls is my hero when it comes to blocking the actors and blocking the camera and the dance they do together. He’s just the best. By the way, have you seen “The Post”? I’d say Steven Spielberg is as good with the camera as anybody in film history. I saw it the other day, and I couldn’t believe how good he is at dealing with a lot of people in that small a space. He’s got 10 people in a living room, and everybody’s moving around, and everything seems natural, and the camera’s dancing around them, and that thing is a miracle of staging and camerawork. I can’t wait to see it again, to really look under the hood and watch how he did it.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on January 12, 2018, 12:51:33 PM
New Interviews with Jimmy Kimmel!

Thank God he seems very relaxed and non-awkard here.  Often appearances by non-performers can be somewhat cringe-worthy.  I'm sure the bazillion interviews he's done of the past 6 weeks have helped...  Unless, he's naturally at ease speaking in front of people--with television cameras present.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: modage on January 12, 2018, 03:07:07 PM
https://youtu.be/wvmQkS-tg6g
Interesting to hear Krips say (at about 21 min) that DDL improvised a lot as Woodcock. Especially interesting because PTA says in the Nerdist interview that there's not really any improv with DDL. Or maybe there was just less compared to the amount of stuff they tried on Vice and The Master with Joaquin.

Krieps says going into scenes like the dinner scene without an ending but PTA anticipating that she would eventually blow up at him because it had to go somewhere.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on January 13, 2018, 09:15:05 PM
Terry Gross (Fresh Air) talks with Paul Thomas Anderson

(Probably to air next week?)

http://nprfreshair.tumblr.com/post/169588861406/charlesmarlow-whatever-you-do-do-it-carefully
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Mogambo on January 14, 2018, 12:19:58 PM
Paul Thomas Anderson is doing an AMA on tuesday.

https://twitter.com/Phantom_Thread/status/952604850969239552
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: csage97 on January 14, 2018, 12:26:53 PM
Paul Thomas Anderson is doing an AMA on tuesday.

https://twitter.com/Phantom_Thread/status/952604850969239552

I've never participated in an AMA before. Are there any rules? Do I just post and see if he responds to my question? I'll probably ask something cinematography-related.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on January 14, 2018, 12:43:33 PM
Paul Thomas Anderson is doing an AMA on tuesday.

https://twitter.com/Phantom_Thread/status/952604850969239552

I've never participated in an AMA before. Are there any rules? Do I just post and see if he responds to my question? I'll probably ask something cinematography-related.

Never done one live, but my sense is we just type our questions and the guest selectively answers them. 

Got to give the dude credit:  He's working his ass off to promote this film.  I guess it's part of the way The Biz works, but it really sounds exhausting.  Wonder if it's "mandatory", ie a legal requirement of the deal signed with the financiers, etc, or if he's doing it because he's passionate about getting the film seen--or both. 
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Drenk on January 14, 2018, 01:01:14 PM
Exactly. He'll pick questions, will give answers. Will disappear forever. I like AMA. I like when writers write.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: d on January 14, 2018, 01:41:21 PM
That is so awesome! Never participated in any of those live but seems like the best interview-related news we could hope for.
Any questions you are already thinking about? I wonder how many people will participate and how difficult it will be to get his answer. Hope PTA die-hards will not disappoint and that will be the first Phantom Thread interview with no questions about DDL retirement.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: csage97 on January 14, 2018, 01:51:25 PM
I've got my question(s) picked out! It's sort of a bunch rolled into one, but I'm hoping the techie in Paul comes out and he's willing to write about these things. My address will be:

What choices did the team make about lighting? Did you use tungsten indoors? Were there any points where you bounced HMIs into the house through the windows (there are some shots with an evening blue sky coming in, so maybe this was from the balance to the tungsten interior)? Was there a general approach to lighting conversation scenes (e.g., two-point, three-point, overheads, etc.)? How did the tight indoor spaces affect the decision process for lighting?

Hopefully that's not too much to ask since they're all questions about lighting. :P
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Drenk on January 14, 2018, 03:46:40 PM
PTA. Happiest when he's working.

https://amp.detroitnews.com/amp/109344926?__twitter_impression=true
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: axxonn on January 14, 2018, 04:09:11 PM
Paul Thomas Anderson is doing an AMA on tuesday.

https://twitter.com/Phantom_Thread/status/952604850969239552

I've never participated in an AMA before. Are there any rules? Do I just post and see if he responds to my question? I'll probably ask something cinematography-related.

No rules, no guarantees about what he sees or replies to. There'll be thousands of posts.

Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on January 14, 2018, 04:12:24 PM
No rules, no guarantees about what he sees or replies to. There'll be thousands of posts.

Yeah, I often wait for someone to 'curate' the session:  They'll weed out all of the copious bullshit, and make a concise read of the most interesting bits...
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: csage97 on January 14, 2018, 05:20:30 PM
Cool. Thanks, everyone. Yeah, I'm not expecting him to even see my post if I do submit it. Looking forward to the discussion and questions, though.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Drenk on January 15, 2018, 04:58:54 PM
The Film Stage — Lesley Manville

https://thefilmstage.com/features/lesley-manville-on-the-power-dynamics-in-phantom-thread-deleted-scenes-and-ptas-humor/
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: Mogambo on January 16, 2018, 10:45:22 AM
PTA is doing a twitter Q&A also. Just tweet your question with #askPTA.

Also, 3 hours 15 minutes to go for the AMA.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: max from fearless on January 19, 2018, 04:38:31 PM
“I have a very strong idea of what I will do next,” he says. “I have to corral it into existence, because there’s a lot of material that I’ve written over the years, dating as far back as 1998-99, that’s been many different things, over many different years, that now it would be great to go back to.” Of course, he declines to elaborate.

*

And yet even at the height of a celebrated career, he is troubled by self-doubt. “You’re watching something and you really feel like you got up to the top of the mountain,” he says, referring to the moment when he completes a film, “and you cannot wait to show it to the world. And then those two hours waiting before the screening starts . . . you just wanna take it and throw it in the ocean.”

I later express a degree of scepticism at his frequent displays of humility. Anderson has never made a poorly reviewed film; this summer There Will Be Blood was ranked by The New York Times as the greatest movie of the 21st century so far.

“As Kendrick Lamar says . . . ” he says, drifting off and lounging back into his seat.

I finish the sentence, quoting the rapper’s song from last year: “‘Bitch, be humble.’”

Anderson points a finger at me and grins.


PTA in the Financial Times
https://www.ft.com/content/4745f4a8-fb14-11e7-a492-2c9be7f3120a (https://www.ft.com/content/4745f4a8-fb14-11e7-a492-2c9be7f3120a)
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on January 19, 2018, 04:58:41 PM
Anderson has never made a poorly reviewed film;


PTA in the Financial Times
https://www.ft.com/content/4745f4a8-fb14-11e7-a492-2c9be7f3120a (https://www.ft.com/content/4745f4a8-fb14-11e7-a492-2c9be7f3120a)

Not to quibble excessively, but that can't possibly be true.

Also:  That link opens to a subscribe page for me.
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: d on January 19, 2018, 05:22:59 PM
Ok, here's full FT article. Sorry about the formatting but have no time now to clean that up.

Quote
Paul Thomas Anderson: ‘I killed the world’s greatest actor?! Don’t blame me for that!’
The ‘Phantom Thread’ filmmaker talks awards, insecurity and why he’s not to blame for Daniel Day-Lewis quitting movies
Paul Thomas Anderson and I are playing a game. “Well, what’s the part that you’re gonna play?” says the American writer-director, scratching his head and imagining a scenario in which I’m cast in one of his films. One of today’s greatest film-makers, Anderson has been responsible for arguably the best roles ever played by Tom Cruise, Julianne Moore, Joaquin Phoenix, Adam Sandler, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Daniel Day-Lewis. But today, over tea, coffee and a little rack of toast in a quiet corner of a central London restaurant, we’re discussing how he would get a good performance out of me.
“And you live in Los Angeles at that time?” he continues, once I’ve selected his 2014 hippie epic Inherent Vice, and a minor role as one of its colourful array of lovable stoners. “So we don’t have to do anything with your accent? You can just talk like you?”
I nod. “OK, great,” he says, laughing as if reassured that the only stumbling block has now evaporated. “I’ll take care of you. I won’t let you be bad. I will make sure that you’re good.
“But if you think you’re gonna get stoned and get through it,” he adds, waggling a finger at me, “then that’s not gonna work.”
The preternatural ability to make sure that actors are good has been the gift upon which Anderson has built a celebrated career. The reason for our breakfast is a film that features one of his finest characters to date: the balletic, twisted romance Phantom Thread, a gothic fable of love and power that marks the second collaboration between the director and Daniel Day-Lewis, and which is being widely hailed as a masterwork.
Features I’d been braced for a quiet interview. Anderson, who first came to prominence in the 1990s as part of an explosive new wave of indie film-making, is known for being rather more reserved in person than his contemporaries — a private figure in the shadow of the more cartoonish personas of Quentin Tarantino and Spike Lee. But the slim 47-year-old who settles on to the plush velvet banquette opposite — scruffy black T-shirt, pelt of short, tousled grey hair — is not reserved at all. In fact, he achieves such a state of relaxation over the course of our conversation that he peppers it with all manner of expletives and inches his way down his seat incrementally to a position more appropriate for a sun-lounger.
Phantom Thread represents a radical departure from Anderson’s previous body of work. For one thing, it’s about fashion. (“It looks pretty!” he says, when I ask how he landed on this rather improbable subject matter.) But his is a body of work that is full of radical departures. There was the film about gambling (Hard Eight, 1996), the film about porn (Boogie Nights, 1997), the film about life, the universe and everything (Magnolia, 1999), the film where Adam Sandler’s character falls in love (Punch-Drunk Love, 2002), the film about oil and capitalism (There Will Be Blood, 2007), the film that is or isn’t about Scientology, depending on how you look at it (The Master, 2012) and, latterly, the 1970s odyssey Inherent Vice, a three-hour literary adaptation so ambitious that critic Anthony Lane remarked in The New Yorker at the time that “Nobody has ever turned a [Thomas] Pynchon book into a movie before, for the same reason that nobody has managed to cram the New York Philharmonic into a Ford Focus.”
Up until this point, though, they’ve all had a subject in common: America. “Or perhaps the question is,” says Anderson, when I ask why he chose to set this film in the UK as opposed to the country whose dysfunctions he’s been chronicling for 20 years, “What took you so long?” He gestures around the restaurant, whose pristine white tablecloths and delicate clattering of cutlery are neatly evocative of the sniffy environs of Phantom Thread’s atelier, almost as if to suggest that this place is plenty dysfunctional, too. “I’ve always wanted to work here.” He cites an influence in the ghost stories of the early 20th-century Cambridge professor MR James, whose work he describes as “super, super British”.
The Britain of Phantom Thread is cartoonishly drawn, a theatre of manners to rival the works of Julian Fellowes. Reynolds Woodcock, the character Anderson wrote with and for Day-Lewis (and whose provocative surname they conceived as an intentional innuendo), could be the director’s exact opposite. A fashion designer in 1950s London, he is, in Anderson’s words, “selfconsumed, self-possessed”. This is some understatement. Woodcock is a monomaniac who wears a tweed jacket over his pyjamas, polices the way people eat breakfast, and fits in neatly with the director’s previous antiheroes, who include a murderous oil tycoon (There Will Be Blood) and a leather-waistcoated sex guru (Magnolia).
Alamy “I think there should be, like, a red-flag sound effect when he talks that much about his mother on the first date,” says Anderson, laughing about his latest protagonist, who falls in love with Alma, a young waitress played by the newcomer Vicky Krieps, and lures her into his home and his soul like some Bluebeard of Fitzrovia. “It should be like” — he waves his hands to mime an alarm going off — “ding, ding, ding!”
The character of Woodcock fits neatly into an oeuvre that has been fascinated by men behaving badly for years. But it also arrives with impeccable timing in the post-Weinstein era; an accidental allegory on gender politics for an industry finally reckoning with its own. Anderson bristles when I bring up the disgraced producer, clearly tired of the line of enquiry — “Ughh, let’s not do this!” he says, grimacing. Getting nowhere, I ask instead how we should feel about Day-Lewis’s character, a man who treats his lover, Alma, more like a mannequin than a human being.
“I personally think it would be hard to ask an audience to be completely sympathetic to the behaviours that [Woodcock] portrays time and time again,” he says, choosing his words carefully. “I mean, he really kind of comes on strong and is so intractable.”
That’s one way of putting it. Is the relationship analogous to that at the centre of Anderson’s 2012 film The Master, in which a young and impressionable navy veteran played by Joaquin Phoenix is coerced into joining a cult by Philip Seymour Hoffman’s answer to L Ron Hubbard? “There’s a similar relationship there, yeah,” Anderson concedes.
Daniel Day-Lewis in 'There Will Be Blood' (2007) © Alamy But the film’s content has generated less discussion than the real-life developments surrounding it: this summer, Daniel Day-Lewis announced that the role would be his last. “It wasn’t so much like him walking around the room and me sitting at the typewriter, you know,” says the director, when we discuss their writing process. He pauses and changes his mind. “Actually — there was some of that. There was a lot of that!”
At this point, the part looks highly likely to win Day-Lewis his fourth Oscar; Anderson explains the actor’s unique brilliance by quoting one of his sound designers, who remarked upon seeing the opening moments of the film: “Holy shit, look at that guy shave!” Yet embodying Woodcock has apparently taken a toll on Day-Lewis. “All my life, I’ve mouthed off about how I should stop acting,” he said in a November profile in W magazine, “and I don’t know why it was different this time, but the impulse to quit took root in me, and that became a compulsion. It was something I had to do.”
“It’s an ongoing conversation, honestly,” says Anderson, referring to his and Day-Lewis’s discussions on the subject. But he says that he believes the actor will not change his mind. “I want to take it seriously because he’s a friend, and he’s made a very big decision with his life.”
Does he ever worry that he’s personally responsible for bringing about the end of Daniel DayLewis’s career? “I killed the world’s greatest actor?!” he exclaims, laughing and waving a piece of toast at me. “Don’t f***ing blame me for that!”
Anderson’s childlike animation at first seems at odds with the gravitas of his film-making. But it’s a dichotomy that has characterised his work from the start. Born in Studio City, California, in 1970, the seventh of nine children, he first acquired a camera at the age of eight. “I would film everything,” he says, miming his childhood self hoisting an enormous piece of equipment on to one shoulder. “I would film my brother, mostly. I think your first instinct is, like, ‘Let’s film something blowing up.’ You know, ‘Let’s film something with blood in it.’”
'Boogie Nights' (1997) with Burt Reynolds and Mark Wahlberg © Alamy His career began in earnest with a short film called The Dirk Diggler Story, a This is Spinal Tap-style mockumentary that Anderson made when he was 18 and which skewered both masculinity and the porn industry. It was later developed into his breakout hit Boogie Nights, an audacious account of the cocaine-fuelled commoditisation of sex in the 1970s. The film made stars of both Anderson and his leading man, Mark “Marky Mark” Wahlberg, amid no small mention of its central character’s absurdly disproportionate anatomy. Janet Maslin wrote in The New York Times in 1997 that the then 27-year-old director’s “display of talent is as big and exuberant as skywriting”; Roger Ebert remarked that “Anderson is in love with his camera, and a bit of a show-off”.
“I probably didn’t even know how to stop and feel an insecurity when Boogie Nights came out,” recalls Anderson, “it was all just like vinegar and attack.”
But this was the spirit of the age. The 1990s represented a revelatory break for cinema, which had been mired in a decade of creative stagnation, as a wave of daring young (mostly male) filmmakers who’d grown up on Steven Spielberg and George Lucas concertinaed influences from European art cinema and pop culture to create genre-breaking hits like Pulp Fiction (1994) and Fargo (1996).
“I can remember seeing Jaws at four or five,” says Anderson, recalling that his father, who worked as a voiceover artist at ABC, had brought home a rudimentary video player.
And you loved it?
“Absolutely,” he says. “We were able to have movies at home, I think, before anybody else, and I had, in a butchered format, Jaws, Star Wars and Rocky, and Close Encounters. And I can remember watching them over and over and over and over again.” Is there anything of those films in his own work? “I would love to think so,” he sighs.
The landscape of cinema today could hardly be more different from the period in which Anderson started his career. Truly independent films are now struggling to find funding and audiences, while many argue that the popular market is saturated with superheroes. Has creativity suffered as a result? Anderson tells a story about reading film listings in a historical paper — a hobby of his. “I’m looking at an old newspaper from the 1950s,” he says, “which everyone sort of looks back at and says, ‘God, that was a glorious time’ — and I’m like, look, I just looked at the newspaper and there’s maybe three movies that I’ve heard of which are fantastic, that are still classics. But there’s 50 movies out that I’ve never heard of — [and] each one looks like a bigger piece of shit than the last one!
“If you start getting into some pile of romanticising,” he continues, “like, ‘The 1990s, that’s when it all happened and it hasn’t happened since then’ . . . it kind of ends up minimising anything that might be going on today, and you can’t . . . ” He trails off. “That’s not f***ing good.”
Alamy This is not to say that he doesn’t have strong feelings about the way we consume movies today. “Well, yes, you know, another word for purist is ‘snob,’” he laughs, when we discuss the sanctity of the big-screen experience. “So — I’m a snob.” Does it bother him that some people will be watching Phantom Thread, which is luxuriously shot and for which Anderson served partly as his own cinematographer, on their phones? “I’m past that ‘what the f***’ moment,” he sighs. “I mean, that happened a while ago. That’s already become . . . it’s not ‘what the f***’ any more.”
But when we discuss the future of the cinema as a venue for collective viewing, and the risk that it may disappear entirely, he looks sceptical. “No. Could it?”
I point out that attendance is falling.
“Hmm, I don’t know about that one,” he says, thinking. “Tell that to Disney.”
At 47, Anderson is still a relatively young man by Hollywood director standards. But with eight major films, at least four of which are widely considered to be masterpieces, he’s amassed a catalogue that would easily suffice for an entire career, if not two. Is he ever concerned with
the idea of legacy? “No,” he says firmly, rejecting the word, “because that would imply that there’s a sort of thinking of what’s come before . . . If you do feel a ticking clock, which is completely natural to do, then that means there’s a bomb that’s gonna go off, so you gotta go forward. That’s my preoccupation: creating something again.”
'Punch-Drunk Love' (2002) with Adam Sandler © Alamy Indeed, he shows no sign of slowing down. “I have a very strong idea of what I will do next,” he says. “I have to corral it into existence, because there’s a lot of material that I’ve written over the years, dating as far back as 1998-99, that’s been many different things, over many different years, that now it would be great to go back to.” Of course, he declines to elaborate.
What he will say is that he might consider making a TV series, an avenue increasingly explored by his contemporaries; Steven Soderbergh and the Coen brothers have shows due to come out this year. “Maybe,” he says slowly, when asked if he’d ever switch to the small screen. “I’d have to come up with a good idea.”
Perhaps more likely, though, is a film starring a woman; all his lead roles so far have been male — though he protests that, in his eyes, Phantom Thread “was Alma’s movie, and she was our protagonist”. “Tilda Swinton’s pretty great,” he says, when we discuss actors he’d like to use. “Any time she turns up on screen you feel a kind of force . . . There’s nothing she couldn’t do.” A few weeks after our interview, it transpires that he also has another actress in mind: the Girls Trip breakout star Tiffany Haddish. At the New York Film Critics’ Circle Awards earlier this month, his speech included a message for the actress: “I know that everyone wants to work with you, but may I please cut in front of the line?”
For now, though, he has other concerns: four children under the age of 13 with his partner, the actor Maya Rudolph. When I ask how he manages to continue making movies with a house full of young kids, he recalls visiting a house in France belonging to the artist Anselm Kiefer. “He has this gigantic home,” he says, “and he built this . . . well, it kind of looks like a large rusty pipe” — he indicates with his hands a pipe as wide as a child is tall, connected to another, smaller house — “and I guess that’s where the children lived, and if they wanted to come see Daddy, they’d have to walk across this rusty pipe.” He bends over with laughter at the thought of this revolutionary approach to child management.
Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon in 'Inherent Vice' (2014) © Alamy Anderson comes across as an artist who has achieved an impressive degree of peace with regard to his work. “It goes back to a [Robert] Altman thing,” he says, referring to the late American director, when we discuss his evolution as both a film-maker and a person, “who was a sort of a mentor of mine, saying, ‘Look — you get a group of people together, build a sandcastle, you have a great time doing it, and then at the end of the day, you all sit back and watch the tide come in and take your sandcastle away.’”
And yet even at the height of a celebrated career, he is troubled by self-doubt. “You’re watching something and you really feel like you got up to the top of the mountain,” he says, referring to the moment when he completes a film, “and you cannot wait to show it to the world. And then those two hours waiting before the screening starts . . . you just wanna take it and throw it in the ocean.”
I later express a degree of scepticism at his frequent displays of humility. Anderson has never made a poorly reviewed film; this summer There Will Be Blood was ranked by The New York Times as the greatest movie of the 21st century so far.
“As Kendrick Lamar says . . . ” he says, drifting off and lounging back into his seat.
I finish the sentence, quoting the rapper’s song from last year: “‘Bitch, be humble.’”
Anderson points a finger at me and grins.
The breakfasters in the restaurant are sloping off to be replaced by the lunchtime crowd, and the director has a long day ahead of him. I ask him a question that’s been playing on my mind since we met. He’s the only film-maker ever to win the directing prizes at all the major European festivals — Cannes, Venice and Berlin — but, despite 19 nominations for his films, he’s never personally won an Oscar. Does he care about Academy Awards?
“That’s like a trick question!” he says, laughing.“You know . . . ” He takes a long pause, thinking, and then answers lightly: “I’m more of a Golden Globe man myself.”
Title: Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
Post by: wilberfan on January 19, 2018, 05:58:05 PM
[I cleaned it up for you (us).  Thanks for the post.]

Paul Thomas Anderson: ‘I killed the world’s greatest actor?! Don’t blame me for that!’
The ‘Phantom Thread’ filmmaker talks awards, insecurity and why he’s not to blame for Daniel Day-Lewis quitting movies.

Paul Thomas Anderson and I are playing a game. “Well, what’s the part that you’re gonna play?” says the American writer-director, scratching his head and imagining a scenario in which I’m cast in one of his films. One of today’s greatest film-makers, Anderson has been responsible for arguably the best roles ever played by Tom Cruise, Julianne Moore, Joaquin Phoenix, Adam Sandler, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Daniel Day-Lewis. But today, over tea, coffee and a little rack of toast in a quiet corner of a central London restaurant, we’re discussing how he would get a good performance out of me.

“And you live in Los Angeles at that time?” he continues, once I’ve selected his 2014 hippie epic Inherent Vice, and a minor role as one of its colourful array of lovable stoners. “So we don’t have to do anything with your accent? You can just talk like you?”
I nod. “OK, great,” he says, laughing as if reassured that the only stumbling block has now evaporated. “I’ll take care of you. I won’t let you be bad. I will make sure that you’re good.

“But if you think you’re gonna get stoned and get through it,” he adds, waggling a finger at me, “then that’s not gonna work.”
The preternatural ability to make sure that actors are good has been the gift upon which Anderson has built a celebrated career. The reason for our breakfast is a film that features one of his finest characters to date: the balletic, twisted romance Phantom Thread, a gothic fable of love and power that marks the second collaboration between the director and Daniel Day-Lewis, and which is being widely hailed as a masterwork.

I’d been braced for a quiet interview. Anderson, who first came to prominence in the 1990s as part of an explosive new wave of indie film-making, is known for being rather more reserved in person than his contemporaries — a private figure in the shadow of the more cartoonish personas of Quentin Tarantino and Spike Lee. But the slim 47-year-old who settles on to the plush velvet banquette opposite — scruffy black T-shirt, pelt of short, tousled grey hair — is not reserved at all. In fact, he achieves such a state of relaxation over the course of our conversation that he peppers it with all manner of expletives and inches his way down his seat incrementally to a position more appropriate for a sun-lounger.

Phantom Thread represents a radical departure from Anderson’s previous body of work. For one thing, it’s about fashion. (“It looks pretty!” he says, when I ask how he landed on this rather improbable subject matter.) But his is a body of work that is full of radical departures. There was the film about gambling (Hard Eight, 1996), the film about porn (Boogie Nights, 1997), the film about life, the universe and everything (Magnolia, 1999), the film where Adam Sandler’s character falls in love (Punch-Drunk Love, 2002), the film about oil and capitalism (There Will Be Blood, 2007), the film that is or isn’t about Scientology, depending on how you look at it (The Master, 2012) and, latterly, the 1970s odyssey Inherent Vice, a three-hour literary adaptation so ambitious that critic Anthony Lane remarked in The New Yorker at the time that “Nobody has ever turned a [Thomas] Pynchon book into a movie before, for the same reason that nobody has managed to cram the New York Philharmonic into a Ford Focus.”

Up until this point, though, they’ve all had a subject in common: America. “Or perhaps the question is,” says Anderson, when I ask why he chose to set this film in the UK as opposed to the country whose dysfunctions he’s been chronicling for 20 years, “What took you so long?” He gestures around the restaurant, whose pristine white tablecloths and delicate clattering of cutlery are neatly evocative of the sniffy environs of Phantom Thread’s atelier, almost as if to suggest that this place is plenty dysfunctional, too. “I’ve always wanted to work here.” He cites an influence in the ghost stories of the early 20th-century Cambridge professor MR James, whose work he describes as “super, super British”.

The Britain of Phantom Thread is cartoonishly drawn, a theatre of manners to rival the works of Julian Fellowes. Reynolds Woodcock, the character Anderson wrote with and for Day-Lewis (and whose provocative surname they conceived as an intentional innuendo), could be the director’s exact opposite. A fashion designer in 1950s London, he is, in Anderson’s words, “selfconsumed, self-possessed”. This is some understatement. Woodcock is a monomaniac who wears a tweed jacket over his pyjamas, polices the way people eat breakfast, and fits in neatly with the director’s previous antiheroes, who include a murderous oil tycoon (There Will Be Blood) and a leather-waistcoated sex guru (Magnolia).

“I think there should be, like, a red-flag sound effect when he talks that much about his mother on the first date,” says Anderson, laughing about his latest protagonist, who falls in love with Alma, a young waitress played by the newcomer Vicky Krieps, and lures her into his home and his soul like some Bluebeard of Fitzrovia. “It should be like” — he waves his hands to mime an alarm going off — “ding, ding, ding!”

The character of Woodcock fits neatly into an oeuvre that has been fascinated by men behaving badly for years. But it also arrives with impeccable timing in the post-Weinstein era; an accidental allegory on gender politics for an industry finally reckoning with its own. Anderson bristles when I bring up the disgraced producer, clearly tired of the line of enquiry — “Ughh, let’s not do this!” he says, grimacing. Getting nowhere, I ask instead how we should feel about Day-Lewis’s character, a man who treats his lover, Alma, more like a mannequin than a human being.

“I personally think it would be hard to ask an audience to be completely sympathetic to the behaviours that [Woodcock] portrays time and time again,” he says, choosing his words carefully. “I mean, he really kind of comes on strong and is so intractable.”
That’s one way of putting it. Is the relationship analogous to that at the centre of Anderson’s 2012 film The Master, in which a young and impressionable navy veteran played by Joaquin Phoenix is coerced into joining a cult by Philip Seymour Hoffman’s answer to L Ron Hubbard? “There’s a similar relationship there, yeah,” Anderson concedes.

But the film’s content has generated less discussion than the real-life developments surrounding it: this summer, Daniel Day-Lewis announced that the role would be his last. “It wasn’t so much like him walking around the room and me sitting at the typewriter, you know,” says the director, when we discuss their writing process. He pauses and changes his mind. “Actually — there was some of that. There was a lot of that!”

At this point, the part looks highly likely to win Day-Lewis his fourth Oscar; Anderson explains the actor’s unique brilliance by quoting one of his sound designers, who remarked upon seeing the opening moments of the film: “Holy shit, look at that guy shave!” Yet embodying Woodcock has apparently taken a toll on Day-Lewis. “All my life, I’ve mouthed off about how I should stop acting,” he said in a November profile in W magazine, “and I don’t know why it was different this time, but the impulse to quit took root in me, and that became a compulsion. It was something I had to do.”

“It’s an ongoing conversation, honestly,” says Anderson, referring to his and Day-Lewis’s discussions on the subject. But he says that he believes the actor will not change his mind. “I want to take it seriously because he’s a friend, and he’s made a very big decision with his life.”

Does he ever worry that he’s personally responsible for bringing about the end of Daniel DayLewis’s career? “I killed the world’s greatest actor?!” he exclaims, laughing and waving a piece of toast at me. “Don’t f***ing blame me for that!”

Anderson’s childlike animation at first seems at odds with the gravitas of his film-making. But it’s a dichotomy that has characterised his work from the start. Born in Studio City, California, in 1970, the seventh of nine children, he first acquired a camera at the age of eight. “I would film everything,” he says, miming his childhood self hoisting an enormous piece of equipment on to one shoulder. “I would film my brother, mostly. I think your first instinct is, like, ‘Let’s film something blowing up.’ You know, ‘Let’s film something with blood in it.’”

His career began in earnest with a short film called The Dirk Diggler Story, a This is Spinal Tap-style mockumentary that Anderson made when he was 18 and which skewered both masculinity and the porn industry. It was later developed into his breakout hit Boogie Nights, an audacious account of the cocaine-fuelled commoditisation of sex in the 1970s. The film made stars of both Anderson and his leading man, Mark “Marky Mark” Wahlberg, amid no small mention of its central character’s absurdly disproportionate anatomy. Janet Maslin wrote in The New York Times in 1997 that the then 27-year-old director’s “display of talent is as big and exuberant as skywriting”; Roger Ebert remarked that “Anderson is in love with his camera, and a bit of a show-off”.
“I probably didn’t even know how to stop and feel an insecurity when Boogie Nights came out,” recalls Anderson, “it was all just like vinegar and attack.”

But this was the spirit of the age. The 1990s represented a revelatory break for cinema, which had been mired in a decade of creative stagnation, as a wave of daring young (mostly male) filmmakers who’d grown up on Steven Spielberg and George Lucas concertinaed influences from European art cinema and pop culture to create genre-breaking hits like Pulp Fiction (1994) and Fargo (1996).

“I can remember seeing Jaws at four or five,” says Anderson, recalling that his father, who worked as a voiceover artist at ABC, had brought home a rudimentary video player.

And you loved it?

“Absolutely,” he says. “We were able to have movies at home, I think, before anybody else, and I had, in a butchered format, Jaws, Star Wars and Rocky, and Close Encounters. And I can remember watching them over and over and over and over again.” Is there anything of those films in his own work? “I would love to think so,” he sighs.

The landscape of cinema today could hardly be more different from the period in which Anderson started his career. Truly independent films are now struggling to find funding and audiences, while many argue that the popular market is saturated with superheroes. Has creativity suffered as a result? Anderson tells a story about reading film listings in a historical paper — a hobby of his. “I’m looking at an old newspaper from the 1950s,” he says, “which everyone sort of looks back at and says, ‘God, that was a glorious time’ — and I’m like, look, I just looked at the newspaper and there’s maybe three movies that I’ve heard of which are fantastic, that are still classics. But there’s 50 movies out that I’ve never heard of — [and] each one looks like a bigger piece of shit than the last one!

“If you start getting into some pile of romanticising,” he continues, “like, ‘The 1990s, that’s when it all happened and it hasn’t happened since then’ . . . it kind of ends up minimizing anything that might be going on today, and you can’t . . . ” He trails off. “That’s not f***ing good.”

This is not to say that he doesn’t have strong feelings about the way we consume movies today. “Well, yes, you know, another word for purist is ‘snob,’” he laughs, when we discuss the sanctity of the big-screen experience. “So — I’m a snob.” Does it bother him that some people will be watching Phantom Thread, which is luxuriously shot and for which Anderson served partly as his own cinematographer, on their phones? “I’m past that ‘what the f***’ moment,” he sighs. “I mean, that happened a while ago. That’s already become . . . it’s not ‘what the f***’ any more.”

But when we discuss the future of the cinema as a venue for collective viewing, and the risk that it may disappear entirely, he looks sceptical. “No. Could it?”

I point out that attendance is falling.

“Hmm, I don’t know about that one,” he says, thinking. “Tell that to Disney.”

At 47, Anderson is still a relatively young man by Hollywood director standards. But with eight major films, at least four of which are widely considered to be masterpieces, he’s amassed a catalogue that would easily suffice for an entire career, if not two. Is he ever concerned with the idea of legacy? “No,” he says firmly, rejecting the word, “because that would imply that there’s a sort of thinking of what’s come before . . . If you do feel a ticking clock, which is completely natural to do, then that means there’s a bomb that’s gonna go off, so you gotta go forward. That’s my preoccupation: creating something again.”

Indeed, he shows no sign of slowing down. “I have a very strong idea of what I will do next,” he says. “I have to corral it into existence, because there’s a lot of material that I’ve written over the years, dating as far back as 1998-99, that’s been many different things, over many different years, that now it would be great to go back to.” Of course, he declines to elaborate.
What he will say is that he might consider making a TV series, an avenue increasingly explored by his contemporaries; Steven Soderbergh and the Coen brothers have shows due to come out this year. “Maybe,” he says slowly, when asked if he’d ever switch to the small screen. “I’d have to come up with a good idea.”

Perhaps more likely, though, is a film starring a woman; all his lead roles so far have been male — though he protests that, in his eyes, Phantom Thread “was Alma’s movie, and she was our protagonist”. “Tilda Swinton’s pretty great,” he says, when we discuss actors he’d like to use. “Any time she turns up on screen you feel a kind of force . . . There’s nothing she couldn’t do.” A few weeks after our interview, it transpires that he also has another actress in mind: the Girls Trip breakout star Tiffany Haddish. At the New York Film Critics’ Circle Awards earlier this month, his speech included a message for the actress: “I know that everyone wants to work with you, but may I please cut in front of the line?”

For now, though, he has other concerns: four children under the age of 13 with his partner, the actor Maya Rudolph. When I ask how he manages to continue making movies with a house full of young kids, he recalls visiting a house in France belonging to the artist Anselm Kiefer. “He has this gigantic home,” he says, “and he built this . . . well, it kind of looks like a large rusty pipe” — he indicates with his hands a pipe as wide as a child is tall, connected to another, smaller house — “and I guess that’s where the children lived, and if they wanted to come see Daddy, they’d have to walk across this rusty pipe.” He bends over with laughter at the thought of this revolutionary approach to child management.

Anderson comes across as an artist who has achieved an impressive degree of peace with regard to his work. “It goes back to a [Robert] Altman thing,” he says, referring to the late American director, when we discuss his evolution as both a film-maker and a person, “who was a sort of a mentor of mine, saying, ‘Look — you get a group of people together, build a sandcastle, you have a great time doing it, and then at the end of the day, you all sit back and watch the tide come in and take your sandcastle away.’”

And yet even at the height of a celebrated career, he is troubled by self-doubt. “You’re watching something and you really feel like you got up to the top of the mountain,” he says, referring to the moment when he completes a film, “and you cannot wait to show it to the world. And then those two hours waiting before the screening starts . . . you just wanna take it and throw it in the ocean.”
I later express a degree of scepticism at his frequent displays of humility. Anderson has never made a poorly reviewed film; this summer There Will Be Blood was ranked by The New York Times as the greatest movie of the 21st century so far.

“As Kendrick Lamar says . . . ” he says, drifting off and lounging back into his seat.

I finish the sentence, quoting the rapper’s song from last year: “‘Bitch, be humble.’”

Anderson points a finger at me and grins.

The breakfasters in the restaurant are sloping off to be replaced by the lunchtime crowd, and the director has a long day ahead of him. I ask him a question that’s been playing on my mind since we met. He’s the only film-maker ever to win the directing prizes at all the major European festivals — Cannes, Venice and Berlin — but, despite 19 nominations for his films, he’s never personally won an Oscar. Does he care about Academy Awards?

“That’s like a trick question!” he says, laughing.“You know . . . ” He takes a long pause, thinking, and then answers lightly: “I’m more of a Golden Globe man myself.”