XIXAX Film Forum

The Director's Chair => The Director's Chair => Topic started by: KJ on January 26, 2013, 06:00:07 PM

Title: David Lowery
Post by: KJ on January 26, 2013, 06:00:07 PM
Well, someone had to do it.

For future news...
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: 72teeth on January 26, 2013, 07:13:07 PM
I heard theres a guy that posts on here who could totally get us some inside skinny on his potential next project  :shock:

Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Cloudy on January 26, 2013, 10:07:47 PM
This is the shit. It's really cool knowing that Xixax has the potential of breeding some quality filmmaking, or that people with a quality understanding of filmmaking love Xixax. Either way. This is the shit.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Tictacbk on March 19, 2013, 07:15:41 PM
After Gritty Sundance Debut On ‘Ain’t Them Bodies Saints’, David Lowery To Reinvent ‘Pete’s Dragon’ For Disney
Source: Deadline: http://bit.ly/15o9Rzs (http://bit.ly/15o9Rzs)

EXCLUSIVE: I didn’t see this one coming. After making his feature directing debut on one of the most talked-about films at Sundance Ain’t Them Bodies Saints, David Lowery has hired on with writing partner Toby Halbrooks to script Pete’s Dragon for Disney and producer Jim Whitaker. I’m told they will reinvent the core story of a venerable Disney family film. It will not be a musical and at this point Lowery is just engaged as writer. The original 1977 Pete’s Dragon mixed an animated fire-breather with a live-action cast of actors that included Mickey Rooney, Red Buttons, Shelley Winters, Helen Reddy and Jim Dale, with Sean Marshall playing the orphan boy who comes to a town with his magical dragon, his abusive adoptive parents in hot dispute.

It is certainly a departure for Lowery, who made the jump from editor to director on Saints, a gritty drama he wrote and directed that stars Rooney Mara, Rami Malek, Casey Affleck and Ben Foster. It’s the tale of an outlaw who escapes prison and sets across the Texas hills to reunite with his wife and the daughter he has never met. The film was acquired by IFC, which will release the pic August 16. Lowery’s repped by WME.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: cinemanarchist on March 19, 2013, 07:30:14 PM
 :shock:
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ravi on March 19, 2013, 07:38:32 PM
 :yabbse-thumbup: :yabbse-thumbup: :yabbse-thumbup:
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Alexandro on March 19, 2013, 08:46:32 PM
this is really fantastic!!!
pete's dragon, the original, has always seemed to me like a wasted opportunity.
and the best of luck, ghostboy.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on March 19, 2013, 09:32:59 PM
This is the strangest, greatest, most hilarious thing ever.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: KJ on March 19, 2013, 10:40:26 PM
WOW
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Reelist on March 20, 2013, 01:33:30 AM
Ghostboy and Pete should collaborate.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ghostboy on March 20, 2013, 02:01:15 AM
This is the strangest, greatest, most hilarious thing ever.

This is our take on it too!

It's definitely a remake, albeit in name only, but we're pretty excited about the story we came up with. We are only writers on it, but fingers crossed for a classic and sincere family movie. With a mostly-practical FX dragon.

Next directing thing will be shortly down the road.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Just Withnail on March 20, 2013, 08:39:52 AM
Am.azing! Congratulations, and good luck!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Sleepless on March 20, 2013, 10:04:04 AM
Awesome. Congratulations. Are you only doing projects where there's a connection to a Rooney in some way?
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Reelist on March 20, 2013, 12:01:10 PM
fingers crossed for a classic and sincere family movie. With a mostly-practical FX dragon.

NICE!

I haven't even seen Pete's Dragon BTW, definitely kicking my childhood self for that. I always got it mixed up with 'Puff The Magic Dragon.'

I'm wondering if the guys at Disney saw your attention to period detail in ATBS and thought you'd be a candidate for this?

Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: RegularKarate on March 20, 2013, 12:46:35 PM
Seems like St. Nick is closer to Pete's Dragon in heart... don't know though SINCE I HAVEN'T SEEN ANYTHING FROM ATBS!!!!

Seriously, congrats... fingers crossed on this one. Pete's Dragon is one of those movies I would watch every couple of days one summer (with the one kid on our street who had a VCR)... I haven't seen it in decades, but it still really stands out as an important film to me. I remember having a fight with my friend about whether the lyric was "Money Money Money BY the pound" (the correct me) or "Money Money Money IN the pound" (my friend, who also thought you were supposed to pee inside a girl during sex).
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Lottery on March 20, 2013, 04:32:40 PM
Pete's Dragon must have been before my time. Anyway, congratulations.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Reelist on March 20, 2013, 04:37:50 PM
you really just harshed my buzz with that comment.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: 72teeth on March 20, 2013, 11:42:38 PM
Aw Man Ghostboy, that is fantastic!!!

Congrats dood!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: md on March 24, 2013, 10:28:25 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cu2gVjiE6Uw

Whenever I see Lowery I think of this...
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: modage on April 11, 2013, 03:23:03 PM
HOLY FUCK.

Robert Redford Teams With 'Ain't Them Bodies Saints' Filmmaker for Crime Drama (Exclusive)
Source: THR (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/robert-redford-teams-aint-bodies-437841)

David Lowery will write and direct the film, which is based on a 2003 New Yorker article.

Lowery is attached to adapt and direct The Old Man and the Gun, based on a 2003 New Yorker article written by David Grann.

Redford is attached to star and will produce the adaptation with Bill Holderman and Conde Nast.

Old Man tells the true story of Forrest Tucker, a man born in 1920 who, as a lifelong bankrobber, spent most of his life in jail or escaping from jail. (He had 18 escapes under his belt, including one from Alcatraz and one from San Quentin.)

The article focused on Tucker at the age of 78, living in a retirement community with his third wife, and still having the hankering to rob banks. In fact, he was caught by police after a robbery in a high-speed chase in 2000 and sentenced to 13 years. He died in 2005.

Lowery’s take focuses on a specific time period in Tucker's life, although details were not revealed.

The project has fascinated Hollywood over the last decade. It was at one point set up at Warner Bros. and had Wolfgang Petersen as board as a director. It was also previously being developed by producer Anthony Mastromauro.

Redford has his thriller The Company You Keep, which he directed and stars in with Shia LaBeouf, out in limited release from Sony Pictures Classics. And just last week he began production on his first comic book movie, Marvel’s Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

Redford is repped by WME and Jackoway Tyerman.

Old Man serves as Lowery’s first move on the directing front since Saints’ Sundance debut. The film, which starred Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara, was a crime drama that also dealt with an escaped outlaw and his relationships. It was described by critics as a crime saga by way of an art film, with THR’s Todd McCarthy comparing the director to Terrence Malick.

Lowery, who has also recently booked a gig to re-imagine Pete’s Dragon for Disney, is repped by WME and Frankfurt Kurnit.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Fernando on April 11, 2013, 03:28:06 PM
HOLY FUCK.


Indeed, congrats GB, awesome news.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Sleepless on April 11, 2013, 03:28:40 PM
Wow. Awesome. Incredible. Brilliant.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: ©brad on April 11, 2013, 04:21:39 PM
Most incredible thing I've read in a long time. The hard part now is to remember to use the name David Lowery and not Ghostboy when I freak out about this and ATBS to my friends.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on April 11, 2013, 04:30:56 PM
I might still be more excited about Pete's Dragon, but you know, yeah, this is pretty cool too.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: wilder on April 11, 2013, 04:43:09 PM
My God. Way to go, man.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: BB on April 11, 2013, 05:11:37 PM
Ghostboy, you fill me with shame.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Frederico Fellini on April 11, 2013, 05:28:08 PM
Ghostboy, you fill me with inspiration.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on April 11, 2013, 05:32:44 PM
Ghostboy, you fill me with shame.
'you're an ancient people, but an innocent one, unburdened by shame.' (lars iyer)

good news lowery? crime/time films, hmm. seems like you're going to get to craft the narrative! very exciting, hope it goes well of course. wme, nice :))
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: HeywoodRFloyd on April 11, 2013, 10:21:24 PM
You champion
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Just Withnail on April 12, 2013, 02:40:54 AM
This is surreal and just completely amazing. Go get 'em!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on April 12, 2013, 04:17:07 AM
Fucking awesome, man!  :bravo:
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: RegularKarate on April 12, 2013, 11:48:09 AM
Amazing!

Is Redford just going to be the voice of the dragon or are you Mo-Capping him too?
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Cloudy on April 12, 2013, 03:34:46 PM
 :bravo:
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: OrHowILearnedTo on April 12, 2013, 03:56:29 PM
Holy moly! Go GB!!!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Gold Trumpet on April 13, 2013, 02:04:08 PM
This is the best and nicest surprise since my return. Love every part of it. Congrats, Ghostboy.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Alexandro on April 14, 2013, 09:14:52 AM
This guy's so hot right now!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ghostboy on April 14, 2013, 11:02:37 PM
Thanks folks. Hopefully I can actually finish the current movie (still making our post-Sundance tweaks) and get down to the business of making this new one. I think it'll be pretty awesome.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on April 17, 2013, 10:37:41 AM
Shout out on NPR's On Point! Great interview with Carruth, and GB mentioned in the same breath as Malick! Way to go!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: cinemanarchist on April 17, 2013, 05:33:46 PM
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/aint-bodies-saints-filmmaker-adapt-433273 (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/aint-bodies-saints-filmmaker-adapt-433273)

Ain't Them Bodies Saints' Filmmaker to Adapt Brian Michael Bendis' 'Torso' (Exclusive)
source: Hollywood Reporter

David Lowery is attached to write and direct the adaptation of the crime thriller graphic novel by Bendis and Marc Andreyko.

After spending years in limbo, the adaptation of Torso, the graphic novel by comics superstar Brian Michael Bendis and Marc Andreyko, is coming back to life.

David Lowery, the filmmaker who drew much praise for his Sundance film Ain’t Them Bodies Saints, has come aboard to write and direct the thriller, which will be produced by Circle of Confusion, the shingle behind AMC’s The Walking Dead. Bendis and Andreyko are also producing.Hollywood has tried for more than a decade to get its hooks into Torso, which was written by Bendis and Andreyko and drawn by Bendis in the late 1990s.

The true story of Elliot Ness’ time after his Al Capone days, when he moved to Cleveland and got embroiled in the hunt of serial killer who was leaving torsos in the river and taunting notes to police, attracted David Fincher, Ehren Kruger, Bill Mechanic, Todd McFarlane and Don Murphy in the mid-2000s.

Fincher was going to direct an adaptation for Paramount as a follow-up to his Zodiac and even had Matt Damon attached but at the last moment, Paramount blinked. The studio thought the budget was too high, and more importantly, saw Fincher’s desire to do it in black and white as a risky commercial bet.

The project fell under its own weight and the rights eventually reverted to Bendis and Andreyko. Bendis, in the intervening years, has become one of the biggest named in comics, working exclusively for Marvel. In March alone, the comics he wrote -- Uncanny X-Men, All-New X-Men, Guardians of the Galaxy, among them -- sold over a million copies, a rare feat in today’s publishing marketplace. Andreyko, too, has moved on to mainstream comics, writing books for DC and Marvel such as Manhunter and Captain America and Bucky.

Torso is now starting from scratch, and is eschewing the studio route for a lower-budgeted, indie approach that will aim be to be a high-minded, period serial killer movie. Bendis said that while the project has had its ups and downs over the last 15 years, he’s never lost belief in its cinematic potential.

“It’s a cool true story that very little people know of,” he said. “You think you know the story of Elliot Ness? You don't. You know the story of serial killers? You don't. And that’s how I kept the faith." Lowery’s Saints was described by critics as a crime saga by way of an art film, with THR’s Todd McCarthy comparing the director to Terrence Malick, and saying the film serves “most decisively to put director-writer David Lowery on the map.” Since Saints bowed, Lowery has kept things varied. He has booked a gig writing a remake of Pete’s Dragon for Disney and is teaming up with Robert Redford on the indie crime drama The Old Man and the Gun.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: cinemanarchist on April 17, 2013, 05:34:22 PM
In other news, I have GOT to get my shit together.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on April 17, 2013, 05:38:54 PM
David Lowery also needs to write and direct a screwball comedy about his insane schedule.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Lottery on April 17, 2013, 05:46:05 PM
On the topic of his schedule, I thought this was pretty cool.

http://vimeo.com/33515966 (http://vimeo.com/33515966)

But I imagine things are different now because he doesn't plan on sleeping again.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ghostboy on April 17, 2013, 05:53:33 PM
This marks the first time I've found out I'm attached to something on xixax.

(this is a real possibility, but it's a little ways off)
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: modage on April 17, 2013, 06:00:16 PM
It's now your responsibility to revive all of David Fincher's old amazing sounding projects. Rendevous With Rama or Black Hole next, plz?
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Lottery on April 17, 2013, 06:04:21 PM
Make it Rendezvous With Rama.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ghostboy on April 17, 2013, 06:05:13 PM
Black Hole

This was my longstanding answer to what my dream project would be. But at this point I think I'd be too worried I'd screw it up. There's a short film called Yearbook that played at Sundance a year or two ago that is probably as good an adaptation (unofficial though it may be) as possible, even though it's only 5 minutes long.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on April 17, 2013, 08:10:29 PM
I've wanted to adapt Torso for the past decade, so if you do get it, you'd better not screw it up.  NO PRESSURE!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ravi on June 03, 2013, 01:19:55 AM
Dallas filmmaker David Lowery leaps onto national stage (http://www.dallasnews.com/entertainment/movies/headlines/20130601-dallas-filmmaker-david-lowery-leaps-onto-national-stage.ece)
Filmmaker David Lowery is keeping busy with several projects, including "Ain't Them Bodies Saints," which played at Cannes and Sundance. But he's content to remain at home in East Dallas.   
By CHRIS VOGNAR Movie Critic cvognar@dallasnews.com
Published: 01 June 2013 01:36 PM

The second annual Oak Cliff Film Festival kicks off Thursday and runs through the weekend, with filmmakers from Texas and other locales stopping by. But for all of the festival’s variety, the event is shaping up as a showcase for one red-hot native son.

That would be David Lowery, the prolific 32-year-old Irving High School graduate currently leaping onto the national stage. His latest feature, the Texas outlaw romance Ain’t Them Bodies Saints (starring Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara), played Sundance and Cannes this year and will be released by IFC in August.
He’s now at work on a reimagining of the Disney favorite Pete’s Dragon and the Robert Redford project The Old Man and the Gun, based on a New Yorker article about a septuagenarian bank robber. Redford will star and produce; Lowery will write and direct.

Lowery has long been tight with the Aviation Cinemas crew, which runs the film festival and the Texas Theatre. So his footprint on the festival comes as no surprise. He’ll host a screening of the dreamlike Robert Altman Western McCabe & Mrs. Miller at 7 p.m. Friday at the Texas Theatre, then return at 9:30 p.m. for a “secret screening.”
Keith Carradine will attend. He’s in McCabe. He’s also in Ain’t Them Bodies Saints.

Lowery’s plate is fuller than a buffet platter. He uses a different dining analogy to describe his work habits.
“I’ve always taken a kind of Lazy Susan approach,” Lowery says. “You get to a good point on one project, and then you do some work on the next one, and then later in the day you work on the next one. There’s actually plenty of time if you just utilize it well.” He pauses. “Which I’m terrible at doing.”
With his thick facial hair and old-soul bearing, Lowery looks like he could have stepped out of a Civil War photograph. He’s soft-spoken and slightly overwhelmed, though it’s not as if he came out of nowhere.

Lowery is known around Texas as a do-everything guy quick to take work on other people’s projects. He was all over this year’s Sundance catalog: In addition to writing and directing Saints, he co-edited Shane Carruth’s Upstream Color and co-wrote Yen Tan’s Pit Stop, which won the Dallas International Film Festival’s Texas Filmmaker Award. “My intent was always just to help out on films that I like and help out friends who were making films,” he says.
Now his creative karma and focus are paying major dividends.

“He’s skyrocketing right now,” says Aviation’s Adam Donaghey, the executive producer of Lowery’s 2009 feature St. Nick and a high school friend from Irving. “It all stems from his relentless execution of his own style. He just did, and kept doing it, and somebody finally saw it.”
That style, much like Lowery, is quiet, patient and soulful; it makes sense that he counts McCabe & Mrs. Miller as a favorite movie, and that Saints has drawn comparisons to the work of Terrence Malick.

Lowery simply isn’t very Hollywood. But unlike other locally raised filmmakers, including Yen Tan and David Gordon Green, he hasn’t decamped for the higher-profile Austin scene. He calls East Dallas home and sounds as if he will for a while.

“I like that Dallas is off the beaten path, as far as the entertainment industry goes, but is still culturally ahead of the curve,” he says. “I get everything I want out of a big city while also managing to remain somewhat invisible. It has plenty of art house theaters, great vegan food and great coffee. And lots of friends.” He should expect to see plenty of them over the weekend.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: MacGuffin on August 22, 2013, 05:08:50 PM
Casey Affleck, David Lowery Reteam for Sci-Fi Tale 'To Be Two' (Exclusive)
Source: THR

The team that made Ain’t Them Bodies Saints is partnering for a thinking man’s sci-fi tale.

Saints helmer David Lowery has closed a deal to adapt and direct To Be Two, an adaptation of a short story from the Into the Silent Land: Travels in Neuropsychology collection by Paul Broks.

Casey Affleck is attached to star and is set to executive produce with Lowery, Toby Halbrooks and James M. Johnston of Sailor Bear. Halbrooks and Johnston were producers on Saints, which opened in theaters last weekend.

Jim Wilson is attached to produce and Silver Reel will finance script development.
 
To Be Two adapts the short story To Be Two or Not To Be and deals with identity and the self. It’s set in a world where teleportation exists and people are scanned, the digital self sent to Mars, reconstructed atom by atom, while the original is vaporized. The story then posits the idea of the teleportation machine malfunctioning and not vaporizing the original person. Who is now real? And how do experiences make them different? And what happens when the authorities want to erase the original person?

The tone of the adaptation is said to be similar to Looper, Rian Johnson’s time traveling movie that saw Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Bruce Willis play the same person from different decades with different agendas.

Lowery wrote and directed Saints, which stars Affleck, Rooney Mara and Ben Foster, and garnered much acclaim when it premiered at Sundance earlier this year. The movie opened from IFC last week with many critics comparing the filmmaker to Terrence Malick.

Since the Sundance unveiling, WME-repped Lowery has booked a gig to write Disney’s reimagined version of Pete’s Dragon with Halbrooks, and is attached to adapt and direct The Old Man and the Gun, based on a 2003 article in The New Yorker. Robert Redford is attached to star.

Affleck is next set to star in Relativity’s Out of the Furnace and just began shooting Interstellar, Christopher Nolan’s sci-fi adventure movie. He is repped by WME and Ziffren Brittenham.

Silver Reel is a fairly new financier on the scene that focuses on development. The company recently teamed with Colin Firth's Raindog Films on the $30 million spy thriller A Foreign Country. Among the other titles it has worked on are the Arnold Schwarzenegger zombie movie Maggie, Nicole Kidman’s Grace Kelly biopic Grace of Monaco, and TIFF title Under the Skin starring Scarlett Johansson.

Halbrooks, Johnston and Sailor Bear are all also repped by WME. Broks is repped by RWSG.

As a side note, Lowery has teamed up with his filmmaking pals Destin Daniel Creton, Joe Swanberg and Adam Wingard, all of whom have buzzy indie movies (Short Term 12, Drinking Buddies and You're Next, respectively) hitting theaters this weekend, for a little quadruple promo.

The filmmakers are promising that, if you see all of their movies and have the receipts to prove it, prizes like a hand drawn illustration from Lowery, a handpainted animal mask from Wingard and a signed coaster from Swanberg can be yours.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on August 22, 2013, 06:08:44 PM
ohhh wow. i know exactly what this is getting into. some heavy research for lowery, i wonder how he'll approach that. for example, if we were a group of people interested in this topic on a regular basis, the conversation would have already exploded

the basic can be quickly explained: neural science is like weather. in science, the easiest thing to say is it's like weather, because of what happened to weather in the 60s-80s: the chaos theory. science couldn't figure out how to forecast weather. science figured out all these other things, but landed on the moon before figuring out weather. tremendous complexities to weather, from all parts of the biosphere

people are still like that -- how do you forecast a person? such complexities. and neural science explores those complexities

i haven't read broks but i immediately see that as a scientist and writer he used transportation to mars as a way to share the complexities and communicate them to non-science people. what i mean is, traveling to mars is not at all the conquest of human survival. space travel is necessary for humans not because space travel is fun, but because our sun will die. the way things are now, there's a sad fear that our planet will die before our sun will, but either way. a famous early narrative of this plight was of course written by asimov, the last question (http://www.physics.princeton.edu/ph115/LQ.pdf), and of course everyone was excited when stephen hawking himself noted this, that we need space travel

to me it's interesting that blok reconfigures his narrative strategy in order to increase his focus (a travel to mars is easier to understand than a travel to a planet we're not familiar with, and his big question is about how we are people). the overlap between modern science questions and philosophical questions, and the unique portrait chosen, excites me because there's definitely the potential for lowery to treat it not as the typical sci-fi "this is the future, this is how it will be," but to treat it as if it's a single step toward a long future that can't at this point be alltheway seen. i say this because i saw saints. this futuristic movie could be treated like a historical movie

i can tell you it's the cusp of science fiction right now, it really is. looper, ok, this is different, pacific rim, ok, this is different
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ghostboy on August 22, 2013, 06:16:34 PM
Right on the money.

It's nothing like Looper, actually. We used that as a budgetary reference, which i think is how it got into the report, but this is gonna be its own thing. The short story is an exploration of ego theory vs. bundle theory, and that's the central concern of the movie as well.

It's gonna be great.

If I had my druthers I'd shoot this and the Redford movie back to back next year.



Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on August 22, 2013, 06:59:55 PM
not because in imaginary land you're standing right in front of me, but on the basis of the ideas being targeted, i can't think of a recent scifi movie that held this degree of exploration. be prepared: if they called you malick before, they're going to call you tarkovsky now

example of me experiencing excitement
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Derek on August 22, 2013, 07:28:53 PM
If I had my druthers I'd shoot this and the Redford movie back to back next year.

I'd love to write a line like that. That's awesome for you dude!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Lottery on August 22, 2013, 09:22:52 PM
Congratulations and good luck.


It's nothing like Looper, actually. We used that as a budgetary reference, which i think is how it got into the report, but this is gonna be its own thing. The short story is an exploration of ego theory vs. bundle theory, and that's the central concern of the movie as well.

Yeah, if anything it reminds me of the surprising turn of events that occurs in Christopher Nolan's fifth film.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ghostboy on August 22, 2013, 09:30:55 PM
Congratulations and good luck.


It's nothing like Looper, actually. We used that as a budgetary reference, which i think is how it got into the report, but this is gonna be its own thing. The short story is an exploration of ego theory vs. bundle theory, and that's the central concern of the movie as well.

Yeah, if anything it reminds me of the surprising turn of events that occurs in Christopher Nolan's fifth film.

Which I haven't seen, but need to - Modage mentioned to me that there might be some similarities.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on August 22, 2013, 09:45:36 PM
sprinkle some paprika and you'll have seen the batch. a difference
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Reelist on August 22, 2013, 09:49:34 PM
Christopher Nolan's fifth film is The Prestige, for anyone guessing.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on August 22, 2013, 09:53:01 PM
planetary difference
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Lottery on August 22, 2013, 09:57:20 PM
Christopher Nolan's fifth film is The Prestige, for anyone guessing.

That was my crappy way of avoiding possible spoilers and twists.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Sleepless on August 29, 2013, 06:13:07 AM
So I was walking out of Kroger on Sunday morning and I saw this:

(http://)

Congratulations on officially being a local celebrity! Xixax is finally starting to take over the world IRL!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Sleepless on September 06, 2013, 01:39:22 PM
Is interviewed on this week's Empire podcast.  :yabbse-thumbup:
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Reelist on September 06, 2013, 01:50:12 PM
Itunes Meet The Filmmaker (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/meet-the-filmmaker/id301899522) podcast as well.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on January 22, 2014, 08:41:58 PM
the lowery awards this year are packed. enormous, prodigious year. i'd like to read the journals

(finally!) watched sun don't shine, which lowery edited. watched pit stop, which lowery co-wrote. he's doing this thing where i like to watch what he's touched. can't, um, one can swap lubitsch for lowery touch -- 2013 was some kinda lowery touch year for sure

there are more(!) ain't them bodies saints, upstream color, sun don't shine, pit stop, bad fever, st. nick, done. and things aren't over(!) wtf is the nor'easter?? editor. gotta visit. also, editor and cinematographer for empire state, a feature from kris swanber(!) wahhat!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on April 01, 2014, 09:03:51 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/ZyzW44F.jpg) (http://m.refinery29.com/best-directors?utm_source=email&utm_medium=editorial&utm_content=los-angeles&utm_campaign=140313-best-directors#)
he's the link, of course
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on April 02, 2014, 01:38:09 PM
^you could click his photo as a link to the article. i'm going to pop the article, kind of like a prayer thing, and because oh i guess posting the article is more helpful:

29 Filmmakers Changing The Game

article's intro:
Quote
It’s an exciting time for movies. A decade ago, if you weren't among the established and well-connected, getting a feature film financed, made, and seen by an audience was a near Herculean feat. And, while being a standout director in today’s content-heavy climate is no piece of cake, the ongoing democratization of filmmaking has provided a whole new crop of auteurs-in-the-making with diverse and exciting approaches of synthesizing their singular visions and sharing them with the world.

And, in celebration of just that, we've collected 29 of the brightest emerging talents in the world of film, and charted their personal and professional journeys while highlighting the ways in which they’re reshaping their medium, one film at a time. To help us with our list, we consulted a series of industry insiders, including The Hollywood Reporter’s Scott Feinberg, Sundance’s director of programming Trevor Groth, and Mette-Marie Katz, manager of sales at L.A-based production company and sales agency XYZ Films.

article mentions:

Ryan Coogler, 27
Breakout Feature: Fruitvale Station
"Coogler’s talent for narrative was first noticed by his creative writing teacher, while he was a star football player at Saint Mary’s College in Moraga, California. On her recommendation, Coogler began to pursue screenwriting and eventually moved to Los Angeles to study filmmaking at USC. A kind word from a professor landed Coogler a meeting with Forest Whitaker, who agreed to help Coogler develop a feature about Grant’s story, one that resonated deeply with the Oakland-native."

Drake Doremus, 30
Breakout Feature: Like Crazy
"Doremus has come a long way since his first feature Douchebag screened at Sundance in 2010."

Ana Lily Amirpour
Breakout Feature: A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night
"We’re going to go out on a limb and say that Ana Lily Amirpour’s directorial debut A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night, is the first of its kind: an Iranian vampire western shot entirely in black and white."

Andrew Bujalski, 36
Breakout Feature: Computer Chess
"Andrew Bujalski, or 'The Godfather of Mumblecore' as he’s sometimes (reluctantly) referred to"

Justin Simien, 30
Breakout Feature: Dear White People
"Dear White People began accumulating buzz online and was named Indiewire’s 'Project of The Year' in 2013. That led to a string of meetings with studios interested in developing the project, but Simien eventually partnered with indie financer Code Red films. After a breakneck 23-day shoot, Dear White People premiered at this past Sundance and wowed audiences with its fresh and insightful take on race relations in America, a Do The Right Thing for the Obama era."

Damien Chazelle, 29
Breakout Feature: Whiplash
"If there’s such a thing as a golden ticket for young, emerging filmmakers, Damien Chazelle just got his stamped. His second feature Whiplash opened this year’s Sundance and according to Groth, it took the festival by storm. 'From that point, everyone was buzzing,' he says. The film was immediately acquired by Sony Pictures Classics, and took home both the Audience and Grand Jury Awards. Not a bad week for the 29-year-old Harvard grad."

Kate Barker-Froyland
Breakout Feature: Song One
"Kate Barker-Froyland first met Anne Hathaway on the set of The Devil Wears Prada all the way back in 2006. She was the director’s assistant"

Richard Ayoade, 36
Breakout Feature: Submarine
"After becoming a star across the pond by nailing the nerd routine in the U.K. laughers The Mighty Boosh and The IT Crowd, Richard Ayoade was poised for a breakout stateside with a role opposite Ben Stiller, Vince Vaughn, and Jonah Hill in the 2012 raunch-fest The Watch. But, the movie flopped, and Ayoade never quite lived up to his next-big-thing billing. Luckily, he had another promising career in his back pocket."

Mike Cahill, 34
Breakout Feature: Another Earth
"When it comes to making movies, Mike Cahill is officially batting a thousand."
"Having previously plied his trade as a National Geographic field producer and an editor on a couple of small-budget indie films, Cahill and his writing partner Brit Marling (who also starred in the film) became the co-darlings of the festival. A bidding war for the film's rights ensued and was eventually won by Fox Searchlight for close to $2 million dollars, nearly 10 times its budget."

Sebastian Silva, 34
Breakout Feature: The Maid
"Silva actually shot Crystal Fairy while waiting for Magic Magic’s funding to come together. There was a tiny crew and no full-length script, which meant the actors had to improvise most of their lines. Silva plans on adopting the same guerilla approach for his next film, his first in America, and hopes to finish shooting in 14 days."

Jill Soloway, 47
Breakout Feature: Afternoon Delight
"Soloway has been very candid about having felt as though she missed her opportunity to see her own vision realized on screen and that her role was to guide younger visionaries in the right direction. But, after her debut short Una Hora Por Favora premiered to favorable reviews at Sundance in 2012, Soloway immediately began work on a feature-length script about a stay-at-home L.A. mom (Kathryn Hahn who hires young stripper Juno Temple as a live-in nanny). With the help of some producers, she raised $800,000, and just like that, Afternoon Delight had its world premiere at Sundance the following year, earning Soloway the Directing Award. The film was acquired by indie distributors The Film Arcade and Cinedigm and was released theatrically in August of last year, solidifying Soloway’s late-blooming career as a fresh female voice in independent cinema."

David Lowery, 32
Breakout Feature: Ain’t Them Bodies Saints
"'David is as bright as anyone I’ve ever met at the festival,' says Groth. 'He’s a purist in the kinds of films he makes, with such attention to aesthetic, without sacrificing story. When it’s all said and done, he’s going to have one of the greatest bodies of work out there.'"

Gia Coppola, 27
Breakout feature: Palo Alto
"With her debut feature Palo Alto, Gia Coppola became the latest member of cinema’s first family to assume their rightful spot in the director’s chair."

Joe Swanberg, 32
Breakout Feature: Drinking Buddies
"Joe Swanberg’s entire career was building up to his breakout hit Drinking Buddies."

Alexandre Moors, 41
Breakout Feature: Blue Caprice
Before his debut feature Blue Caprice earned raves at last year’s Sundance, Moors was best known for being Kanye West’s go-to director.

Sarah Polley, 35
Breakout Feature: Away From Her
"It’s as exciting as it is true: Sarah Polley has only scratched the surface."

Zal Batmanglij, 32
Breakout Feature: The Sound of My Voice
"But, after the film's success, Batmanglij and his band of outsiders suddenly found themselves standing on the inside of the walls they had been peeking over ever since he graduated from Georgetown University and moved to L.A. Ridley Scott's production house, Scott Free, dropped $6.5 million on Batmanglij's second feature The East"

Josh Trank, 30
Breakout Feature: Chronicle
"Josh Trank, welcome to the big leagues. With just one film under his belt, the L.A. native’s career has skyrocketed after a small movie he made for just $12 million wound up grossing an astonishing $126 million worldwide. That film was Chronicle, and when it opened at number one in February of 2012, the then 27-year-old Trank eclipsed the likes of Steven Spielberg and James Cameron to become one of the youngest directors ever with a top-grossing movie."

Josephine Decker
Breakout Feature: Thou Wast Mild And Lovely
"The result is an audacious second feature based on the novel East of Eden, about a laborer who falls in love with a farmer’s daughter. It comes from an artist who has long been working outside the mainstream, but that may change swiftly as New Europe will be selling the film’s international rights, while Paradigm handles the North American rights."

Charlie McDowell, 30
Breakout Feature: The One I Love
"Just because Charlie McDowell was born into Hollywood royalty — his parents are actors Malcolm McDowell and Mary Steenburgen — doesn’t mean he didn’t pay his dues. Whether it was as a production assistant on Curb Your Enthusiasm or a consultant on Ken Burns’ Baseball, McDowell cut his teeth any way he could."

Behn Zeitlin, 31
Breakout Feature: Beasts of The Southern Wild
"After winning the festival’s Grand Jury Prize, Zeitlin’s film exploded onto the scene, becoming a full-blown cultural phenomenon."

Dee Rees
Breakout Feature: Pariah
"The Nashville native has yet to make a follow-up, but has a number of projects on the go, including an adaptation of Toni Morrison’s Home and an HBO series that she’s developing with Viola Davis. Rees has come a long way since leaving the marketing industry to enroll in NYU’s graduate film program, where she met her mentor Spike Lee. (He was instrumental in getting Pariah made.)"

Gareth Evans, 33
Breakout Feature: The Raid
"'He has an innate ability to infuse an energy and an urgency into his films that is almost poetic,' says Katz, whose production company and sales agency XYZ films was instrumental in discovering Evans. 'The action never feels contrived or overwrought. It’s always innovative.' According to Katz, Evans had originally envisioned The Raid on a much larger scale, but didn’t have the necessary resources at the time. But, that was then. After the success of the first film, Evans had no trouble securing funding for The Raid 2: Berandal, which just recently screened at SXSW. And, the buzz has been deafening. According to Katz, Hollywood has already come calling. 'I have no doubt he’s going to become one of the major players,' she says."

Martha Stephens, 29
Breakout Feature: Land Ho!
"Her first film, Passenger Pigeons, examined how a small Eastern Kentucky coal town changes after the sudden death of a miner, while her second film Pilgrim Song follows an ex-music teacher who treks through the Appalachian wilderness in search of enlightenment. Both films were made on very meager budgets and both racked up the awards when they premiered at SXSW within two years of each other, making them the ultimate companion pieces.
It was on her third feature, Land Ho!, that Stephens decided to branch out with the help of some old friends. Not only did she team up with her former classmate Aaron Katz, who co-directed the moving road-trip comedy with her, but she also enlisted fellow UNSC grad and indie-film icon David Gordon Green to produce the film, which was shot in Iceland."

James Ponsoldt, 36
Breakout Feature: Smashed
"credited with reinvigorating the pallid teen drama"

Cary Fukunaga, 36
Breakout Feature: Sin Nombre
"While casual observers may just now be succumbing to the Cult of Fukunaga, the California native and former pro snowboarder, has been in the directing game for a whole decade. As a grad student at NYU, Fukunaga wrote and directed the short Victoria Para Chino, which screened at Sundance, won him a Student Academy Award, and was even shortlisted for an Oscar."

Maya Forbes, 45
Breakout Feature: Infinitely Polar Bear
"The seasoned comedy writer met wunderkind director J.J. Abrams in a park where their children played together."

Destin Daniel Cretton, 35
Breakout Feature: Short Term 12
"What he had was last year’s breakout hit, a film he wrote based on his own experiences working at a foster-care facility for at risk teens. It was an eye-opening experience for Cretton, who made short films on the side as a hobby. He eventually decided to pursue filmmaking more seriously and enrolled in the film program at SDSU. An original short version of Short Term 12 was his thesis film, which went on to win the Jury Prize for U.S. Short Filmmaking at Sundance in 2009. But, it wasn’t until Cretton’s first feature, I Am Not A Hipster, earned raves at Sundance in 2012 that he was able to lock up funding for the feature version of Short Term 12."

Mona Fastvold, 32
Breakout Feature: The Sleepwalker
"Prior to directing The Sleepwalker, Fastvold had built an extensive filmography directing music videos for the likes of Sondre Lerche, Razika, Maribel, Chris Holm, JBN, The Megaphonic Thrift, and Civiltwilight, but what really helped secure funding was an accompanying short she made to convince people she had the chops to direct a feature. It worked. Thanks to funding from a combination of private equity money and a grant from the Norwegian Film Institute, she was able to make The Sleepwalker over a hectic 18-day shoot."
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Reelist on April 02, 2014, 04:18:45 PM
he’s going to have one of the greatest bodies of work out there.'"

Ain't Them Bodies Great
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ravi on April 04, 2014, 04:38:04 PM
David Lowery in Talks to Add Directing Duties on Disney's ‘Pete's Dragon’ (Exclusive) (http://www.thewrap.com/david-lowery-talks-add-directing-duties-disneys-petes-dragon-exclusive/)

After being hired to co-write the screenplay, David Lowery is in negotiations to direct “Pete's Dragon” for Disney, multiple individuals familiar with the project have told TheWrap.

The original 1977 film featured an animated dragon interacting with a live-action cast including Mickey Rooney, Shelley Winters, Red Buttons and Sean Marshall, who played an orphan fleeing his abusive adoptive parents.

Lowery and Toby Halbrooks wrote the script, which reinvents the core of the original family film, which is not expected to be a musical this time around.

Lowery has experience working with young actors, having previously directed “St. Nick,” an indie movie about runaway children who have to fend for themselves in the wild.

Should Lowery close a deal to direct “Pete's Dragon,” it's unclear whether that would come before his adaptation of Kevin Powers’ acclaimed novel “The Yellow Birds,” which insiders suggest would take second position. Jeffrey Sharp and Jim Kohlberg's Story Mining and Supply Co. is developing that film, which is based on Powers’ experiences as an Army machine gunner in Iraq.

Lowery, Halbrooks and their Sailor Bear partner James M. Johnston recently produced Alex Ross Perry's movie “Listen Up Philip,” which debuted at Sundance in January and stars Jason Schwartzman and Elisabeth Moss.

Lowery is repped by WME.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Pozer on April 07, 2014, 12:10:05 AM
Confirmed: Mickey Rooney won't be cameoing.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: MacGuffin on May 05, 2014, 02:17:36 PM
The 11 Movies That Changed My Life: 'Ain't Them Bodies Saints' Director David Lowery

FEATURES BY CORY EVERETT
 
It's hard to think of another indie filmmaker in recent memory who has taken advantage of his post-Sundance moment quite as well as David Lowery. After conquering the fest last year as a triple-threat (with three separate films) — co-editor on Shane Carruth's "Upstream Color," co-writer on Yen Tan's "Pit Stop," and perhaps most notably as writer/director on "Aint Them Bodies Saints," the 70's flavored romantic crime drama we called "a wholly engrossing and impressive piece of work" — Lowery got straight to work on figuring out his next project(s).

Currently on his lazy Susan of possibilities are the David Fincher serial killer project "Torso," the Robert Redford-led caper "The Old Man And The Gun," re-teaming with 'Saints' star Casey Affleck for the heady sci-fi "To Be Two," and the remake of "Pete's Dragon" which he was recently slated to direct. (Oh, he also found time to squeeze in an episode of Sundance Channel's "Rectify," and lent his name as producer to Alex Ross Perry's forthcoming "Listen Up Phillip," one of our favorites from Sundance this year.)

Lowery took a short break from writing "Pete's Dragon" (and likely three or four other possible features) to be the latest participant in our My Life In Movies series — whose previous interviewees include Terry Gilliam and "Hide Your Smiling Faces" helmer Daniel Carbone — and spoke about the varied cinematic influences that have shaped his life.


1. The first movie you ever saw.
One of my earliest memories, movie-related or otherwise, is of seeing a man dunking a man's head in a toilet on television, and my mom telling me that this is what would happen to me if I ever joined the army. It wasn't until my senior year in high school that I would discover that this was a scene from "The Great Santini," starring Robert Duvall. My mother's admonition worked; I never had any inclination whatsoever to join the military, and still feel somewhat ill at ease about working on a war picture, which I now am.

2. The first moviegoing film experience you can remember.
The first movie I ever saw in the cinema was Walt Disney's "Pinocchio," upon its 1984 re-release, which would have put me at three years old. I loved it, developed an early crush on the Blue Fairy (or rather, the standee in the lobby, which made a bigger impression on me than the film) and decided I wanted to be Pinocchio when I grew up.

3. The best moviegoing film experience you ever had.
A 35mm screening of "Two-Lane Blacktop" at the Alamo Drafthouse. It was actually a double feature with "The Shooter," and Monte Hellman was there, but those details are irrelevant. It was "Two-Lane Blacktop," all on its lonesome, that gave me a particularly exhilarating high. I can't quite explain it, but I'd never experienced prior and certainly haven't since. I won't deny that external circumstances might have had something to do with it, but regardless, the film remains in my top four or five favorites of all time.


4. The first film you saw that you realized, you too could be a filmmaker.
Predictably (hubristically), it was "Star Wars." Perhaps not even the films, but the Random House storybooks, which I took to heart long before I saw the movies (I grew up without a TV and was too young to see any of them in the theater).

5. The first movie you became obsessed with.
If a 7 year-old can truly be obsessed, then see above. If 17 is a more reasonable age, see below.

6. The movie that always makes you cry (or the movie that is your emotional comfort food movie).
"Buffalo '66." This was the first film that hit me on the level of emotional autobiography. Perhaps its to the detriment of my own character that it still does, but I hope not. The hot chocolate and the heart-shaped cookies at the end — they make my heart swell. The last time I watched the film, about six months ago, I looked up the actor who plays the donut shop clerk in that last scene. His name is Manny Fried, and I was sad to learn that he passed away in 2011. I hope he was proud of this tiny, perfect performance.

7. The movie that always freaks you out/makes you scared.
David Lynch's "Fire Walk With Me" has a scene in it that scared me so bad that I don't remember it. I blocked the memory out — repeatedly! I've seen the film two or three times, and I can never remember what it is that scares me. It's probably not even a scene but a particular accumulation of images and sounds, arranged just so, that triggers whatever synapse in my brain release the waves of sheer terror I associate with this blank space in my memory of the film.

8. The movie you love that no one would expect you to love.
"Step Brothers," maybe, although anyone who knows me wouldn't be too surprised about that.

9. The movie that defined your coming-of-age/high school experience.
There are too many of these to count. I'll go with "Romeo + Juliet," because it was released my sophomore year, right before that pivot point in adolescence when one begins the gradual tip towards adulthood. And also because I saw it six times in the theater.

10. The movie that defined your childhood.
Since I already mentioned the 'Star Wars' movies, I'll shake things up in the mildest way possible now and cite the Indiana Jones movies. I don't think any of these choices need much explanation, although I would like to note that my favorite of the latter trilogy always was and still is 'Temple Of Doom.'


11. A film you didn't like at first, but later came to love.
"Gummo" is the example that comes to mind first. I rented it in high school and couldn’t get through 40 minutes of it. A few years later, after having a more positive reaction to "Julien Donkey Boy," I tried again and found it far more favorable. In the years since, I saw "Trash Humpers" in the theater three times, so clearly whatever rot Harmony Korine introduced to my brain has taken hold. I also did an about-face on Jim Jarmusch’s "Dead Man," although I think my negative reaction to it had more to do with the fact that I watched it with my dad, who found it not the father-son-bonding-over-a-Western experience he had in mind. All it took was a solo viewing for it to become one of my very favorite films, and one which I quote even more often than "Step Brothers."
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: ©brad on May 05, 2014, 02:43:32 PM
Modage interviewing Ghostboy. It doesn't get much more awesome than that.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Reelist on May 05, 2014, 04:37:01 PM
  :bravo:  Good job, guys! I found that really relatable. Pinocchio is the first movie I remember seeing as well. And there's nothing I enjoy quoting more than Step Brothers. Wish we could figure out what it was that got you in Fire Walk With Me... :ponder:


 This is good too.

I saw "Trash Humpers" in the theater three times, so clearly whatever rot Harmony Korine introduced to my brain has taken hold.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: cine on May 06, 2014, 03:21:03 PM
The 11 Movies That Changed My Life: 'Ain't Them Bodies Saints' Director David Lowery

FEATURES BY CORY EVERETT

this reminds me of the epilogue of Boogie Nights where the characters are coming together to work on projects, film births, etc.

also reminds me of when i slept on RK's couch. 
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Punch on May 17, 2014, 02:29:54 PM
Benedict Cumberbatch & Tye Sheridan To Star In David Lowery's 'Yellow Birds'

Benedict Cumberbatch, Tye Sheridan and Will Poulter are now attached to star in the movie, which is still putting together financing. Based on the National Book Award Finalist novel by Kevin Powers, the story follows two soldiers, a man and teenager, who head to fight in the Iraq war.

The project is based on Kevin Powers’ novel about two soldiers who head out to fight in Iraq. The older man promises to watch over the younger, teenage, soldier.

Joining Cumberbatch on the cast are Tye Sheridan and Will Poulter. WME Global, CAA and UTA will handle US rights.




one aspect about this book is that it doesn't gloss over american imperialism even with the western lens it has














Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on May 17, 2014, 02:41:10 PM
 :onfire:
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ravi on July 12, 2014, 03:39:26 PM
Casting call for Pete's Dragon (http://www.auditionsfree.com/2014/open-nationwide-auditions-disneys-petes-dragon-lead-role/)
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on September 20, 2014, 01:30:46 AM
Disney Finds Its Pete For "Pete's Dragon" Remake - Variety (http://variety.com/2014/film/news/disney-pete-petes-dragon-1201309299/)
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on September 20, 2014, 02:23:03 AM
jealous
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ghostboy on September 20, 2014, 10:31:04 AM
Very curious (mildly nervous) about what the fans of the original movie will think when they discover that this new one has absolutely no connection to it other than the title and the character name implicit in that.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Alexandro on September 20, 2014, 10:37:51 AM
that's exciting!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: modage on September 20, 2014, 11:13:14 AM
Very curious (mildly nervous) about what the fans of the original movie will think when they discover that this new one has absolutely no connection to it other than the title and the character name implicit in that.

I think they'll be okay. Just go easy on the CGI!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ghostboy on September 20, 2014, 11:51:21 AM
Just go easy on the CGI!

The CGI has turned out to be more necessary than I thought, but it'll still be relatively minimal, all things considered. There's only one company I'd trust to pull it off to my standards, and they're onboard to do it, so....fingers crossed.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Kal on September 20, 2014, 11:12:40 PM
So cool, can't wait to hear more and see it!!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on September 21, 2014, 03:24:12 AM
Forget about the fans of the original and do your thing. Of course it's easy for me to say it, but that's what I really believe in. Fans are very important and they will watch the movie anyway, but you're making it for yourself. Just my two cents.

Also, yeah, as long as you don't CGI the hell out of it, you'll be OK.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Alexandro on September 21, 2014, 11:45:42 AM
also (and I'm sure you know better than me on this), are there really many fans of that film? like a fanbase?? It was always kind of a bastard child in the Disney cannon, always the last film to get out on video, and generally not too respected. That's my perception. So that's good I think, because that's enough reason to do your own thing.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on September 21, 2014, 12:27:50 PM
Also ignore all the people telling you to lay off the CGI. As long as the CGI is artful and good, do as much as you want.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ravi on September 21, 2014, 01:37:52 PM
I will only watch if the dragon is real and Pete is CGI.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: MacGuffin on September 21, 2014, 05:54:31 PM
Very curious (mildly nervous) about what the fans of the original movie will think when they discover that this new one has absolutely no connection to it other than the title and the character name implicit in that.

Lemme guess, Daenerys returns to claim her lost dragon "son" and exacts revenge on Pete.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: modage on September 21, 2014, 10:07:49 PM
Also ignore all the people telling you to lay off the CGI. As long as the CGI is artful and good, do as much as you want.
Except me. Don't ignore me. I know what I'm talking about.  :yabbse-grin:
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on September 21, 2014, 11:00:12 PM
There's only one company I'd trust to pull it off to my standards, and they're onboard to do it, so....fingers crossed.

fingers snahhhpped. who are you snapping for?
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on September 24, 2014, 07:15:21 PM
^is that, is that a secret, who you want to do the visual effects? hmm. i'll float my guess and wait for announcement day

this post is to share a positive story. last night during conversations with friends, a discussion about matthew robbins led to a conversation about universal and disney which led to maleficent which led to me sharing the news that the director of ain't them bodies saints is now working with disney to create a fantasy movie, which i described, and i said there've been trips to new zealand mentioned

it was a funny(ish) moment then, because the room became silent. everyone was thinking about the life of david lowery for a moment. like i already said, pure jealousy here. in the context of the conversation, everyone was feeling jealous of lowery, tbh. and one friend quietly whispered "that's crazy" while looking at the ground and thinking about pete's dragon

how could i possibly be worried about how you're going to use computer effects, when i and many others may never be able to use them ourselves. it's flat-out the big-ticket ride and i'm excited for you
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: max from fearless on September 25, 2014, 02:18:41 AM
^^^ Everything he said.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on September 25, 2014, 12:02:18 PM
Oh yes. In retrospect my comment (I'm speaking only for myself here) might sound like arrogant or full of envy or whatever. That was not the intention at all, I didn't want to act like I was trying to tell an established filmmaker what to do. It's just that I personally don't really have much patiente for CGI-heavy fantasy films anymore. They all look the same to me, and they don't look good at all. But if this was any other filmmaker other than David whom we 'know' for years, I'd just say something like "hell, I trust the guy who did Ain't Them Bodies Saints to deliver the goods".
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on September 25, 2014, 01:40:30 PM
I think it will be fine. The CGI used throughout Ain't Them Bodies Saints was tastefully done; you don't even notice it.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Pozer on September 25, 2014, 01:45:40 PM
I think it will be fine. The CGI used throughout Ain't Them Bodies Saints was tastefully done; you don't even notice it.

Hear, hear!

Ain't Them Bodies' CGI baby > Children of Men's
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: modage on October 17, 2014, 10:17:50 AM
Redford onboard (http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/robert-redford-talks-disneys-petes-737672) Lowery's Pete's.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: 03 on October 17, 2014, 02:40:31 PM
three out of the four words in that sentence were names. mega.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on November 08, 2014, 02:10:51 PM
casually mentioning i wish i could hear the name of the dp for pete's dragon
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on November 08, 2014, 03:49:40 PM
I'm going to assume it's Bradford Young again until I hear otherwise.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ghostboy on November 08, 2014, 07:27:48 PM
I'm going to assume it's Bradford Young again until I hear otherwise.

It sadly won't be. Timing wasn't right to move to New Zealand for six months! We'll do the one after this together...
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on November 08, 2014, 07:45:34 PM
Well, that narrows it down, at least.

For what it's worth, I would be more than happy to move to New Zealand for six months. Caveat: I am terrible at cinematography.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: wilder on November 13, 2014, 01:21:29 PM
Lowery's films St. Nick (2009) (https://www.fandor.com/films/st_nick) and Pioneer (2011) (https://www.fandor.com/films/pioneer) are available streaming in HD on Fandor, which you can watch on your TV through Roku and Chromecast
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on December 05, 2014, 05:51:05 PM
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2788732/fullcredits

bojan bazelli is the dp
weta digital for effects
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: matt35mm on January 31, 2015, 12:53:15 AM
PETE'S DRAGON is currently in production in New Zealand.

David's gonna be tryin' to blog each day.

http://road-dog-productions.com/weblog/
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on January 31, 2015, 01:00:34 PM
 :yabbse-thumbup:
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on January 31, 2015, 01:07:46 PM
Would it kill him to post some pictures?
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on February 09, 2015, 11:30:10 PM
It didn't kill him!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: matt35mm on February 09, 2015, 11:33:21 PM
We don't know that yet! We don't know WHAT it's done to him, and we won't know until the next time he posts!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on February 09, 2015, 11:58:11 PM
Shit, I probably jinxed it.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: tpfkabi on February 14, 2015, 01:57:16 PM
The sci-fi film with a living legend - who?
If I read it in the thread I have already forgotten.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: matt35mm on February 14, 2015, 02:09:28 PM
He wrote: "... a period crime movie starring a living legend and a sci-fi film from the producer of Under The Skin."

The living legend is Robert Redford. The project is THE OLD MAN AND THE GUN.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on March 03, 2015, 03:18:36 AM
Reading Ghostboy's production blog, I keep being struck by how insanely long a 70-day shoot seems. In the time they've been in production so far, Last Rescue would have been filmed twice with extra days off, and they're still a week away from the halfway point! Part of me loves the idea of having the luxury of money to shoot a movie with, the other part of me is terrified of the idea of having that much time to fuck things up with. And I know with deep certainty that even with those 70 days, he's still going to have a laundry list of shots and scenes he wishes he could have spent more time on. Good lord, I'm ending so many sentences with prepositions.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: 03 on March 03, 2015, 10:50:14 PM
cliffs notes: this blog is fvcking amazing
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: wilder on March 26, 2015, 01:17:44 PM
Some gold from Lowery's blog:

Quote
The highlight of today was introducing Robert Redford to the gaggle of kids he'd be performing with - all non-actors, all under the age of ten or eleven. One particular nine-year-old sized him up with very put-upon swagger and then, moments later, noticed his boots were untied and volunteered to lace them up for him. This wasn't necessarily a kindly offer - there was a bit of one-up-manship to it, a "need someone to fix your shoelaces for, bud?" sort of move. Moments later, a handful of kids had gathered around to see who could best knot this bemused movie star's laces. If I can only hang onto one memory from this movie, this would rank pretty high on the list of candidates.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on March 26, 2015, 01:44:42 PM
lol the lowery touch on redford so good
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on March 26, 2015, 05:01:59 PM
That makes me wonder. Does a nine-year-old today comprehend what a Robert Redford is? Does that mean anything to those kids, or is he just another old dude they do scenes with in between watching PewDiePie play Five Nights at Freddie's 3 on Youtube?
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Alexandro on March 27, 2015, 10:29:40 AM
when I was 9 I didn't.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: modage on March 27, 2015, 02:04:46 PM
That makes me wonder. Does a nine-year-old today comprehend what a Robert Redford is? Does that mean anything to those kids, or is he just another old dude they do scenes with in between watching PewDiePie play Five Nights at Freddie's 3 on Youtube?
He's Hail Hydra from Captain America 2.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on March 27, 2015, 02:19:53 PM
That makes me wonder. Does a nine-year-old today comprehend what a Robert Redford is? Does that mean anything to those kids, or is he just another old dude they do scenes with in between watching PewDiePie play Five Nights at Freddie's 3 on Youtube?
He's Hail Hydra from Captain America 2.

Incidentally, that's also the only way nine-year-olds know who Garry Shandling is.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ghostboy on March 28, 2015, 04:28:05 AM
I did not know who he was until INDECENT PROPOSAL came out, which was when I was 12, and I remember my mom being disappointed that he was in something so smutty.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on March 28, 2015, 04:48:36 AM
I remember watching The Sting at a very young age. I remember loving Redford and Newman's repartee, and I remember not being able to follow the plot AT ALL. Then Sneakers came out when I was ten, and my dad took my brother and me to see it in the theater.

But even beyond the actual movies I had seen him in, I was always aware of his legacy, or at least his cultural impact. He was a Movie Star. In some ways he was the archetypal movie star, in a line you could trace from Clark Gable to Cary Grant to James Dean to him. I don't know that the typical child of today has that relationship with the concept of the movie star anymore.

I'm not trying to say that's inherently a good or bad thing -- I'm not telling the kids to get off my lawn quite yet -- I just find it interesting to think about. The media landscape between when we were kids and now has changed by orders of magnitude.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on April 28, 2015, 03:11:54 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/OveqHZf.jpg)

=

(http://i.imgur.com/OLJ1h0v.png)
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on August 15, 2015, 07:18:48 PM
http://www.slashfilm.com/petes-dragon-d23/
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on August 18, 2015, 04:11:44 PM
http://www.aintitcool.com/node/72740 (http://www.aintitcool.com/node/72740)

Quote
PETE'S DRAGON

Speaking of wild child movies, let's touch upon another one Disney has in the works, a remake of a film that holds a very special place in my heart.

The original Pete's Dragon was the first film I saw in a theater and remains one of my favorite examples of that particular era of Disney movie magic.

So it might seem weird for me to say that I'm not dreading the remake. For one, I know that co-writer and director David Lowery is just as big of a fan of the original as I am and secondly, he's a real deal dramatic filmmaker. From what I've heard Lowery and Toby Halbrooks' approach is very different, but keeps the relationship between a boy and his dragon intact. In other words, it's doing what remakes should do: take the core of what works in the original and give us a different experience with it.

The location is now the Pacific Northwest and Pete's not a runaway from a hillbilly family trying to use him for slave labor. Pete's a feral child in the wilderness and one day a Forest Ranger, played by Bryce Dallas Howard, stumbles across him. Little does she know his imaginary friend, who happens to be a dragon, is maybe not so imaginary.

The thrust of the footage they showed was in building up the mystery of Elliot. First off, the cinematography was not your typical family film look. Think more Amblin and less Yogi Bear. Robert Redford also brought a lot of weight to the small amount of footage we saw.

Most of the Pete's Dragon presentation was a conversation between Bryce and Redford. She's telling him about this feral boy (we get glimpses of a dirty Oakes Fegley roaring at something), how she found him and how he's being integrated into this small logging town (some fish out of water looks from Fegley while in town)... and how he has an imaginary friend.

Redford isn't so sure the drawing Pete made of his dragon friend (not at all like the Elliot we know... on all fours, hair more a like patchy coat or mane instead of the purple tuft on the top of the head) is from the kid's imagination.

The last thing we see in the footage is Pete reaching out and running his fingers through the fur of his dragon friend. The fur changes colors in response and the title came up.

The tone of the whole thing was way serious. I can't wait to see what this thing ends up being.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: RegularKarate on February 19, 2016, 12:36:18 PM
Quote
PETE’S DRAGON Teaser Poster Teases Pete’s Dragon
Disney has been busy making live action versions of the beloved cartoons, but that doesn't mean they are done remaking and rebooting their old live action classics (despite Tron Legacy). The next live action remake is Pete's Dragon, and it's a really interesting film on paper. It's directed by David Lowery, a for real indie film guy who made the leap to the big leagues not with an action blockbuster or a superhero movie but rather with the tale of a kid and his maybe imaginary dragon bestie. Lowery, best known for Ain't Them Bodies Saints and Boycrazy Bikini Mishap, isn't the only indie world darling to leap to Disney - Alex Ross Perry is writing the new Winnie the Pooh!

Lowery's hiring makes Pete's Dragon stand out from the rest of Disney's recent live action output, but so does the decision to go with a CGI dragon. This is a major aesthetic choice, as the dragon in the original Pete's Dragon was a cartoon, and one who was drawn especially cartoonishly. There was nothing realistic about that dragon at all, and purposefully so. Lowery's film has chosen to go away from that, but Disney has so far hidden the dragon (even at D23 they kept the full dragon out of sight), so this teaser poster is our best look at the beast yet.

It seems like Lowery is splitting the difference here. While the CGI dragon will surely be lit and interact with the environment in a real way, the design doesn't look like a photoreal creature. There's a lumpy, fuzzy aspect to the creature that makes it look like a big giant puppet, at least in this image. If I'm right about this it's a great aesthetic choice - doing the CGI stuff that everybody expects while not chasing the realism that makes so many CGI creatures lame.

The next question: when do we actually see the dragon? They can't be holding it until release - the merch people would plotz.
Devin Feraci, BMD (http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2016/02/19/petes-dragon-teaser-poster-teases-petes-dragon)

(http://media.comicbook.com/2016/02/petes-dragon-2016-poster-170686.jpg)
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on February 19, 2016, 12:39:48 PM
living the dream xx
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Garam on February 19, 2016, 12:46:09 PM
That's a cool poster but that dragon definitely has to be part-Llama or something...maybe had an Alpaca for a grandfather...
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on February 19, 2016, 12:59:36 PM
It's a cat. It's a big green cat.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on February 19, 2016, 01:07:50 PM
I really like the fuzziness. Maybe it resembles the titular wild things in Where the Wild Things Are. This looks so much better than a Shrek-like creature or a How to Train Your Dragon dragon.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on February 19, 2016, 03:04:12 PM
I should note I wasn't being dismissive or disparaging with my comment. Just pointing out that dragon is very clearly a cat, which, given Ghostboy's admitted love of felines, makes perfect sense.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: RegularKarate on February 19, 2016, 04:23:00 PM
I like the look of it.
It looks mossy, like it belongs in that forest.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Lottery on February 19, 2016, 05:05:15 PM
That's a cool poster but that dragon definitely has to be part-Llama or something...maybe had an Alpaca for a grandfather...

Maybe they were going for this?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zXLZvsSmBIs
First thing I was reminded of.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on February 19, 2016, 09:05:24 PM
you can hear it like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBqAwAJqess

Quote
Disney has also confirmed (via its Twitter account) that the Pete’s Dragon teaser trailer will debut this Sunday (February 21st), during the Disneyland 60 special (which commemorates the 60th anniversary of the original Disneyland theme park) that will air on ABC from 8-10 pm ET. The Pete’s Dragon teaser may offer a better look at Elliott (among other things) – and Pete’s disappearing/reappearing pal ought to be an impressive-looking CGI character, seeing as he’s being created by the same WETA Digital that brought Smaug in Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit trilogy to life.

The teaser trailer may also touch (however briefly) on the main conflict of the Pete’s Dragon remake, which reportedly involves loggers threatening the forest where Elliott resides. Pete’s Dragon (1977) did not include any such environmental themes, but the remake – which Lowery co-wrote with his frequent collaborator Toby Halbrooks – has, in fact, promised to “reinvent the core of the original family film,” so this could be how it goes about doing just that.

http://screenrant.com/petes-dragon-2016-trailer-motion-poster/
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: matt35mm on March 17, 2016, 12:03:38 AM
Long Podcast: http://nerdist.com/love-alexi-9-david-lowery/

(I haven't heard it yet, so I don't know what is discussed on there. They might just talk about cats.)
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on March 17, 2016, 01:48:35 AM
I'm about 45 minutes in, and it's been very entertaining. More personal talk than film-specific so far, but the friendship between Ghostboy and Alexi gives them a rapport that's really fun to listen to. Very little cat talk so far, which I appreciate.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on March 19, 2016, 06:42:18 AM
This was really entertaining and was great to know our guy a little bit more. Really enjoyed it.

Also, I had no idea Ghostboy was so close to the so called "mumblecore" crowd. The other day I was watching "Listen Up Philip" and that's when I started to realize he was really present in these guys work. That's cool, as a great generation of filmmakers really starts to establish themselves with great features.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on March 19, 2016, 01:55:20 PM
you see him in Alexander the Last, which i'm special mentioning because once you start looking for Ghostboy's name in the Thanks section of movies you're going to see his name around all the time. imdb doesn't provide a helpful credits list in this regard, because i assure you the list is long. The House of the Devil is when i first noticed this.

of course i want to see Baby Mary and Empire Builder and wonder when/how i will.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: JG on March 20, 2016, 08:38:38 AM
really appreciated what david had to say about making a movie with a non-confrontational personality. its something i think about a lot!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Reelist on March 24, 2016, 12:08:32 PM
I listen to hours of podcasts everyday and they're usually just to drown out my own thoughts, but the true sign of a quality conversation is when I have to pause and rewind because I feel like I missed something good. I did that about 4 times with this one, and I'm sure you'd be glad to know you're in the company of Paul Thomas Anderson and William Friedkin with that, for their WTF interviews ( with Paul's, I was pausing about every ten minutes). I'm always hesitant to listen to directors on podcasts because I'm worried they'll talk more about their body of work than themselves, but you and Alexi are so closely linked that she seems more invested in promoting you as a person than a Director. She gives you a stellar intro, but my favorite parts are how she says you "look like a vampire" because I guess I never put my finger on exactly what it was, but you've got a fucking intense look about you.


(http://i.imgur.com/5rrUFzQ.jpg?1)


Did you take that line from 'Pi' to heart and stare into the sun as a child? No, it's good to have a mystery around you as a director. Can't be all toothy smiles and good naturedly on the red carpet. The public should know you're a force to be reckoned with!

The other thing she says is that you're "Obsessed" with 'The Brown Bunny', and I don't think I've ever heard of anyone even liking that movie. It got such a weird reception when it was released, between the Roger Ebert feud and the critical consensus that Gallo was basically trolling the audience. I still haven't seen it, but between your praise and how much I like "Buffalo 66", I think it's well worth a shot.

What I appreciated most about the interview was to learn that you come from humble beginnings. 1 of 9, and homeschooled! These are things about you I wouldn't have gleaned just from knowing you here, but it seems to explain so much about your work ethic. You never dealt with the confinement of going to school and were basically taught to pursue your dreams over just holding down a job. The other thing it does is force you to learn independently, and choose your own courses of study. It's always interesting when a heavy hitter comes along with the badge of never going to film school. The influx of these directors in the 90's seems to have made us take it for granted how much intensive study is required in making a film, whether you like it or not. We come across these success stories time and time again, but the message always seems to hold true that no one is simply going to come along and ask you to make a film. You have to prove yourself through your own work what you're capable of. Once that gets recognized, the sky's the limit!

So, even more than the recent press surrounding 'Pete's Dragon', this interview got me excited for your overall career. You have certainly paid your dues in the business, but the release of this movie is going to put a lot more attention on your unique aesthetic outlook. It makes me wonder how successful you'll be in making another $12,000 movie like 'St. Nick' when there are plenty of people willing to give you $120,000 for it. You guys always talk about going back to your 'simpler days' of filmmaking until it gains traction with certain actors who can't operate on a film of that budget.

I'm really looking forward to 'Pete's Dragon', though. It'll be such a trip, watching one of your movies at my Mall! I know you will do the story justice and exceed all of our expectations with the depth of characters and atmosphere throughout.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: RegularKarate on March 24, 2016, 04:52:25 PM
Can't be all toothy smiles and good naturedly on the red carpet. The public should know you're a force to be reckoned with!

Despite the stoic look that seems to be oft captured by cameras, seeing him in person can fill you with the same friendly glow a big smile does. As intense as his face can go, you can't help but feel he's a kind person. We've only met a few times, but I felt I should speak out against the implication that he's scary (unless that's what David wants implied, in which case, I'm sorry to out you as a nice guy).

The other thing she says is that you're "Obsessed" with 'The Brown Bunny', and I don't I've ever heard of anyone even liking that movie. It got such a weird reception when it was released, between the Roger Ebert feud and the critical consensus that Gallo was basically trolling the audience. I still haven't seen it, but between your praise and how much I like "Buffalo 66", I think it's well worth a shot.

I don't love the movie, but it's definitely worth watching. You know all the bad shit that was said at the time was based on a cut that was a lot different than what got released. Ebert even gave the final version a positive review and praised the edit of the movie and gave it three stars.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ghostboy on March 25, 2016, 01:41:18 AM
Loved reading that post! I'm glad y'all enjoyed that podcast. Alexi is awesome.

And in case anyone doubted my commitment to The Brown Bunny....here's the poster (https://t.co/xQ8VWA1SKE) I have that's too big to hang on any of my walls.

Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on March 28, 2016, 04:19:08 AM
That Brown Bunny part was the funniest, I think. It's the perfect movie to have people watch at your place.

I don't know if I'd recommend it, Reelist, because it's a very peculiar experience, but I also loved it. Saw it when it came out in the theatres here in Portugal in 2004, with my older brother (which was just weird) and a few other older ladies in the audience (which was even weirder) and it is fascinating. The slow pace is almost hypnotic, and even if the ending feels like it's out of place, it's just the catharsis that movie needs. Bought the DVD but have never seen it again. However, some of those shots, particularly in the beginning, have stayed with me since. Powerful stuff.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on March 28, 2016, 01:23:30 PM
Reelist we're twitter friends and my header is/always has been from The Brown Bunny. so i'd like to support RK and EPR supporting Ghostboy supporting The Brown Bunny. and i don't like things in tepid ways. i like The Brown Bunny all the way. i think it's perfectly geared toward reflecting its character, from an emotional/psychological state. the problem is it's not a perfect character. but a perfect character is movie bullshit anyway.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Reelist on March 29, 2016, 10:35:10 PM
You know, I like to think that I've swayed this conversation away from David and towards what xixax is and has always been about: gushing over the undersung movies that we LOVE. I can identify with you guys because I've always felt this away about 'Sling Blade'. So simply shot, yet so emotionally effective. I'll consider 'the brown bunny' in that sense as I carry onward.

I didn't want to sound like such a fanboy on that first post, but I consider ghostboy a true brethren. There's a part towards the end where he talks about "eating a lot of food, incredibly fast" that I totally related with. I didn't grow up in as big a family as his, but when I have a huge spread in front of me, I just think "I gotta have it ALL!". And I eat like smeagol, it's gotten to an embarassing point where I have to hide from my coworkers at lunch so I can devour my meal like a true savage.

 Anyways, ghost. keep it under the sheets! if you get my draft
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on April 13, 2016, 04:29:56 PM
Jenkins spotted this. And as he said, the headline is the story. Not much more info.

Disney Sets ‘Pete’s Dragon’ Helmer David Lowery For New Live Action Peter Pan Film

http://deadline.com/2016/04/peter-pan-live-action-disney-film-david-lowery-petes-dragon-1201736940/

EXCLUSIVE: Disney will make its own live-action Peter Pan film, and has set David Lowery to direct a script that he will write with Toby Halbrooks. They teamed to write and Lowery directed Pete’s Dragon, a new version of Disney’s 1977 live action/animated musical. It will be the second effort in the family film space for Lowery, who was best known for writing and directing the edgy indie Ain’t Them Bodies Saints.

Disney might as well reclaim the J.M. Barrie work about the boy who would not grown up; it was the focus of its successful 1953 animated film. Many other studios have made their own versions on the big and small screen, including Steven Spielberg’s star-studded Hook to most recently the Joe Wright-directed Pan, which didn’t work out well for Warner Bros. Lowery is separately working towards directing Robert Redford in The Old Man And The Gun, which Lowery adapted from the David Grann Vanity Fair article about an aging thief who in the 1980s knocked off a lot of banks in throwback style and became a folk hero outlaw.

This becomes another strong project for Disney’s live-action division, run by Sean Bailey, which has generated its own list of family-themed blockbusters from past Disney properties and theme park attractions and some originals. It doesn’t get the ink accorded to sister silos Pixar, Marvel and Lucasfilm, but it has gotten results that should continue with the upcoming Jon Favreau-directed The Jungle Book, which is already slated to develop a sequel. The division has a Tim Burton-directed Dumbo percolating, and Pirates Of The Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, which directors Joachin Ronning and Espen Sanberg have wrapped.

Also percolating is the James Bobin-directed sequel Alice Through The Looking Glass, a Mary Poppins sequel with Rob Marshall directing Emily Blunt and Hamilton‘s Lin Manuel Miranda, the Bill Condon-directed Beauty And The Beast with Emma Watson, Angelina Jolie in Maleficent 2, Emma Stone set for Cruella De Ville, Dwayne Johnson attached to Jungle Cruise, James Mangold developing Captain Nemo, Ehren Kruger developing Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride, with a version of Tower Of Terror based on a John August idea. There is also Tinkerbell, which has Reese Witherspoon attached. Latter film is on track to happen before Peter Pan, and it is possible that there could be some crossover cast.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Reelist on April 13, 2016, 04:34:19 PM
What's next, the "Pete & Pete" movie?!?!
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ghostboy on April 13, 2016, 05:07:26 PM
Peter and The Wolf.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Just Withnail on April 13, 2016, 05:59:57 PM
Interesting! Will this happen before The Old Man And The Gun?
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Reelist on April 13, 2016, 06:13:44 PM
You kidding?
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: polkablues on April 13, 2016, 07:21:57 PM
I'm going to take this as a good sign that Disney's happy with how Pete's Dragon is turning out.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Ghostboy on April 13, 2016, 08:06:21 PM
Interesting! Will this happen before The Old Man And The Gun?

OLD MAN first. Plus something else.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Just Withnail on April 14, 2016, 12:20:32 PM
Something with a mini-budget like you mentioned in the podcast?
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: matt35mm on August 09, 2016, 04:12:58 PM
Can't believe they didn't mention XIXAX!

http://www.indiewire.com/2016/08/petes-dragon-remake-director-david-lowery-interview-studio-micro-budget-1201714850/

David Lowery On ‘Pete’s Dragon’: How a Microbudget Filmmaker Became Disney’s Secret Weapon
This is the story of a filmmaker who went from living in the back of his car to tackling the studio arena. It didn't happen overnight.

Eric Kohn

Nine years before he completed production on the multi-million dollar Disney remake of “Pete’s Dragon,” David Lowery was living out of the back of his car, editing corporate videos. The Dallas native directed his first feature, the little-seen “Lullaby,” at age 19. The ensuing years found him collaborating with a close-knit group of local film-savvy friends, but little in the way of upward mobility. “I never put a premium on making a living,” he told me in a recent phone conversation. “It was never one of those things that was important to me.”

Lowery’s work at the time suggests as much — it’s anything but commercial — and yet it provided him with an ideal platform for a massive career move as one of Disney’s newest secret weapon. “Pete’s Dragon,” a $60 million re-imagining of the 1977 live-action-animated musical film, has all the hallmarks of Lowery’s earlier work: a serene, parochial vision of lonely characters chasing their dreams in a vast countryside tinged with magic realism.

Opening this week, it’s a welcome antidote to the louder, messier spectacles that dominate the blockbuster market. Lowery, now signed up to write and possibly direct a reboot of the company’s “Peter Pan,” has gone from DIY survivor to a rising star of the studio system. A bald, soft-spoken thirtysomething with piercing green eyes and a thick, untamed mustache, Lowery looks a bit like the Disney version of a Williamsburg bartender, which is exactly the kind of upgrade the studio has been chasing in its latest bid to give old properties a hip new spin.

Lowery’s into the idea. “I think you can get away with introducing people to new ideas, new concepts, new flavors and new tones in the mainstream,” he told IndieWire’s Bill Desowitz earlier this year.

“Pete’s Dragon” may indeed offer younger viewers a gateway to themes much deeper than anything they’ve encountered before. The story finds a young boy (Oakes Fegley) whose parents die in a car crash befriending a gigantic, benevolent creature in the woods. The delicate effects work capably bring the fantasy to life, but the film maintains a tactile quality grounded in a handful of finely-wrought characters. Pete’s ultimately befriended by a local park ranger (Bryce Dallas Howard) and her dragon-obsessed father (Robert Redford) as the movie careens toward a showdown with local authorities eager to contain the beast.

It’s not groundbreaking territory, but in its understated way, “Pete’s Dragon” resembles Lowery’s mystical visions of rural America more than anything in the Magic Kingdom. “There was no gloss to this process, no sense that we had this giant safety net from Disney if we screwed up,” Lowery said. “It felt very true to me.”

Growing Into It

Lowery’s low-key, almost sleepy demeanor makes it hard to imagine the director juggling the large-scale demands of an effects-driven production, but that’s exactly what made him a good fit. “David never complains,” said the actor-director Amy Seimetz, who directed the taut lovers-on-the-lam thriller “Sun Don’t Shine,” which Lowery edited. “He is the most zen, results-oriented, diligent motherfucker I know.”

Still, Lowery acknowledged that “Pete’s Dragon” challenged him harder than any of his previous efforts. “You have to get used to a style of filmmaking that is very different from the freedom of making no-budget movies,” he said. “It’s ridiculously hard.”

Lowery’s personal blog stretches back 12 years and chronicles his meticulous investment in crafting one  intricate project after another with a grand, novelistic sweep. On several occasions, he makes vague references to unnamed projects in various unfinished stages. “Some rough drafts,” he wrote in his first post from 2004, wrestling with an early script. “It’s getting there.”

In other entries, he delves into art galleries, books and movies in a never-ending quest to find his place in a vast sea of creativity. “The version of Franzen that emerges in his writing is intensely curious to me,” he writes in one passage. In a 2005 post, after discussing a series of recent moviegoing experiences that included Terrence Malick’s “The New World” and Orson Welles’ “The Trial,” Lowery confessed: “Everpresent in my mind while I’ve been watching all of these films is one of my own, sitting in the refrigerator back in Texas.”


There were a lot of those. If Lowery speaks of the “Pete’s Dragon” experience as if it were a big parade at the end of an epic journey, it’s because he’s spent a long time on the road.

A few months after making the backseat of his car into a bedroom, Lowery made his inaugural trip to Park City to screen his short film “A Catalog of Anticipation” at the Slamdance Film Festival. The nearly-wordless 10-minute short follows a series of fantastical events, including Lowery himself waking up from the roots of a tree, and culminates with a girl discovering dead fairies lying around her property. From its grimy video opening, the film builds to a crisp stop-motion finale. Both awe-inspiring and melancholic, “A Catalog of Anticipation” justifies its title by anticipating the imaginative Lowery projects that would soon follow.

Not long after his Slamdance trip, Lowery made his second feature, the minimalist drama “St. Nick.” Shot in and around a single location, the film follows a pair of young siblings on the run from some undefined threat and living in isolation. A poetic look at the mysterious nature of childhood perception, “St. Nick” lingers in its young protagonists’ expressionistic surroundings. Shot for a mere $12,000, “St. Nick” screened at the SXSW Film Festival and other smaller American gatherings but never received a proper theatrical release.

Lowery began couchsurfing, at one point staying with Malaysian-born filmmaker Yen Tan, with whom he co-wrote the anthology drama “Pit Stop,” which would later premiere at Sundance. As Lowery became more entrenched in the community of independent filmmakers traveling the North American festival circuit, he began editing more features (Kris Swanberg’s “It Was Great, But I Was Ready to Come Home,” “Bad Fever”) and figured he was leveling off.

While “Star Wars” first inspired his mainstream filmmaking ambitions when he was seven years old, Lowery’s collaborations with the likes of microbudget directors Joe Swanberg and Frank Ross led him down a different path. “I’d gotten used to the idea that this might be my field — making vaguely obscure movies that play at film festivals and maybe get some acclaim,” he said. “At that point, my goal was maybe to make a movie for a million bucks.”

Instead, he moved out to Los Angeles with his producing partner Toby Halbrooks, worked briefly on a television pilot that didn’t get picked up, and returned to Texas. Then he made the short film that would change everything.

A Rapid Rise

At first, the 15-minute “Pioneer” looks almost too simple to hold much interest. The premise finds a benevolent parent (Will Oldham) telling a creepy bedtime story to his young child. However, from this basic starting point, Lowery delivers a remarkable dose of cinematic minimalism. As Oldham’s character recounts the 100-year quest to find his missing son, the gold-tinted lighting and thundering sound design generate an eerie and magical effect. In 2011, “Pioneer” went to Sundance, where Lowery signed with WME’s indie agent superstar Craig Kestel. In short order, Lowery was taking meetings around Los Angeles for his next feature, the expressionistic tale of an outlaw on the lam and the lover who motivates him to escape prison.

Produced for around $3 million, “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” would star Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara in their best performances, and premiere two years later in competition at the Sundance Film Festival. When the movie arrived there, Lowery was at the tail-end of an editing blitz, having also edited Shane Carruth’s “Upstream Color” and Seimetz’s “Sun Don’t Shine” a year earlier. But it was “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” — which would head to Cannes a few months that — that demonstrated Lowery’s unique ability to combine lyrical sensibilities with broader genre components. It was a shrewd attempt to smuggle arty cinematic devices to broader audiences. “I hope it feels like a film people have seen before but they’ve never seen this way,” he told IndieWire at the time.

Disney took note. The possibility of relaunching “Pete’s Dragon” came to Lowery by way of Hollywood producers Jim Whitaker and Adam Borba, who saw Lowery’s previous work and set him up to pitch the project for Disney executives. Lowery brought Halbrooks, his co-writer, along for the ride. “David knocked it out of the park,” Halbrooks recalled of the initial meeting. “I think he spoke for about 45 minutes straight, which at that point was the longest I’d ever heard him talk about anything. I was spellbound. Looking around the room, it was clear that everybody else was, too.”

Disney’s Gameplan

Lowery’s not the only young filmmaker plucked from the Sundance arena to join the Disney ranks. Alex Ross Perry, whose festival favorites “Listen Up Philip” and “The Color Wheel” present unsettling portraits of anxious young adults, recently signed up to write a live action “Winnie the Pooh” movie centered on a grown-up Christopher Robin. James Ponsoldt, best known for the teen romance “The Spectacular Now” and last year’s David Foster Wallace portrait “The End of the Tour,” will soon tackle a “family adventure film” called “Wild City,” an original story that combines CGI and live action as it tells the story of several animals living in the Los Angeles zoo.

And, of course, the fate of the rejuvenated “Star Wars” franchise now lies in the hands of film festival-certified directors Rian Johnson, Gareth Edwards and Colin Trevorrow. And now Ava Duvernay, who won the Sundance directing prize for 2012’s “Middle of Nowhere,” will adapt “A Wrinkle in Time.”

Lowery, who worked closely on the production of “Pete’s Dragon” with Disney president Sean Bailey and production head Louie Provost, positioned the studio’s interest in hiring filmmakers with singular visions as a canny form of quality control. “They’re really solidifying the type of movies they want to be associated with,” he said, citing Jon Favreau’s remake of “The Jungle Book” and next year’s “Beauty and the Beast” as other examples. “They want to make movies that exemplify the brand…From one type of perspective, that limits the kind of movies they can make. But if you’re taking that movies that fit the brand and applying them to an exciting perspective from a filmmaker who has interesting ways of looking at things, that narrow corridor expands.”

Viewed in those terms, the tactic strikes a dramatic contrast to the war stories of individualistic young filmmakers hired by studios and infuriated by their loss of autonomy. Recent cautionary tales include the scandal of “Fantastic Four” director Josh Trank, who went from his breakout “Chronicle” to launching a tirade on Twitter about why his superhero reboot had been destroyed by Marvel. Marc Webb followed up his Sundance breakout “(500) Days of Summer” by directing two forgettable “Spider-Man” films.

But Lowery claims that Disney made sure he felt like he was making a movie in his own voice. “They never referred to it as a Disney movie,” he said. “They referred to it as a David Lowery movie.  It was weird to hear those words uttered on the Disney lot.”

While some filmmakers may hold tight to the comfort a big studio paycheck, Lowery will take a break from the Disney game soon to work on “The Old Man and the Gun,” which stars Robert Redford as an aging bankrobber. “I have so many aspirations and interests that would not fit within the Disney brand,” Lowery said. “I need to make sure I’m engaging those proclivities as well.” Nevertheless, he added, “I’m happy to keep making Disney movies.”

Lowery struggled to address whether his longtime peers, many of whom remain tethered to the microbudget realm, could handle the pressure of a big budget endeavor. “I would tell anyone not to do it, quit while you can,” he said. “You have to enjoy it enough to put with all the trials and tribulations.”

A few minutes after a hanging up the phone, he emailed a clarification. “If I had gone down this path and realized halfway through that it wasn’t for me, it would be disastrous,” he wrote. “If there’s a filmmaker out there who wants to go down this path, I would encourage them to do it, and enter the fray knowing that while it’s not easy, it is possible to maintain your voice and vision in the studio system.”
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: matt35mm on August 11, 2016, 02:35:41 PM
Another thing: http://www.businessinsider.com/petes-dragon-david-lowery-director-profile-2016-8
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Just Withnail on August 13, 2016, 04:55:06 AM
Another thing: http://www.businessinsider.com/petes-dragon-david-lowery-director-profile-2016-8

Quote
Lowery admits that no one at Disney had ever seen "Saints" until months into he and Halbrooks writing the script.

Woa! That's interesting.

Also, David, please do a Star Wars film at one point.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: RegularKarate on October 28, 2016, 05:25:06 PM
Casey Affleck, Robert Redford Re-Team With David Lowery For THE OLD MAN AND THE GUN
http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2016/10/28/casey-affleck-robert-redford-re-team-with-david-lowery-for-the-old-man-and (http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2016/10/28/casey-affleck-robert-redford-re-team-with-david-lowery-for-the-old-man-and)

It’s been a hell of a year for everyone involved in this story. Robert Redford starred in David Lowery’s live-action Pete’s Dragon, a carefully crafted ode to childhood wonder, and Casey Affleck delivers one of the year’s best performances in the upcoming Manchester by the Sea. Now, Affleck joins Redford and his Ain’t Them Body Saints director Lowery for what is sure to be another noteworthy collaboration, the crime biopic The Old Man and the Gun.

Redford has been attached to the project for a number of years now, and with cameras set to roll next spring, he’ll finally play notorious criminal and escape artist Forrest “Woody” Tucker, whose eighteen prison breaks catch the eye and interest of a detective played by Affleck. Tucker was first imprisoned at the age of fifteen, but his criminal career spanned long enough for him to be played by an eighty-one year old Robert Redford, including a famous escape from San Quentin State Prison at the age of seventy.

The film is based on the 2003 New Yorker article of the same name (which you can read here (http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2003/01/27/the-old-man-and-the-gun) if you’re a subscriber) and feels a lot like the “one for me” before Lowery’s next “one for them,” a live-action Peter Pan movie for Disney. Though given how well Pete’s Dragon turned out, all of the Upstream Color editor’s directorial efforts may end up feeling like personal triumphs once it’s all said and done.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: matt35mm on November 22, 2016, 03:29:45 PM
Fucking Casey Affleck let the cat out of the bag...

https://thefilmstage.com/news/casey-affleck-and-rooney-mara-secretly-shot-a-new-feature-with-david-lowery-this-summer/
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: RegularKarate on November 23, 2016, 10:03:20 AM
Plus something else.

http://screencrush.com/casey-affleck-rooney-mara-david-lowery-secret-movie/ (http://screencrush.com/casey-affleck-rooney-mara-david-lowery-secret-movie/) (same info, but a little more gushing over DL)
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: jenkins on November 23, 2016, 01:28:31 PM
the fact that he wanted to do that and did that is beautiful to me. i look forward to the tone which what will that be like oh i wonder and oh i know, there'll be the lowery touch.

the Lowery Touch is not a myth.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: matt35mm on January 24, 2017, 02:49:21 AM
An interesting panel on directing as an editor, from this year's Sundance, featuring David. All the directors on the panel have had extensive experience with editing, and have edited their own movies. I found it particularly relevant to me, as my career path is being an editor, but I also direct my own little movies, which I edit.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dy55dnbNiXc
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Shughes on January 25, 2017, 11:07:25 AM
This is also interesting from Sundance 2017.

Very Minor Spoilers (I'm guessing - since they broadly discuss the scale of the film and what it's about).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=618kfpU248c
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Shughes on February 10, 2017, 06:07:41 AM
Two great directors discussing their craft:

https://www.facebook.com/sundance/videos/10154513458978515/ (https://www.facebook.com/sundance/videos/10154513458978515/)
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: wilder on March 26, 2017, 02:16:44 AM
Elisabeth Moss, Tom Waits, Danny Glover Join David Lowery’s ‘The Old Man & The Gun’
via The Playlist

You want to resist the urge to reduce things to a black and white view, but if you were going to look at anyone in the indie movie scene and say there were winning, well, frankly David Lowery is winning. The filmmaker behind “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” is arguably one of the best directors working today. And he’s on a total roll. The jump to the big leagues with Disney’s “Pete’s Dragon” was no sell out move or film where the studio took control; Lowery’s adaptation of the cartoon was genuinely tender and heartfelt. Lowery then returned with his indie roots for “A Ghost Story” that reteamed him with his ‘Saints’ stars Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara, and he’s got a terrific follow-up with “The Old Man With A Gun.”

The film, which already stars Affleck, Robert Redford (who co-starred in “Pete’s Dragon”) and Sissy Spacek just got that much better with the addition of Elisabeth Moss, Tom Waits, Danny Glover, Tika Sumpter and Isiah Whitlock Jr. That’s a hell of a cast and Fox Searchlight, sensing a winner, has pounced on the movie to land U.S. distribution. “The Old Man With A Gun” centers on an elderly bank robber (Redford). He’s managed to escape from prison over a dozen times in his life before moving to a retirement community and now he’s looking to spice things up with another heist.

The movie begins shooting in April and knowing Lowery’s quick pace, the film will easily be ready for Sundance — that is unless Searchlight wants to save the picture for another frame or festival (Cannes, where “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints” appeared?).
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: ono on August 01, 2017, 07:04:18 PM
This site definitely helped me appreciate stuff like George Washington back in the day.  It's a poorly titled film, but a great one.  I forget who it was that first said great things about it here?  DGG was this place's it boy for a hot minute in like '03 or '04, that's for sure.

https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/4782-under-the-influence-david-lowery-on-david-gordon-green-s-george-washington
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: matt35mm on August 02, 2017, 02:06:31 AM
I feel exactly the way the David does about this movie. I loved it then and I love it now, and think about it all the time.
Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: RegularKarate on August 02, 2017, 09:20:10 AM
RIDLEY SCOTT AND DAVID LOWERY TO PRODUCE OCCULT-SEX MAGICK SERIES!!! (http://birthmoviesdeath.com/2017/08/02/ridley-scott-and-david-lowery-to-produce-occult-sex-magick-series)

Quote
Strange Angel is a drama series created by Mark Heyman and based on George Pendle’s book of the same name. It explores the real life of Jack Parsons, a man in 1940s Los Angeles who helped pioneer the field of American rocketry, and by night is a performer of sex magick rituals and a disciple to occultist Aleister Crowley.

Title: Re: David Lowery
Post by: Drenk on August 02, 2017, 02:45:03 PM
Thomas Pynchon didn't invent anything.