XIXAX Film Forum

The Director's Chair => Paul Thomas Anderson => Topic started by: ono on July 07, 2011, 03:45:25 AM

Title: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: ono on July 07, 2011, 03:45:25 AM
Some of these you may have seen before, some may be brand new to someone else.  Thought it'd be good to have one place for these things.  Anything to wake the dead, right?  The Arclight thing I hadn't seen before, but it's not incredibly interesting.  The one with Figgis, it's just amusing to see him scarf down that pizza and wax poetic about porn even more than previously thought possible.  I've probably seen the BoogieRose interview a long time ago.  The others, not as sure, though they might have poked up around here on occasion.  They've made a recent appearance on YouTube, and I just "re-discovered" them myself.  Relevant: http://www.xixax.com/index.php?topic=6555.0

By Mike Figgis, Hollywood Conversations, circa 1998
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPrMhLycYSQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RwrHagmkr7U
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1BM_wyZ-u_Q

Charlie Rose, circa Boogie Nights
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHQ44-0535w
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4IN0CvezLQ

Charlie Rose, circa Magnolia
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLloBJe1cno
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_U8zGNKK3s

Charlie Rose, circa Punch-Drunk Love, with Adam Sandler
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2z6PmQD47FI
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3i7OsibPpfA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dlbhl8hH_jE

Charlie Rose, circa There Will Be Blood, with Daniel Day-Lewis
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tTw24Jt4AY
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nl-11EdID0A
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLtP-2CEPpM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FxsgYunIY_g
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvjQfDWxC2s

PTA at the Arclight, circa There Will Be Blood
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ek3sPaJGuE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1us8RFaTSA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nuEFrjlxYRk

And of course: cigsnvines channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/cigsandvines
Contains Henry Rollins Interview pre-There Will Be Blood, some Fiona stuff, and some miscellany.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on July 07, 2011, 05:09:18 AM
Years ago, I found a streaming video, Real Media format or something, of an interview PT did with some kind of local news station, I think around the time of Magnolia. The interview takes place in some kind of small set, and both he and the reporter are standing as they talk. Never was able to find it again. Any of you know what the fuck I'm talking about?
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: theyarelegion on July 07, 2011, 07:13:32 AM
wilderesque, I know the interview that you're talking about alright (I think I posted it here at some point)....I think the website that hosted the stream went kaput and the video disappeared....which is a shame since it was an interesting little interview. hopefully it resurfaces somewhere.

anyway, here's another q&a w/pta (http://vimeo.com/918334) (at Arclight again, not my video) this time as a guest speaker for the Harvard-Westlake (high school) film festival (http://www.hw.com/filmfestival/PreviousFestivals/2008Festival/tabid/2152/Default.aspx)....random story of mine to go with it: I was originally going to see Shine A Light that evening at Arclight but as I made my way into the place I saw posters for the festival with paul's name on them so I blagged tickets from the check-in lady just as she was packing up and got in right as it was starting up....I met him after, said hello and shook his hand....couldn't have planned it better.... (also, robert elswit was one of the judges)
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on July 07, 2011, 09:45:12 AM
Alright I found part of that interview. Guess I recorded it with some terrible free software that only let me save the first 1:15...then it cuts off. The full interview was longer than this.

Uploaded at:

http://www.sendspace.com/file/632yjw (http://www.sendspace.com/file/632yjw)

...at the point that it cuts off, I think he says something like "that's where I was at that time..." I don't know. He said that somewhere, always stuck with me. Gives you the confidence to make something that feels true to you at a specific point in your life, even if you aren't sure whatever you're thinking will be something that you permanently believe in.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Reelist on July 07, 2011, 12:04:12 PM
good idea for a thread. I haven't seen the early Charlie Rose ones yet, or at the arclight. thx
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Mr. on August 08, 2011, 05:33:32 AM
He did an interview with Elvis Mitchell after post Magnolia, where he talks about film school, frogs, Tom Cruise, etc.
The interview only exists in small clips.

Anyone has the full length interview?
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: socketlevel on August 11, 2011, 10:46:36 AM
the first interview was clearly during the coke days.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: md on January 16, 2012, 10:19:24 AM
Has anyone seen this??

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mtmQXH171Q&feature=player_embedded#!

kind of has this Christian Slater vibe to him.  Maybe its the coke?
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Pubrick on January 16, 2012, 05:30:00 PM
Has anyone seen this??

yes, it was seen and discussed here:

http://xixax.com/index.php?topic=11590.msg311439#msg311439
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: md on January 16, 2012, 11:58:27 PM
whoa coke talk.  what would we do with out you pew....

don't answer that.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Just Withnail on May 15, 2012, 12:42:21 PM
Criterion interviews PTA and Robert Downey Sr. (https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151741530385565&set=a.267108010564.311536.24856820564&type=1&theater)

Can you guys view this link of pure awesomeness?
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Pubrick on May 15, 2012, 12:46:50 PM
^hand stuck to his face again..

 :ponder:
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: KJ on May 15, 2012, 12:48:01 PM
yes! that's sounds amazing.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: malkovich on May 17, 2012, 03:09:21 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pzIkSLK7DU
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: KJ on May 18, 2012, 01:47:07 PM
Love Pauls reaction on the 00.50 mark. He's like "oh don't tell me this again, maaaan!", haha.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Fernando on May 22, 2012, 04:20:20 PM
Part two.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_kd044Ca0M
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Fernando on May 24, 2012, 01:55:16 PM
Part 3.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJUxPQzlIDs
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: DocSportello on June 18, 2012, 12:47:45 AM
Anybody else notice watching boogie nights since the robert downey sr. interviews that he's the studio exec dude? I know it's probably old news but I knew nothing of downey sr until the criterion vidoes so i thought it was cool that he was in the film. I like those interviews. He talks like a wiseguy.


(http://www.wearysloth.com/Gallery/ActorsD/4856-23867.gif)
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on June 18, 2012, 03:48:16 AM
He's also de TV director of the What do Kids Know gameshow. According to Paul on the DVD commentary for Boogie Nights, he loves watching Downey act, but he never gave him bigger parts because he can't remember any lines. I think he's the one who came up with the MP/YP stuff, right?
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: noyes on July 25, 2012, 02:37:25 AM
Misnomer of a title, but some interesting or mundane questions depending on how you look at it
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAIID6DCDeY
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: InTylerWeTrust on July 26, 2012, 07:48:41 AM
Misnomer of a title, but some interesting or mundane questions depending on how you look at it
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAIID6DCDeY


That's my channel and I uploaded that Video. I put "There will be blood" in the title because he was there promoting there will be blood. But you're right, I'll change the title.


 
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Reelist on July 26, 2012, 09:25:08 AM
Damn, you got the PTA market cornered. How is it that you've just discovered xixax? I don't think you've Introduced yourself (http://xixax.com/index.php?topic=2.0) yet.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: InTylerWeTrust on July 26, 2012, 09:40:31 AM
Well, for starters I didn't "just discovered Xixax". I've actually been lurking around this site since around 2009 LOL (and Loving it). Never really  thought of "becoming a member" of it until recently when you guys post one of the pictures I sent to https://twitter.com/#!/cigsandredvines and I felt the need to comment on it.

But yeah, I'll formally introduce myself now...
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: theyarelegion on July 26, 2012, 10:42:23 AM
anyway, here's another q&a w/pta (http://vimeo.com/918334) (at Arclight again, not my video) this time as a guest speaker for the Harvard-Westlake (high school) film festival (http://www.hw.com/filmfestival/PreviousFestivals/2008Festival/tabid/2152/Default.aspx)

I posted the same video on page 1.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: 72teeth on July 26, 2012, 12:10:34 PM
Never really  thought of "becoming a member" of it until recently when you guys post one of the pictures I sent to https://twitter.com/#!/cigsandredvines and I felt the need to comment on it.


i posted that picture. i brought the new guy here.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Reelist on July 26, 2012, 12:15:29 PM
It's a shame when someone else gets the credit for your post. Turns out that Tic-Tac posted There Will Be Bud (http://xixax.com/index.php?topic=10123.msg260090#msg260090) back in '08. You guys didn't scold me for it! So I'm doing so myself:


"Jesus Christ, Reelist. You need to get your act together. Did you just discover youtube? We all laughed and forgot about that video years ago, and it wasn't even that funny. I'm on my last nerve with this dude.."
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: matt35mm on July 26, 2012, 01:43:55 PM
Well I'm glad that somebody finally said it.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: theyarelegion on July 27, 2012, 02:11:33 AM
I was just providing some background information about the video since it wasn't really a CMBB promotional thing but a high school's film festival. Maybe I was subconsciously glory hunting...
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Reelist on July 27, 2012, 03:21:05 AM
Well, I just read your post and you were actually there :shock: So you obviously have the upper hand in this situation.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Achpi on August 21, 2012, 04:29:50 AM
THIS : http://archives.arte.tv/fr/archive_28274.html was the best PDL interview. he ends up saying to the journalist : "there's no denying you got the movie...".

sadly, i have no idea how to get those videos. but they seem to be still there.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: DocSportello on October 01, 2012, 08:09:08 AM
For all the fellow Canadian Xixaxers on here (or anyone who can get the CBC on your satellite radio), tune into the CBC right now! PTA is coming up for an interview on Q with Jian Gomeshi. If you miss it I believe they will post it on the website tomorrow for everyone. Should be a good interview.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: theyarelegion on October 01, 2012, 05:57:24 PM
it's up now: http://www.cbc.ca/q/

Thanks Doc!
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on October 02, 2012, 08:02:40 PM
Well, this is a pleasant surprise. PTA is on Fresh Air in like 3 minutes. Tune in now!
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: ono on October 02, 2012, 08:52:34 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AfWK9Dz9Mks until it gets removed.
Part 2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GyilcV8sPTc
Part 3 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4KSGAS9EExU
Part 4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=POduBIL5KdA
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on October 02, 2012, 09:25:11 PM
http://www.npr.org/2012/10/02/162153952/paul-thomas-anderson-the-man-behind-the-master

It was an excellent interview. As always, Terry asked him questions that would not have occurred to other interviewers. No need for Charlie Rose.

Unfortunately, she also continued the trend of omitting PDL from his filmography. Even included Hard Eight nearly every time when coming back from a break, but skipped right over PDL. She might have mentioned PDL in the last re-introduction, but I could have misheard that.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: ono on October 02, 2012, 09:31:53 PM
She also said Boogie Nights was the first time he and PSH worked together and then went on and on before asking the question, and by that time he either forgot to or decided not to correct her.  Not his style anyway.  She's asking good questions, but I'm not finding too much new here, still in part three.

Ah, memories.  "This week, Balki gets a headache on Perfect Strangers."

This time around he didn't segue to "Balki gets a blowjob."  I guess that's growth.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on October 03, 2012, 10:29:11 PM
http://cigsandredvines.blogspot.com/2012/10/interview-empire-magazine.html

SPOILERS - GO AWAY, PUBRICK



PTA directly addresses the "I'll go no more a roving" scene where all the women are naked which many reviewers/viewers seemed to think actually happened. NOT TRUE.

Now if he'd just confirm the theatre dream sequence...
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: ono on October 03, 2012, 10:46:26 PM
Nice article, but it bugged me that the "five PTA moments" were snipped to two.  Not that we probably couldn't guess anyway.  Still would've been nice to read.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on October 03, 2012, 10:58:28 PM
SPOILERS






Now if he'd just confirm the theatre dream sequence...

Well sure, but he doesn't need to, because Freddie even tells Master (in the school) that it was a dream.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Reelist on October 04, 2012, 06:44:26 AM
SPOILERS


I feel like such a film aficianado for the fact that from the very moment I saw a titty, I knew it was his imagination. It shocks me that people would for a second think that was real, they must've been expecting some real Charlie Manson level cult shit
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: md on October 04, 2012, 03:15:52 PM
it shocks me that youve seen a titty XL
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Neil on October 04, 2012, 04:44:05 PM
SPOILS








There's a slow tracking shot that moves in on him as he's nodding off, i thought it was implied.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: SeanMalloy on October 08, 2012, 05:16:29 PM
PTA scheduled for "The Daily Show" this Thursday!

I have tickets for Wednesday though, with special guest... Magic Johnson...
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: matt35mm on October 09, 2012, 02:43:12 AM
Tip: the morning of the Daily Show taping, more tickets are often released. Same goes for Colbert. It's worth a shot.

But I'm pretty sure that you can't get a ticket if you have had a ticket in the past several months. But you can get a friend and just go with them (each person can claim multiple seats but it's under one person's name).
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: ©brad on October 09, 2012, 12:15:31 PM
PTA on Fresh Air. (http://www.npr.org/2012/10/02/162153952/paul-thomas-anderson-the-man-behind-the-master)
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Cloudy on October 11, 2012, 10:30:58 PM
Funny. Jon Stewart asked some of the best questions yet. Really enjoyed that interview. Stewart seems like a genuine fan.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Pozer on October 11, 2012, 10:53:49 PM
yeah it was great. wish it was the entire half hour. jon really waxed his car, loved what he said about the film at the end "The Master!!!!!!! it is........a beeeauuuuutiful piece of filmmaking. oooooooh the great Paul Thomas Anderson!"

also, swear he called it "The Bastard" in the intro. tho i'm hittin the wine again.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on October 12, 2012, 12:50:16 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gj3u3U6Ngk&t=13m49s
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: squints on October 12, 2012, 05:12:52 PM
I always enjoy Stewart's interviews with people he genuinely respects and admires. His interview with Tom Waits comes to mind and it seems in this one he is really a huge fan.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Cloudy on October 12, 2012, 09:39:36 PM
Anyone who wants to listen to one of the more personal and more entertaining Q&A's should do a 7-day free trial to SiriusXM and listen to PTA's Q&A with the Rotten Tomatoes crew. It was great. It's in their OnDemand section.

And I totally agree, when Jon Stewart really admires his guest he knows what to say and switches into this gear of seriousness/focus.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Pozer on October 13, 2012, 01:35:19 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UgL2gJrQLA
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on October 14, 2012, 09:46:37 AM
Anyone who wants to listen to one of the more personal and more entertaining Q&A's should do a 7-day free trial to SiriusXM and listen to PTA's Q&A with the Rotten Tomatoes crew. It was great. It's in their OnDemand section.
If I knew how to rip streaming audio, I would do that. If anyone knows how to do that easily, let me know.

Regardless, we should have a full transcription up on the site later today...
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: HeywoodRFloyd on October 14, 2012, 11:31:40 AM
Anyone who wants to listen to one of the more personal and more entertaining Q&A's should do a 7-day free trial to SiriusXM and listen to PTA's Q&A with the Rotten Tomatoes crew. It was great. It's in their OnDemand section.
If I knew how to rip streaming audio, I would do that. If anyone knows how to do that easily, let me know.

Regardless, we should have a full transcription up on the site later today...

Try Jaksta, I've used it for all things streaming, audio and video, and it seems to rip them all. Regardless of the source site.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on October 14, 2012, 04:25:07 PM
Got it.

http://soundcloud.com/cigsandredvines/paul-thomas-anderson-on-sirius

But the audio is super quiet... Any suggestions?
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: HeywoodRFloyd on October 14, 2012, 09:27:14 PM
Awesome, thanks man. Btw it sounds nice and loud to me with headphones on
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Reelist on October 15, 2012, 05:22:58 AM
Yeah, you gotta listen to it on full blast with headphones and it's fine.



(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRCqKUkxubGW5o_u7UdBZnEodkae0Y2DZr08exjIu0NgCwo71qcqsZU03CO)



Thanks Mod!
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on October 15, 2012, 07:08:45 AM
Now with full transcription:
http://cigsandredvines.blogspot.com/2012/10/interview-sirius-xm.html
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Reelist on October 15, 2012, 01:12:12 PM
That was definitely the best PTA interview I've heard. So cool to get a little peek inside the guys life.

I think my favorite part was when he talked about having a bunch of old cameras and parts in his garage like some sort of cinematic mechanic.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on October 26, 2012, 10:19:00 PM
There are a bunch of new interviews up on the site (http://cigsandredvines.blogspot.com/) but I'd like to point you towards this for now wherein PTA lays the smack down on a reporter asking him the Tom Cruise question...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aY-SWGmeVBE

(skip to 14:50)
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: HeywoodRFloyd on October 26, 2012, 10:27:16 PM
There are a bunch of new interviews up on the site (http://cigsandredvines.blogspot.com/) but I'd like to point you towards this for now wherein PTA lays the smack down on a reporter asking him the Tom Cruise question...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aY-SWGmeVBE

(skip to 14:50)
I said this on twitter, but I'll say it here aswell, when PTA says he stole the phrase "trying to write War and Peace in a bumper car" from someone but can't remember who, that's a quote from Kubrick!

He says it in his speech while accepting the DW Griffith Award:

At the 1:05 mark

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3p1T3sVX4EY

Legends, both of them.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: mogwai on October 27, 2012, 02:32:14 AM
There are a bunch of new interviews up on the site (http://cigsandredvines.blogspot.com/) but I'd like to point you towards this for now wherein PTA lays the smack down on a reporter asking him the Tom Cruise question...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aY-SWGmeVBE

(skip to 14:50)

That was brilliant and I loved his smirk at the reporter afterwards.  :finger:
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Reelist on October 27, 2012, 09:47:21 AM
when PTA says he stole the phrase "trying to write War and Peace in a bumper car" from someone but can't remember who, that's a quote from Kubrick!


Great minds think a lot.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: HeywoodRFloyd on November 08, 2012, 07:30:03 AM
A little bit of brilliance. I hope they release the full version.

Elvis Mitchell Q&A with PTA (LACMA)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ztf-DCMaTpo
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Frederico Fellini on November 09, 2012, 07:14:29 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W67CUYm_FFg



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjxRgTityQE
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Frederico Fellini on November 11, 2012, 08:14:36 PM
Paul Thomas Anderson: How To Fuck Sandcastles

(Popcorntaxi.com)
 

Let’s set the scene.

Paul Thomas Anderson has arrived in Australia the day before. He’s jet lagged out of his skull, and has had a full day of interviews with journalists eager to discuss his new film, The Master which opens today across Australia.

After being cooped up in a hotel room all day, he’d had enough – and out onto the deck that runs along the front of Sydney’s The Sebel Pier we went.

It was a round table discussion, from right to left, it was Matt, representing Ezy DVD and Matt from Matt’s Movie Reviews, and yours truly, Oscar Hillerstrom, talking to Paul Thomas Anderson about his film.

Both Matts had first go on the questions, and because they really went ‘in there’ I took a slightly more relaxed approach, seeing as PTA was dead on his feet (after us, it was a nap for an hour, and the then launching the Cockatoo Island Film Festival) and that it was a lovely day. A serious filmmaker, who makes serious movies – is in fact just a normal guy after all. Enjoy a brief glimpse into the mind of the mind that made The Master.

Warning: in case you didn’t get this from the heading of this post – it gets a little sweary.

 

PTA You mind if I wear my shades? I’m not trying to be cool.

EZY DVD Go for it. So this is your first film without Robert Elswood as your DOP. You could work with any DOP in the world, so why Mihai (Malaimare, Jr) and what was it about his work that you thought, he’s the right man for the role?

PTA Well, the films that he made with Coppola. Youth Without Youth. Have you seen Tetro?

EZY DVD I haven’t seen Tetro.

PTA They’re good. I mean, whether you like them or not, there’s so much filmmaking going on. You can just feel the excitement. Whether that’s coming from Coppola or Mihai or both. I guess there was a choice of working with somebody who was younger or someone who had been around. It seemed to me to work with someone younger who was just starting out.

MMR This is your second film now where the subject of religion plays a vital role in the story. What is it about religion that is important to your stories and does your Catholic upbringing play a role in that?

PTA Ha. No. I don’t fuckin’ know. When we would go to church on Sunday I was just sort of bored. It was so dull, which is too bad because the stories they were telling were good stories. The music was kind of boring. I didn’t like confession either. Something didn’t feel right about that because I never really had the guts to tell them what I had really done wrong so I was always making stuff up that was maybe half as bad as what I had done. You weren’t gonna go in there and tell them you were jerking off or something like that.

It’s funny to hear you say ‘religion is a big part of your films’. And I guess it is, but i just don’t think of it that way. It’s like you’re talking about someone else’s films but I completely understand what you’re saying. From my point of view it feels like it doesn’t even apply, which is weird I know, because it’s there.

I think it’s maybe mainly just There Will Be Blood because that was pretty clear with a preacher and all that. But I don’t think of it as it applies to this film because maybe Scientology is a religion now, but he’s not a religious leader, he’s not starting a religion the way it is in our film and this portion of the story.


OSCAR I’d like to hear about the connection between real life stories and your storytelling. We have Jason Robards’ tale from World War Two in a particular scene early in the film, and also obviously stuff from the early times of L. Ron Hubbard. When you come to fucking a sandcastle, when does that become something that’s like, ‘oh, this was something here, it’s going to be part of this story’, it’s going to be an edge to my character that way. Or is it just, ‘this is what happened’ and I want it to be a part of the fabric of this particular tale.

PTA Well, sometimes it’s reverse engineering; like hearing that story that Jason Robards talked about was something that stuck with me and it’s something you write down. And the reverse engineering part is that it’s good enough to wanna film or have that in there and something grows around it just to lead to that moment. And the sand castle getting fucked, it’s as simple as I wrote out ‘Freddie’s on the beach during World War Two’ and that was all we had. And we just went to the beach and started shooting stuff for the day.

Jack Fisk had seen this picture of sand dolls,’sandies’ they would call them. that sailors would make. And so Joaquin was being Freddie and it sort of seemed like the first thing he would do is try to fuck it. So that kind of stuff just happens. You have to count on it. Well, you can’t count on it but you hope that enough things are put in place that you can get stuff like that. It’s funny, you have ‘Freddie sits on a beach’ and never in a million years did I think we’d end up with him fucking a sand doll. It just doesn’t occur to you. I wish I had been that good of a writer to write that down. It never works that way.

EZY DVD The first time that you tried to get the film up with Universal and it got dropped, how did you react? Did it make you even more determined to make the film or not sure whether you’d get this off the ground?

PTA Never that. I mean, sad. It’s a blow to your momentum and a blow to your ego. It’s hard and precarious because you’ve got to get everyone together at a certain time and you have to gamble on everyone’s time and usually you’re gambling with a studio who’s usually leading you along because they may or may not do it, they make you think that ‘no, no, it’s going to work out’.

It’s just things that can kind of drag on for months on end and ultimately it never feels good to be heartbroken or rejected. But it doesn’t turn into ‘oh we’re never gonna make this’, it’s just like, ‘who’s next’. If anything it’s a nice rejection to have. It somehow fuels you up. We thought after There Will Be Blood  we’d be able to cash in, but that’s just not the case. We were back to square one. I felt like I was a freshman again, which is good. It’s a great place to be at. Having to box out and try to scrounge up the cash to make a film.


MMR I thought that Joaquin Pheonix and Phillip Seymour Hoffman were just amazing in the film. Phillip you’ve worked with previously but Joaquin, this is the first time you’ve worked with him, and it’s been a few years since he’s been on the screen. So what was it like working with an actor like that?

PTA Good. He was hungry and I felt silently confident because I knew what Joaquin was getting away from when he made that film. He was trying to get away from being in films where you stand on your mark and you say your lines. I felt silently confident that what I was going to offer him was not going to be just a return back to that. And he didn’t know that for sure. He had seen my films and we knew each other a little bit. But I knew how we’d work and I had an instinctual feeling that he would feel comfortable working with us, me and Phil, and all of the people I had worked with on all these films. I just knew he was going to like it and feel comfortable because it’s not restrictive.

It’s pretty loose and it’s not about fucking visitors on the set and press kits and shit like that. I felt really confident he was going to be happy and I dare say he was. I wanted a good environment for him to work in. Because I could see his frustrations – that many actors do go through, feeling like I didn’t sign up to this business or job to get into this thing where I feel like I’m just remembering my lines and there is no excitement to it. He’s made two other films since we shot our film so you’ll see him. He’s not going to go anywhere for a while until he gets bored again.


OSCAR   Traditionally, a movie maker pitches an idea, the studio gives you money and you make the movie. But you’ve developed a process and a style of filmmaking, which is, ‘this is my artistic output and you can take it or leave it as a studio’; but also  this ‘take it or leave it’ applies to the audience member.  What would you say to directors out there who feel the fear of ‘how am I going to get my movie up?’. At what point did you personally say, ‘fuck it, I’m going to let that go and I’m going to do what I want to be an artist, and if I can make a movie that’s great, but if I can’t that’s fine too’?

PTA You’re giving us much more credit than we probably deserve. I thought for sure this was going to be a big hit. I know what you mean though. I think you have to be willing to work at a budget range that’s responsible, which is pretty easy for us. We’re not too expensive. Probably we could be even cheaper than we are. You’ve made me think.

EZY DVD I want to ask you about the online campaign with the roll out of the teaser trailers. There’s a lot of content in there that didn’t make the final cut. Was that deliberate or was that just the way it worked out?

PTA We were just messing around doing those things because we knew that stuff wasn’t going to make the film but it was great. And some of it was, that horrible thing where you see a trailer and think, ‘I don’t need to see the film anymore’. Everything is there. And it was probably a way to use good material. It wasn’t A+ material that was good enough to be in the film, but it was strong enough to create something to promote the film, and it was a way for stuff to be seen that never would have gotten out there and so you didn’t have to do that horrible thing. You know that feeling, ‘why do I want to see the movie now?’.

EZY DVD It made me wonder how long the initial cut was.

PTA Not much longer. There’s never one big long cut. We dump things over as we go and some things come and go. The longest it ever was was like 2:45, but we knew it wouldn’t be that. We always knew it should be about 2 hours or 2:15. So it was never like having a four hour cut where you put everything in. Sometimes you get to a scene and you get there and it’s just not good and you don’t even bother with it.

MMR So the film is set just after World War Two. What do you think it is about that time in American history, that a figure like Lancaster Dodd could flourish and have a following? Is there anything about that time that makes him more prominent than say today or twenty years before that?

PTA Less skepticism probably. If someone came along like him today would we go for it? Maybe. I don’t know. Talking about past lives and ESP becomes popular, psychoanalysis and all that kind of stuff. So it was a little bit of right place, right time.

MMR Do you think there could be a fragility from all the horrors of war?

PTA Yeah, for sure. Definitely. Curiosity about what you’ve gone through or what just happened. Even if it’s just the distance we have now, looking back on it and realising. I dare say they knew what they were doing. New shit had come to light, man.

OSCAR I remember you talking to Henry Rollins about Boogie Nights and saying the goal of the porno movie is to give you a boner. What was your goal for The Master?  It seems like an interesting dissection of character, of life. For one character, life’s too much and the other character, life is not enough – that could be one interpretation of the film.

PTA That’s nice. I never thought of it that way or said it quite like that. I thought we were making something kind of pulpy, honestly. That’s what I tried to get down. It should probably be a bit shorter than it is, but I thought like two hours was a length of some of the noir films. It’s just kind of punchy and hard and a lot of momentum forward.

The film’s probably a bit more episodic than I thought it was going to turn out but that’s okay. I think that’s good. It makes it a little more liquidy. A little harder to grab hold of, which is good.

I think it should just feel like that booze that he drinks. Like if porn is a boner, this should just feel like a sip of something that burns your stomach, that maybe makes your head a little bit bubbly. Like if you could concoct a drink that made your stomach and your chest burn like a shot of tequila but made your head feel like you had champagne, that would be a great feeling for the film. It’s weird, talking about food. I remember talking about There Will Be Blood, we said it should feel like steak and vodka. We had this mantra to ourselves. It’s weird.

EZY DVD With your editors you often sort of alternate between Dylan Tichenor and Leslie Jones. Is that due to availability or do you think their editing strengths lie with the material?

PTA Good question. They are different. It’s availability and mixing it up. I love working with both of them. I’ve never really put my finger on it. No one’s ever asked me that before. Fuck, come back to that. I don’t want to waste your time searching for an answer that’s great.

MMR I read a couple months back that you’re going to be doing an adaptation of Inherent Vice. I’m just wondering, how’s that coming along?

PTA Thanks, it’s coming along pretty good. It’s hard but it’s fun. Do you know his work at all?

MMR No.

PTA You should check it out. Just to work so intimately with somebody else’s writing makes you feel like, it’s like a writing lesson. Like going back to school. Just watching somebody’s skill with words and moving them around. How they can do it? It’s like a masterclass for sure. It’s really humbling. It’s less like writing something, feeling more like ushering something or an editor. So it’s a different thing entirely. It’s great to mix it up and not be creating something from scratch. So we’ll see how it goes. Not quite sure if anything will come of it. Hopefully.

OSCAR It sounds like the process you have set up is ‘play time for actors’. By the looks of things, Joaquin threw himself into the role,  smashing historic toilets and letting rip, but also being in character. Do you ever feel a bit guilty where you’ve created this environment where people can really lose themselves?

PTA Fuck no. Why would I feel guilty?

OSCAR Because you know they love it. But at the same time, there’s possibly some damage that’s being done.

PTA No, it’s all just pretend. You know, Joaquin’s a big boy and everyone wants to have fun doing what they’re doing and i think Joaquin’s version of fun is probably different than other people’s. But I would hate to give the impression that it’s a play ground for actors too, because that can get into dangerous territory, when you get into endless improvs and people making shit up and it goes on forever. We would call them Horrible Jazz Odysseys. And sometimes we call cut and say ‘that’s a jazz odyssey, stop, everyone stop!’.

That’s too much acting going on. Too much improv. Because it can be that. A bunch of stoned people playing the same note over and over again. It’s not in service of anything. And you can feel those days where the crew checks out, everyone’s glazing over, thinking, ‘we got good stuff yesterday. It seemed like everyone was doing something specific, why suddenly now are we in this jam session that’s one guitar solo too many?’. So it can’t just be this playground. You have to have some rules and restrictions and guidelines to play in, otherwise you get a jazz odyssey.

EZY DVD I have to ask. The Mattress Man commercial was in one shot. Was Phillip Seymour Hoffman padded up?

PTA Well it’s not great mystery. It’s a visual effect. An amazing visual effect. There’s a kind of seamless blend between Phillip and a stunt man that’s done to create the movie illusion that Phil jumped off. I’m not giving away some big secret of cinema history or anything like that. But I still don’t know how they did it. I was there and it still gets me every time. And that’s just these 30 nerd technicians up at ILM up in San Francisco that can play with their computers and get it to do something that i don’t understand. It looks really good, doesn’t it?

EZY DVD I was watching it over and over again just yesterday, and I can’t see the cut.

PTA Neither can I. No. It’s as simple as having Phil walk up and do it and get to the moment where he finishes, and you sort of have to find a pose that you get into, and then there’s a monitor and there’s a stuntman. You match his clothes as close as you can, and hopefully they’re the same build and all that kind of stuff and he jumps and tumbles over and when he lands on the ground he freezes. That’s the hardest part of the caper. The stuntman has just smashed his face into the ground and has to stay there like that. You sort of have that moment, put Phil into that position, and he stands up and they blend it and get it stitched together. Yeah.

EZY DVD That’s a wrap.

PTA That’s a wrap? Great. I’m gonna try and get some rest before we go over there. Nice talking to you guys.

EZY DVD Enjoy tonight.

OSCAR Congratulations on the film. Loved it.


************************************************************************************************************


Quote
New shit had come to light man.



LOL Did PTA just quote the Big Lebowski?
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Ulivija on November 14, 2012, 03:50:16 PM
Here's a transcription for those who can't wait for the official version

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=S-3VQMYQIqk

PTA: There was a whole section, when the movie leaps forward in time, that was a bit of a mess, and Adam said something: “Why don’t you just get rid of it?” And it took me six months to realize what he was talking about, that you could just get rid of it. I wrestled with this whole thing and he ran around in my head saying, “Why don’t you just get rid of it?” And I realized at the last minute, you could just get rid of it. [laughter]
AS: And I said, what about a bowling pin [unintelligible. Beaver?] [laughter] I never get any credit for that. OK, so we’ll do one more question. Whoever it is, say it, ask it.
Questioner [without waiting to be called on]: How much of your—[audience bursts into laughter at his audacity]
PTA: That’s how you do it!
AS: OK, go!
Questioner: How much of your writing do you feel is influenced by your personal world views? Do you kind of try to stay out of it, not wanting to judge the character? What’s that process like?
PTA: Well, I suppose no matter how much you want to stay out of it, hopefully that’s kind of impossible. But—god, I don’t know. It should be an exciting film. It shouldn’t be homework, or it shouldn’t be me telling you what to think, or anything like that, I don’t think. It think you try to—that’s a drag. That would not be my business. Hopefully you get to a place where, I think I said before, this great writer said, “Writing should be like autohypnosis, where, you know, at its best you’re not really doing it. You’ve got characters who are behaving how they would behave. You’re powerless against the fact that you’re gonna seep through, but hopefully you try to remove yourself from the equation. You know that foggy moment when you first wake up, and it’s just this thin little sliver where you don’t think about who you are or what’s going on? Trying to get to that kind of sliver in your writing is the sweet spot, hopefully. It’s not too much like, you know, pouring medicine down someone’s throat. Otherwise I’d be doing THIS for a living [gestures at audience]. I’d just come to you and, you know, lecture. [laughter]
Questioner: What book are you reading right now?
PTA: What book am I reading right now? Well, I’m spending a lot of time reading Inherent Vice [crowd cheers] ‘cause I’m trying to do a [unintelligible] of that. I just finished reading, and I’m gonna read it again, Waging Heavy Peace, which is Neil Young’s book.
AS: All right!
PTA: Which is so great. High recommend—go get it! It’s great. And it’s this thick, but it’s so easy to read. I read it so fast.
AS: Yeah, I saw him two weeks ago.
PTA: At the Hollywood Bowl?
AS: Yeah, it was so great. By the way, I’m reading Purplicious. Purplicious.[laughter]
PTA: [unintelligible]
AS: Aww, it happened after Punch-Drunk.
Questioner: What’s your all-time favorite movie, both of you?
PTA: My all-time favorite movie? Um, right now my all-time favorite movie would be—Oh, god, I don’t want to—um, you go first [to AS].
AS: Yeah, I don’t really have a favorite. I have ones that rocked me as a kid that I’ve thought about the most. You know what blew me away as a kid? Oliver. Oliver. That killed me.
PTA: Well, The Black Stallion was probably my favorite.
AS: Yes, that’s very good. “Time’s up for everyone” is a good one, too.
Questioner: Are you going to work together again?
AS: We’ve talked about it.
PTA: We talk about it all the time.
AS: We’ve talked about it, but we had kids before that could happen—
PTA: Mmm hmm.
AS: Someday. Someday.
Questioner: You and Daniel Day-Lewis could be brothers. [laughter]
AS: Oh, yeah! I know! I definitely could be his goofy brother.
PTA: What advice would you give young filmmakers when it comes to communicating with actors? From both sides.
AS: I think, just a good way, is making sure the actor gets to keep his confidence, is a nice way to approach. If you’re not getting what you want out of your actor, don’t strip away EVERYTHING. Just kind of lead him in the right direction, and get him or her—. Just, as an actor, if you’re doing things that are deep, you just need to feel secure, or feel like you’re amongst family. So that’s probably the best advice. I don’t know. There’s more than that, but that’s good for me.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Frederico Fellini on November 16, 2012, 12:17:06 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_A4pqo5WE8
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Frederico Fellini on January 28, 2013, 07:54:29 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5t62XADK0w4



"I can't take this interview straight"   LOL..
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Cloudy on January 28, 2013, 11:22:31 PM
I've seen bits and pieces of this one, but never the full thing. One of the best interviews I've seen of him. That was amazing/insightful/entertaining.

That fucking interviewer KNEW HIS SHIT, question after question. And PTA was loose as a goose.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Cloudy on February 12, 2013, 01:16:09 AM
PTA audio interview with Elvis Mitchell finally uploaded onto their site:

http://www.kcrw.com/etc/programs/tt/tt130211paul_thomas_anderson
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Sleepless on February 12, 2013, 09:01:57 AM
Listened to it last night. Very much focused on PTA's focus on character as the core of this movie.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Reelist on February 12, 2013, 05:43:31 PM
such great questions! I think that's the best Master interview we're gonna get. Elvis Mitchell is a God. All of the talent is stored in his dreadlocks


(http://media.monstersandcritics.com/articles2/1415515/article_images/emitchell.jpg)

actually in this picture he looks more like the devil
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: ©brad on February 13, 2013, 09:26:58 AM
Elvis Mitchell is the man, that picture notwithstanding.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Cloudy on March 01, 2013, 08:32:31 PM
PTA WGA
http://cigsandredvines.blogspot.com/2012/11/interview-wga.html

THAT was fucking MAGNIFICENT.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: ono on March 01, 2013, 10:12:59 PM
...I just spent $20 preordering his Blu-Ray.  I love him and all, but no way am I spending another $20 for a third party interview.

And I realize you can read it.  That's not the point.  Part of PTA's charm is the way he speaks.  His mumbling, his fidgeting.  You can't get that from a transcription, and fuck you, no, it's not worth $20, asshole.

Now the saint who transcribed the interview?  Him I'd buy a coffee.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Larry on March 19, 2013, 04:03:06 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIsyIuKqnoM
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: HeywoodRFloyd on March 20, 2013, 08:28:27 AM
I kinda feel for PTA, I just hope one day he'll have the power and studio support to just have a Michael Ciment hanging around after each film for interviews, and the odd one with the Hollywood Reporter/Rolling Stone or whatever
I feel like he's really been milked this time round. The film IS  his statement, why does he need to make follow-up statement for his statement. I must say I prefer the ultra-rare interview Kubrick styles
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: KJ on March 20, 2013, 10:47:34 AM
I am happy as long he doesn't become a Malick. I like to hear him chitchat.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Frederico Fellini on April 06, 2013, 11:43:41 AM
PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON ON MAX OPHULS's  "The earrings of Madame de.."   (Not an interview but whatever....)   


http://vimeo.com/62472331#
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Pubrick on June 05, 2013, 05:35:24 PM
so this port magazine interview just went online (via c&rv-m)

http://www.port-magazine.com/film/the-master-director-paul-thomas-anderson/#&panel1-1

it's all about the master, with some tidbits about boogie nights.

good interview overall but the dude interviewing shows his ignorance sometimes, especially in these two parts from page 7:

Quote
Boogie Nights, which instantly established Anderson’s reputation as one of the best filmmakers of his generation alongside Quentin Tarantino and David O Russell.

(emphasis mine)

DOR, seriously? maybe he was struggling to come up with more than 2 cinema-changing directors from the 90s but that dude is NOT it. that statement reminds me of that dude Brian Atene who made the FMJ audition tape for kubrick and went on about how Michael Curtiz was the best director ever. amateur. also this was embarrassing:

 
Quote
When I told Anderson I thought his movies were about America, he blanched. “Don’t say that!” he said, looking disgusted. “Don’t put those words in my mouth. It’s nauseating to even think about it that way.”

Don't need to explain why that's stupid. I'm glad PTA wasn't too polite to hide his contempt for such an ignorant reading.

but it wasn't all bad, these were the highlights:

Quote
PTA: I have an interest in cults – everything is a cult, in a way. What’s the difference between a cult and dropping my daughter off at school this morning? It’s a group of people gathered in one place pursuing a likeminded set of ideas and goals.


and from the same page:

Quote
You don’t call him by his name, Lancaster Dodd?
PTA: No, I call him Master. That is his name.

that's funny. i'd like to have seen what his expression was when he said that. oh and he's still watching porn! he name drops a current "great" young actress on page 4, whom he says resembles Julianne Moore. he's right.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on June 05, 2013, 06:05:15 PM
When I told Anderson I thought his movies were about America, he blanched. “Don’t say that!” he said, looking disgusted. “Don’t put those words in my mouth. It’s nauseating to even think about it that way.”

^ This made my day.

I absolutely love how openly PTA is shutting down ignorant questions these days. Maybe he's getting too old for politeness.

I don't recall anything quite like this in his older interviews, but correct me if I'm wrong. It would be interesting to see a proto version of it.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Sleepless on January 09, 2014, 09:16:23 AM
The latest episode of the Austin Film Festival Podcast, On Story, is a 45 min discussion between PTA and Jonathan Demme. I haven't listened to it yet, but according to the description it's more focused on Demme's career than Paul's.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Pubrick on January 09, 2014, 12:10:56 PM
can he get over jonathan demme already?

no one else in the world cares about the dude. he's a decent director, he got an oscar that one time, he made lots of films in different genres (not kubrick different, not even ang lee different, but whatevs), he has good taste in music. then for a long time nothing happened. he made a movie on video.  and now i've run out of things to say about jonathan demme.

similar to his Bob Downey Sr obsession, the only reason to explain their elevated status (apart from one of them maybe being friends with his dad) is that they have close relatives who were notable drug users. one survived and went on to rule the world, the other, Ted, did not.

but that isn't very unique in those circles.

Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: jenkins on January 09, 2014, 12:54:27 PM
crazy mama, citizens band, melvin and howard, stop making sense, something wild, silence of the lambs, rachel getting married -- great character movies, and pta also makes great character movies. not sure the problem here
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Pubrick on January 10, 2014, 10:20:21 AM
there's obviously no "problem" as there's obviously nothing wrong with him running his mouth about whoever he wishes.

my point, which you illustrated nicely by simply listing a bunch of movies he's made as if that means anything, is that apart from PTA's love of the guy Demme is really not very influential. and i wondered if anyone else felt the same way.

i'm not saying he's a BAD director, but who really gives a shit about him? before PTA started fanboying him hardcore i think he would hardly make anyone's list of "best directors" of the century or whatever.

it's like if i became someone of PTA's status and started talking about Curtis Hanson all the time. the dude is nothing special. i'm baffled why PTA gives him so much attention.. if "character movie" is the only justification then that really doesn't do much to set him apart from a million other directors. (obviously million = dozens)
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: jenkins on January 10, 2014, 11:47:22 AM
i like when the silent partner plays the midnight circuit. from elliott gould's golden days, written by curtis hanson, it's a nice weaving of genre and naturalism. white dog, easy to admire. hanson is most well-known for la confidential, which is the most distinguished modern movie about classic hollywood crime and architecture. what's better, the black dahlia, gangster squad, something like that? nahhh, be serious. bad influence again weaves naturalism with genre, this time hedonism and greed because we're in los angeles in 1990 and james spader can't help but be impressed by rob lowe's mayhem adventures (lol, guyyyys). the hand that rocks the cradle exists, like bad influence, within a specific pop culture flavor of its time, and this one is when creepy sex-tinged thrillers were popular. when i first saw it i thought that was about as creepy as life could get, it understands creepy better than other thrillers from the bizarre explosive period of creepy thrillers. the river wild is in white waters with meryl streep, kevin bacon, and john c. reilly. story of my dreams. wonder boys is a chabon adaptation with all these bigname actors and i haven't seen it. when 8 mile came out i remember thinking it was like a version of gladiator, except instead of swords they used words. thought that was so fun

i think curtis hanson illustrates the appeal here is a consideration of the time period of the movies, and i think if you were pta's status you would talk about hanson bc you grew up while he was flourishing and your exposure to him could've helped you better understand how people merge with pop culture and become cinema. hanson is more appreciated in the genre community, and genre movies tend to lift character details for story purposes, while demme is more appreciated in the character community, bc he doesn't always allow his story to lead the characters, he much more depends on the character leading the story. demme influenced pta, i think pta feels that way, pretty sure
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Pubrick on January 10, 2014, 12:18:03 PM
i like what you said. makes sense.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Larry on January 20, 2014, 02:02:06 AM
PTA & Scorsese

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZB52KomiBE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbKdlM2GhqE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkL6s-K91AI
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: velociraptor on May 01, 2014, 07:36:52 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLloBJe1cno

This is old, obviously. But one of my favorite aspects of the interview is this part, where Rose won't allow PTA to not answer the question 'what's the movie about?'
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Frederico Fellini on May 01, 2014, 12:29:16 PM
LOL I still remember the day I uploaded that video. I wish Paul would go on Charlie Rose or a show like that again : / 

P.S: I haven't uploaded anything on that channel in a long time.. I'll step it up when IV comes out.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: velociraptor on May 01, 2014, 12:43:07 PM
Nice! Thanks for uploading, these videos are wonderful to go back to every once in awhile.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Punch on May 02, 2014, 08:50:20 AM
http://www.dga.org/Events/2011/05-may-2011/Francis-Ford-Coppola.aspx



1998 DGA Lifetime Achievement Award recipient Francis Ford Coppola was the subject of the Guild’s 75th Anniversary event on March 26. Coppola, the winner of two DGA Feature Film Awards (The Godfather and The Godfather Part II) and multiple nominations (The Conversation; Apocalypse Now; The Godfather Part III) was honored at the DGA Theater in Los Angeles.

In addition to his DGA Award-nominated work, Coppola’s filmography includes Tetro, Youth Without Youth, The Rainmaker, Jack, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Tucker: The Man and His Dream, Peggy Sue Got Married, The Cotton Club, Rumble Fish, The Outsiders, One from the Heart, The Rain People, Finian’s Rainbow and his upcoming release Twixt Now and Sunrise. As a producer, Coppola worked to provide young independent filmmakers freedom from studio interference. He was also a pioneer of technological filmmaking advances like pre-visualization, word processing for screenplays, electronic editing and experimentation with high definition.

“Francis Ford Coppola is one of the most influential and innovative filmmakers of our time,” said DGA President Taylor Hackford in his welcome. “His work has helped shape contemporary cinema around the world.”

Coppola was joined onstage by directors P.T. Anderson (There Will Be Blood), Catherine Hardwicke (Red Riding Hood) and David O. Russell (The Fighter), for a conversation about the impact his films had on their own careers and others of their generation. Each of the directors presented clips from Coppola’s work to form the basis of their conversation. 75th Anniversary Advisory Committee Chair Michael Apted served as moderator.

“Francis’ influence lies not only in the awards he’s won or the films he’s directed, but also in the example he’s set for young directors,” said Apted.

Ever humble, the legendary director attributed much of his success to his creative collaborators. “Film is an ensemble,” said Coppola. “You’re the ringleader, but hopefully you have all of this wonderful work coming out of people whom you inspire, but also inspire you.”

Via Cinephilia and Beyond
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: velociraptor on July 04, 2014, 09:54:57 AM
http://www.clickhole.com/theysaidwhat/find-out-what-pharrell-paul-thomas-anderson-and-de-436

PTA has a 'quote' in today's "They Said What" feature on Clickhole. Pretty amazing.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: max from fearless on July 14, 2014, 02:38:14 PM
Not a PTA interview per se, but a part one of a conversation between him and Jonathan Demme on Robert Downey Sr.’s cult classic Greaser’s Palace. I love the way how I'm such a PTA fanboy that him wiping his nose on his shirt or picking his nose, doesn't bother me...

http://video.klru.tv/viralplayer/2365287114/
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: 03 on July 16, 2014, 04:17:21 PM
yeah, it's definitely worth watching but don't expect too much.
it's one of my favorites of his, but it's incredibly surrealist and silly, the closest thing i could liken it to would be 'el topo' toned down and americanized.

if you want a good starter and overall probaly his best film, go with 'POUND'.
the performances are amazing. its really weird, and it's shot like a play.
it's a little difficult to find, as far as i know, but worth the search. i don't know, maybe wilder has some info on a release??
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on July 17, 2014, 05:51:14 PM
his best film, go with 'POUND'.
it's a little difficult to find, as far as i know, but worth the search. i don't know, maybe wilder has some info on a release??

For future reference, go to FilmAF (http://www.filmaf.com/), change the region drop-down menu to 'ALL', and it will return results showing blu-ray and DVD releases worldwide. Sometimes titles are changed overseas or are listed under their foreign translation, so searching by Director instead of Title can sometimes return more accurate results.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: max from fearless on October 05, 2014, 01:19:58 PM
Ok, so this masterclass will be up in a couple of days, but my twitter feed threw these at me and I had to share, I just had to, cos they made me smile and want to watch/make/play more movies, and Alex Cox is a hero not only for his movies, but also for his moviedrome show which was spot on and something I loved when I was a kid....

A snippet of the mighty moviedrome below...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoGGHPLdy5U
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on October 05, 2014, 06:17:15 PM
Watched the Grimes video. Meh.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Frederico Fellini on October 05, 2014, 08:16:07 PM
Watched the Grimes video. Meh.

I don't understand it's voice. Had to mute. Video was shit. PTA trolling.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: noyes on October 05, 2014, 09:01:47 PM
Hardly trolling. That shit is a good song. Not even a Grimes fan (or familiar with the director), though I've heard of her before.
Needless to say, it wasn't necessarily the highlight of the day.

My man Rodrigo Perez already posted a relatively in-depth review on The Playlist. Assuming it'll be up on FilmLinc's YouTube page soon, so that'll be good to relive. Good times, good crowd.

Here's the review: http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/paul-thomas-anderson-at-nyff-5-influences-of-inherent-vice-plus-curated-clips-films-you-should-know-20141005
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on October 05, 2014, 09:14:39 PM
Watched the Grimes video. Meh.

I don't understand it's voice. Had to mute. Video was shit. PTA trolling.

He must have been using it to illustrate something very specific. Otherwise it doesn't make sense. Or he hasn't seen many music videos... and doesn't remember his own...
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on October 05, 2014, 09:32:06 PM
Pitchfork calls "Oblivion" the best song of the decade so far (which I guess is how you know it's not). Their write-up does shed some light on the meaning of the song.

It is a fairly profound/personal song in content... shame that the lyrics are so clunky and the tune is so forgettable.

http://pitchfork.com/features/staff-lists/9466-the-top-200-tracks-of-2010-2014/10/

Quote
If “Oblivion” says anything about our collective psyche at the midway point of a decade already defined by seismic, globe-altering revolutions, it’s that the personal will always be political. The song recounts a specific sexual assault (“One of the most shattering experiences of my life,” Grimes, who was born in Vancouver as Claire Boucher, told SPIN in 2012) by describing the psychic fallout: “And never walk about after dark/ It’s my point of view/ Because someone could break your neck/ Coming up behind you always coming and you’d never have a clue,” she lisps in her high, pinched voice. It’s a dazzling, paralyzing performance, in part because Boucher sounds almost playful, and in part because the skronking behind her—the song’s springy, propulsive synth line was one of 2012’s most unforgettable—indicates something other than victimization. “See you on a dark night,” Boucher repeats.

The song’s video, directed by Emily Kai Bock, features a tiny, pink-haired Grimes lip-syncing “Oblivion” at a McGill football game (and later at a motorcross rally), wearing skeleton gloves and clutching a plastic boom box. There aren’t many women hanging in the stands besides Boucher; one, darting up behind her, swats at the hood of Boucher’s sweatshirt, a vaguely combative gesture that somehow seems more goofy than aggressive. On the field, a squad of taut-bellied cheerleaders, their hair pulled back with candy-colored bows, soar forth and land. Grimes, mouthing the lyrics to “Oblivion,” dances the way people dance when no one is looking: a desexualized, mostly arrhythmic twitching that does not seem to be for the benefit of anyone else at all.

The particular kind of masculinity that gets amplified by organized sporting events—the same feral, drooling aggression Bill Buford made infamous in Among the Thugs, his harrowing account of hooliganism among English soccer fans—would be an easy target for a feminist with a video camera, but Grimes is received warmly by the crowd. In that sense, it is a triumph—of perseverance, if not humanity—and it feels consistent with her mission. The subversion of expectation is a part of Grimes’s founding aesthetic, and she frequently marries more defiant genres like noise and punk with propulsive pop production, outfitting her dissent in studio glimmer.  The melody can be so sweet as to feel bubblegum, and when Boucher sings a bit like “I will wait forever”–a line that always jumps out–“Oblivion” starts to seem like a very different kind of lament.

But what “Oblivion” ultimately offers is victory. It’s the sound of one woman turning personal devastation into not just a career-making single, but a lasting anthem of transformation.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: P Heat on October 06, 2014, 08:33:42 PM
Lel. I always liked the Grimes video and how spontaneous it seems. It has a idgaf quality to it. Also, it was shot on film. The song itself it okay.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on October 06, 2014, 08:41:18 PM
PTA elaborates on Grimes here.

http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/paul-thomas-anderson-at-nyff-5-influences-of-inherent-vice-plus-curated-clips-films-you-should-know-20141005
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: P Heat on October 21, 2014, 02:01:10 PM
Anyone have an idea on when the Masterclass With PTA is going to be uploaded on youtube? :/
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: md on October 25, 2014, 07:51:55 AM
Haven't seen the Master Class posted but here are a few excerpts and quotes (I dont believe has been posted).

http://flavorwire.com/481033/10-filmmaking-lessons-from-paul-thomas-anderson/view-all
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on October 25, 2014, 01:08:50 PM
I have the full recording too. I can prob upload someplace. I thought filmlinc was gonna do it by now.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on October 25, 2014, 01:25:42 PM
Oh man do it
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Just Withnail on October 25, 2014, 02:14:05 PM
Oh yes please do!
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Larry on October 25, 2014, 04:14:52 PM
I have the full recording too. I can prob upload someplace. I thought filmlinc was gonna do it by now.

make it xixax official
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Reelist on October 25, 2014, 04:39:21 PM
Don't play with my emotions, mod
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Lottery on October 25, 2014, 07:22:24 PM
Yeah, post it meng.

Haven't seen the Master Class posted but here are a few excerpts and quotes (I dont believe has been posted).

http://flavorwire.com/481033/10-filmmaking-lessons-from-paul-thomas-anderson/view-all

I really love this, these are exactly the type of lessons/ideas present-day PTA would promote (okay, that's clearly evident from the purpose of the article).
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on October 27, 2014, 10:12:15 PM
Here you go, an Xixaxclusive.

https://soundcloud.com/cory-everett/on-cinema-paul-thomas-anderson
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: max from fearless on October 28, 2014, 04:35:00 AM
Thank you sir - now let us up vote you into the stratosphere!!!
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on November 11, 2014, 01:42:31 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9JWkO-B-uc
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on November 12, 2014, 07:51:40 PM
Kent Jones' interview with PT for Inherent Vice is now available as a podcast download (http://www.filmlinc.com/pages/the-close-up) through FilmLinc's website and through iTunes (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-close-up/id938706022?mt=2)
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: jenkins on November 26, 2014, 07:15:57 PM
considering it "too hard" to find the appropriate topic to share this news, about this event i'm not going to. i keep meaning to share the news here, i've forgotten, and it surprises me that no one here has shared the news

(http://i.imgur.com/6VZJW6M.jpg)
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: max from fearless on November 27, 2014, 03:20:53 AM
Jeesus. That line up is CRAZY. The Prince deserves it....
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on December 01, 2014, 07:46:26 AM
Anyone have the PTA interview in the new Total
Film issue?

http://www.gamesradar.com/total-film-latest-issue/
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: max from fearless on December 01, 2014, 08:41:46 AM
I've got it - you want the pdf? Here's a snippet in which PTA talks directly to me...

Inherent Vice takes a while to settle. It needs two or three viewings to get a handle on…

I don’t aim for that, but I like hearing it, because I think the implication is that it feels good, that you want to see it again, so that’s high praise. But it’s weird… I was thinking about it last night. We were the centrepiece [of the New York Film Festival] and it was a weird feeling. Like, ‘How did I get here? How do I get on the sidelines again?’ [Laughs] It’s thrilling that people have expectations but there’s no way it can be what you thought it was. How many albums have you bought when you go, “This is fucking terrible”. Then you listen to it three or four times and it’s great.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on December 01, 2014, 09:06:43 AM
Yeah, PDF would be great. Thanks!
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: max from fearless on December 01, 2014, 09:13:27 AM
TOTAL FILM PTA INTERVIEW

HE MADE BOOGIE NIGHTS, MAGNOLIA AND THERE WILL BE BLOOD, HE’S HAILED AS ONE OF AMERICA’S GREATEST WORKING DIRECTORS, AND HIS NEW FILM INHERENT VICE IS ALREADY BEING TAGGED AS A MASTERPIECE. FINDS IT ALL RATHER SURREAL. “HOW DID I GET HERE?” HE SAYS. “HOW DO I GET ON THE SIDELINES AGAIN?”

October 4, New York. Paul Thomas Anderson’s seventh movie as writer and director, Inherent Vice, is receiving its world premiere at the Starr Theater on Broadway and West 65th. Anderson and his cast – Joaquin Phoenix, Josh Brolin, Benicio del Toro, Owen Wilson, Jena Malone, Martin Short, Eric Roberts, Katherine Waterston and his wife, Maya Rudolph – take to the stage. The buzz is palpable, as are Anderson’s nerves while delivering a brief intro. Filmmaker and players settle into their balcony seats. The lights dim. Two hours and 28 minutes later, they rise once more, and so too does the audience, its thunderous ovation eliciting flashing teeth and waving arms from on high. Later that night, or rather in the early hours of the next morning, Anderson and co are relaxed and relieved at the intimate after-party at Tavern On The Green, Central Park. All smiles and cigarettes, their mellow satisfaction matches the soft radiance emanating from bejewelled lanterns hanging in trees, candles on table tops. The air is crisp, the sky is starless. Music from the ’70s, much of it featured in Anderson’s 1997 breakthrough feature Boogie Nights, wafts through the enclosed garden space, and Rudolph shimmies towards her husband as The Bee Gees’ ‘Stayin’ Alive’ replaces The O’Jay’s ‘Love Train’. It is, indeed, a time to dance – tonight caps three long years of Anderson wrestling Thomas Pynchon’s unfilmable novel to the screen. The next evening is cold and bright. Windows glint, the edges of skyscrapers are scalpel-sharp. Anderson is way up on the 17th floor of the Trump Hotel, ensconced in a non-smoking suite sucking on cigarettes. He’s wearing a casual shirt and jeans, his chin coated in stubble, his hair mid-length and shaggy as befits the vibe of his new movie. Set in 1970, Inherent Vice is a stoner-noir, with Phoenix’s buzzed and befuddled PI Larry ‘Doc’ Sportello put on a case by his free-spirited ex, Shasta (Waterston). What begins as a straightforward investigation into the disappearance of real-estate magnate Mickey Wolfmann (Roberts) slides down a kaleidoscopic rabbit hole inhabited by Nazi bikers, Black Power militants, psychics, a presumed-dead saxophone player (Owen Wilson) and a hippie-hating flat-top cop (Brolin), while somewhere, everywhere, lurks the Golden Fang – perhaps just the name of a schooner belonging to a blacklisted movie star, perhaps an Indochinese drugs syndicate, perhaps a cabal of tax-dodging, coke-snorting dentists. Probably all of the above and a whole lot more. As indecipherable as The Big Sleep (“In the middle of shooting, I thought ‘Are the reviews going to say ‘Incoherent Vice’?” grins Anderson) and as gripped with paranoia and anxiety as ’70s noirs Chinatown, Night Moves and The Long Goodbye, Inherent Vice is also furiously funny – Anderson wasn’t kidding when he name-checked Police Squad! and Top Secret! as visual inspirations. “I just found myself fucking beaming!” he, well, beams when Total Film remarks he looked genuinely overcome at the applause last night. It was a sweet reaction given you’d think he’d by now be immune to praise after the plaudits heaped upon Boogie Nights, Magnolia, Punch-Drunk Love, There Will Be Blood and The Master. “Every part of you goes, ‘Do not let this make you feel good’. But I hadn’t seen it with an audience before and I couldn’t fucking help it!”

Inherent Vice takes a while to settle. It needs two or three viewings to get a handle on…

I don’t aim for that, but I like hearing it, because I think the implication is that it feels good, that you want to see it again, so that’s high praise. But it’s weird… I was thinking about it last night. We were the centrepiece [of the New York Film Festival] and it was a weird feeling. Like, ‘How did I get here? How do I get on the sidelines again?’ [Laughs] It’s thrilling that people have expectations but there’s no way it can be what you thought it was. How many albums have you bought when you go, “This is fucking terrible”. Then you listen to it three or four times and it’s great.

Do those expectations ever weigh on you when you’re making a movie?
Not setting out. But the night before last, that’s when the reality sets in. I fucking couldn’t go to sleep. Finishing a film and getting it ready is propelling you forward, and when you stop and realise you’re in New York and you’re showing the movie tomorrow, it comes crashing in: “Holy fuck!”

Pynchon’s novel is so dense and rich. How did you even begin to adapt it?
I just sat down and wrote the book out in a script form. And I think the idea there was that I didn’t have any other ideas. To look at it in a way that’s familiar to me meant I could put it out on the floor and cut and paste. It was labour intensive work but good, because you get to know the thing. I just got a cookbook holder and put it up there and was like [mimes typing]. My back hurt and there was no inspiration going on, but as I was going along, I have to say there was stuff, instinctually, where I was thinking, ‘Maybe this doesn’t need to be there?’ I was making edits in my mind.

Did you stay in touch with Thomas Pynchon throughout the adaptation process?
My throat hurts [laughs].

You obviously want to honour his privacy. But presumably you were keen to keep him in the loop and do right by his words?
You don’t want to fuck with his shit if you don’t have to. But I found myself numerous times in that bad place of being reverential, thinking ‘I’ve got to protect it’. To best respect it is to sometimes dismantle it and tear it apart to make it a movie. You can write out dialogue exactly as it happens in the book, and then you hear everyone say it… You’ve got good actors and it should work, but it just doesn’t sound good. It’s a different thing. We’ve seen books turned into movies that try so hard to be literary. And they’ve failed because [the mediums] are different. Being respectful, but also having to wrestle with it and not be nice with it, was a delicate thing, for sure.

Did you go back and watch the classic film noirs before shooting?

I know that stuff so well and I watch it all the time. Truthfully, I probably was watching so much more of that stuff in a new way when I was doing The Master. Ironically, that was a film, to me, that linked so much more to that stuff – those movies were all these guys coming back from the war, and they’re not fitting in with society, and there’s always a girl that’s fucking them over. That was the stuff I was thinking about for The Master. Ridiculously enough, I thought that was more like a film noir. When it came to this one, I knew that material so well, I was trying to stay away from it.

Given your love of Robert Altman, surely The Long Goodbye was a touchstone?
I had to forget that The Long Goodbye exists. I love that movie so much and know it so well, but don’t try to do that. The truth was, there was so much to be wrestled with in the book, that was the preoccupation. Forget movies. But years ago, watching The Big Sleep again, it was, ‘OK, plot don’t really matter; it’s just how to get your guy on the road.’

Doc makes Elliott Gould’s shambolic Philip Marlowe in The Long Goodbye look positively switched on. What made you choose Joaquin Phoenix for the role?
There wasn’t anything I can point to. It was more like, ‘He’s a great actor, and I loved working with him [on The Master]’. I remember thinking, ‘I gotta get someone to play this great character’, and I was rummaging through, thinking about who could do this. Robert Downey and I had talked about it for a little while, but that was kind of not serious. And I remember sitting in the editing room staring at Joaquin on the monitor: ‘He’s right in front of my face! This is my man!’

He really puts himself out there in this…
There’s no director that works with Joaquin who doesn’t want to work with Joaquin again. There’s a long line of people who want to work with him, as they should. I can’t say a bad word about him. I’ve heard people say, “I didn’t think he could be funny”. But he’s so fucking funny in this. It’s a good character: he’s on the fucking case; he doesn’t know what the case is, but he’s fucking on it [laughs].

This is an ensemble film like Boogie Nights and Magnolia but the style is more in keeping with There Will Be Blood and The Master, very focused, very controlled. Would you have made it differently when you were younger?
Probably. For sure. Of course I would of.

It’s different to the trailer in that...
Is the trailer misleading, do you think?

It makes the movie look more madcap than it is…

It’s madcap [laughs].

But the trailer makes it look fast and frantic, a bit more ‘’40s screwball’.
Right. [Pause] I fucked up.

The trailer’s great, but the film’s a little different in its style and mood.

Well, it’s a little bit more formal, but so much of that came from how the scenes are written in the book. You’re in Doc’s apartment. You’re in this other location. Here’s him driving from here to there. Those are the scenarios from the book. There wasn’t a lot of room for camera pyrotechnics. There were great opportunities for long scenes with a lot of dialogue between two actors, where we can have one nice long shot, and that was nice to do. There’s a scene I really like with Reese [Witherspoon] and Joaquin on a park bench, and it’s just a nice, long, slow push. We’d done the scene earlier in the day. They were sitting at a table. And it was a fucking chore. We did a shot of him, and a shot of her, and then a close-up. I was like, “This fucking feels like shit”. At the end of the day I said, “Just sit on that park bench and let’s do it like that”. And it was so much easier.

That takes a certain confidence, doesn’t it – to resist being at all ostentatious in your direction?
But this is also a weed-smoking movie, so that inevitably gets into it, too. If you’ve got everyone coked-up, you probably get a bit more Boogie Nights energy to it. We get a little bit of that energy going with Dr. Rudy Blatnoyd [Martin Short], at the dentist; cocaine comes in and we start to be a bit frenetic. But yeah, you try to prove yourself as a director when you’re starting out; I think everyone does, or has. And then when you feel like you’ve got the job, you can settle down a little bit, hopefully just servicing the story, servicing the actors.

Beneath the gags and the Pretzel-plotting throbs a real sadness…
The obvious thing there, for that era, is that they fucked up and they lost and they let it slip away. But like any liberal-thinking hippy, they’ll probably argue about their ideas for too long or end up getting stoned and confused and not have enough manpower to really follow through on the battle [laughs]. But I think deeper than that is that thing Doc has for Shasta. That’s something that everybody can get with – the girl I shouldn’t be with but I need to know who’s she fucking, where did she go, what did I do? That was really heart-breaking in the book. How much you can miss someone.

All of your films have dealt with dysfunctional families, with fathers and sons. There’s a bit of that in Inherent Vice, too.
For sure. It’s small, but that stuff with Coy Harlingen [a missing saxophonist played by Owen Wilson] and his family. Coy says to Doc [asking after the child he left behind], “Did you see any sign of those little-kid blues? They can get that. Did you see anything?” [Groans] It makes my fucking heart melt. And Doc’s kind of pretty easy-going on everything, but his one moral stand is, whatever mistakes this guy made, nobody should go through life without seeing his daughter. So that little family connection is in there. That stuff gets me every time. I love the way Pynchon does that in the book. I think we did a pretty good job of it.

When Robert Ebert reviewed Bonnie And Clyde, he wrote “It doesn’t matter that it’s set 35 years ago… It was made now and it’s about us.” Is that true of Inherent Vice?
That’s good. That’s nice. Well yeah... the Golden Fang is still in business [laughs]. Probably more so than ever. Back then, people would call conspiracy theories. They’re not even conspiracy theories anymore. It’s just fact that we live with. It used to be, “You’re fucking high, you’re paranoid.” It almost seems like now they’re saying, “We know you know, and we don’t fucking care. We used to hide it, and now that you’ve found us out, what you gonna do about it?” Whether it’s youth or generational, everyone’s always got ideas how they’re gonna make things better, and end up fighting up against something bigger than them that just pushes them into the ground.

Do you consider Hollywood part of the Golden Fang?

Yeah. I don’t think, fortunately, this has happened to us so far – who knows if it might? – but inevitably, I’m sure, movies are being financed through some horrible human rights violation somewhere in some African country. Hey look, I’m staying at the Trump Hotel, and the building’s shaped like the Golden Fang, and they’ve sponsored the film festival. There’s a great line in the book, it didn’t make it into the movie: “Are you sure about this, man? Are you sure you can trust people this heavy duty?” And Doc says, “Good people get bought and sold every day. You might as well trust somebody evil once in a while. It makes no more or less sense.”

Tell us about Police Squad! being an inspiration.

The things that entertain me, or that I have time for, are usually, like, a half hour, or cartoons, or Police Squad! At this point in my life, I’m as guilty as anybody else of watching something on my phone, or on YouTube. I used to watch three movies a day, sitting on my couch. Now I have four kids and I’m watching things in a way different way. I’m watching a 10-minute piece of something, or I’m watching a music video, or I’m seeing a clip from some TV show, or watching a trailer for a movie rather than seeing the actual movie. With the amount of time I have to go see films, there’s now high
stakes. Like, when I went to see Interstellar, I was like, “I’m going to see fucking Interstellar, at the theatre.” That’s important to me. Sadly, I don’t [usually] have the time. Kent Jones, the guy who runs the [New York] Film Festival, he’s living a fucking dream life, in some way. He watches everything, all the time. I’m not at that spot.

Your family obviously takes precedence, but you inhaled movies when you were younger. Is there a part of you that misses that?
Yeah. I got deathly sick about six months ago, to the point I could not get out of bed. I was laying there, watching movie after movie. And I thought, ‘I might stay sick for a couple more days’ [laughs]. I mean, I was getting a lot of sympathy from the wife, I didn’t have to make lunch and get everyone ready for school. I thought, ‘I could spread this out’. And I did, just for an extra half a day. But the point is, I did need to refuel on movies. It wasn’t just me being lazy. It was proper pause to say, ‘I’m watching this movie and I’m receiving it well. I’m not distracted, I’m not falling asleep, and I’m enjoying it whether I really like it or not.’

Scorsese, it’s been said, used to have different movies playing in every room of the house. He’d absorb them by osmosis as he pottered around…
He’s a fucking junkie, in the best way. I don’t want a TV in every room; that’s too much info for me. But I have a small TV in the kitchen and I put on Turner Classic Movies. That’s a way for me to have it there as wallpaper, or a little comfort
blanket, or check in to see what’s going on while you’re making dinner. And the kids can watch it. No matter what’s on, they can watch it because there’s not going to be too much disgusting shit for them to see. Grabbing it piece by piece in a busy life is sometimes all you can take. I think it’s OK. Sneak a look. It’s preferable to see it in a movie theatre, but I don’t feel bad. If I’m going to get on a plane to go home, I’m gonna watch three movies before I get back.

Back to Inherent Vice. Katherine Waterston gives a breakout turn as Shasta. People after the premiere were saying that her nude scene is this movie’s equivalent of There Will Be Blood’s “I drink your milkshake!”

Good. I think that’s good, right? The sex scene is pretty much how it is in the book. It becomes something that is special and unique because it’s one shot, which is always ideal, particularly if someone is naked and really vulnerable, instead of saying, “You’re gonna have to do this 40 times in  five different ways.” That was a good one. Concise, focused, and letting her have opportunities to do a good take. But I like that people are responding to that scene because I think it’s a special one.

So, what’s next? You sometimes have big gaps between films. You’re not going to pull another Kubrick, are you?
We’ve been working pretty consistently from The Master to this. But… I don’t know. I don’t have an answer. Everything’s always percolating, but nothing serious. I can only do one thing at a time. Right now, my instinct is I just want proper
pause. And who knows how long that will last? Hopefully just a couple of weeks, or a couple of months. Take it easy and not force it. But at the same time, you feel the clock ticking. Honestly, I’m tired right now. But in a good way, feeling we  did it, like we’ve done something good
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: jenkins on December 01, 2014, 01:04:35 PM
Back to Inherent Vice. Katherine Waterston gives a breakout turn as Shasta. People after the premiere were saying that her nude scene is this movie’s equivalent of There Will Be Blood’s “I drink your milkshake!”
Good. I think that’s good, right? The sex scene is pretty much how it is in the book. It becomes something that is special and unique because it’s one shot, which is always ideal, particularly if someone is naked and really vulnerable, instead of saying, “You’re gonna have to do this 40 times in  five different ways.” That was a good one. Concise, focused, and letting her have opportunities to do a good take. But I like that people are responding to that scene because I think it’s a special one.
was going to say this was the scene like that, back when someone here asked if there was a "big memorable scene" in iv, but i was worried only i'd think that. so now i'm less worried about that
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: velociraptor on December 01, 2014, 02:36:08 PM
His humility is so refreshing. It's not an act either, I think his sense of humility towards what he does is a massive reason for his success. He just lets himself be in awe of the process and doesn't want to know everything, let alone put on airs that he does.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on December 01, 2014, 02:49:43 PM
Thanks for posting that interview, max. This should be on the poster:

he’s on the fucking case; he doesn’t know what the case is, but he’s fucking on it
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: jenkins on December 01, 2014, 03:00:06 PM
if a poster with "incoherent vice" and that^ tagline could be whipped into shape that'd be, idk, i'd look at it
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on December 08, 2014, 11:35:02 AM
New interview with Indiewire:
http://www.indiewire.com/article/paul-thomas-anderson-on-trying-not-f-ck-up-adapting-inherent-vice-20141208
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on December 12, 2014, 11:32:52 AM
Great interview about music in his films.
http://www.wonderingsound.com/feature/paul-thomas-anderson-inherent-vice-music-films-interview/

He says today he'd cut the Wise Up scene out and just get to the frogs!

These are good too.

http://filmmakermagazine.com/archives/issues/winter2008/blood.php

http://huffpost.com/us/entry/6305022?utm_hp_ref=entertainment&ir=Entertainment
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: ono on December 12, 2014, 01:19:40 PM
The last one is a 404.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on December 12, 2014, 01:33:51 PM
http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/6305022?utm_hp_ref=entertainment&ir=Entertainment
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Drenk on December 13, 2014, 07:11:40 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KLa65wSTYo
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on December 20, 2014, 08:59:48 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M95Yz1DwAOI
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: max from fearless on December 21, 2014, 07:14:47 AM
This one's fun! Bonus Track: Kurt's extended interview with Paul Thomas Anderson

http://www.studio360.org/story/paul-thomas-anderson-inherent-vice/ (http://www.studio360.org/story/paul-thomas-anderson-inherent-vice/)
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Lottery on December 28, 2014, 08:53:11 AM
http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/dec/28/paul-thomas-anderson-intereview-inherent-vice-mark-kermode
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Tictacbk on January 02, 2015, 01:09:11 PM
PTA is gonna be on WTF Monday: https://twitter.com/marcmaron/status/551051480099078144 (https://twitter.com/marcmaron/status/551051480099078144)
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Fuzzy Dunlop on January 03, 2015, 12:37:38 AM
PTA is gonna be on WTF Monday

This has serious potential to be PTA's most revealing interview in a long, long time.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Gittes on January 03, 2015, 11:00:25 AM
Well, that should be good!

I'm still hoping for a Charlie Rose interview, though.

You know what would be great? A discussion between Tarantino and Anderson. I loved listening to the former talk about TWBB. His admiration for PTA was pretty effusive. I wonder what he thought of The Master and Inherent Vice.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Lottery on January 05, 2015, 05:35:45 AM
http://www.wtfpod.com/podcast/episodes/episode_565_-_paul_thomas_anderson
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: max from fearless on January 05, 2015, 10:03:06 AM
FUCKING INCREDIBLE
FUCKING INCREDIBLE
FUCKING INCREDIBLE
FUCKING INCREDIBLE
FUCKING INCREDIBLE
FUCKING INCREDIBLE
FUCKING INCREDIBLE
FUCKING INCREDIBLE
FUCKING INCREDIBLE
FUCKING INCREDIBLE
FUCKING INCREDIBLE
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: putneyswipe on January 05, 2015, 10:10:22 AM
 :bravo:
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Drenk on January 05, 2015, 10:18:08 AM
The Pynchon talk was great because they were having a conversation with "Fuck."

I just love the guy. I'm a fanboy and I love him. Love his movies and love him. He's fucking stupid about Magnolia being too long; he can't cut a shorter version, Magnolia is all about not editing yourself, being naked, and he can feel ashamed, but some people love this movie as it is.

And David Foster Wallace was his teacher.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on January 05, 2015, 02:36:10 PM
This was amazing. Even if we've heard some of these questions before, the mood and interaction between them was quite enjoyable, it was the best promotional interview I have seen Paul do in a long time. Way too long for IV to premiere in Portugal, (and I'll even wait a couple of days after it does so I can get to see it on my birthday) and what's so interesting is that I don't seem to be wanting to see this RIGHT GODDAMN NOW as much as I wanted to see CMBB and The Master, which I guess is fine, maybe it has something to do with having read the book, so I can listen to these interviews not fearing any spoilers and I suppose they'll do unitl it comes out.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on January 05, 2015, 05:16:08 PM
Definitely the best PTA interview in years. Loved how candid it was, Maron telling him that his movies require a little work to come around to, etc. Wish it were twice as long.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: ©brad on January 05, 2015, 11:13:37 PM
Yeah that was 100 minutes that felt like 20. This PR tour is giving us a PTA we haven't heard from in a while. It must be the breezy stoner subject matter of Vice. The Master just wasn't as fun(ny) to talk about. Or maybe it's Warner Bros. realizing the star of the movie is Paul himself and the only hope of not losing all their money is if his avid fanbase turns out in droves.

Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Gittes on January 06, 2015, 07:35:41 AM
It was good, but it was kind of irritating that Maron just blew past Punch-Drunk Love so quickly and got so little out of PTA with regards to that film. I got the sense that Maron wasn't giving that film its proper due (as one of the greatest of all time!) and was talking about it as if it were a minor curiosity in Anderson's filmography.

Well, actually, I guess the Truffaut comparison was high praise, and I appreciate that Maron was being honest about not "getting it." Still, it's unfortunate that he clearly isn't a big fan of the film and/or hadn't watched it for a long time. I'm sure there's still plenty that Anderson could say about the making of PDL (if he were asked the right questions).
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: velociraptor on January 06, 2015, 08:44:34 AM
It was good, but it was kind of irritating that Maron just blew past Punch-Drunk Love so quickly and got so little out of PTA with regards to that film. I got the sense that Maron wasn't giving that film its proper due (as one of the greatest of all time!) and was talking about it as if it were a minor curiosity in Anderson's filmography.

Well, actually, I guess the Truffaut comparison was high praise, and I appreciate that Maron was being honest about not "getting it." Still, it's unfortunate that he clearly isn't a big fan of the film and/or hadn't watched it for a long time. I'm sure there's still plenty that Anderson could say about the making of PDL (if he were asked the right questions).
The great part about WTF is that Maron is always going to be a big part of the interview. It may be irritating at points, but it's a huge part of his best interviews (if you've seen his interview with Louis CK you know what I'm talking about). I get the feeling Maron's personal resentment of Adam Sandler may have played into him not taking PDL too seriously.

That's a big part of why I loved this so much, actually. Maron clearly has a ton of respect for PTA, but not enough to make him a fanboy at all. It made the tone of the interview perfectly casual and productive. This was so much fun to listen to.

Best part by far was the ending where they both very sincerely said "I love you" to one another.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Fitzroy on January 06, 2015, 03:29:21 PM
Nevertheless...
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Reelist on January 06, 2015, 07:50:07 PM
It took me 4 hours to listen to this interview! Not because I was preoccupied, I just kept pausing every 10 or so minutes to soak it in. We've never heard such an intimate interview with PTA, and unlike so much other press you can feel the relief on Paul's part in not being asked such run of the mill questions, but having someone expressing an interest in your work and wanting to get to the bottom of it. He likes the challenging relationship people have with his films, you can tell. You feel him smirking through the microphone when Marc does his "COME ON! WHAT'S HE DOING?! I'LL BE SEEING THAT AGAIN." What higher compliment could you give a filmmaker, really? When you walk out of a film completely satisfied, your appreciation of it will only diminish on repeat viewings, wouldn't you say? Ok, so he doesn't rake it in at the box office, but his movies create loyal fans who will support him for a lifetime.

It was cool to hear some more about his upbringing in that crazy brady bunch house they lived in. It made it so much clearer why family is everything to him. I just imagine him growing up in this bustling household full of teenagers coming and going as they please, sneaking off to do secret things, and he's watching them like "FUCK YEAH!" Having that many older brothers and sisters, you're just hipper to what's going on. You see them dating and partying and working on their little projects and think "I can't wait to grow up! what am I gonna do?" It must explain why he latched onto filmmaking so quick. Once he found 'that thing' and just ran with it, no one ever discouraged him. His Dad gave over the reigns to a state of the art, probably several thousand dollar video camera to a 10 year old! I couldn't think of a more apt metaphor for his relationship with the studios today.

So much of this conversation felt like the 'lost commentaries' of his movies! Like, how he explained that while learning his dad was dying, he said "You're telling me that frogs are falling from the sky" to the bearer of bad news. I had never known that association was so closely linked before. I immediately started thinking about my own dad, and how when he dies it really will feel like the laws of the universe have changed. The last time I watched Magnolia was with him, and that was the first time I'd seen it with anybody else. It was fun to finally show him this movie that sparked my film fanaticism, something I've almost kept a secret because of how much of an impact it had on me, and really break it down for him to gage his reaction on everything.


it was kind of irritating that Maron just blew past Punch-Drunk Love so quickly and got so little out of PTA with regards to that film. I got the sense that Maron wasn't giving that film its proper due (as one of the greatest of all time!) and was talking about it as if it were a minor curiosity in Anderson's filmography.

Agreed, because it's my favorite of his. If Maron had known better, it would've been a good segue into how he met Maya Rudolph. If you have any familiarity with WTF at all, you'd know that Marc holds a grudge like no other. I believe he was an acquaintance of Sandler, starting out in comedy, but when he blew up and hit the mainstream Marc starting doing a bit about his goofy persona. Once Sandler caught wind of that he cut off all ties with him and they've never spoken since. So, it probably makes him physically ill to see him onscreen in any capacity, let alone trying to be 'serious'. Man, how great of an episode is that gonna be when the time finally comes around?



I think I've said enough for now, I'll just leave on the note that it left me feeling truly inspired. Like, "Why am I not making movies right now?" And even though I skipped through most of it, It's the greatest promotion Inherent Vice could ever have.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Lottery on January 06, 2015, 08:20:18 PM
They also simplified The Master into its purest essence- about two dudes in love. I wish there was a bit more about PDL too. No one ever really talks enough about that one (and it is like my second favourite), it's a shame.

And damn, Maron mentioning that it sounded like PTA was making a film based on the Hollywood Blacklist was so on point, I could really see that in my head. Just like his idea for the 'early days of tv' film. They both look a little bit like The Master in my head.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: 03 on January 06, 2015, 09:47:03 PM
(http://img2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20120624090208/simpsons/images/c/cb/Comicbookguy.gif)
best. pta. interview. ever.

best parts(some already mentioned):
. sydney getting more discussion than pdl
. pta looking for porn landmarks
. just sounds like two dudes talking
. pta getting giggly uncomfortable at pynchon questions
. breakdown of 'master' as 'two dudes in love'
. breakdown of 'cmbb' as 'a son and father have problems'
. dad talk ( i feel you on this, Reelist, but from the other side, since i actually lost my dad 9 years ago and did watch the film with him, as well.)
. shooting first parts of IV while him and joaquin 'just hanging out'
. every other part
. the whole thing
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Pozer on January 07, 2015, 12:20:02 AM
EVER.

from cigarettes to I love yous.

true lols at Maron calling him out during Pynchon talk

"I'm gonna just uh, say no"
pause
"Whyyyy?!"

Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: polkablues on January 07, 2015, 12:23:30 AM
Definitely the loosest and openest we've heard him since probably the Boogie Nights commentary.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on January 08, 2015, 03:39:29 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPB6GXG7Wa8

I don't like this woman.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Gittes on January 09, 2015, 10:20:10 PM
Foster Wallace as his teacher at Emerson?! That part blew me away. fuck. that is so cool

Yeah, I had the same reaction.

I remember coming across a message board thread years ago, and the topic was about pairing up directors with their literary analogues. Someone paired up PTA with DFW. I've noticed the comparison elsewhere over the years, too, but I don't know enough about Wallace's work to thoroughly comment on the supposed connection. However, I have read Wallace's fantastic essay, "Big Red Son," which is about the pornography industry and his visit to the AVN Awards. He actually mentions Anderson and Boogie Nights in that essay.

Also, I know that Wallace was an instrumental figure in the conception of "New Sincerity." The connection between this concept (which entails the creation of works of art that expressly refuse cynicism, detached irony, etc.,) and filmmakers like Anderson are pretty obvious, and this has been discussed in academic articles. Because of all of this, DFW and PTA have been vaguely linked in my head for a while. So, finding out that the former taught the latter struck me as both surprising and totally appropriate. A neat piece of information, for sure.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Lottery on January 15, 2015, 09:53:57 PM
http://www.rollingstone.com/movies/features/paul-thomas-anderson-reveals-secrets-of-stoner-odyssey-inherent-vice-20150115
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Alexandro on January 16, 2015, 10:34:16 AM
the guy looks like he's aged 20 years since there will be blood. his face is turning really interesting, very badass.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: ono on January 16, 2015, 11:33:59 AM
Four kids, man.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Something Spanish on January 21, 2015, 06:09:58 AM
Anyone know if the C&RV site is going to do a series of interviews for IV with key production players like they did with The Master?
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on January 21, 2015, 08:50:01 AM
Anyone know if the C&RV site is going to do a series of interviews for IV with key production players like they did with The Master?
Totally possible but I doubt it? I did them for The Master but that film seemed to have a lot less press than this one does and for IV it feels like most of the key dept. heads have already been interviewed someplace else. The only stuff I'd really want to hear from PTA is if there was much other stuff from the book was shot but cut and if he realizes the extent to which his films challenge audiences. But if they do one, I'd read it.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Something Spanish on January 21, 2015, 09:11:09 AM
props for that modage, they were all great reads. since you did it for The Master why can't you do it for IV? I'm sure the board can come up with a few dozen never-before-asked questions.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on January 21, 2015, 11:00:24 AM
I don't write there anymore. But like I said, fingers crossed, maybe they're working on it.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: modage on January 29, 2015, 09:58:02 AM
Good interview with DAZED (http://www.dazeddigital.com/artsandculture/article/23431/1/paul-thomas-anderson-ghosts-and-the-sea).

PTA talks about JAWS/the sea, Wes/BUDAPEST ("No matter what anyone has to say about Wes Anderson, you can’t fault that movie"), Cruise/TOMORROW and QT's "retirement."
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Sleepless on January 29, 2015, 01:37:19 PM
This week's Empire Podcast (49 minutes in) (http://www.empireonline.com/news/story.asp?NID=43307)
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Drenk on January 29, 2015, 04:54:52 PM
Good, sad interview...

http://www.littlewhitelies.co.uk/features/articles/paul-thomas-anderson-29054

Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Something Spanish on February 08, 2015, 04:22:42 PM
Good, sad interview...

http://www.littlewhitelies.co.uk/features/articles/paul-thomas-anderson-29054

What did you find sad about that interview?
Here's one for us Italianos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=npsCl4xkKkY
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: P Heat on March 27, 2015, 07:28:57 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXT0WOUceak

JD and PTA at it again.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Larry on April 15, 2015, 10:45:26 PM
http://www.parismatch.com/Culture/Cinema/Paul-Thomas-Anderson-reste-bien-acide-720190 (http://www.parismatch.com/Culture/Cinema/Paul-Thomas-Anderson-reste-bien-acide-720190)

can anyone do a proper translation?>

q:Your films are held in the past. Is this the way to talk about this?
pta: I have nostalgia for the past. This could be a disease. At a time of depression were said to be nostalgic ...

q: Are you seriously unless we imagine?
pta:This film is very déconnant.[?] They say funny people on stage are sinister in life. Maybe is it true in reverse for serious filmmakers said. I am in good spirits most of the time. I watch movies at home are generally short and comical. And I tend to make long and serious films.

Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: jerome on April 17, 2015, 05:01:50 PM
Your movies are period pieces/set in the past. Is that a way for you to talk about the present?
I am nostalgic about the past. It might be pathological, really. Back in the day, people with depression were labeled as nostalgic...

Are you less serious than we think?
This film is pretty wacky. They say people who are funny on stage are quite sinister in real life. Perhaps the opposite is true for directors who are perceived as serious. I'm in a good mood most of the time. The movies I watch at home are mostly short, funny ones. And yet I tend to make long, serious movies.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on October 19, 2015, 08:42:30 PM
Bridge of Spies Q&A with Spielberg moderated by PT (http://www.dga.org/Events/2015/Dec2015/BridgeofSpies_QnA_1015.aspx)
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: ono on October 21, 2015, 10:20:41 PM
I've got so much interview to give, I just don't know where to put it.

https://www.criterion.com/lists/150628-paul-thomas-anderson-s-favorite-films

This is over two years old, but whatever.  And actually, I don't think it's an interview, but a collection of quotes and the movies they reference.  There are some standouts that seem to have been omitted, but still, it's nice to peruse.

Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: jenkins on October 22, 2015, 12:06:27 PM
Bridge of Spies Q&A with Spielberg moderated by PT (http://www.dga.org/Events/2015/Dec2015/BridgeofSpies_QnA_1015.aspx)

watched this btw, thanks. i like how they're comfortable being movie nerds. a sad fact i know for certain is some PTA fans are fucking terrible movie nerds, since they think their PTA fandom is what makes them a movie nerd and, it's like, what do you say to that, you can try to tell them to listen to PTA but if he doesn't mention a title it won't help. genuinely not a description of a single person here, only a description of my irl encounters in LA with a certain type of PTA fan.

saying i'm super glad it's easy for Spielberg and PTA to chat movies and i enjoyed hearing them do so. i predict i'll best remember how Spielberg gushed over Michael Curtiz, Steven Soderbergh, and PTA. since he's a movie nerd <3. well actually he was talking about Soderbergh's tv show. represent.

Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: OpO1832 on October 26, 2015, 08:17:26 PM
I enjoyed watching both
scorsese and anderson

what a treat.

thank you
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on December 24, 2015, 11:17:26 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hEqp1HVj5Ac
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Something Spanish on December 26, 2015, 03:51:19 PM
whole lotta thigh slapping going on from QT
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on January 19, 2016, 12:26:35 PM
PT Talks "The Big Short" With Adam McKay  (https://soundcloud.com/thedirectorscut/episode-7-the-big-short-with-adam-mckay-and-paul-thomas-anderson)
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on February 01, 2016, 02:11:51 AM
^
Quote
PT: What’s happening next?

Adam McKay: I’m talking with Farrell and John C. Reilly about doing a comedy about two guys that go down to defend America’s borders against the immigrants…

Please please please let this happen
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Dobbs on August 07, 2016, 01:58:33 PM
I've got so much interview to give, I just don't know where to put it.

https://www.criterion.com/lists/150628-paul-thomas-anderson-s-favorite-films (https://www.criterion.com/lists/150628-paul-thomas-anderson-s-favorite-films)

This is over two years old, but whatever.  And actually, I don't think it's an interview, but a collection of quotes and the movies they reference.  There are some standouts that seem to have been omitted, but still, it's nice to peruse.


There was another list about his "favorite" films but I can't find it.
Does anyone remember it?

EDIT
I think I found it, it was the Cigs&Red Vines PTA Picks. Unfortunately the links are all down even with the adblocker disabled. Oh well.
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: wilder on August 07, 2016, 05:19:20 PM
I remember some of it: 42nd Street, Bad Day Black Rock, The Band Wagon, Baraka, Breaking the Waves, Chaplin’s movies, Dancer in the Dark, Dark Star, Fred Astaire’s movies, I Am Cuba, Jazz on a Summer’s Day, L.A. Confidential, Lost in Translation, Melvin and Howard, Network, Ordinary People, Preston Sturge’s movies, Singin’ in the Rain, Sunrise, Sweet & Lowdown, Swing Shift, They Drive By Night, The Three Colors Trilogy, White Heat, You Can Count On Me

Airplane, The Asphalt Jungle, The Best Days of Our Lives, The Big Sleep, Breakfast with Curtis, Breaking Away, Giant, The Innocents, Mulholland Drive, The Ninth Configuration, Prince of the City, Secrets & Lies, The Son (Dardennes), They Shoot Horses Don’t They?, Three Businessmen, Tunnel Vision, Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s films, and When the Cat’s Away were mentioned at other points in time
Title: Re: PTA Interviews (on YouTube or otherwise)
Post by: Dobbs on August 08, 2016, 08:11:06 AM
Whoa, thanks brother!