XIXAX Film Forum

The Director's Chair => Quentin Tarantino => Topic started by: MacGuffin on March 27, 2011, 10:14:40 PM

Title: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on March 27, 2011, 10:14:40 PM
Uma Thurman Confirms Quentin Tarantino’s Next Picture Is The “Southern”
Source: The Playlist

Next ‘Kill Bill’ Film Is “Down The Road” For a director known for his lengthy dialogue, Quentin Tarantino sure has been keeping quiet recently. Though he’s currently writing the screenplay for what will become the directors 8th film (or 7th, if you count the “Kill Bill” series as one, as originally intended), details have so far been hard to come by. The first murmur of news came about a month ago when Italian actor Franco Nero said Tarantino was involved with a spaghetti western called “The Angel, The Bad And The Wise” but was revealed shortly thereafter this was probably not a directorial project for him. AICN’s sources confirmed that Tarantino’s next film would be a spaghetti western, Christoph Waltz would be starring and the title Nero mentioned was not even close. Speculation then turned to the slavery-era Texas Western he had talked up during the “Inglourious Basterds” press rounds. Tarantino said at the time, “I’d like to do a Western. But rather than set it in Texas, have it in slavery times. With that subject that everybody is afraid to deal with. Let’s shine that light on ourselves. You could do a ponderous history lesson of slaves escaping on the Underground Railroad. Or, you could make a movie that would be exciting. Do it as an adventure. A spaghetti Western that takes place during that time. And I would call it ‘A Southern’” Deadline caught up with the director at The Weinstein Company‘s Oscar party who confirmed he’d completed a draft of a script for his Western and would probably finish a final version within a few months. Unlike his epic screenplays for “Inglorious Basterds” and “Kill Bill” this one had “just flowed out of him,” and he expected production (set up at The Weinstein Co.) to start shortly after finishing the script. It was not, however, confirmed that this Western would be the same ‘Southern’ he had mentioned in several interviews years earlier. Hollywood Outbreak caught up with actress and Tarantino muse Uma Thurman doing press rounds for her new film “Ceremony” and when asked about the possibility of a third “Kill Bill” installment, she offered the following news. “I think he has a script ready to start of a new film, ‘A Southern’, I think it’s really exciting. It’s another new story and a fresh piece of material that he is channeling at the moment. So I think ‘Kill Bill’ lives down the road.” So, fantastic news. This appears to be the first somewhat official confirmation that this is indeed the slavery-epic he’d been working on. In 2007 he told the British press of the early gestation of the project, “I want to explore something that really hasn’t been done,” he said at the time. “I want to do movies that deal with America’s horrible past with slavery and stuff but do them like spaghetti westerns, not like big issue movies. I want to do them like they’re genre films, but they deal with everything that America has never dealt with because it’s ashamed of it, and other countries don’t really deal with because they don’t feel they have the right to.” As for a third “Kill Bill,” we could take it or leave it but news of an original film from the visionary filmmaker leaves us incredibly excited. Meanwhile, “Kill Bill: The Whole Bloody Affair,” Tarantino’s long-promised full cut of the film(s), premieres tonight at the New Beverly in LA.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: modage on March 28, 2011, 11:55:53 AM
^ I wrote that. ^  :yabbse-grin:
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Gold Trumpet on March 28, 2011, 11:57:33 AM
Haha, it's still cool you write for The Playlist.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on March 28, 2011, 12:12:12 PM
it'll never not be cool. Thanks Mod/Mac for that info, it's great news! Sounds like its gonna be epic.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: squints on March 28, 2011, 04:20:43 PM
i'm more excited for the fact that mod wrote that than i am for the possibility (unlikelihood) that this movie ever gets made.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Marty McSuperfly on April 30, 2011, 12:33:08 PM
According to a poster on Hollywood Elsewhere, Tarantino's Southern is called Django Unchained.

He writes: As someone who has actually read Tarantino's latest script - and no I can't forward it to anyone, it'll get out there pretty soon anyway and I ain't about to scan 166 pages of script because I'm sitting on a hard copy - I can tell you that most of you are just shooting from the hip. DJANGO is fucking awesome and it's a script that only QT could have written... and I actually think it's one of his most personal scripts to date.

First off, this thing is going to be controversial with a capital C. The title character Django is a freed slave, who under the tutelage of a German bounty hunter (Christophe Waltz) becomes a badass bounty hunter himself and after assisting Waltz on taking down some bad guys for profit, is in turn assisted by Waltz in tracking down his slave wife and liberating her from an evil plantation owner. And that doesn't even half begin to cover it! This film deals with racism as I've rarely seen it handled in a Hollywood film. While it's 100 percent pure popcorn and revenge flick, it is pure genius in the way it takes on the evil slave owning south. Think of what he did with the Nazis in Inglourious and you'll get a sense of what he's doing with slave owners and slave overseers in this one. It's violent and funny and full of great Tarantino monologues and shoot outs (and slave rapes and slave tortures) and the center piece of the script is this fantastic relationship between Django and his Obi-Wan Waltz and it all just fucking works in the way only Tarantino makes it work. If you're a QT hater this script won't convert you. If you're a fan, you'll be onboard for the entire ride and you'll love every fucking second of it. I cannot wait to see the finished movie. It's going to shock and offend and drive people nuts when they see this thing. Detractors are going to find a thousand reference points from previous movies, but they've never been presented like this and I'm some one who has seen a LOT of movies and this script didn't feel familiar to me in the slightest.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on April 30, 2011, 12:41:39 PM
The title character Django is a freed slave, who under the tutelage of a German bounty hunter (Christophe Waltz) becomes a badass bounty hunter himself and after assisting Waltz on taking down some bad guys for profit, is in turn assisted by Waltz in tracking down his slave wife and liberating her from an evil plantation owner.

That rules. Waltz is playing like the exact same character as Landa, but with a good heart. Must be one of his long lost ancestors. I'm geekin over this. I'm sick of people here bitching about Tarantino lately, he da man.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on April 30, 2011, 01:49:21 PM
I'm also of the opinion that QT is at the top of his game. This sounds like an amazing film.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pozer on April 30, 2011, 03:24:38 PM
He writes: As someone who has actually read Tarantino's latest script - and no I can't forward it to anyone as I came on all 166 pages soiling the hard copy
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on April 30, 2011, 04:01:13 PM
It probably won't be the definitive statement on the south's troubled past, and the villains, like Nazis, are laughably obvious, sure, but okay, I'll see this too. 

Second movie in a row to reference an Italian film title.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on April 30, 2011, 04:38:53 PM
He writes: As someone who has actually read Tarantino's latest script - and no I can't forward it to anyone as I came on all 166 pages soiling the hard copy

haha.

I was kind of hoping this would be a spaghetti western type flick in the same style as the Sergio Leone classics. Kill Bill 2 had bits of that style, but I wanted a full on spaghetti western.

This one sounds just like another over the top idea that QT, RR and :shock: came up with one night when they were all sitting around watching SpikeTV and lighting their own farts on fire.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on April 30, 2011, 05:10:59 PM
I was kind of hoping this would be a spaghetti western type flick in the same style as the Sergio Leone classics. Kill Bill 2 had bits of that style, but I wanted a full on spaghetti western.

This one sounds just like another over the top idea that QT, RR and :shock: came up with one night when they were all sitting around watching SpikeTV and lighting their own farts on fire.

I'd think the name change and synopsis would reinforce your spaghetti western hopes.  Wasn't Eastwood a bounty hunter in the No Name trilogy?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on April 30, 2011, 05:33:52 PM
Quentin Tarantino Saddles Up For Spaghetti Western 'Django Unchained'
BY MIKE FLEMING | Deadline

Back when I saw him in late February at Harvey Weinstein's Oscar night party for The King's Speech, Quentin Tarantino told me that his script for a Western was just pouring out of him easily, that he'd finished a draft and expected to turn in a final version within two months. As a web leak of the cover page of his new script Django Unchained attests, Tarantino finished that script two days ago, right on schedule. Here's what I've heard: While Tarantino has spoken about doing a variation of the Western genre he called a "Southern," I'm told he has actually written a spaghetti Western, that stylized and violent brand of films popularized by Sergio Leone and a few other directors in the 1960s. Tarantino will put his stamp on one of his favorite genres same as he did when he took on the war mission movie with Inglourious Basterds. The project is moving very quickly. Tarantino is reuniting with Pulp Fiction producer Stacey Sher. Sher will produce with Pilar Savone. Weinstein, who distributed Pulp Fiction, will spearhead domestic distribution on Django Unchained through TWC. Universal International has the inside track to co-finance and handle foreign distribution because of the relationship built on 2009's Inglourious Basterds, which grossed $190 million overseas, and $314 million overall. Despite the early look that Universal International will get, Tarantino's script is also being pursued by Warner Bros, Paramount and Sony Pictures, I'm told. Django Unchained will be casting up quickly to begin production later this year; whether it starts late summer or fall depends on cast availability. Just like on Inglourious Basterds, Tarantino will be casting top-shelf on his spaghetti Western. Getting the WME-repped Tarantino back behind the camera is another boost for the rebounding TWC. After the leak of the cover page, everyone involved will be working harder to keep the script under wraps.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on April 30, 2011, 07:20:10 PM
Do you pronounce it Jango? I wonder if that Rango movie bit off it too.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on April 30, 2011, 08:40:40 PM
Do you pronounce it Jango? I wonder if that Rango movie bit off it too.

Yes and probably yes (I never saw Rango).

Django was a European phenomenon.  I'm by no means a Django expert but I know things like the name Django would be attached to non-Django westerns due to popularity and a potential increase in ticket sales, which made for a large number of formal and informal sequels, like when I IMDb Django and find a movie such as Massacre Time (Fulci!) that stars Franco Nero, though he isn't playing a character listed as being named Django, but then there's a listing of title options:  "Massacre Time (1966) aka "Tempo di massacro" - Italy (original title)  aka "Django the Runner" - Netherlands (informal literal title)."  Where did that last one come from?  I believe he was especially popular as a character in Germany.

Some of the movies are pretty outrageous, and that's even being comparative to Corbucci's original which is crazy enough (very good too, I think).  Spaghetti western fans know the name well.  Alex Cox's Straight to Hell is a riff on Django, Kill!, Alex Cox being a notable fan of the genre and author of the book 10,000 Ways to Die: A Director's Take on the Spaghetti Western.

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: New Feeling on May 02, 2011, 11:04:20 PM
I would go down on a lawman for a copy of this script right now
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: theyarelegion on May 04, 2011, 02:15:22 PM
I would go down on a lawman for a copy of this script right now

http://hotfile.com/dl/116661269/f0d82aa/Django_Unchained_TARANTINO.pdf.html
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on May 04, 2011, 02:23:05 PM
I would go down on a lawman for a copy of this script right now

http://hotfile.com/dl/116661269/f0d82aa/Django_Unchained_TARANTINO.pdf.html

I can't get that to download for shit. Either the captcha is wrong or it tells me my download expired. Eff this.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: New Feeling on May 04, 2011, 03:25:45 PM
yeah this isn't working for me either
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: New Feeling on May 04, 2011, 03:27:39 PM
oh fuck yeah I figured it out.  Thanks a bunch
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 04, 2011, 03:39:17 PM
It was probably just busy earlier Stefen, because I 'figured it out' right now too.  I clicked appropriate links and the file downloaded.

It may even be real.  Seems like it would've been hard to fake this soon but maybe some name changes on a script already done?   It's the right page length and it's written in a style similar to QT's previously published scripts.  You can't tell on the Internet these days, though, can you?  

PS I'll e-mail you it or whatever if it still doesn't work for you.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on May 04, 2011, 03:48:12 PM
Figure it out? What are you guys talking about? Just tell me. I don't have time to solve a riddle. I have to get to softball practice!  :yabbse-angry: :yabbse-angry: :yabbse-angry:
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 04, 2011, 03:49:34 PM
I was teasing the other person.  I just clicked download.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on May 04, 2011, 03:52:12 PM
It worked now. Good.

How real do we take it?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 04, 2011, 03:56:33 PM
It seems pretty real.  There are a lot of fucks and niggers, a character named Eskimo Joe, QT logic and narrative devices, references to Rocky and Flashdance, etc.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 04, 2011, 04:04:57 PM
Stefen I just found your description (of course QT would spell your name wrong):

"Who's STEPHEN?  Stephen is a very old black man, who with his bald pate, and tufts of white curly hair on the sides, looks like a character out of Dickens - if Dickens wrote about House Niggers in the Antebellum South.

Stephen has been Calvin's slave since he was a little boy.  And in (almost) every way is the 2nd most powerful person at Candyland.  Like the characters Basil Rathbone would play in swashbucklers, evil, scheming, intriguing men, always trying to influence and manipulate power for their own self interest.  Well that described Stephen to a tee."

If this isn't a real QT script it should still be made.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on May 04, 2011, 04:07:39 PM
^lol.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 04, 2011, 04:12:35 PM
who do you think should play Django, guys? An unknown? Maybe the black guy from Basterds?

wouldn't you be pissed if you're script was online like a week after you wrote it? I'm sure a lot of us would do it voluntarily (except for socketlevel, of course), but when you're a big name director, that shit is spoilertastic! I guess it creates good buzz tho, most of the moviegoing public don't give a fuck about a screenplay, and it all comes down to the director's vision in the end, anyways.

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 04, 2011, 05:56:51 PM
who do you think should play Django, guys? An unknown? Maybe the black guy from Basterds?

Jacky Ido?  He's African French.  Ideal for the Basterds role, but he'd have to be a really great actor to pull off this Django.  Another handicap is that he isn't well-known or bankable.  Seems unlikely.  I don't think QT will cast an unknown, but like always an unexpected.

Except I agree with others Dr. Schultz seems tailored for Christoph Waltz.

And I'll eat my hat if this isn't the real deal script.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: New Feeling on May 04, 2011, 06:01:57 PM
yeah I am only 14 pages in, but there is no doubt that this is legit and Christoph Waltz better be in it
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pas on May 04, 2011, 06:02:57 PM
My pick would be MC Jean Gab'1 (http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q=MC+Jean+Gab%271&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi)

he's a good african actor who can play bad ass. He'd also have the accent of an african slave because he's african.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on May 04, 2011, 06:36:03 PM
I'm resisting reading this (so far).
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 04, 2011, 07:10:37 PM
I dove right in, I didn't want to read the Basterds script before I saw it because I thought it would be stale and didn't want to ruin any surprises. This is a really good read, but I might have to ease off it a bit toward the end so as not to spoil anything.


My pick would be MC Jean Gab'1 (http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q=MC+Jean+Gab%271&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi)

he's a good african actor who can play bad ass. He'd also have the accent of an african slave because he's african.

Looks too much like fuckin' Tyrese.
(http://img260.imageshack.us/img260/1607/moton46e3435bw7.jpg)

(http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSnZjcOgcI0Mw2EF4Sz-kPHUDA1vdLWd-QOUh6IGin2m0hiTkW28w)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Ghostboy on May 04, 2011, 09:33:56 PM
How the hell does this thing get leaked so quickly? Does he do it himself?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on May 04, 2011, 09:41:50 PM
Had to read the first page. Properly evocative. Tell me if I'm wrong, but it seems like it might be an actual legitimate slavery movie, i.e. not a Kill Bill-style revenge cartoon.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 04, 2011, 09:47:21 PM
Sorry but it's cartoons and revenge.  But really great cartoon and revenge, I mean really really great.  I was hooked.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on May 05, 2011, 02:26:35 AM
so where am i sposed to get this now

it says the file's been taken down

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on May 05, 2011, 02:48:46 AM
I'll send it to you. I'll send it through facebook.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on May 05, 2011, 02:56:12 AM
thanks!

maybe his scripts read better than his movies cos i'm just sick of how his dialogue is delivered these days, especially in basterds.. it's like they're just reading a book out loud. i really wanna like him again cos he made one of the best movies ever, but damn if his movies in the last 10 years aren't piles of overrated shit.

oh well.. page one...
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on May 05, 2011, 04:59:20 AM
Like all previously Tarantino leaked screenplays, I can't wait to read the first few page of it and then impatiently wait for the movie to be released.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on May 05, 2011, 09:42:58 AM
I just read an intriguing explanation for the screenplay leak... Apparently the script is controversial and resolutely non-commercial, so, if someone involved in the process does attempt to reign Tarantino in, he will already have a legion of media and fans prepared to defend and champion the film (and the original vision).
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on May 05, 2011, 09:45:26 AM
who do you think should play Django, guys? An unknown? Maybe the black guy from Basterds?
Wouldn't be surprised if it were Djimon Hounsou.

As long as tarantino doesn't try to "surprise" us by casting Fiddy cent..........or the RZA
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on May 05, 2011, 09:54:18 AM
who do you think should play Django, guys? An unknown? Maybe the black guy from Basterds?
Wouldn't be surprised if it were Djimon Hounsou.

As long as tarantino doesn't try to "surprise" us by casting Fiddy cent..........or the RZA

I really like the Rza's acting lol. not much range but he puts a smile on my face. Unlike fiddy he gets involved in great projects too.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on May 05, 2011, 09:55:44 AM
There are so many way-too-obvious choices... I actually hope he casts a relatively unknown actor.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 05, 2011, 12:24:35 PM
I'm def. thinking an unknown. Someone with true grit. Possibly an African actor, but the way that he talks in the script makes him seem like he's already americanized.. So someone that American audiences recognize would be cool too.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on May 05, 2011, 12:38:01 PM
I'm about 40 pages in and it's not remotely controversial. It's really preaching to the converted. I hate how people consider this kind of thing controversial... it's pretty great/fun so far, and i dig it, but controversial is something like Happiness or pointing your finger at something politically correct. Anyone that finds this controversial is themselves racist and living in the wrong era.

the most controversial moment in inglorious basterds was when the one German soldier proudly doesn't give any information and he is killed by the bear Jew. in that moment you can tell tarantino was making a point that these men had honor to them. I'm waiting for a moment like this in the script. all the blacks are amazing people, and the majority of the whites are total racists. both sides being two dimensional.  which is fine, and fun. but a slave driver that loves a black woman/man or a black slave who helps in some way or another his slave master would be far more controversial.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: modage on May 05, 2011, 12:51:00 PM
http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/archives/we_read_it_casting_quentin_tarantinos_slavery_epic_django_unchained/
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 05, 2011, 12:57:37 PM
http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/archives/we_read_it_casting_quentin_tarantinos_slavery_epic_django_unchained/

From that article:  “the Basil Rathbone of house niggers.”

Why put quotes around it when it's not a direct quote from the script?  Who is the author quoting?

"Who's STEPHEN?  Stephen is a very old black man, who with his bald pate, and tufts of white curly hair on the sides, looks like a character out of Dickens - if Dickens wrote about House Niggers in the Antebellum South.

Stephen has been Calvin's slave since he was a little boy.  And in (almost) every way is the 2nd most powerful person at Candyland. Like the characters Basil Rathbone would play in swashbucklers, evil, scheming, intriguing men, always trying to influence and manipulate power for their own self interest.  Well that describes Stephen to a tee."

Typos abound in that article, which they should really work on if they want to separate themselves from other glorified fanboy news sites.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on May 05, 2011, 01:13:58 PM
well there you go, i posted too soon :)

looking forward to the past 40 page mark.

Michael K Williams would be sweet.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on May 05, 2011, 01:56:47 PM
Jonah Hill, Danny McBride, and Chris Tucker? WHAT THE CRAP? No, no, a thousand times no. Is this a list of people who should be kept out of the movie at all costs?

Thank God modage didn't write this article.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on May 05, 2011, 02:00:02 PM
agreed. I'd like it if he goes real with this script and none of this flashy form shit. From what i've read of the material, it could go both ways...
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on May 05, 2011, 02:09:07 PM
agreed. I'd like it if he goes real with this script and none of this flashy form shit. From what i've read of the material, it could go both ways...
Yeah, but this is Tarantino.....

I can't imagine him picking a total unknown for Django: how many times has he done that? He'll more than likely pick someone who needs a career boost, or an actor we're unaccustomed to seeing in a role like this, like Marlon Wayans, or one of his (biological) brothers.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: cinemanarchist on May 05, 2011, 02:33:23 PM
Django = (http://www.brucebriggs.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/steve-urkel-mug-shot-500x387.jpg)


Eh, eh?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 05, 2011, 02:41:35 PM
Hell yeah.  Then Django could have alter-egos!
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on May 05, 2011, 04:22:45 PM
someone email me a copy so I can put down the inner hater in me?
or make him grow tall. whichever.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 05, 2011, 05:13:20 PM
Yeah. I lost my copy, but I think it's for the best. I read enuff into it to know that it's badass and be totally stoked  :)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: theyarelegion on May 05, 2011, 09:09:14 PM
http://www.mediafire.com/?bhq4d75vmv2286r
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on May 06, 2011, 04:45:47 AM
he should cast Lexington Steele.

and at some point in the film he should have lex whip a white man half to death with his huge dick.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y154/pubrick/emoticons/icon_darin.gif)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 06, 2011, 04:59:33 AM
he should cast Lexington Steele.

and at some point in the film he should have lex whip a white man half to death with his huge dick.

(http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y154/pubrick/emoticons/icon_darin.gif)

Typically there isn't that type of surprise when I Google image search an actor's name.  But I do see what you mean about the huge dick.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: P Heat on May 06, 2011, 05:13:05 PM
This shouldn't be the only thread active in here :yabbse-sad:

I have my doubts that this new film from QT will be good after him doing Basterds... hopefully it turns out good, using some sergio leone references like in kill bill and the beginning of basterds (only good part imo)

*just read the first 10 pages. TONS of sergio leone stuff in there lol, a little bit of everything. Good stuff. Don't see anything of the south and blacks so far. I see its not the entire script though.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on May 06, 2011, 06:19:35 PM
Will Smith Emerges As Frontrunner to Star in Quentin Tarantino's Next Film (Exclusive)
Project is a spaghetti Western about a slave in the Old South who teams with a German bounty hunter to search for his wife.
Source: THR

Will Smith has emerged as the frontrunner to star in Quentin Tarantino’s next film, a spaghetti Western about a slave in the Old South who teams with a German bounty hunter to search for his wife. Tarantino stalwarts Samuel L. Jackson and Christoph Waltz also are circling key parts. Django Unchained, Tarantino’s follow up to his worldwide blockbuster Inglourious Basterds, will be distributed domestically by the Weinstein Co. but Tarantino is in the process of selecting a studio partner to release the film internationally. Sources say he is meeting with Universal executives today, and similar meetings with Sony, Paramount, Warner Bros. and possibly others have been scheduled. Sources prepped for those meetings say Tarantino would like Smith to star in the film, the script for which has been making the rounds in recent days to wide acclaim. No official offer has been made to Smith, and any deal would of course be subject to working out finacials, which might be difficult given Smith's status as one of Hollywood's few sure-thing stars. Indeed, although Smith has been out of multiplexes since 2008’s Seven Pounds, he is still considered among the top two or three box office draws worldwide. Smith is being teed-up for the title role of Django, a freed slave who seeks to reunite with his slave wife, a journey which will see him team up with a German bounty hunter to take down an evil plantation owner. Tarantino wrote the bounty hunter part with Waltz in mind, according to insiders. The German ends up training Django and helping him seek his wife. Jackson would play the house slave to the bad guy, Monsieur Calvin Candie. The slave is an expert manipulator and will face off with Django. Smith and his reps have received the screenplay, which could be a hot potato due to the themes of racism and the liberal use of the N-word. It's unclear whether Smith has read the script yet. The actor manages his image very carefully but the part is heroic and could be iconic. And let’s not forget that Denzel Washington won his two Oscars playing characters who used the N-word. Tarantino is aiming for a fall shoot.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on May 06, 2011, 06:45:52 PM
No.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: polkablues on May 06, 2011, 07:00:21 PM
Shut it down.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: picolas on May 06, 2011, 07:09:33 PM
oh Fuck. Off.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 06, 2011, 07:23:25 PM
I didn't think it'd be funny to suggest the man even as a joke.  Really horrible development that's hopefully unfounded.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Sleepless on May 06, 2011, 08:54:41 PM
Figures after Pitt.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pas on May 06, 2011, 09:18:34 PM
hahahahaha.

hahaha.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 06, 2011, 09:43:47 PM
No one hates Will Smith more than me, but strangely enough, I'm not bothered by it. I guess it's just the Tarantino-y choice given his box office draw and action movie experience ( I can't help but be reminded of Wild Wild West now...puke) I haven't liked anything he's been in since Six Degrees of Separation..which is exactly why he needs a QT flick to change it up a bit.  The idea of a light-skinnded slave never crossed my mind, but it makes sense for Django's character. Maybe some white slave owner raped his Mom's, giving him even more of a reason to retaliate. It's a surprising choice, but at least it means this shit's gonna be made...and seen.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 06, 2011, 10:04:39 PM
Will this project be 3D?  The thought just popped into my head.  Recently he stated he would have liked if Kill Bill had been 3D, and says he plans to make the next Kill Bill in 3D.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Fernando on May 06, 2011, 10:18:13 PM
I doubt he'll do it in 3d, but if he does he'll do it to see 3d feet
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Satcho9 on May 07, 2011, 12:26:37 AM
Anyone have a legit PDF link that isn't that bogus 14 page version you can PM me?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: theyarelegion on May 07, 2011, 01:05:45 PM
sorry guys when I was looking for the script I came across that phony version first and forgot to delete it.

here's the real script:

http://hotfile.com/dl/117067285/bbba80b/Django_Unchained_TARANTINO.pdf.html
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 07, 2011, 01:16:46 PM
shit still don't work. It's no biggie, don't worry bout it. From now on when I read the script I'm gonna imagine Will Smith's face and be like, uck. Still gotta read it anyway.


this shit works, y'all

http://www.filestube.com/1M80CFIzXyL1pbxjs8N6r6/Django-Unchained-TARANTINO.html (http://www.filestube.com/1M80CFIzXyL1pbxjs8N6r6/Django-Unchained-TARANTINO.html)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on May 07, 2011, 01:41:51 PM
I'm still hoping this is a rumor or some sick joke, but it's getting more legit by the day:

http://www.variety.com/article/VR1118036551

"Multiple sources tell Variety that he's already been informally offered the role."
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Gold Trumpet on May 07, 2011, 01:58:43 PM
One of the bigger ego boosts for a director is to put an actor into an unlikely role and change people's opinions about them. I completely believe this story. With that said, I don't believe Will Smith is beyond challenging his movie bankability to make a decent picture. Since I have never seem him do a role similar to what is described in this film, I rather remain skeptical instead of disgusted.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: polkablues on May 07, 2011, 02:20:33 PM
The problem is that Will Smith is not an actor, he's a personality.  Unless QT's vision for his Old South slave revenge story requires that the slave be a likeable, charismatic charmer, he's the wrong damn choice.  And if that is what QT is envisioning, I don't want to spend my ten bucks on it.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Gold Trumpet on May 07, 2011, 02:58:13 PM
It's a personality role. If Smith can adequately hover over it, I don't see how he is any worse than most actors in QT movies. They all hype up their performances.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on May 07, 2011, 03:16:23 PM
Will Smith would basically have to make a Barry Egan scale transformation for this to work at all. I guess it could happen. He would have to suppress almost everything.

Also, he seems too skinny.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 07, 2011, 03:22:35 PM
Part of me has become perversely attracted to the idea, despite my initial repulsion.  In large part because discussions of his potential casting, that I've been exposed to, outside of Xixax, typically involve the kind of lame, easy casting alternatives that typified the Playlist article.  There's a strange parallel between Django and Will Smith that's surely not lost on QT, something to do with how some (most) people in Django's world are opposed to the idea of a free black bounty hunter, and some (most) people are opposed to Smith in a serious, dangerous role (and would the role even feel dangerous if any other actor was cast?).  The character in the movie has to overcome the prejudices and assumptions of his world, and it's kind of interesting that QT chose an actor who'll have to overcome a different type of stereotyping.

Unfortunately it may not benefit the movie, because I truly agree with what polkablues is saying, and I'd really rather a better actor land the role.  But I do see the charms of casting Will Smith (!?).  I remain skeptical, but no longer repulsed.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: P Heat on May 07, 2011, 03:32:17 PM
Lol that the will smith news. Shits going down hill now . chances of this turning to a good QT film are slimmer  :yabbse-sad:
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 07, 2011, 03:44:00 PM
does anyone else see this when you think about him in the role?

(http://www.starstills.com/product_images/i/554/ss3095859_-_photograph_of_will_smith_as_capt_james_jim_west_from_wild_wild_west_available_in_4_sizes_framed_or_unframed_buy_now_at_starstills__61151_zoom.jpg)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on May 07, 2011, 03:51:54 PM
Remember that Samuel L. Jackson turned down the part of Buck Swope in Boogie Nights because he knew he was wrong for it?

Perhaps Will Smith should do this movie a favor and do the same.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 07, 2011, 03:57:07 PM
I just realized how similar my recent post is to The Gold Trumpet's at the bottom of the previous page.  Even eerily similar final sentences.  Must have been an unconscious echo.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pozer on May 07, 2011, 04:00:38 PM
yeah it's doomed. shoulda resurrected this guy  

(http://starsmedia.ign.com/stars/image/object/142/14246104/marvin_pulp-fiction_pictureboxart_160w.jpg)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 07, 2011, 04:06:03 PM
That guy, yes! He seems like a wimp tho. I'd be watching the whole movie thinking its a mad tv parody.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: matt35mm on May 07, 2011, 04:22:40 PM
The problem is that Will Smith is not an actor, he's a personality.  Unless QT's vision for his Old South slave revenge story requires that the slave be a likeable, charismatic charmer, he's the wrong damn choice.  And if that is what QT is envisioning, I don't want to spend my ten bucks on it.

Isn't this what Tarantino always does, though? I don't know why anyone's surprised. Tarantino is clearly interested in casting "personalities" and letting that be a weird element in his films. That seems to be the case in practically of his movies.

I don't exactly know what you mean by Smith not being an actor. He's an actor as much as anybody's an actor. He brings a certain baggage to the role, which is what Tarantino often wants. He's all about putting MOVIE STARS into his movies.

Tarantino also likes to turn the personality on its head, so Smith is probably being considered because the role is exactly what you wouldn't expect to see Will Smith do in a movie.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 07, 2011, 04:29:49 PM
But I don't think matt35mm read either The Gold Trumpet's post or mine :(
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: matt35mm on May 07, 2011, 05:04:12 PM
No, I didn't. Whoops.

But I think I said something a little different from what you were saying, which is that Tarantino always does this. This is his pattern, not something out of left-field. I don't understand why anybody is surprised. When the script was first leaked, the speculation should have just started with "which famous personality will play this part?" and not "which great actor will play this part?"

Then, when Will Smith's name came up, we could all say, "Oh. Right. That is what QT would do. Makes sense."

I wouldn't really go so far as to say that Will Smith has to overcome anything to play this role. Who cares what people's expectations of Will Smith are? What are your expectations of Tarantino? It should be exactly this, because of everything he's done before. As far as your expectations of Will Smith in a Tarantino film, well, just look at Tarantino's other films, and you probably won't be surprised when the movie finally comes out (if Smith indeed ends up playing the part).

I will probably enjoy the movie, but I don't expect to be surprised by it. I'm not skeptical nor am I disgusted. I'm not even terribly interested, which is why I only skimmed this thread and missed your post. I guess I only chimed in to say that I don't see what the big whoop is about Will Smith maybe doing this movie. Probably a dumb reason to chime in, but people have chimed in for less.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 07, 2011, 05:14:02 PM
Jacky Ido?  He's African French.  Ideal for the Basterds role, but he'd have to be a really great actor to pull off this Django.  Another handicap is that he isn't well-known or bankable.  Seems unlikely.  I don't think QT will cast an unknown, but like always an unexpected.

I quote myself from an earlier page to suggest that I did expect something like this, but I still thought that Will Smith was a bad choice.  And on this page you can see me reconciling to the fact that it happened and it's (maybe) Will Smith.  So I don't think your chiming in was dumb (I was just like, man, he skimmed over me for sure); you realized immediately what it took me a day or so to realize, and that's probably because I read the script and had personal expectations in mind.

I disagree there's nothing Will Smith has to overcome though, and point to this thread as evidence, and chatter about his (potential) casting in general.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 07, 2011, 06:02:50 PM
Jonah Hill, Danny McBride? WHAT THE CRAP? No, no, a thousand times no. Is this a list of people who should be kept out of the movie at all costs?

Jonah Hill would be great as Sonny. All that's required of him is to play a fat, goofy virgin. He'd be HILARIOUS in it!

As for Danny Mcbride, I think Michael Madsen fits the sadistic side of Ace Woody a lot better, but this being 'A Southern', Danny certainly has the look and accent of someone who would train slaves that brutally fight to the death. As much as I'd want to see his face, I don't want him to be funny in this.


I just finished reading and it's his most violent, action-packed movie to date. Not a dull moment in it. It says 'Nigger' more than every Tupac album combined, and Spike Lee's not gonna say SHIT ( his only comeback would be to do a Holocaust movie where they say 'kike' even more times  :yabbse-grin: )
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: New Feeling on May 07, 2011, 10:05:34 PM
While I like the concept and enjoyed most of the scenes, in the end I thought this was a pretty lackluster reading experience.  I'm sure it'll be pretty awesome once translated to the screen but as a huge fan of all of QTs work I think this is going to be a small step down in quality, much the same way I feel about TWBB in the PTA filmography.  It's an interesting continuation of the historical thing he started with Basterds, emphasized by casting Waltz as Schultz which seems inescapable and makes for an interesting counterpoint to Landa.  I think casting Will Smith makes sense when you consider Pitt as Aldo Raine and that perhaps Quentin is keen to work with the mega-stars of the time, that said I really hope he casts someone else.  I'm hoping that this is just the second of a "history trilogy" with Waltz and maybe next time he'll get DiCaprio who apparently he has a hard-on for.
 
The problems for me are mostly with Broomhilda and Candie and Stephen, who are all good characters but don't really come to life.  With the right actors they could all be great I suppose.  I'm especially excited at the possibility of Samuel L. Jackson getting to do some real acting again as Stephen.  And even worse are the rest of the "villains" who seem more or less interchangeable.  But most problematic is that I feel the same way about Django himself, he's pretty awesome in the early going but as he becomes more talented and self-assured he just kinda becomes genreic hero material.  It felt like the whole thing kinda jumped the shark at the big turning point, but then I also realize Quentin will probably add a lot of texture to the last act during production. 

still expect this to be a contender for best film of 2012. 
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 08, 2011, 12:04:35 AM
as a huge fan of all of QTs work I think this is going to be a small step down in quality, much the same way I feel about TWBB in the PTA filmography. 


(http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_li0sydr9ox1qgd17ro1_400.gif)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: New Feeling on May 08, 2011, 12:27:40 AM
yeah well I realize that's the most controversial opinion in this world the last few years but there you go it's how I feel
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on May 08, 2011, 12:55:10 AM
GO TO HELL!

You know what? I'd be okay with Wil Smif. Why not? He hasn't done a good movie in years but is still the biggest movie star ever. He could do something cool and still be the biggest star ever. Even if this bombs his rep is intact. He would do it. He isn't an idiot.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Satcho9 on May 08, 2011, 01:03:59 AM
Thanks @ Reelist & Theyareligion for the PDF!

One more request: Can anyone get Will Smith to pass?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: polkablues on May 08, 2011, 01:18:43 AM
Our only chance is to convince Spielberg to ditch DDL and cast Will Smith as Lincoln, like we've always known he should.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: P Heat on May 08, 2011, 02:52:06 AM
While I like the concept and enjoyed most of the scenes, in the end I thought this was a pretty lackluster reading experience.  I'm sure it'll be pretty awesome once translated to the screen but as a huge fan of all of QTs work I think this is going to be a small step down in quality, much the same way I feel about TWBB in the PTA filmography.  It's an interesting continuation of the historical thing he started with Basterds..

EFF outta here with that opinion. Bastereds is Q.T's worst by far and it doesn't look like this new one will be good neither (you never know though). All of P.T's works are perfect. bold statement but i think a few people here agree =]
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 08, 2011, 04:30:41 AM
If most internet polls didn't turn so pathetic I would do a “least favorite qt/pta” one. I'm curious.
ps Death Proof/Magnolia
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 08, 2011, 10:20:17 AM
ps Death Proof/Magnolia

Fair enough.. it's crazy how much flack Magnolia has been getting around here these days. It's certainly what brought me to this site, and it'll always have that special little place in my heart somewhere. I guess it just took us some years to get past that first impression that it was the best movie of all time.

To say that Basterds and TWBB are a step down in quality is an outrageous statement...retarded really.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: P Heat on May 08, 2011, 02:31:26 PM
Why does only Q.T's thread stay active :yabbse-undecided:

btw who actually thinks basterds was good?  it was o.k but seriously a downer after the 1st viewing.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on May 08, 2011, 02:46:56 PM
I did. I love Basterds. I'm one of the few who actually think it's one of Tarantino's best.

I also enjoyed Death Proof, for what it's worth.

I haven't read this script yet, but the concept interests me, and I'm excited to see what's to come of it, especially with this casting.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 08, 2011, 05:49:38 PM
I did. I love Basterds. I'm one of the few who actually think it's one of Tarantino's best.

I also enjoyed Death Proof, for what it's worth.

So what's your least favorite?

Why does only Q.T's thread stay active :yabbse-undecided:

Get your hands on the Inherent Vice script!
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: P Heat on May 08, 2011, 05:59:45 PM
LOL. I have the e-book and the audio book for it. If PT wants the script private so be it i don't mind.

would like that picture of him using that 2001 cam though..
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 08, 2011, 06:14:59 PM
I'd say my least fav. of Tarantino's is Kill Bill Vol. 2. It's convoluted, overlong, anti-climactic, and boring. I've tried to like it many times and have only succeeded in liking parts. Like the trailer brawl, that parts good. Once the third one comes out I'll be able to watch it all as a whole and get much more satisfaction out of it. Tarantino's stuff just grows on me. I don't get what you said about Basterds being a 'downer' after the first time, P heat. I like it more every time I see it, new connections are drawn, the dialogue starts to make more sense. Everything about that movie I find enjoyable as fuck.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on May 09, 2011, 04:10:38 PM
Foreign For Quentin Tarantino's 'Django Unchained' Goes To Will Smith's Home Studio Sony (Even Though Universal Tried Hard)
BY NIKKI FINKE | Deadline

EXCLUSIVE: Sources tell me that international on Quentin Tarantino's new Spaghetti Western Django Unchained is going to Sony to co-finance production later this year and distribute sometime in 2012. This after the filmmakers met with every major studio except Warner Bros. Of course, The Weinstein Company is taking domestic. But the surprise is that Universal International didn't have the inside track since it co-financed and took overseas on Tarantino's last film, Inglourious Basterds, in a very successful pairing ($201M international for a global cume of $321M). Actually, Universal really wanted Quentin's latest and tried to really step up. There was a big meeting this past Friday between Universal International and Quentin where the foreign guys went to extraordinary lengths to pull out all the stops. Employees wore T-shirts emblazoned with the languages of all the managing directors of the territories in town. And a bag of handmade scalps was presented to Tarantino --a reference to the "100 Nazi scalps" from Inglourious Basterds to remind Quentin how well the studio did for that movie last time around. Instead, Django Unchained went to Sony because of its existing relationship with Will Smith, whom Quentin desperately wants to star in the film. "Having Will involved is the key. That's what the filmmakers want, and they think the best chance of making it happen is at his home studio," an insider tells me.

UPDATE: Right now, Will is still pondering his role as a slave in the script, which I just read and would be a very risky project for the actor, who's known for carefully controlling his professional persona. Other top-flight casting will start immediately. The film is a take-off on the Sergio Leone/Eastwood "Man With No Name" films. According to the script, it's not a Spaghetti Western remake or reboot but a brand new story with a similar character and similar stylized violence from those 1960s films. Tarantino's Pulp Fiction producer Stacey Sher will produce with Pilar Savone and Harvey Weinstein. Getting the WME-repped Tarantino back behind the camera is another boost for the rebounding TWC.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on May 09, 2011, 06:45:02 PM
i don't know why the smith casting is suprising to anyone, especially to fans of his films, this is the same thing he's done throughout his career only slightly different.

all of his films have been concerned with "rescuing" or "liberating" actors who were otherwise lost in oblivion: Tierney, Travolta, Foster/Grier, Carradine and then Waltz (the less said about death proof the better). with waltz i think he tried something different, the oblivion was not lack of success or being a stalwart of a bygone era, he was lost in the oblivion of foreign markets.. he needed to be liberated from obscure foreign films that no american would ever see and be reintroduced to the loving arms of the hollywood elite where he would go on to receive critical acclaim and mass audience acceptance.

QT was obviously vindicated, having achieved a new kind of mass manipulation of audience perceptions. i don't even like his films anymore and i can see that these things are his primary concerns. he calls himself a lover of cinema and for better or worse that is truly all he cares about.. and feet. the subtext of his last few films which have only been marginally mentioned in these parts, that they are about television versus cinema, and this genre versus that genre, are all quite accurate and key to understanding his motivation. i don't care enough about his movies to go any further, but whatever his next movie is really about will reveal what kind of liberation he is attempting with Will Smith.

i mean the parallels are written right there in the title. let him do whatever film he wants.. he's FREE isn't he? slavery as a metaphor for something.. something. is he going to achieve it? probably not as well as he thinks, cos his movies are crap now. but that's what he's trying.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on May 09, 2011, 07:28:04 PM
It's like if my grandma (rip) threw me a surprise party, and my feelings were that it was sweet of her, I know all about her surprise parties and how they come when you turn 13, 16, and 18, and grandma can't keep a secret anyway so I've known about this for weeks, and I'll appreciate it because she's expressing her type of love, but what's strange is that she decorated the party in a crocodile theme, and crocodiles are nowhere near my favorite animal nor are they animals cherished by anyone at the party in particular, so everyone's asking me "what's the deal with the crocodiles?" and I'm like "dunno" and they ask her but she's drunk on vodka punch and only wants to dance.  Most people just think "oh, grandma!" and that's the best answer, it's like the time she gave everyone life-size wooden man-with-cigar silhouettes and no one knew what the fuck to do with them.

Because you know there's going to be a surprise doesn't mean you can't be curious about the particular form the surprise takes, some of its idiosyncratic flavor and unexpectedness.  It's painfully clear to me that only a few of us are reading this thread anyway (who wants to read multiple pages of past posts?  it's not that I don't understand), and certain opinions are becoming repetitive (I too had a very repetitive instance only a page or so ago).  Although I've learned the attenuating phrase for this is approximately, "Not that I even care about this movie anyway..."  Which is like showing up at my grandma's party without caring whose birthday it is.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pas on May 09, 2011, 07:45:48 PM
sundown, you are becoming a top tier poster here. Where the fuck where you the last 6 years you've been registered?! Excellent post.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 12, 2011, 04:19:40 AM
i hope this news about Will Smith's ginormous trailer in SoHo just goes to show he's a prima donna who will NEVER be satisfied enough with what a QT movie could pay him and the role will go to a better suited, much blacker actor.

Will Smith's movie trailer is bigger than your apartment

(http://news.myjoyonline.com/photos/news/Will%20Smiths%20container.jpg)


The city of New York typically has a pretty high threshold for the inconveniences that come with movies that are filmed here, but Will Smith has discovered the breaking point.
In NYC to film "Men in Black III," Smith had parked a massive, double-decker, 1,150-square foot trailer smack in the middle of the Soho neighborhood. Adding insult to injury for the people inconvenienced by the behemoth, Smith is renting an apartment less than a mile away.
The trailer, nicknamed "The Heat," as the New York Post reports, "includes a lounge, a movie room with a 100-inch screen, marble floors throughout, offices for his assistants and writing staff, a large bedroom and all-granite bathroom. It measures about 53 feet long, has 22 wheels and weighs in at around 30 tons."
"It looks bigger than my apartment!" Brigette Moreno, who lives in the building next to where the trailer was docked Tuesday, told the Post.
"The smell that comes along with it is disgusting. It's like living in a gas station. I really like Will Smith, but I would be embarrassed if that was my trailer. A little modesty goes a long way."

Source: The Scoop
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on May 12, 2011, 07:57:23 AM
a better suited, much blacker actor.

Wtf dude
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 12, 2011, 11:19:45 AM
by black, I simply mean skin tone.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Fernando on May 12, 2011, 11:43:52 AM
haha

Will Smith's trailer booted from NYC

(CBS/AP) NEW YORK - There'll be no on-street parking in New York for actor Will Smith, the mayor's office has decided.

Smith's tricked-out trailer was sent packing Wednesday after complaints from residents in the SoHo neighborhood, where his new film is being shot.

Bigger than most city apartments, the 1,100-square-foot double decker boasts a lounge, a movie room with a 100-inch screen, staff offices and large bedroom and bathroom.

It has been among the two dozen "Men in Black III" trucks and trailers that have taken over SoHo for several days. But its size has locals up in arms about parking, noise and fumes.

"I love Will Smith, but this is about survival,'' said Anessa Rahman, co-owner of an antiques store a few steps from the curbside spot where the actor's trailer had been parked.

The trailer, along with the rest of the crowded Hollywood convoy, was putting a dent in her business, she said.

Wednesday afternoon, the megatrailer was removed by Columbia Pictures.

"This trailer has been used many times in this city by different studios on various movies over the years, and while its use has never been an issue before, we regret any inconvenience it may have caused,'' Columbia Pictures spokesman Steve Elzer said.

The film, the third installment in the sci-fi comedy series about agents who monitor alien activity, is scheduled to continue shooting in the area through Friday.

Directed by Barry Sonnenfeld, it also stars Tommy Lee Jones, Josh Brolin, Emma Thompson, Nicole Scherzinger and Rip Torn. It is scheduled for release in May of 2012.

No word on where Smith will be cooling his heels now between scenes, though the New York Post reports that the actor also rents a $25,000-a-month apartment less than a mile away from the set.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on May 12, 2011, 11:46:13 AM
So much for carefully managing his image.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on May 12, 2011, 12:48:46 PM
he should have just paid the store owner 500 a day for any loss of business she'd endure.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on May 12, 2011, 01:02:25 PM
Will Smith might be the whitest black dude ever.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: matt35mm on May 12, 2011, 01:17:15 PM
Whatever happened to the Will Smith that would flip his prep school jacket inside out so that he could be all funky fresh? WHATEVER HAPPENED TO KEEPIN' IT REAL??
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: P Heat on May 12, 2011, 04:41:53 PM
that trailer is bigger than some homes here in Florida! lol

what a show off.

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on May 15, 2011, 09:52:25 PM
reading the script
it's Drivin Miss Daisy with guns and gore
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: polkablues on May 15, 2011, 10:14:56 PM
In that case, never mind.  Will Smith will be perfect for it.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: 72teeth on May 16, 2011, 02:33:22 AM
seeing all those naughtseeies get torn to ribbons at the end of IG was one of the more overwhelming moment of my film watching career and now im 20 pages away from the ending of DU... should i stop?

pleases answer asap... as im drunk and bored

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 16, 2011, 05:33:16 AM
Don't stop!
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: theyarelegion on May 16, 2011, 08:35:43 AM
believing!
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on May 16, 2011, 04:10:23 PM






****SPOILER FOR THOSE THAT READ THE SCRIPT***







Did anyone else find what Schultz did to Candie out of character? Here is a man that holds true to his code of conduct and then randomly abandons it, seemingly just so the story can go into the 3rd act. I'm not saying it wasn't motivated, just poorly and for the sake of the plot.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: 72teeth on May 16, 2011, 11:12:53 PM


*****SPOILS CONTINUED*****













I'm glad i finished it. The 3rd act definitely feels rushed and un-climactic, much as the final scenes of Inglorious Bastards did. I went and read the Basterds screenplay after finishing Django, and they are very similar in many ways, other then the rushed endings, and not just in that Quentin way.... as he has always been a history class advocate, i feel as though he is doing a "Quentin's Revenge on History" trilogy, in which case I'm wondering what comes next, The Natives vs. Jamestown? Anyway, the Basterds ending improved from script to screen, hope he tweeks this one as well...
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 16, 2011, 11:34:32 PM
.... as he has always been a history class advocate, i feel as though he is doing a "Quentin's Revenge on History" trilogy, in which case I'm wondering what comes next, The Natives vs. Jamestown?

*************************************SPOILIES************************************************

Idk, it doesn't seem like he should do another 'oppressed overcoming oppressor' story, because in this one it's no shock that Django fuckin eviserates everyone, whereas in Basterds you're like 'holy shit, he killed Hitler!' I almost wanted him to bring some Historical figure into it to change it up. You can't do Lincoln in the balcony, because he just used that in the last film. I remember when I first told my Dad about QT doing a slavery movie, and the first question he asked was "does it have Harriet Tubman in it? " it made me laugh to myself, because I thought "How boring would a QT Harriet Tubman movie be? There's no violence." It made me think that he's kinda missin the mark by not including any of those types of figures in it, but he's definitely making a statement about that era and America today, and to fuck with any of the events in history (besides a slave kicking ass and taking names and completely owning ) would seem kinda hacky.

Did you ever hear how one day he wanted to do a biopic where he played John Brown? That seems out of the question now after this. I could see a slight chance of him returning to this period, but its practically the same movie.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: New Feeling on May 17, 2011, 01:14:57 AM

 Anyway, the Basterds ending improved from script to screen, hope he tweeks this one as well...

that's exactly how I felt, and when considering the ending of Death Proof which was also extremely revised and expanded by the time it got to the screen, i feel like it's safe to assume this is is going to be a lot better than it reads
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: 72teeth on May 17, 2011, 01:48:52 AM
wow, i forgot about Death Proof... he really needs to drop Revenge Films for a while, so 20 years from now i could say, "O wow! A good old fashion QT revenge film!"
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 17, 2011, 07:25:33 AM
When's he gonna do like a straight up rom-com? I'm down for that.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on May 17, 2011, 12:44:10 PM
When's he gonna do like a straight up rom-com? I'm down for that.

I would like to see him at his most reserved, which Jackie Brown holds the current tittle.

imagine Quentin Tarantino's "Ordinary People"

that's something that would blow my mind.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on May 17, 2011, 06:08:18 PM
Tarantino is too cool for school. I can't ever imagine him doing something that is toned down. The older he gets, the more he seems to be toning it up, actually.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on May 17, 2011, 06:11:25 PM
agreed, the more comfortable he becomes the more cartoon like he gets. He needs to get angry again, this is the guy that wrote Natural Born Killers after all.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on May 30, 2011, 05:15:00 PM
Idris Elba Tweets Spark Speculation Of An Audition For Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Django Unchained’
Source: The Playlist

English actor Idris Elba, still best known as Stringer Bell from David Simon‘s epic HBO series, “The Wire,” tweeted this weekend, “Having one of the biggest meetings of my professional life today…meeting a very controversial director for a very controversial part.” And the Internet pretty much lit up with speculation. “I wish I could tell you more but…in due time,” he added.“On the plane to the destination of my fate…..ok…. a lil dramatic….destination of my life..?” Almost immediately, tweeps and pundits started asking: what kind of potentially major role makes Idris Elba so melodramatic? Could it be the lead role in Quentin Tarantino‘s slavery epic, “Django Unchained”? After all, “Django Unchained” is a controversial powder keg of racial politics and what other African American roles have made this much of a stir of late? Our IndieWIRE brethren at Shadow & Act were the first to ask and pose this question and we’ll be honest, the thought crossed our minds immediately as well. But wait, isn’t Will Smith in line for the lead part of an American slave who teams up with a German bounty hunter to track down his enslaved wife and wreak havoc and revenge on all those that cross their path? Yes, Quentin Tarantino went as far as letting Sony land foreign rights to the picture because Sony is essentially the home of Will Smith (the Weinstein Company has domestic rights, natch). So what’s going on exactly? Well, one of several things is possible, but of course this is all fun speculation, but here goes. 1) The role is too controversial for Will Smith’s clean-cut, African-American version of Tom Cruise‘s image and he’s decided to politely decline the role. 2) Elba could easily be auditioning for another role in the film, though yes, Django is the plum role in the film. Perhaps it’s possible, that Samuel L. Jackson is not interested in the role of Stephen, the black slave who is the right hand man of the main villain in the picture, and Elba is auditioning for the part instead. Arguably, since Stephen is a house slave who colludes with his white master and hates on his fellow black slaves the role is more controversial than the Django character. 3) Elba is actually auditioning for Marvel‘s Luke Cage and has the internet all fooled. J/k. 4) Any # of things we all aren’t privy too, an entirely different role, etc. The hope is choice no. 1, frankly. While we still prefer our casting pick of fellow “The Wire” alumnus Michael K. Williams, almost any African American actor seems better than the squeaky-clean Will Smith. Yes, Smith can act when he wants to and taking the role could be a very subversive move and it ensures an major box-office both domestically and internationally, but as far as interesting and adventurous casting and letting a great thespian take the role, we can probably think of a dozen actors we’d rather see in the part. So is Idris Elba auditioning for the lead or any part in “Django Unchained”? It’s possible, but to say definitely would be speaking without any facts. To be honest, this writer would be pleased as punch if the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air had moved on, but we assume we’ll know more soon; these various reports will precipitate further news during this upcoming week.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 30, 2011, 09:52:49 PM
oh, totally. He's big and built and has a nice cocoa complexion.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: polkablues on May 30, 2011, 10:01:53 PM
oh, totally. He's big and built and has a nice cocoa complexion.

(http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d179/polkablues/Kirsten-dunst-cringe-gif.gif)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on May 31, 2011, 01:32:28 AM
^lol.

Stringer or Omar would be awesome in it.

Has anyone ever seen Idris Elba without facial hair? Has that ever happened?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: cronopio 2 on May 31, 2011, 01:21:41 PM
(http://www.lahiguera.net/cinemania/actores/idris_elba/fotos/9644/idris_elba.jpg)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on May 31, 2011, 02:02:43 PM
 :yabbse-thumbup:
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on May 31, 2011, 04:09:32 PM
Rumor: Could Leonardo DiCaprio Play The Main Villain In Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Django Unchained’?
Source: The Playlist

Random posts on Twitter factual news does not make. However, this one is worth paying attention to for several reasons. Former Creative Screenwriting magazine Senior Editor Jeff Goldsmith tweeted this morning, “Casting Rumor: Leonardo DiCaprio WILL play villian Calvin Candie in [Quentin] Tarantino‘s “Django Unchained”! QT wanted him for I.B. & now has him!” And yes, while Goldsmith is dialed-in in L.A., it’s just a rumor and tweet. However, Goldsmith was one of, if not the first person to tweet about Will Smith‘s participation in Tarantino’s Spaghetti Western slavery epic. And while Smith isn’t 100% locked-in for the role (and Idris Elba is now rumored to be involved), the “Men In Black” star has definitely been in discussions to join the film so clearly Goldsmith’s information is usually on point. But wait, there’s more. When first announced, Variety wrote, “Tarantino has also been looking to work with Leonardo DiCaprio…Tarantino was courting Leonardo DiCaprio for the villainous role of Hans Landa in ‘Basterds,’ which ultimately went to [Christoph] Waltz. Likewise, Tarantino is believed to have written the role of Dr. Schultz for DiCaprio, but when he passed, it was modified for Waltz.” So it sounds like the “Inception” star was at least somewhat in the mix. While that info seems to be somewhat mixed-up—we were told DiCaprio pursued the role in “Inglourious Basterds,” and didn’t get the part, not the other way around (after all, if Tarantino wanted DiCaprio for the role, as reported, why did he go with Waltz instead?)—DiCaprio was reported as being in talks with Tarantino at the time for the role, so clearly the two have had some conversations. Lastly, a source of ours that helped us break some “Inglourious Basterds” information back in the day tells us they have heard this same information, but that DiCaprio’s involvement was a “no go.” If this all falls into line and is true—or at least the intentions are true—it could mean a few things. Yes, Schultz was written for DiCaprio, but he’s already passed as reported, end of story, and this is just a case of old news resurfacing as rumor. Or perhaps Tarantino is modifying things for DiCaprio’s schedule—“Django Unchained” shoots in the fall and could potentially overlap with Baz Luhrmann‘s “The Great Gatsby,” which DiCaprio will star in and is shooting either mid-summer or late summer/early fall—opting to have the actor play the smaller, villainous role that could be packed into 2-3 weeks of shooting. Here’s another theory: Some are saying Will Smith has passed and Idris Elba is auditioning. If that’s the case, then Tarantino still needs a major international name, no? DiCaprio would fit that bill, as would tweaking the sched to his needs. All just (major) speculation of course. We’re of course assuming that Goldsmith’s information is correct. But hey, dude was right once and it surely does sound like at the very least, DiCaprio and “Django Unchained” were in the same casting-idea sentence at least at one point. As for us, we put forth Josh Brolin in our dream casting of the film in the role of Calvin Candie. But for now, let the rumor mill churn forth…
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 31, 2011, 05:59:05 PM
I thought Keitel would've been a shoo-in, he looks like a Calvin Candie. It's good news though, I guess the movie has to have one shining star. I'm starting to wish I didn't read the script now, I already went through the whole story with Smith and Keitel in my head, haha. It didn't quite seem to mesh that way so this must mean I'm in for a surprise :yabbse-smiley:
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on June 07, 2011, 10:20:57 PM
Leonardo DiCaprio In Early Talks For Quentin Tarantino's 'Django Unchained'
BY MIKE FLEMING | Deadline

EXCLUSIVE: Talks are about to get underway for Leonardo DiCaprio to play the role of villainous ranch owner Calvin Candie in Django Unchained, the Sergio Leone-style spaghetti Western that Quentin Tarantino wrote and will direct as his next film. DiCaprio is being courted to play a charming but ruthless proprietor of Candyland, a despicable club in Mississippi where female slaves are exploited as sex objects and males are pitted against each other in "mandingo" style death matches. Candie is a slave's worst nightmare and the freed slave Django must cross him in order to reclaim his wife. Now, deal making discussions are just getting underway, but I'm told there is a much higher likelihood of DiCaprio taking part in the film at this point than Will Smith, who had been reported as lead candidate to play the title role of DJango, a slave who is liberated and taught the tricks of the trade by a German dentist-turned-bounty hunter. That role is expected to be played by Christoph Waltz, who won an Oscar playing Hans Landa in Tarantino's last film, Inglourious Basterds Tarantino's Pulp Fiction star Samuel L. Jackson is also expected to play the role of Rodney, Candie's valet who keeps the slaves in line at Candie's residence. Tarantino turned in his script in late April to The Weinstein Company's Harvey Weinstein, and Sony Pictures signed on shortly after to distribute in offshore territories. The courtship of Smith for the role of Django has gone on for so long that I'm persuaded it has become a long shot. At this point, I've heard alternative names that include Idris Elba, Jamie Foxx and Chris Tucker. The latter is a surprise because he hasn't starred in a movie since 2007's Rush Hour 3, but he showed some serious dramatic chops playing a memorable small role in Tarantino's Jackie Brown. The emergence of DiCaprio as the film's main villain is intriguing. Candie in some ways is comparable to the polished but loathsome Landa in Inglorious Basterds. That role intrigued DiCaprio in the formative stages when Tarantino was just formulating a cast. It didn't come together and Tarantino decided he wanted an actor who could speak German as well as other languages. Waltz proved a glove fit for that role and it was impossible to read Django Unchained and not see Waltz in the role of Dr. Schultze. Candie is every bit as colorful and ruthless a villain as Landa was. DiCaprio next stars as FBI director J Edgar Hoover in the Clint Eastwood-directed J Edgar. Django Unchained is being produced by Tarantino's Pulp Fiction producer Stacey Sher, along with Pilar Savone.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on June 14, 2011, 08:56:53 AM
Jamie Foxx Now Front-Runner For Lead In Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Django Unchained’? Leonardo DiCaprio Locked In?
Source: Playlist

Arguably the most sought-after job vacancy in Hollywood right now is the titular slave-turned-bounty-hunter in Quentin Tarantino‘s neo-Western “Django Unchained.” And while we might have fatigue over the same old lily-white shortlist of 18-35 year old men that come up for every superhero gig or tentpole actioner, this has been a little more refreshing, if only for the fact that it’s allowed the African-American acting community to go through the rumor mill in a way that, shamefully, they generally don’t get to for big projects. The role was allegedly written by Tarantino for Hollywood’s biggest star, Will Smith, but for whatever reason, it’s looking increasingly unlikely that Smith will take the role, and a list of other names has emerged behind him, including the British star of “The Wire” and “Thor,” Idris Elba, and Chris Tucker, who since working with Tarantino on 1997’s “Jackie Brown” has only made films with the words ‘Hour’ and ‘Rush’ in the title. But, if rumors are to be believed, one actor is jumping to the front of the pack: the gossip-mongers at Showbiz 411 suggest that Jamie Foxx, previously reported to be on the short-list, is in the lead in the chase to play Django. It’s unclear where the site are sourcing the info from: they mention talking to Samuel L. Jackson, who has a supporting role in the film, at the Tony Awards on Sunday, but don’t go as far as to say that the information came from him. Still, the site are sometimes on the money, and it’s plausible enough: Foxx is a big enough star to keep the backers happy in lieu of Smith, but he’s also a good fit for the role—not as imposing as Elba (Django is described as being fairly slight), not as annoying as Tucker, with action experience and some decent performances under his belt, when he’s not slumming it in the likes of “Valentine’s Day” and “Law Abiding Citizen.” We were also told last week by Warners that they’d been pursuing Foxx for a role in “Gangster Squad,” but that the scheduling didn’t work out—was Foxx holding out for “Django Unchained?” Should the comedian/actor/musician sign on, he’d join Christoph Waltz, as benevolent German bounty hunter Dr. King Schultze, Jackson as the villain’s right-hand man and head house-slave Stephen, and Leonardo Di Caprio, who Showbiz 411 claims is definitely signed after he was reported as being in talks a few weeks back, as the villain, Calvin Candie. And if Foxx doesn’t take the part of Django, we’d like to remind everyone that Michael K. Williams is available.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: modage on June 14, 2011, 09:50:07 AM
Nooooooooo.

Would much prefer Smith to Foxx. Or um, anyone?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: diggler on June 14, 2011, 11:38:31 AM
Michael K Williams would be so perfect, but it will never happen.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Fernando on June 14, 2011, 12:00:12 PM
stringer too, but that rumor was apparently for guillermo del toro's movie.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on June 14, 2011, 12:22:46 PM
Ugh. Jamie Foxx is the worst.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on June 14, 2011, 01:11:50 PM
Foxx is a good actor with perhaps an irritating real life personality.  Is it in Block Party that Dave Chappelle says good comedians are bad actors and good actors are bad comedians, and uses Foxx as an example of the latter.

He can summon the intensity to play the part.  I can see it.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on June 14, 2011, 01:20:08 PM
jamie foxx's a pretty good comedian. but I think he's also a fine actor. he'll be good in this/anything.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: modage on June 14, 2011, 01:29:34 PM
Foxx is a good actor with perhaps an irritating real life personality.

Yes, it's this.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Sleepless on June 14, 2011, 01:31:27 PM
Foxx fits in with the new Tarantino gang (other members include Eli Roth).
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on June 14, 2011, 09:48:35 PM
Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Django Unchained’ Lands On Christmas Day 2012
Source: Playlist

In a film that already seems to be packing plenty of surprises, it looks like Quentin Tarantino still has one up his sleeve. Confirmed by BoxOfficeMojo, Tarantino’s slavery vengeance tale “Django Unchained” has been set by The Weinstein Company for a Christmas Day 2012 release. Looks like you better leave some room in that stocking for a pair of tickets to the film. The move is an interesting one which seems to follow suit with Sony‘s counterprogramming move this year, slating David Fincher‘s high profile downer “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo” with a December 21st release and an ad campaign touting it as “The Feel Bad Movie Of Christmas.” Also, Tarantino is no stranger to the holiday season as 1997’s “Jackie Brown,” also had a similar release, which you might recall even had a “Santa’s Got A Brand New Bag” tagline on its teaser poster featuring a bag full of money. There are still more questions than answers right now surrounding the film which follows Django is a freed slave who trains under a German bounty hunter and with his help, tracks down his slave wife to liberatate her from an evil plantation owner. While nothing is inked just yet, Christoph Waltz is pretty much guaranteed for the bounty hunter role, with Leonardo DiCaprio rumored to be locked for the villain Calvin Candie with Samuel L. Jackson as his sidekick. But the Django himself is still open. Will Smith has been courted but it appears he wont be taking the role, with Jamie Foxx rumored to be in the pole position for the job. Either way, December is already looking ridiculously packed with “Life Of Pi” and “Lone Ranger” arriving just days before and “The Hobbit” towering over everybody earlier in the month. But the Weinsteins are making a strong play that the film will be an alternative choice, and a juicy one at that. Filming is expected to start late summer/early fall and it doesn’t look like Tarantino will be rushing for this one to be ready in time for Cannes. Sorry, Thierry.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on June 14, 2011, 10:43:09 PM
PT vs QT at Oscars (PT's a lock but not QT, agreed).
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Sleepless on June 14, 2011, 11:11:19 PM
Who gives a fuck anymore, really? Both films will have the weight of Weinstein behind them, however. My money is on Harvey being smart enough to recognize The Master as the award-bait, Django as the moneymaker.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on June 14, 2011, 11:15:24 PM
Wait....so you give a fuck? It's (the Oscars) like the Kentucky Derby. Not important or ultimately meaningful but fun for the betting.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Fernando on June 14, 2011, 11:59:33 PM
just today I was wondering that if the master is already filming it could have a dec/2012 release, given how the whinesteins love awards, but with this news who knows, that month is packed as it is and they are already supporting his boy qt.

and they unfortunately love oscars, so lets hope the master gets a fall release in 2012 or we will probably see it until 2013..

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on June 15, 2011, 12:07:55 AM
But Django's partner studio could split award campaign costs right? I don't know the politics, does it not work that way?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on June 17, 2011, 06:10:19 PM
I just read this screenplay and really liked it. I have a sort of love/hate relationship with QT. When he's on his game nobody can touch him and he's on his game here. The script really rolls along. It doesn't let up much. While reading (and ultimately watching) Inglorious Basterds, I always found most of the parts with Shoshanna and the movie theater to be boring and really slow the film down. There's none of that here. From the second you meet Django and Schultz, it really keeps its steam. And that actually kind of worried me a bit. I'm hoping we get those awesome long takes and wide shots that were always in the Leone films. LOVE THOSE.

It's going to be controversial if it's filmed the way it's written. There's rape, gory and bloody murders, animal cruelty (which bothered me and I wish it was taken out), but what's going to be the most controversial is the word Nigger. It must have been said about 1000 times in the screenplay. Every way you can say Nigger, it's said. It's needed and I hope it doesn't change, but that's going to be the most controversial part of the movie, I think.

I read it envisioning the roles that are rumored and some worked, some didn't.

Christolph Waltz is PERFECT for Schultz. You can really tell that QT wrote the role for him.

And I really hope Leonardo DiCaprio plays Calvin Candie. I think he would be good. The thing is, the character doesn't even show up until around the 50 page mark. It's a pretty small role. It's highly memorable, but it's not even one of the top 3 characters screen time wise. The character is pretty ruthless and Leo could pull it off.

STEPHEN, the house Nigger could be played by Danny Glover. I think that would be fine casting. Is this the role Sam Jackson is doing? He would be fine too. Stephen seems older tho. It's funny, Danny Glover and Sam Jackson are 2 years apart, yet it feels like Danny Glover is so much older than Sam Jackson. Both would be fun. 

As for Django, Will Smith just isn't black enough. And I don't like Jamie Foxx here either but that could be because I'm not a fan of him. I would like to see Michael K. Williams in the role. I think he could pull it off. It's a bad ass role. It needs to be a bad ass dude in the role.

It's like Inglorious Basterds except it's more realistic, but still sort of cartoony at times, which is fine. It will get the same praise and accolades that IG did. It won't be winning any best picture awards, but it could have some acting nods. It will be a fun movie. Meatheads will love it, everyone here will be divided 50/50, but we'll all have a blast watching it for the first time before it's pros and cons really sink into our brains.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on June 17, 2011, 06:56:37 PM
I haven't read the script, and I already know I'll love it.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on June 22, 2011, 08:55:44 AM
Jamie Foxx Chosen For The Lead Role In Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Django Unchained’?
Source: Playlist

Yes, this bit of news is coming just from a tweet right now, but it comes from someone who has been on point for some of the biggest news surrounding Quentin Tarantino‘s “Django Unchained” thus far. Former Creative Screenwriting magazine Senior Editor and host of “The Q&A” podcast Jeff Goldsmith tweeted yesterday evening, “Will Smith is out! Inside sources tell me that Tarantino has chosen Oscar winner @iamjamiefoxx to play Django! #fb” If you have your doubts, Goldsmith was one of, if not the first person to tweet about Will Smith‘s interest in Quentin Tarantino’s Spaghetti Western slavery epic. And he also was hip to Leonardo DiCaprio‘s involvement before it got to the trades. Clearly, Goldsmith’s sources are pretty well informed.

While Quentin Tarantino actively sought out Will Smith for the lead role—with the actor’s longtime home Sony landing the foreign film rights in an effort to lure Smith—the writing has been on the wall for a while now. With days turning to weeks, it quickly became apparent Smith might not be so hot on the role and assortment of other names including Jamie Foxx, Idris Elba and Chris Tucker began entering the mix. In fact, if you like a good conspiracy, there have been some suggestions that the Weinsteins involvement in Paul Thomas Anderson’s Scientology skewering “The Master” put Smith off of working with the studio completely, but of course, that’s just a rumor. However, Foxx stepping into the lead role is frankly, just as strong a substitute both from both a business and artistic standpoint.

Not only is Foxx a big enough star to keep the backers happy in lieu of Smith, but he’s also a good fit for the role—not as imposing as Elba (Django is described as being fairly slight), not as annoying as Tucker—with action experience and an ability to turn out good performances when he’s not slumming it in “Valentine’s Day” and “Law Abiding Citizen.” It should also be noted, we were also told a couple weeks ago by Warner Bros. that they’d been pursuing Foxx for a role in “Gangster Squad,” but that the scheduling didn’t work out—was Foxx holding out for “Django Unchained?”

Add it all up, and we’re pretty sure a story will be hitting the trades about Foxx being in negotiations for the film in the near future (it was about a week between the DiCaprio tweet and the news hitting outlets). Should it all work out, he’d join Christoph Waltz, as benevolent German bounty hunter Dr. King Schultze, Samuel L. Jackson as the villain’s right-hand man and head house-slave Stephen, and Leonardo Di Caprio, as the villain, Calvin Candie (who last we heard was still in talks). “Django Unchained” hits theaters on Christmas Day 2012
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on June 22, 2011, 12:04:07 PM
Whatever prevents Jamie Foxx from making more music is fine with me.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: picolas on June 22, 2011, 05:55:40 PM
he did manage to make eli roth watchable.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on June 22, 2011, 07:01:14 PM
A girl I know has the biggest crush on Eli Roth in Inglorious Basterds. She was telling me he's so hot in it because he's kind of fat and out of shape and so hairy and his eyebrows are so bushy and he just looks so manly.

I looked at her in disgust. She was disgusting me.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on June 22, 2011, 08:20:04 PM
Yet another baseless attempt by the playlist to start a ridiculous Scientology rumor. Didn't they learn from mod's fuck up?

Not to mention the usual grammatical errors, superfluous use of "of".. what gets me the most is the insistence on trying to make The Master into some kind of anti Scientology manifesto.

They must hate pta.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on June 22, 2011, 09:05:33 PM
Yeah, calling it a "Scientology skewering" is not only premature and baseless—but actually contradicted by things we know. Also makes it sound like a satire.

I get the sense that they just throw in things like that on a whim because they sound interesting.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on June 22, 2011, 09:17:38 PM
The Playlist is a gossip site with occasional news. It's really bad.

What makes it worse is that it used to be awesome. Best blog on the net. 
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on June 23, 2011, 12:51:13 PM
Kerry Washington In The Mix To Play Broomhilda In ‘Django Unchained’
Source: Playlist

While nothing is official on Quentin Tarantino‘s highly anticipated slave/western/vengeance flick “Django Unchained,” this is the way it’s shaping so far. Jamie Foxx would play the titular Django, who under the tutelage of a German bounty hunter played by Christoph Waltz squares off against Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio) the brutal owner of mixed race club and his top slave, the manipulative Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson) in order to free his wife Broomhilda…which brings us to this latest bit of news.

As the trades chased the news of Foxx being “chosen” to play the lead in Tarantino’s film, Variety offered up a new morsel of info, revealing that Kerry Washington is in the mix of contenders to play Broomhilda in the film. In our script review of “Django Unchained” we said that the character itself is kind of thing essentially amounting to the damsel in distress of the picture, who really loves her man, and… that’s about it. The tricky thing about casting this part is the fact the role would require a fair amount of nudity which might nix the interest of some of the bigger A-list type names (ie. Zoe Saldana or Paula Patton).

Again, there isn’t much to the part and while we’d love to see someone like Taraji P. Henson or Naomie Harris (who is being lured for “Bond 23”) jump into the film, we won’t be surprised if a smaller name winds up snagging the part (we suggest Meagan Good (”Eve’s Bayou,” “Brick,” “D.E.B.S”) or Teairra Mari from “The Lottery Ticket”). An interesting bit to keep an eye on regardless, and we’re sure more names will surface in the coming days. Lots more parts still to cast with a lot of time to get it together. Filming starts later this year, with a Christmas Day 2012 release date scheduled.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Sleepless on June 23, 2011, 01:35:34 PM
Or, black girls the Playlist wants to see naked.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on June 23, 2011, 04:32:51 PM
it is very fun to laugh at the playlist, as informative and gossipy as it is. it's like gossip without any effort to hide the desperation.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on June 23, 2011, 05:07:29 PM
Or, black girls the Playlist wants to see naked.

haha.

But I agree with them on Meagan Good. I'd like to see her naked too.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Fernando on July 18, 2011, 03:26:12 PM
GT's idol Kevin Costner in talks for a role. (http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/archives/kevin_costner_will_be_leonardo_dicaprios_henchman_in_quentin_tarantinos_dja/)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Gold Trumpet on July 18, 2011, 03:47:01 PM
GT's idol Kevin Costner in talks for a role. (http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/archives/kevin_costner_will_be_leonardo_dicaprios_henchman_in_quentin_tarantinos_dja/)

Hahaha, love it. He's not balding enough for me now so I've moved on, but Bull Durham is still amazing.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on July 18, 2011, 04:56:05 PM
He's not balding enough for me now so I've moved on

 :yabbse-huh:
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: SiliasRuby on July 19, 2011, 02:43:53 AM
GT's idol Kevin Costner in talks for a role. (http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/archives/kevin_costner_will_be_leonardo_dicaprios_henchman_in_quentin_tarantinos_dja/)

'JFK' is soooooo good.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on July 19, 2011, 07:18:08 AM
He's not balding enough for me now so I've moved on

 :yabbse-huh:

That made no sense to me either.

Does GT literally mean that Kevin Costner has too much hair these days and as a result has fallen out of favour with him? WTF?? Who even thought of him as a bald actor anyway, did i somehow miss the day he became the new Telly Savalas?

Can anyone make any sense of this? Award for the most creative responses.. or whoever nails the actual meaning.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Gold Trumpet on July 19, 2011, 08:48:26 AM
Hah, who cares? Fernando called Costner my idol which implied emulation. I'm going bald so I made a reference to movie screen idols having to be a little more bald to warrant the tag. Pretty simple. My baldness is a Jason Statham version but I wished he made better movies.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on July 19, 2011, 03:18:52 PM
that was some footnote ridden punchline
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on July 19, 2011, 03:54:30 PM
So who is your bald movie idol, Robert Duvall?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: shadow_hippie on July 20, 2011, 01:54:11 AM
Read half the script before I had to stop myself. Tarantino always provides one hell of a read. Not too keen on Foxx's casting, but Waltz should be excellent. Dicaprio seems like an odd choice too, but I've been wrong before.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on July 22, 2011, 11:50:37 PM
Dicaprio seems like an odd choice too, but I've been wrong before.

I read your three posts, you've never been wrong
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on September 30, 2011, 08:35:10 PM
Kurt Russell to Replace Kevin Costner in Quentin Tarantino's 'Django Unchained'
The actor is in talks to join Leonardo DiCaprio, Jamie Foxx and Samuel L. Jackson in the film.
Source: THR

Kurt Russell is reuniting with Quentin Tarantino for Django Unchained.

Russell is in talks to join the all-star movie, which includes Leonardo DiCaprio, Jamie Foxx, Samuel L. Jackson and Christoph Waltz. He would replace Kevin Costner, who bowed out last week.

The movie is set in the American South of the 1800¹s and follows a freed slave (Foxx) who partners with a German bounty hunter (Waltz) in order to find his wife.

The bad guy list they encounter is impressive: DiCaprio as a Francophile plantation owner who forces slaves to compete in death matches and Jackson as a vile head slave who works for DiCaprio.

Coming on to the list of antagonists will be Russell, playing a character called Ace, a man who oversees the plantation in a ruthless manner and who relishes punishing slaves.

The Weinstein Co. will distribute the movie domestically while Sony Pictures handles the rest of the world. The movie is due to go into production in November.

Russell starred as a serial killing stuntman in Tarantino's Death Proof, which acted as the second half of the 2007 B-movie combo Grindhouse. The CAA-repped actor hasn't appeared on the big-screen since but has an indie football drama titled Touchback in the can.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on September 30, 2011, 10:45:17 PM
wooh-hoo!!!    :multi:
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on October 01, 2011, 02:23:35 AM
That is great news. however costner woulda been interesting for sure. I don't know which i'd prefer.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: wiped_out on October 14, 2011, 10:06:31 PM
Looks like Don Johnson joined the cast as well as Tom Savani

I read the script and I really enjoyed it. I just have to say that I envisioned someone like Keith Carradine playing Calvin Candie, considering that I read that character to be older, besides Candie was supposed to have grown up with Stephen and looks to Stephen as a consiglieri. I would of liked to have seen Stacy Keach in this somewhere as well as Gunther Kaufman(from Whitey and Fassbinder's movies) but thats WISHFUL thinking.

you know when I read the script I pictured Ace Woody to be a someone in his 30s, I think it would be inspired casting if DiCaprio played the part of Ace Woody since hes the real villain of the movie. Whose gonna play Scott Harmony? How bout that young actor from Terri, you know that movie with John C. Reliey. Broomhilida?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Fernando on October 21, 2011, 12:56:42 PM
Joseph Gordon-Levitt Lining Up Quentin Tarantino’s ‘Django Unchained’
source: theplaylist.

Well, here’s a pretty easy case of connect-the-dots. We just finished reporting that Joseph Gordon-Levitt‘s “Premium Rush” had been moved from January 13, 2012 to August 24, 2012 and we figured maybe it was a tactic by Sony to get the film some additional heat after the actor’s turn next summer in “The Dark Knight Rises.” However, with Variety reporting that JGL is now in talks for a role in Quentin Tarantino‘s “Django Unchained” they add, “he’ll have to sort out several scheduling issues that could prevent him from participating.” You see where we’re going with this?

With “Django Unchained” scheduled to be shooting right when “Premium Rush” was going to be hitting theaters, there is no way Gordon-Levitt would be able to star in Tarantino’s film, while doing press for David Koepp‘s movie. However, with Sony politely bumping back the film, the scheduling conflict is resolved and everything is in place for the actor to join the movie. But the question now is: what role could it possibly be? Based on the script we read, we’re not really sure where he would fit in with the parts that are left, except perhaps as one of the redneck Brittle brothers, but even then, those parts are fairly small. That said, Michael K. Williams recently said Tarantino had been rewriting a script—including creating a possible new role for him after he lost out on the lead—so there may be a new character, JGL is playing. Either way, it’s another solid addition to the film’s eclectic cast.

Just to recap: Jamie Foxx, Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz, Dennis Christopher, Kurt Russell, Laura Cayouette, Don Johnson, M.C. Gainey and Tom Savini are already set for the movie. “Django Unchained” comes out Christmas Day next year, and believe it or not, with all those names, there is still more casting to come.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: KJ on October 21, 2011, 01:11:44 PM
Oh, that's surprising. He dosn't seems like a actor Tarantino would go for and as the article says I can't really see what role he could play. Very exciting news, tho. The casting so far is fucking great. Can't wait for this film.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on October 31, 2011, 11:51:25 PM
Anthony LaPaglia Joins ‘Django Unchained,’ He & Joseph Gordon-Levitt Will Play Australian Brothers
Source: Playlist

Looks like Joseph Gordon-Levitt is gonna throw some shrimp on the barbie.

Joining Quentin Tarantino‘s “Django Unchained” just over a week ago, many speculated the actor would be playing Scott Harmony, the 24 year-old kid whose father buys the slave Broomhilda for him to boost his confidence. But nope, he’ll be one of the Australian hicks and Deadline reports that Anthony LaPaglia will join him as the leader Jano with the actor saying that he and JGL will play “mean brothers.” “It’s wildly ambitious and imaginative, deals with that subject matter in a way it hasn’t been dealt with before,” LaPaglia said.

In the script we read, these are some pretty small parts. They’re only on the screen for 12 pages, but they participate in a comedic and crucial key scene near the end of the movie. Have the roles been beefed up during rewrites? Perhaps. Or maybe these two are just taking the opportunity to play in Tarantino’s yard, which is just as likely. There is also one more Aussie brother in the script, which we presume is yet to be cast.

The duo are part of a massive ensemble that includes Jamie Foxx, Leonardo DiCaprio, Samuel L. Jackson, Christoph Waltz, Kerry Washington, Dennis Christopher, Kurt Russell, Laura Cayouette, Don Johnson, M.C. Gainey and Tom Savini. Filming kicks off in January for a Christmas Day 2012 release.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on October 31, 2011, 11:57:23 PM
it's funny to me how QT films get the reputation for having "massive ensemble" casts, like this one is being described. when the truth is that apart from one or two REALLY major actors, he always fills his films with people who would be grateful to take ANY work.

they are usually recognizable names, or has beens, or whatever.. but hardly "name" actors who would draw in more than a few nerdlingers who remember them from their golden age or one-hit wonder.

this cast is still just a few famous people and a bunch of other actors who you may or may not have heard of.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on November 11, 2011, 05:36:55 PM
Sacha Baron Cohen in Negotiations for Quentin Tarantino's 'Django Unchained'
Cohen would play a small but showy character that's party to disappearance of the title character's wife.
Source: THR

Sacha Baron Cohen has nabbed one of the last roles in Django Unchained, Quentin Tarantino’s latest production.

The movie is set in the American South of the 1800's and follows a freed slave (Jamie Foxx) who partners with a German bounty hunter (Christoph Waltz) in order to find his wife.

The actor is in negotiations to portray a minor but showy role of a off-kilter gambler who buys the wife (Kerry Washington) much to his misfortune.

Cohen joins a high wattage cast that only includes Foxx and Waltz but also Leonardo DiCaprio, Samuel L. Jackson, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Kurt Russell, Don Johnson, RZA, and Anthony LaPaglia among others.

The movie is due to start shooting later this month.

Cohen will next be seen in Martin Scorsese’s Hugo, which opens November 23.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: AntiDumbFrogQuestion on November 13, 2011, 07:53:33 AM
With all the latest casting news, I have to admit, Tarantino is known for picking the most appropriate person for the part he writes, or writes/re-writes to make the character fit the individual, no matter how small or large their screen time.  While Sacha Baron Cohen might mean the lamest part of "Hugo", it might mean amazing stuff for "Django".

Guess we still have a while to see.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Brando on April 03, 2012, 12:16:19 PM
Django Unchained set pics

http://www.christophwaltzfans.com/2012/04/02/django-unchained-first-pictures-emerge-spoiler-alert/ (http://www.christophwaltzfans.com/2012/04/02/django-unchained-first-pictures-emerge-spoiler-alert/)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Brando on April 05, 2012, 10:19:05 AM
JGL has dropped out due to a scheduling conflict with his directorial debut Don Jon's addiction.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pwaybloe on April 05, 2012, 11:25:39 AM
I typically don't speak acronyms, but I figured out you are referring to Joseph Gordon-Levitt.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on April 05, 2012, 02:28:11 PM
Yes, the 3 seconds you've saved from typing his full name translates to 30 minutes on the other end of us unhip dudes trying to figure it out. Or five minutes of googling. Eitherway. Exponential. Thanks.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on April 05, 2012, 04:17:11 PM
Good riddance, I say. Seeing cutie boy up there spewing out Tarantino dialogue in an awful southern accent would've ruined Christmas for me.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: polkablues on April 05, 2012, 04:30:12 PM
We need a comprehensive list of official Xixax-approved acronyms: JGL, RDJ, LVT, PTA, PDL, CMBB, and so forth.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on April 05, 2012, 04:35:54 PM
We need a comprehensive list of official Xixax-approved acronyms: JGL, RDJ, LVT, PTA, PDL, CMBB, and so forth.

Don't forget PSH and DDL.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on April 05, 2012, 09:19:38 PM
That's why he said "and so forth".
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on April 05, 2012, 09:23:56 PM
ASF
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: New Feeling on April 06, 2012, 06:51:17 PM
I'm with the Reelest
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on April 08, 2012, 12:41:04 PM
you are, where? Thought I was alone..
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: New Feeling on April 09, 2012, 04:37:41 PM
I second your most recent opinion in this here thread
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on April 12, 2012, 02:13:06 AM
(http://wpc.556e.edgecastcdn.net/80556E/img.site/PHDWT3vARfvTHK_1_m.jpg)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: wiped_out on April 22, 2012, 04:20:48 PM
When I read Django, I pictured Keith Carradine playing Calvin Candie, but DiCaprio will be interesting..

I also envisioned Stacy Keach playing the fella who leads the posse with the KKK esque hoodies, I think his name in the script was Big Daddy Bennett

Lastly, since Sacha Baron Cohen is playing Scott Harmony, do you folks think that Q.T will go the Fassbinder route ala Whity and make Scott Harmony gay? Broomhilida his beard to save his family's face, or no...

It will be interesting to see how the Cleopatra Club scene plays out.

Q.T cut out some of this best scenes from Inglorious Basterds(the Bear Jew's Boston flashback with him getting the signatures on the bat and the encounter with the spunky old lady, the female theatre owners scenes, and a whole section that was to be shot in "French New Wave black and white". I hope he doesnt cut anything out for Django but I wouldnt mind him adding more, cause I really enjoyed his script.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: KJ on April 25, 2012, 01:29:48 AM
The "French New Wave black and white-chapter" in IB was never cut. It just wasn't shot that way.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: I am Schmi on April 26, 2012, 08:58:31 AM
http://insidemovies.ew.com/2012/04/26/first-look-two-photos-revealed-from-quentin-tarantinos-django-unchained-exclusive/

First stills! Awesome. This is right behind The Master, and 'Killing Them Softly' for me.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on April 26, 2012, 10:07:19 AM
glorious
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: wiped_out on May 09, 2012, 02:08:20 PM
Rumor has it Michael Fassbinder has replaced Sacha Baron Cohen, due to latter dropping out to promote his film The Dictator.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on May 09, 2012, 08:34:23 PM
good. he wouldn't fit either
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: wiped_out on May 10, 2012, 09:49:14 AM
Scott Harmony which was Baron's part is up for grabs
and now Kurt Russell's part which is the villain Ace Woody is now up for grabs.
It seems Kurt walked off the set, how lame..
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: mogwai on May 10, 2012, 09:56:40 AM
It seems Kurt walked off the set, how lame..

He realised that his role required acting.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: diggler on May 10, 2012, 12:46:42 PM
It seems that Walton Goggins is absorbing the part, which is great news.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: I am Schmi on May 26, 2012, 03:28:51 AM
First trailer will supposedly air with Prometheus. Going to the midnight showing now, just for the trailer.

http://collider.com/django-unchained-trailer-prometheus/168914/
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: KJ on May 28, 2012, 01:23:42 PM
More pictures: http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.397365543635104.82363.120231564681838&type=1
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on May 28, 2012, 05:23:11 PM
Wow, it really is a Western...
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on May 28, 2012, 07:16:00 PM
Wow, it really is a Western...

No, remember, it's a Southern.. (qt really wants to make that a thing).
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: KJ on June 02, 2012, 04:57:41 AM
Django Unchained Emerging Artist Contest

Inspire legendary director and producer Quentin Tarantino in the Django Unchained Emerging Artist Contest, which starts June 15 and ends June 30.

The contest gives you a chance to create an original multimedia piece, whether it’s poster art, a funny .gif or a short film. All submissions will be viewed and judged by the master himself.

The winner will get a chance to meet Quentin Tarantino at this year’s Comic Con in San Diego, where the winner and a guest will be flown to the convention and invited to attend the “Django Unchained” panel -- as well as hear firsthand why Quentin picked the winning piece.

There are some guidelines for creating a short film:

Needs to be a maximum of 3 minutes in length
Include footage from either the official “Django Unchained” trailer or one of Quentin’s three favorite spaghetti westerns that helped influence the making of the film Django Unchained, all of which will be available for download on June 15.
Use one track from Red Bull Records artists AWOLNATION, Twin Atlantic or Innerpartysystem as part of the soundtrack for the piece, which will also be available for download on June 15.
Be sure to check back to the site in the following weeks to see exclusive footage from the film, learn about what inspired Quentin to make “Django Unchained” and get advice from the master.


http://django.redbullusa.com/
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: KJ on June 06, 2012, 02:58:22 AM
Teaser trailer preview

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIGKwpwF1t8&feature=player_embedded
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on June 06, 2012, 04:56:57 AM
what's up with di caprio never been able to do accents?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on June 06, 2012, 04:41:10 PM
Trailer


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2iy8fDVbI4
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on June 06, 2012, 05:59:53 PM
Blood on the cotton was cool.

Might be the first good QT in 16 years.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: O. on June 06, 2012, 06:46:15 PM
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xrcz2c_django-unchained-trailer-bande-annonce-vo-hd_shortfilms

For those who missed it.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: BB on June 06, 2012, 10:05:03 PM
Might be the first good QT in 16 years.

I think you mean 15 years. Unless you mean From Dusk Til Dawn.  :shock:

But yeah, trailer looks good. I am henceforth cautiously optimistic about this one.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on June 06, 2012, 10:16:03 PM
I was sold on this movie when I heard the concept. Not the greatest trailer, but I'm still in.

I'm very satisfied with Jamie Foxx's vibe. Thank God he's not goofy or something. I hope he never smiles in the entire movie.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pozer on June 06, 2012, 11:17:41 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUdM9vrCbow

johnny cash in western trailer. coens did it.

halfdrunk but looks inglourious at best.

p, a more masterful teaser is pending for your attention here/url]

           tried to link total recall thread in there like nine times^

edit; youve commented in there already. chrissakes, pubs. i got one more bottle of zinf to go,lets see some master p.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on June 13, 2012, 08:12:43 AM
International Trailer


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTY0GWtpi0s
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: The Ultimate Badass on June 17, 2012, 01:38:19 AM
This looks like an utterly boring retread of a hundred (a thousand?) other movies. I don't care how many anachronistic proto-funk tracks you shoehorn into the soundtrack. We've seen it before.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: 72teeth on June 17, 2012, 02:15:09 AM
I know sure its true but i just feel bad you cant get passed that fact... consider nothing, just let it warsh over
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on June 17, 2012, 03:16:00 AM
the script is different enough - he's doing that 12-scene movie thing again a la pulp and inglorious basterds. I'm not fully sold on the movie, but it's definitely no 3:10 to Yuma.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: children with angels on June 17, 2012, 04:29:58 AM
This looks like an utterly boring retread of a hundred (a thousand?) other movies. I don't care how many anachronistic proto-funk tracks you shoehorn into the soundtrack. We've seen it before.

There are a hundred (a thousand?) other comic, race-revenge, Spaghetti Western-meets-Sweet Sweetback Badass Song mashups?

It's strange, but the whole thing that defines the second half of Tarantino's career has only just occurred to me: they're all about the way exploitation films allow for the wish-fulfilling revenge of the oppressed: the 70s female-empowerment kickass heroine and rape-revenge movie (crossed with the downtrodden samurai), the Jewish vengeance narrative, and now the Blaxploitation fantasy ("A baadasssss nigger is coming back to collect some dues..."). What exactly he achieves with that whole framework by doing it so self-consciously, and whether they're successful, is another matter. But the pattern itself has only just struck me - maybe it was super-obvious to everyone else...!
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: AntiDumbFrogQuestion on June 17, 2012, 09:33:33 PM
This looks like an utterly boring retread of a hundred (a thousand?) other movies. I don't care how many anachronistic proto-funk tracks you shoehorn into the soundtrack. We've seen it before.

Anachronisms, eh?
I guess we could just call it 'Steampunk' and get away with it!
Enough luke-warmly inspired wannabes seem to think that's a good buzz-word to slather their Kickstarter description in, so why can't it work here!?

Maybe next from QT we'll get a tale set in Medieval times featuring Queen and AC/DC, possibly centered around a Knight.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on June 22, 2012, 11:55:39 PM
the script is different enough - he's doing that 12-scene movie thing again a la pulp and inglorious basterds. I'm not fully sold on the movie, but it's definitely no 3:10 to Yuma.

ya i read the script too, and it could have been so much better if it wasn't so over the top. i read it, really digging it and now that I'm seeing the way he's treating the scenes it just feels tired and old tarantino.

might just be the trailer, and cut to get the tarantino crowd, so i'll hold out until i see it.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on July 01, 2012, 09:30:06 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J1SjNVR6YaQ
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on July 01, 2012, 09:37:45 PM
The trailers make it seem like Kill Bill 3, but I have a strong feeling they are misleading. I hope it's closer to Inglourious Basterds.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on July 02, 2012, 03:27:14 AM
according to the script, it should be closer to Inglorious - less of an adventure/journey, more of a series of long scenes.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pwaybloe on July 02, 2012, 09:48:58 AM
according to the script, it should be closer to Inglorious - less of an adventure/journey, more of a series of long scenes.

Ha!  Exactly. 
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on July 02, 2012, 11:00:31 AM
Hey, there's nothing wrong with a good long Tarantino scene.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on July 03, 2012, 02:01:53 PM
yeah I like them too.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on August 21, 2012, 03:19:39 AM
Anthony LaPaglia Exited 'Django Unchained,' Says Production Was "Out Of Control"
Source: Playlist
 
As "Django Unchained" made its way in front of cameras, Quentin Tarantino saw both the cast and script for his upcoming slavery/western/vengeance pic change as production moved along. Joseph Gordon-Levitt had to bail on his small role in the film, Kevin Costner couldn't commit to his role either, Sacha Baron Cohen had to bow out, and Kurt Russell also exited the picture (and while Jonah Hill did initially turn down the movie due to scheduling, he was able to join later on, albeit in a different role). And it looks like yet another actor left the project over timing.

As his shooting days kept getting changed, Aussie actor Anthony LaPaglia found the schedule between "Django Unchained" running up against his role in Robert Connolly's Julian Assange film "Underground," which he signed on for this spring. And when push came to shove, he sided with Connolly who he had worked with before on "Balibo" -- and he doesn't mince words about what he saw happening on Tarantino's film. "The production was just out of control, over-budget, it was everywhere. I had to formally withdraw. They recast it and they still haven't shot anything. I could have said nothing and just hung out, I could be there shooting it now," he told Australian site News, about the film which wrapped at the end of July.

And it seems the filmmakers thought LaPaglia would and should have bailed on "Underground" to keep waiting to work with Tarantino. "The people at 'Django,' their attitude more or less was, 'Just dump the other film,' but I couldn't do it out of respect to Rob Connolly, out of respect to the material, out of respect to the commitment I'd made," he said, noting that if he bailed on "Underground" it might have caused the entire film to collapse, as financing was raised and backed on his name.

Originally, LaPaglia was going to feature alongside Joseph Gordon-Levitt, with the pair playing "mean brothers." In the script we read, these are some pretty small parts, amounting to only about 12 pages, but they participate in a comedic and crucial key scene near the end of the movie. But Tarantino has also clearly been changing things since then, so it remains to be seen whether those roles are still in the movie.

Regardless, his comments are an interesting perspective on the making the film. "Django Unchained" opens on Christmas Day.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Alexandro on August 21, 2012, 08:54:41 PM
that's sad in the sense that it's true that you find a lot of people with that mentality of "you're doing what movie? get out of that, fuck that, come here", with no regard to principles or any other normal human concern. yet it's also true that is very likely we will never hear of that anthony la plagia other movie ever again other that in this note, as many other la plagia items in his filmography. you just gotta do the right thing and enjoy yourself....a career can't be based on fame search or money.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on October 10, 2012, 10:58:26 PM
New Trailer


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5bJYfG0J3Kc
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on October 10, 2012, 11:36:52 PM
I'm underwhelmed.

Hopefully the trailers are exaggerating the lightness of the film. Because that would be massively disappointing.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on October 10, 2012, 11:48:00 PM
Wait, so Jonah Hill is in this, WTF? Well, cool. I'll be glad to see him play a fat racist, he was born for that part.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on October 12, 2012, 11:57:00 AM
Not a big fan of these trailers so far, but I'm sure the movie will be very different in tone than what these make it out to be.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: AntiDumbFrogQuestion on October 20, 2012, 04:52:54 AM
Not a big fan of these trailers so far, but I'm sure the movie will be very different in tone than what these make it out to be.

I remember seeing the first images of "Inglorious Basterds" and thinking how terrible they looked, then seeing the trailer and feeling it still might be underwhelming despite the high quality of it.
In the end, though, that movie exceeded expectations.

One hopes that the same can be said here.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on October 20, 2012, 05:48:13 AM
It's been happening to me since Kill Bill. His trailers never seem as interesting as the actual movies turn out to be.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on October 24, 2012, 03:25:06 PM
New Trailer


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RHuvpPfmjMA
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on November 15, 2012, 10:43:06 PM
PLAYBOY INTERVIEW: QUENTIN TARANTINO
by Michael Fleming

When PLAYBOY interviewed Quentin Tarantino in 2003, it had been six years since the release of Jackie Brown, and as he prepared for the release of Kill Bill, the question loomed: Could Tarantino, who had broken all the rules, changed the crime genre with Reservoir Dogs and the Oscar-winning Pulp Fiction and spawned a legion of imitators, keep it up?

By the time Uma Thurman sliced and diced her way to vengeance for the massacre at her wedding, the clear answer was yes. Nine years later, nobody questions Tarantino’s staying power anymore. His patented formula: reinventing established genres, mining his encyclopedic knowledge of film, writing dialogue that attracts big stars and injecting his unique sensibility and skewed worldview into otherwise predictable events. The result is an original blend that, along with his outsize personality, has transformed him into one of the few directors whose name means something at the box office. With a deal that gives him final cut, a large percentage of gross and the kind of autonomy most directors can only dream of, Tarantino writes his own rules. With the exception of Grindhouse—the B-movie homage he made with his From Dusk Till Dawn collaborator Robert Rodriguez—Tarantino’s movies have all made money.

After Kill Bill, Tarantino even rewrote history, killing Hitler and his Third Reich cronies in Inglourious Basterds, a violent wish-fulfillment fantasy. The film garnered eight Oscar nominations (and a best supporting actor trophy for Christoph Waltz) and became Tarantino’s most financially successful film to date, with $321 million in worldwide ticket sales. Now Tarantino is back with Django Unchained. Just as Inglourious Basterds started out as a Dirty Dozen–style mission movie, Tarantino began with the goal of writing a spaghetti Western. Only he set it in the antebellum South, and its protagonist is a slave (Jamie Foxx) who is freed by a bounty hunter–dentist (Waltz) and taught the bounty-hunting trade. Django is on a collision course with a plantation owner (Leonardo DiCaprio) who has consigned Django’s wife, Broomhilda (Kerry Washington), to sexual servitude. The depiction of female slaves forced to engage in sex with their masters and males pitted against one another in brutal to-the-death brawls is sure to raise controversy, but subtlety has never been Tarantino’s favorite technique.

We sent writer Michael Fleming (who conducted our recent Tom Cruise interview as well as the interview with Tarantino in 2003) to catch up with the writer-director. Fleming reports: “Quentin, now 49, has certainly matured from the filmmaker who told raucous tales of brawling with cabdrivers and taking ecstasy at the Great Wall of China while filming Kill Bill. We met at his house high in the hills of Los Angeles, a home that sports a great view of the Valley. The first thing I noticed when I drove up was the gaudily painted Pussy Wagon, the bright yellow Chevy Silverado SS that Uma Thurman drives in Kill Bill. Above that is a drive-in movie theater sign, a prop from Grindhouse.

“His house is filled with movie memorabilia. Posters for unexpected films—Children Shouldn’t Play With Dead Things, for example—hang on one wall, and I think I spotted oversize green Hulk hands. You can tell Tarantino is still single and able to indulge his voracious appetite for all things movies, because no wife would put up with it.”

PLAYBOY: Is that the real Pussy Wagon in the driveway, the one the Bride drives in Kill Bill?

TARANTINO: Oh, yeah.

PLAYBOY: Do you actually drive it?

TARANTINO: I haven’t in a little bit. It was kind of fucked-up because it just sat there for a long time while I was off filming. We just got it looking nice again.

PLAYBOY: It’s probably not the best car for Quentin Tarantino to be driving if discretion is the goal.

TARANTINO: No, but it’s fun to do the opposite sometimes, to cruise with the windows down. You take the big, long Malibu drive and everybody is like, “Hey, it’s Quentin.” That’s fun.

PLAYBOY: You killed Hitler in Inglourious Basterds, with Jewish soldiers scalping Nazis. In Django Unchained you have a liberated slave turned bounty hunter who takes on the slave masters who turned his wife into a prostitute. Hollywood is recycling fairy tales, from Alice in Wonderland to The Wizard of Oz. Are you doing a more creative version by crafting revisionist-history fables that allow victims of loathsome events to rise up and have their day?

TARANTINO: It’s in the eye of the beholder to say if it’s more creative or not, but that is what I’m doing, partly because I would just like to see it. You turn on a movie and know how things are going to go in most films. Every once in a while films don’t play by the rules. It’s liberating when you don’t know what’s happening next. Most of the movies that have done that did it accidentally, like they punched into a contraband area they hadn’t quite thought all the way through. But for that moment in the film, it is liberating. I thought, What about telling these kinds of stories my way—rough and tough but gratifying at the end?

PLAYBOY: What movie sparked this idea?

TARANTINO: When it came to Inglourious Basterds, there was a movie done in 1942, Hitler—Dead or Alive. It was just as America had entered the war. A rich guy offers a million-dollar bounty on Hitler’s life. Three gangsters come up with a plan to kill Hitler. They parachute into Berlin and work their way to where Hitler is. It’s a wacky movie that goes from being serious to very funny. The gangsters get Hitler, and when they start beating the fuck out of him, it is just so enjoyable. They shave his mustache off, cut off that lock of hair and take his shit off so he looks like a regular guy. The Nazis show up, and Hitler, who doesn’t look like Hitler anymore, is like, “Hey, it’s me!” And they beat the shit out of him. I thought, Wow, this is fucking hysterical.

PLAYBOY: When viewers get to the end of Inglourious Basterds, the common reaction is, Wait, is Tarantino allowed to change history like this?

TARANTINO: That wasn’t the jumping-off point for the film—it didn’t come to me till just a little bit before I wrote it. I’d written all day and was meditating about what the next day’s work was going to be. I was listening to music, pacing around, and finally I just grabbed a pen, went over to a piece of paper and wrote, “Just fucking kill him.” I put it near my bedside table so I would see it when I woke up the next morning and could decide after a night’s sleep if it was still a good idea. I saw it, paced around awhile and said, “Yeah, that’s a good idea.” I went out on the balcony and started writing. And I just fucking killed him. [laughs]

PLAYBOY: You’ve also mixed history with fiction in Django Unchained. Did you study films or history to capture pre–Civil War life in the Deep South?

TARANTINO: You could make a case for watching World War II movies, if only to learn the clichés that help storytelling by giving the audience what they’re used to. There are only a handful of real slave movies. To me this is a Western but set in the Deep South. What I was interested in as far as slavery was the business aspect: Humans as chattel—how did that work? How much did they cost? How many slaves did an average person in Mississippi have? How did auction houses work? What were the social strata inside a plantation?

PLAYBOY: What do you mean?

TARANTINO: In the case of Django Unchained, Leonardo DiCaprio’s character, Calvin Candie, is a plantation owner who has 65 square miles of land. He’s like Bonanza’s Ben Cartwright but in the South, one of a handful of cotton families in Mississippi. Anybody in that position is like a king in their own kingdom. All the poor whites who work for them and all the slaves are their subjects. They own everything as far as they can see, and the plantation is completely self-contained as a moneymaking entity. Candie is born into this, which means he doesn’t have to give a fuck about the business anymore; it takes care of itself. It’s a weird perversion of European aristocracy. That was a fascinating perspective to use with the whole story and with how Candie chooses to spend his time.

PLAYBOY: In the movie, slaves are raped and men fight against each other like pit bulls. When you made Jackie Brown and Pulp Fiction, you were criticized for liberal use of the N word. There’s plenty of that here. Are you sitting on a powder keg?

TARANTINO: Now I’m picturing myself sitting on a keg of TNT like a Looney Tunes cartoon. It remains to be seen, I guess. If we are, it’s not because I’m trying to be inflammatory. I’m just telling my story the way I’m telling it. I’m putting it in a spaghetti Western framework and highlighting the surreal qualities inherent in the material. I’m highlighting them mythically and operatically, and in terms of violence and gruesomeness, with pitch-black humor. That’s all part of the spaghetti Western genre, but I’m doing it about a section of history that couldn’t be more surreal, bizarre, cruel or perversely comedic when looked at from a certain view. They go hand in hand.

PLAYBOY: But the idea of portraying these slave women as prostitutes—

TARANTINO: Well, they’re not 100 percent prostitutes. The Cleopatra Club in the film is not a brothel. It’s a gentlemen’s club, a bring-your-own-bottle kind of place. There it’s bring your own pony, and you can have dinner with her.

PLAYBOY: Pony is the term for an attractive slave woman?

TARANTINO: Yeah.

PLAYBOY: And that really existed?

TARANTINO: Oh yeah, absolutely. I think it’s the cornerstone of slavery, or one of the things that made it work. Aside from the labor force, it was the sex on demand. The minute people own other people, we all know that’s definitely part of it. Did they do that back then? Yes. They do that right now—go to Bangkok. The thing about the Cleopatra Club is, if you like your slave girl you can take her there. You can have dinner. You can socialize. If you are a guy who wants to take your pony and just fuck her for a night on the town, okay, you can do that. But maybe you actually love your girl and she’s kind of your de facto wife. This is a way to take her out and show her a good time.

PLAYBOY: You originally wanted Will Smith to play Django. How close did you come to getting him?

TARANTINO: We spent quite a few hours together over a weekend when he was in New York doing Men in Black 3. We went over the script and talked it out. I had a good time—he’s a smart, cool guy. I think half the process was an excuse for us to hang out and spend time with one another. I had just finished the script. It was cool to talk to someone who wasn’t guarded about what he was saying.

PLAYBOY: What did he have to say?

TARANTINO: That’s private stuff between us, but nothing negative.

PLAYBOY: He has to evaluate material partly based on his status as arguably the world’s biggest star and certainly its biggest African American star.

TARANTINO: Yeah, I know. But he didn’t walk away from it because he was scared of the material.

PLAYBOY: Why then?

TARANTINO: It just wasn’t 100 percent right, and we didn’t have time to try to make it that way. We left with me saying, “Look, I’m going to see other people.” He said, “Let me just see how I feel, and if you don’t find anybody, let’s talk again.” And then I found my guy.

PLAYBOY: Why Jamie Foxx?

TARANTINO: There are a lot of reasons I could say, but the gigantic one is that he was the cowboy. I met six different actors and had extensive meetings with all of them, and I went in-depth on all their work.

PLAYBOY: Who?

TARANTINO: Idris Elba. I got together with Chris Tucker, Terrence Howard, M.K. Williams.

PLAYBOY: Williams, from The Wire and Boardwalk Empire?

TARANTINO: Yes. I talked with Tyrese. They all appreciated the material, and I was going to put them through the paces, make them go off against one another and kind of put up an obstacle course. And then I met Jamie and realized I didn’t need to do that. Jamie understood the material. But mostly he was the cowboy. Forget the fact that he has his own horse—and that is actually his horse in the movie. He’s from Texas; he understands. We sat there talking, and I realized, Wow, if this were the 1960s and I was casting a Django Western TV show and they had black guys as stars of those in the 1960s, I could see Jamie on one of those. And that’s what I was looking for, a Clint Eastwood.

PLAYBOY: When Playboy interviewed Foxx several years ago, he talked about growing up in Texas. Even though he was the football team’s star quarterback, he was regularly called racist names and treated badly. How did that inform his performance?

TARANTINO: He understood what it’s like to be thought of as an “other.” Even though he’s on the football team, one of the stars, when he goes out with the pretty white girl in the school, everyone loses their minds. He understood what it’s like to be hired as a piano player in a big white Texas home. When you’re the black piano player at a cocktail party, you’re furniture. You don’t talk to nobody. No one talks to you. They’re not supposed to even think about you. They should be able to say anything they want to say because you are furniture.

PLAYBOY: So they can say something racist if they want.

TARANTINO: And they did.

PLAYBOY: And you’re invisible.

TARANTINO: That’s exactly it. He told me many stories like that, how the lady of the house is paying him, saying, “Look, I’m sorry about the things that some of the guests and my husband said. They didn’t mean anything by it. Here’s some cash.” He told me that once he showed up and they said, “Whoa, whoa, you need a jacket to come in here.” He said, “Oh, well, I would’ve brought one, but nobody told me.” And they said, “That’s okay. We got an extra jacket up there. I’ll get it for you.” They give him a jacket, he does his thing, and he’s getting ready to leave. “Okay, here’s your jacket.” They’re like, “Whoa, hey, that’s your jacket now, buddy. I don’t want that jacket.” They said that to his face.

PLAYBOY: How are you when actors ask you to change material?

TARANTINO: Well, somebody can actually have a good idea and come up with a neat “Hey, well, what if this happens?” Sometimes it’s “Oh, wow, that’s a good idea. Let me think about it.” People have given me good ideas. But it’s not like I hand in a script and get notes back. I’ll get notes back on the cut of the movie, but if people have a problem with the script, we’re probably not making the movie together. The studios that made Django also did Inglourious Basterds, and they were all happy. It was never an issue with all the subtitles in that film. Nobody said, “Can we try it in English?” They just knew it wasn’t the deal. The way it has worked with me since the beginning is, it’s all in the script. I might change something, but if you read and liked the script, you’ll probably like the movie.

PLAYBOY: When you shoot a slave movie in the Deep South, how does the community react?

TARANTINO: Sociologically one of the most interesting things went down when we were on the Don Johnson character’s plantation, Bennet Manor. He has cotton fields there, and he has cotton pickers—girls, men, children, old people. But he also has ponies, and he’s the one who sells pretty girls. That’s his big stock: He is a plantation pimp, and people come from far and wide to his plantation to buy one of his pretty girls. We had a bunch of extras from the community, St. John the Baptist Parish. It was cool, re-creating this history with black Southern extras whose families have lived there forever. They knew what went on back then. Then there was a social-dividing issue between the extras that mirrored the ones between their slave characters in the movie. The ponies were pretty, and they looked down on the extras playing cotton-picker slaves. They thought they were better than them. And the people playing the house servants looked down on the people playing the cotton pickers. And the cotton pickers thought the people playing the house servants and the ponies were stuck-up bitches. Then there was a fourth breakdown, between the darker skinned and the lighter skinned. Obviously not for everybody, and it wasn’t a gigantic problem, but it was something you noticed. They started mirroring the social situations of their characters, being on this plantation for a few weeks.

PLAYBOY: What about the local whites? Were they resentful?

TARANTINO: Well, frankly, there weren’t that many whites in the area on our set. We had local crew for sure, but there was no reason for whites in the area to be hanging around.

PLAYBOY: Leonardo DiCaprio was initially mentioned for the Hans Landa role that won Christoph Waltz an Academy Award in Inglourious Basterds. DiCaprio’s your new villain now.

TARANTINO: Leo and I never actually got together and talked about Inglourious Basterds. He was curious about playing the role, but I knew I needed somebody with all those linguistic skills. Leo can actually speak good German, but Landa spoke French in the movie more than German. So it was never in the cards. But Leo and I have hung out over the course of 15 years, and he likes my writing and makes sure he gets a copy of scripts I finish to see if there’s anything that might float his boat. He got this one and really liked Calvin Candie.

PLAYBOY: He called you?

TARANTINO: Yeah.

PLAYBOY: When you wrote Candie, did you have anyone in mind?

TARANTINO: I did, but I don’t want to say who, simply because when I finished the script I realized they were a little older than I wanted the character to be. That’s a problem I have. I’ll be thinking about somebody and not take into account that I’m thinking of them from 20 years ago. Leo was younger than I had initially written, but I read it again and could see no reason why the character couldn’t be younger. And since I’m hitting hard this notion of the American South re-creating European aristocracy in this amateur make-it-up-as-you-go-along fashion, the notion of him as the boy emperor was cool. His daddy was a cotton man, his daddy’s daddy was a cotton man and so was his father before him. So Candie doesn’t have to do anything. It’s all set up, and he can be the petulant ruler with other interests. His passion is not cotton. It’s Mandingo fighting.

PLAYBOY: Is he a classic Tarantino villain?

TARANTINO: He’s the first villain I’ve ever written that I didn’t like. I hated Candie, and I normally like my villains no matter how bad they are. I see their point of view. I could see his point of view, but I hated it so much. For the first time as a writer, I just fucking hated this guy.

PLAYBOY: Why?

TARANTINO: He is master of the institution of slavery, and my despising that is why I wrote this whole thing. He’s the bedrock of it all. So I thought, Wow, I got Leo, and he doesn’t know that it’s a lot of smoke and mirrors and not as good as some of these other parts. But working with Leo, we ended up making it as good as all those other parts. The whole petulant boy emperor idea solidified as opposed to the older plantation big-daddy fellow. Leo formed a new character, and he was direct about what he wanted to do. Just as I have an agenda about history that I want to get across in this movie, so does he, and he brought all this research into his character. Leo had a nice monologue, talking about being a boy and his father doing this and being surrounded by black faces growing up. How could he ever be anything other than what he is? He was born into this. Is a prince going to deny the throne, his kingdom? I still blame him, but what chance did he have?

PLAYBOY: You write terrific villains. Who set the bar highest for bad guys for you?

TARANTINO: Lee Van Cleef is one of my favorite actors. I love him in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

PLAYBOY: What makes a good bad guy?

TARANTINO: You can point at a movie like Schindler’s List and there’s Ralph Fiennes. And there’s No Country for Old Men and Javier Bardem, and Inglourious Basterds and Christoph Waltz. The last time I watched a regular genre movie and the bad guy showed up and blew me away was Alan Rickman in Die Hard. It was the way he took over the film. It’s definitely fun to write characters like that. But what I’m always trying to do, even in the case of Reservoir Dogs, is get you to kind of like these guys, despite on-screen evidence that you shouldn’t. Despite the things they do and say and despite their agenda. I also like making people laugh at fucked-up shit.

PLAYBOY: The last time you did a Playboy Interview you described being propositioned by women mailing you photos and things. What does the mail look like now?

TARANTINO: If I’m at a film festival, out and about in town or in a bar, I can chat a gal up and it’s still all good. I don’t keep up with mail anymore. When I went to the Venice Film Festival and was the head of the jury, I couldn’t do anything because everyone knew I was there. You go down to the bar, where it was always cool to drink with some of the other jury members, but it was a constant bum’s rush.

PLAYBOY: You took ecstasy at the Great Wall to let off steam while you were making Kill Bill. When you shoot a tense slave drama in the Deep South, how do you let loose?

TARANTINO: This movie was so hard. I thought about it in terms of Kill Bill, and I was like, Okay, I am not partying like I did on that one. We had the weekends off, and sometimes I found myself sleeping all Saturday and maybe every once in a while going out to dinner.

PLAYBOY: You told Howard Stern that Brad Pitt cut you a hunk from a hash brick while you were talking about Inglourious Basterds. What kind of trouble did you get in from Brad, or from Angelina Jolie?

TARANTINO: Oh no, that time I was okay. Brad fucking started it. He mentioned it at a fucking press conference. I’d mentioned it earlier, but he made it official. Maybe he doesn’t realize he’s the one who officially started it, but he did. But it was all good. It got picked up on a zillion sites: “Quentin gets Brad high to say yes to Basterds.” And then 996 related articles. [laughs]

PLAYBOY: Do drugs have a positive impact on your creative process while you’re writing or directing?

TARANTINO: Well, no. I wouldn’t do anything impaired while making a movie. I don’t so much write high, but say you’re thinking about a musical sequence. You smoke a joint, you put on some music, you listen to it and you come up with some good ideas. Or maybe you’re chilling out at the end of the day and you smoke some pot, and all of a sudden you’re spinning a web about what you’ve just done. Maybe you come up with a good idea. Maybe it just seems like a good idea because you’re stoned, but you write it down and look at it the next day. Sometimes it’s fucking awesome. I don’t need pot to write, but it’s kind of cool. Making this movie was really hard. The weekend comes and all I want to do is smoke out to veg. It’s just shutting down. My blowout on Django was always Friday night. In New Orleans, me and the crew would go out to some bar. There were tons of bars, and some of them were pretty wild. We would be out till six or seven in the morning and then just sleep all day, recuperate Sunday, maybe show a movie and be back at it Monday.

PLAYBOY: Do you have a medicinal marijuana prescription, which allows everybody in Hollywood to get pot legally?

TARANTINO: I might be the only guy here who doesn’t have that.

PLAYBOY: You turn 50 next year. Do you think about getting married and having kids?

TARANTINO: We’ll see. I’ve had things that have almost worked out but haven’t, where I thought I’d get married and have kids. I’m not necessarily against it anymore. I was into it, but then I got over it. I had a little baby fever for a while but got over it.

PLAYBOY: Did you spend quality time around a little kid?

TARANTINO: No, no, no. The movie I’m working on is my baby. But I’m in an open time in my life right now, and I’m kind of interested to see what’s going to happen next.

PLAYBOY: Is any of that because you’re about to turn 50?

TARANTINO: I don’t think so, because I don’t think about it like that. I think you’re the first person to keep referring to my turning 50. [laughs] Yeah, I’m still hanging on to my 49. I have a little while yet. All this 50 talk? It’s just mean.

PLAYBOY: It’s pissing you off?

TARANTINO: Yeah. [laughs] I could be open right now to meeting a cool girl, getting along with her, taking it to the next step and, if that’s good, taking it to the next step. And let’s just see what the deal is.

PLAYBOY: You’re going to be one of those 65-year-old guys chasing kids around the house, aren’t you?

TARANTINO: Frankly, I wouldn’t have a problem with that at all. I mean, a little ego in me would like to be younger when I have kids, but fucking kids don’t give a shit. And there is that aspect of being older now and having time with them. You don’t have better shit to do. The kid doesn’t care.

PLAYBOY: What’s the most appealing thing about living a single man’s life?

TARANTINO: I have the freedom to do what I want. I can make the day whatever I want to make it. People with families have responsibilities to their team. I’m sure there are negative aspects to my bohemian lifestyle, to be sure.

PLAYBOY: Like what?

TARANTINO: I don’t know. I’m just talking the most mundane stuff.

PLAYBOY: You can’t think of a single thing, can you?

TARANTINO: Yeah. If I had a wife, I would probably be more polite. She would make me write thank-you notes. When people do something nice for me, she would make me do something back—a note or a phone call—which I won’t do on my own. [laughs] That would be a nice part of the bargain. I wouldn’t be such a caveman. I might be a little less remote. Having said that, though, with the artistic, almost academic way I like to live my life when it comes to the movies I make and the research I do on them, I’ve got it pretty great. If I wanted to live in Paris for a year, what the fuck? I can. I don’t have to arrange anything; I can just do it. If there is an actor or a director I want to get obsessed with and study their films for the next 12 days, I can do that. The perfect person would be a Playmate who would enjoy that.

PLAYBOY: Well, they’re out here.

TARANTINO: I know, and that’s why I say it’s not impossible.

PLAYBOY: We could probably throw a rock from your house here and hit one.

TARANTINO: Well, they have to be legitimately Playmate on that. They have to dig it. They have to be down with a J. Lee Thompson film festival.

PLAYBOY: How do you know if women you meet are into Quentin the guy and not Quentin the filmmaker? Does it matter?

TARANTINO: Well, I’m not Quentin the average guy. Expecting her to like me the way she would like me if I were a plumber or if I worked at Why Not a Burger is not realistic. And why would you want that? Part of me is me and my life, and part of me is me and my artistic journey. That’s all part of it.

PLAYBOY: Does that mean the woman should be a fan?

TARANTINO: No, it just means that if you like my work or respect what I do, it’s conceivable that could be an attractive element if you meet me. And if you like me and I’m charming and sexy or whatever things you could be attracted to, that could be a plus. You can date this girl and that girl, but if you’re going to get together and try to be girlfriend and boyfriend, me and my life and my artistic journey are part of the deal. And part of my life is my artistic journey. At a certain point it becomes overwhelming when you’re doing a film. A girl needs her own life too.

PLAYBOY: But she has to understand your artistic journey comes first.

TARANTINO: Yeah.

PLAYBOY: You’ve threatened to retire at 60. Why put a timetable on it?

TARANTINO: Who knows what I’ll do? I just don’t want to be an old-man filmmaker. I want to stop at a certain point.

PLAYBOY: Why?

TARANTINO: Directors don’t get better as they get older. Usually the worst films in their filmography are those last four at the end. I am all about my filmography, and one bad film fucks up three good ones. I don’t want that bad out-of-touch comedy in my filmography, the movie that makes people think, Oh man, he still thinks it’s 20 years ago. When directors get out-of-date, it’s not pretty.

PLAYBOY: Stanley Kubrick was viable in his later years. Scorsese and Spielberg have made good movies in their 60s, and Woody Allen made Midnight in Paris in his 70s. Won’t fans want to see what’s on your mind as you continue to develop as a man?

TARANTINO: Maybe. If I have something to say, I’ll do it. I haven’t made any gigantic declarative statements. I just don’t want to be an old filmmaker. I’m on a journey that needs to have an end and not be about me trying to get another job. Even if it’s old and I’m washed up, I’d still want to do it. I want this artistic journey to have a climax. I want to work toward something.

PLAYBOY: When a director jumps the shark, doesn’t it have more to do with him getting fat and happy and losing his edge or not listening?

TARANTINO: Could be, but it’s also age. [laughs] The directorial histories don’t lie for the most part, but I’ll concentrate on a unique example: I hadn’t thought about how old Tony Scott was until he checked out. And I knew him. I thought, Wow, Tony was close to 70?

PLAYBOY: As a director, how will you know when you’re not capable of that anymore?

TARANTINO: Well, I guess that’s what I’m trying to figure out.

PLAYBOY: You don’t turn these things out once a year. How many films do you have left in you?

TARANTINO: You stop when you stop, but in a fanciful world, 10 movies in my filmography would be nice. I’ve made seven. If I have a change of heart, if I come up with a new story, I could come back. But if I stop at 10, that would be okay as an artistic statement.

PLAYBOY: When we did the interview last time—

TARANTINO: I reread that interview not long ago. Literally the next day I was asked, “Do you want to do another one?” The thing that was cool about that first interview was that you made a big deal about me doing Pulp Fiction and then coming back with Kill Bill. So is he the real deal or not the real deal? And I thought, Well, if Playboy’s coming back, then I guess I passed the real-deal test.

PLAYBOY: You certainly have passed that test. Last time, you said you felt you could become a fine actor if that were your priority. Why did it stop being important to you?

TARANTINO: I just lost the bug. I think I got the bug from a combination of two things. I’d had a good experience doing From Dusk Till Dawn, and I started going out with Mira Sorvino. She’s an actor and so is her father, Paul, and they talk about acting a lot. I got all into that. And there were old dreams and desires from when I was a little boy. Now it’s the opposite. If I write a part for myself, I cut it down to nothing. Actors have said that now that I’m over myself, I can get down to doing good work. But it’s more about the fact that when I did Kill Bill, I was going to play Pai Mei, and it was so hard—

PLAYBOY: Pai Mei is the teacher Daryl Hannah poisons.

TARANTINO: Yes. I was going to play him. I’d trained to do the fights and everything, but it was such a big-deal movie that it needed all my attention directing. When I was done with it, I decided that if I’m going to be on a set, I want it to be my set, with me directing. I don’t want to be an actor in somebody else’s movie. I don’t want people faxing call sheets to my house, and I don’t want to get up in the morning for somebody else’s movie.

PLAYBOY: The tragedy in Aurora, Colorado, where a gunman massacred moviegoers at a Dark Knight Rises midnight screening, led some filmmakers to do some soul-searching about how they depict on-screen violence. Did you?

TARANTINO: No, because I think that guy was a nut. He went in there to kill a bunch of people because he knew there would be a lot of people there and he’d make a tremendous amount of news doing it. That’s no different from a guy going into a McDonald’s and shooting up people at lunchtime because he knows a lot of people will be there.

PLAYBOY: When people point to movies for glorifying violence, what do you say?

TARANTINO: Well, I never get into this argument because no one has this argument with me. [laughs] They know where I’m coming from. I make violent movies. I like violent movies. I’m on record about how I feel there is no correlation between art and life in that way.

PLAYBOY: After Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction, you were this raging, rule-breaking outsider who redefined the gangster-movie genre and spawned imitators. How do you see yourself now?

TARANTINO: Bob Dylan going into the 1970s; De Palma, Scorsese, Kubrick and Spielberg going into the 1980s. I would like to be thought of as one of the premier directors of his time, at the height of his powers, with his talents at his fingertips, with something to say, something to prove, just trying to be the best he can be.

PLAYBOY: No longer an outsider?

TARANTINO: Yeah. That’s one thing that’s actually kind of nice. I’m not a Hollywood outsider anymore. I know a lot of people. I like them. They like me. I think I’m a pretty good member of this community, both as a person and as far as my job and contributions are concerned. Back in 1994 I think they were all pretty impressed with me, and that was cool, but I felt like an outsider, a maverick punk, and I was hoping I wouldn’t fuck it up. I still do things my own way, but I didn’t go away either. I still kind of feel like I’m always trying to prove I belong here.

PLAYBOY: When J.D. Salinger died, it was clear what a burden his early success had been. After Pulp Fiction, do you give a big sigh of relief when you make a movie and feel you have risen to the level of your earlier work?

TARANTINO: No. I like people to be excited and think my best work’s in front of me. That means you’re trying to top yourself to one degree or another. I take that seriously. It’s a subjective thing, but you are trying to make a big, bold, vital work that moves your artistic journey forward. I wouldn’t have it any other way. I want there to be anticipation. I was actually quite proud when I read that Django is one of the most anticipated movies coming out this year. It’s a black Western. Where’s the anticipation coming from? I guess a lot of it is me. That’s pretty fucking awesome.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: KJ on November 27, 2012, 04:14:21 PM
Bloody New Images From Quentin Tarantino's DJANGO UNCHAINED
Read more at http://www.comicbookmovie.com/fansites/JoshWildingNewsAndReviews/news/?a=70556#c1OyMqtdYL6RXVyM.99
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on November 28, 2012, 06:47:26 PM
ha ha did you see David O'Russell mouth "temper tantrum" to correct Quentin, both neurotic and correct.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on November 28, 2012, 10:02:00 PM
New Trailer


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cWBp23bWhiQ
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on November 28, 2012, 11:35:12 PM
If that Rick Ross song plays at any point in the actual movie... I swear I will walk out.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: BB on November 29, 2012, 11:59:29 AM
Just one more gunshot... There. Perfection.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on November 29, 2012, 01:29:04 PM
ha ha did you see David O'Russell mouth "temper tantrum" to correct Quentin, both neurotic and correct.

explain
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on November 29, 2012, 05:33:35 PM
explain



He (more than likely) meant to post that in this thread:   http://xixax.com/index.php?topic=12395.msg320828#msg320828

But (more than likely) he was drunk and/or high and goofed up.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: HeywoodRFloyd on December 02, 2012, 10:26:25 PM
Early Twitter buzz from first screening of Django Unchained:
http://www.slashfilm.com/early-buzz-first-django-unchained-audience-wowed-by-tarantinos-blend-of-violence-and-humor/ (http://www.slashfilm.com/early-buzz-first-django-unchained-audience-wowed-by-tarantinos-blend-of-violence-and-humor/)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: modage on December 10, 2012, 08:47:30 AM
Was kinda disappointed by this, prob my least favorite of his films besides "Death Proof" which is obvs the worst. There's lots to enjoy but it seemed like QT wasn't sure if he wanted to just use the slavery setting as a jumping off point for another revenge romp or dig in for a little more emotional resonance so he didn't really do either super successfully. Music selection was a little sloppier than usual too. More later but  :yabbse-undecided:

MAJOR SPOILS, DON'T READ
QT has the worst, most distracting cameo of all time. It pulls you right out of the movie in the last 30 min.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: wilder on December 11, 2012, 11:35:27 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WsyG6Rtwdew

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7hRNh-gFEE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6NG_DGFc7_Y
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on December 12, 2012, 10:09:23 AM
You missed one..


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFlX-fsPWwQ
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Alexandro on December 12, 2012, 05:45:20 PM
http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/django_unchained_2012/

I don't know why I'm still surprised.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Cloudy on December 12, 2012, 08:03:31 PM
As much as he's a conceited, pompous, self-congratulating asshole. He spouts film knowledge like a fucking fantastic fountain.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on December 13, 2012, 12:52:05 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1d0p4TyubP4



Polka was right on, he said he does type one finger at a time! LOL. It's the size of his head, I'm telling you...
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Kellen on December 13, 2012, 01:00:44 PM
http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/django_unchained_2012/

I don't know why I'm still surprised.


Does every film nowadays open up to %100 on rotten tomatoes?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: polkablues on December 13, 2012, 03:16:38 PM
They're all either 100% or 0% at first. At least until Armond White gets his hands on them.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on December 13, 2012, 04:03:08 PM
NEW CLIP:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOCJqz4UCN8




Leo is going for his oscar..



NEW CLIP #2:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbBBzAGhmrM


Sam Jackson looks terrifying..
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on December 13, 2012, 09:05:44 PM
NEW CLIP #3:



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=weexqqlLZmM
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on December 13, 2012, 09:11:44 PM
Quentin on the Howard Stern show talking about DJANGO UNCHAINED..



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVo8WfALdaY
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on December 14, 2012, 12:17:46 PM
I'm sorry I'm hogging the whole thread, but all these little new clips are coming out, Gotta post 'em...


TV SPOT #1:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i6vtdG6YXGI



TV SPOT #2:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6Rs3duqnx4



TV SPOT #3:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GEl1dSBV200\



"I counted 6 shots"
"I count 2 guns motherfucker!"



Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ©brad on December 14, 2012, 02:24:38 PM
Yeah guns are so cool man. Fuck this movie. 

Also maybe we don't need every single TV spot posted?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on December 14, 2012, 02:30:52 PM

maybe we don't need every single TV spot posted?

My bad. I did apologize in advance though.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ©brad on December 14, 2012, 02:38:07 PM

maybe we don't need every single TV spot posted?

My bad. I did apologize in advance though.

No my bad. Continue posting whatever you want. I'm just cranky.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on December 14, 2012, 03:53:07 PM
interesting word use in that "takes a pair" tv spot. 

"it takes a pair, to take on the master."

sorry qt, but you just don't have the Cojones to take on the master.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Kellen on December 14, 2012, 07:13:38 PM
interesting word use in that "takes a pair" tv spot. 

"it takes a pair, to take on the master."

sorry qt, but you just don't have the Cojones to take on the master.


I just caught that trailer and thought it was a bit odd.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: New Feeling on December 15, 2012, 11:37:22 AM
interesting word use in that "takes a pair" tv spot. 

"it takes a pair, to take on the master."

sorry qt, but you just don't have the Cojones to take on the master.

Django is going to outgross The Master in less than a week of release, it's going to be nominated for more awards, stimulate more discussion, and it's ultimately going to be beloved by far more people than the Master.  They're both movies with balls to spare, but if you want to put them in direct competition it's pretty clear who the winner here is going to be. 
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on December 15, 2012, 01:52:11 PM
interesting word use in that "takes a pair" tv spot. 

"it takes a pair, to take on the master."

sorry qt, but you just don't have the Cojones to take on the master.

Django is going to outgross The Master in less than a week of release, it's going to be nominated for more awards, stimulate more discussion, and it's ultimately going to be beloved by far more people than the Master.  They're both movies with balls to spare, but if you want to put them in direct competition it's pretty clear who the winner here is going to be.

(http://cdn.smosh.com/sites/default/files/bloguploads/college-people-frat-guy.jpg)"Fuckin' agreed, bro. If someone thinks The MasterBATER is a better movie than Django then they're obviously gay. Why else would they even admit to watching a movie where dudes are jerking off all the time? They need to go watch QT's other movies like Kill Bill or Boondock Saints and then apologize for being wrong."

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on December 15, 2012, 02:06:45 PM
HAHAHAHAHA...
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on December 15, 2012, 04:28:09 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c5dCopAZaq8
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on December 16, 2012, 10:29:48 PM
Saw this in an Academy screening. There were no special guests. The house did not go wild, nor even seem very enthusiastic, and there wasn't applause for any member of the cast or crew outside QT, which applause can point toward a nomination. I'm very curious about what will happen.

Confess to being sleepy during the screening (and confess I'm sleepy as hell right now) from staying up all night for Cinefamily's Telethon. Thought I was disappointed with the movie, but have found my thoughts returning to it. I think the narrative is hella basic, and that overall it's close to being a repeat of things he's done before.

But then, he's QT. And when I think back on the movie, my memories are very cinematic, and that's exciting. I think it wasn't what I wanted and that I have to see it again and not tired. That's what I think.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on December 17, 2012, 11:50:50 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pPZdz7Pe9mk


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdA1hvBP3Iw


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmmpKHhcGFE
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on December 18, 2012, 01:20:44 AM
Oh no, is that Lil Bow Wow? Fuck this..
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on December 18, 2012, 02:31:49 AM
Yeah, dude. Just today I found out that lil'motherfucker is one of the new hosts of 106&park... I fucking hate BET. (No Racist)

I also hate when Tarantino tries to act black around black people. Awkward for everyone involved.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Stefen on December 18, 2012, 03:10:12 AM
I also hate when Tarantino tries to act black around black people. Awkward for everyone involved.

Haha, the best was when he did that at the Grammy's a couple years ago when he was introducing Eminem, Lil Wayne and wheelchair Jimmy from Degrassi.

He was even wearing sunglasses indoors.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on December 18, 2012, 11:16:06 AM
I'm gonna have to watch it just to see how he blacked it up this time. He was the only white guy there. Better bundle up the Massengill tight, the douche chills will be strong with this one..
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ©brad on December 18, 2012, 12:05:02 PM
Oh my god. I made it 75 seconds.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on December 18, 2012, 12:38:00 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zv0ecgerGAc
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pedro on December 18, 2012, 09:27:25 PM
I also hate when Tarantino tries to act black around black people. Awkward for everyone involved.

Haha, the best was when he did that at the Grammy's a couple years ago when he was introducing Eminem, Lil Wayne and wheelchair Jimmy from Degrassi.

He was even wearing sunglasses indoors.

never forget 
http://videos.nymag.com/video/The-Grammys-Quentin-Tarantinos

(sorry that was the best i could find)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on December 19, 2012, 03:58:29 AM
new feeling, you're right.  Only a guy with HUGE cajones would act like that.

but seriously, it's important to address what kind of conversation will be stimulated from Django Unchained, or the importance of box office gross sales (see also Avatar), or the importance of awards (see also Crash), and whether or not the fact that a film is beloved by a lot of people means anything.

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on December 19, 2012, 04:29:21 AM
way to bring it back around, Neil.


I don't even remember what this conversation is about
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Alexandro on December 19, 2012, 09:55:39 AM
that's hilarious!! the dude actually makes a black voice when he's around black people. he's like zelig.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Just Withnail on December 19, 2012, 10:18:45 AM
it's important to address what kind of conversation will be stimulated from Django Unchained, or the importance of box office gross sales (see also Avatar), or the importance of awards (see also Crash), and whether or not the fact that a film is beloved by a lot of people means anything.

This gets to the heart of what I meant when I said that I find QT uninteresting. To me the answer to your question is that it obviously doesn't mean anything how many people like it, and the important thing, as you say, is what kinds over commentary it will stimulate. Which will always start with what kind of thoughts it generates in me myself, and these last few films I really haven't been stimulated in at all. Of course there's a lot of interesting filmmaking going on, of course there will be virtuosic moments, of course there will be some interesting angle on something. But less and less I feel there are "oh my, that's interesting and intriguing and why did he do that I must know and discuss, why why why" and more "that's badass. but i feel like i know why he did that and even if that gut feeling is wrong, i can still go with it and be in peace"

There's little mystery in a QT film these days, little room for me to "join" with the film. I feel bombarded, more than seduced. Hell, some of the most worthwhile relationships I have with films are the one's where have to do some seducing myself. "Does the film like that I approach it with this idea? Nope! Let's try something different." QT-films are slutty.

And even when there is mystery, some idea you need to get down to, i don't feel that the thoughts and discussions are any interesting. i guess it might just come down to a question of liking or not liking a style. had he made these films with a cinematic language that really drew me in for repeat viewings, then I would be more intrigued to get to the bottoms of its ideas (which there is always plenty of in the cinema you find interesting as stick your own head into the mix). but his style just bores me to death.

His last three films haven't excited me enough to make me revisit them, because they don't haunt and revisit me the way the films that really stimulate me usually does. The only image from his last three that comes back once in a while is the fantastically executed climax of IB with the burning canvas. The climax forces me to think about why these images are so incredibly potent (though the answer may be pretty straight forward). While a film like Pulp Fiction has a thousand little mystieries that draws me back.

I expect to see this and be entertained, but I don't expect to be haunted.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on December 19, 2012, 01:43:07 PM
There's no doubt it'll be entertaining, and i'm sure i'll enjoy myself in the theater, but QT has this problem where he likes to use heavy handed themes so that way the film appears to have this cerebral edge, but it really doesn't.  It's kind of like the briefcase in PF and what withnail was saying. It's neat, it just really doesn't mean a whole lot the closer you look at it. 

it'll be fun, and I don't need  someone to preach to me or teach me something, i just want substance and stlye, not necessarily style over substance, or style with the appearance of substance.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Alexandro on December 19, 2012, 02:14:12 PM
I really don't understand this Tarantino bashing. He's clearly one of the most interesting filmmakers working today, even more so because he has never tried to be "serious". How many writers and directors are around who have been able to develop their unique genre/brand and survive in an industry that despises uniqueness. Not only survive, but be successful enough to enjoy the freedom he has.

Someone brought up Wes Anderson earlier, and there's no real resemblance at all. There's a guy who seems content with exploring the exact same territory aesthetically and intellectually in every single movie, with various results (I think he's made mostly great films, but a couple are pretty bad). But meatheads don't like his films so he gets a pass? And Tarantino is popular with meatheads so let's hate on the guy.

I think Tarantino's take and mashups on the crime/war/western genres and other subgenres have all been worthy of discussion, both in ideas as in cinematic language. Just like Sergio Leone, who is so clearly his biggest influence. I don't know how any serious cinephile can watch Inglorious Basterds and declare it empty entertainment. Really? I think there's enough essays online by now to offer a different perspective and at least "prove" that these films offer more than just that. If you don't like it, fine. But it's different when a filmmaker's take on things rubs you the wrong way than to say there is nothing but kool-aid behind an ouvre that's clearly richer than what a lot of Tarantino's detractors are implying.

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on December 19, 2012, 02:55:38 PM
The war you're waging right now, Alexandro, the defense of QT, that happens inside me while I watch his movies. Cinematically, who is better than QT? Who has his infectious passions, his giddy playfulness, his earnest reverence for cinema culture? Like, just a few others, and not all of them are as skilled and creative as he is.

But, I don't like or dislike the movies based on extraneous principles or QT's career's admirable qualities, I like or dislike his movies based on his movies and how I respond to them. The basement sequence in Pulp Fiction, Kill Bill, IB, and now this -- whatever ideas he smuggles through, the narratives themselves, these revenge fantasies, are wearing me down. I can celebrate brutal retaliation against only so many clear enemies.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on December 19, 2012, 03:16:20 PM
I will say Alexandro, that I like the idea that he's not "serious," in the context other directors want to be considered and I also like that  you've pointed out that his brand is working for him in such a way that promotes a sort of artistic freedom for him and that is a really great thing for him.

it seems a little one dimensional to sum up anti-qt posts under the category, "because meat heads like his films." 

I wouldn't say his films are empty entertainment, I enjoy watching all his films, still to this day-it's just that maybe if he knew how to match spectacle and narrative (see also Kubrick) then i wouldn't be making statements like this. That's wishing a lot, I know.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Just Withnail on December 19, 2012, 03:24:06 PM
I really don't understand this Tarantino bashing. He's clearly one of the most interesting filmmakers working today, even more so because he has never tried to be "serious". How many writers and directors are around who have been able to develop their unique genre/brand and survive in an industry that despises uniqueness. Not only survive, but be successful enough to enjoy the freedom he has.

A very admirable accomplishment for him, but has little bearing on how I watch his films.

Quote from: Alexandro
Someone brought up Wes Anderson earlier, and there's no real resemblance at all. There's a guy who seems content with exploring the exact same territory aesthetically and intellectually in every single movie, with various results (I think he's made mostly great films, but a couple are pretty bad). But meatheads don't like his films so he gets a pass? And Tarantino is popular with meatheads so let's hate on the guy.

Well I brought up WA but I don't know where you got that last part from. And the opinion you seem to hold of WA is pretty much exactly the opinion I hold of QT. There's nothing wrong film the films individually, mostly there on a scale from good to great, but for me I'm talking about that giddy excitement that makes me want to read and write about them. For me it's just not there. And if I do want to write about them, I'll pick their best films, because they're so similar that would I end up writing about them it wouldn't make a difference (if I wrote about them. A lot of people of course do, but what I usually read about them, I don't find particularly interesting. You pick your battles and how to spend your time.

Quote from: Alexandro
I think Tarantino's take and mashups on the crime/war/western genres and other subgenres have all been worthy of discussion, both in ideas as in cinematic language. Just like Sergio Leone, who is so clearly his biggest influence. I don't know how any serious cinephile can watch Inglorious Basterds and declare it empty entertainment. Really? I think there's enough essays online by now to offer a different perspective and at least "prove" that these films offer more than just that.


Just because he quotes Leone doesn't mean he's anywhere near him. Sure, IB is much more than empty entertainment, but so is so any other films, all of which inspire me much much more than him. He doesn't inspire me to go deep and think about it. I don't feel there's any mystery and room for me in there, more like statements from QT. And when there's so much cinema I find wildly more exciting, I think about that instead. There's not enough there for me on the first or even second viewing to make me want to revisit them. I feel like the thoughts that Tarantino usually invites me to think are not as interesting as the thoughts I think after other films. Too much cinema, too little time for Tarantino.

Quote from: Alexandro
If you don't like it, fine.


Exactly :)

But it's different when a filmmaker's take on things rubs you the wrong way than to say there is nothing but kool-aid behind an ouvre that's clearly richer than what a lot of Tarantino's detractors are implying.

Well, I don't think there is, to me. Someone else, with their own lived life behind them, will of course think something else.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: modage on December 19, 2012, 03:36:08 PM
I have no beef with QT (other than having to listen to him in interviews) but still found the film to be a disappointment. I feel like he's been in kind of the same gear since Kill Bill V.1, sometimes it works (KB1, IB), sometimes it doesn't work as well (KB2, DP, DU). If the movie rules, I don't mind that he may be leaning on some of the same tricks that worked for him in the past, but when it doesn't work I can't help but wish he'd stretch himself a little more. I'd still prob consider him one of my top 5 filmmakers working today so when he makes a film that's not capital-G GREAT, it's hard to not be disappointed.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Sleepless on December 19, 2012, 04:34:20 PM
Just tell me does he sneak in a gratuitous foot shot or not?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on December 19, 2012, 04:39:07 PM
He said in the Opie and Anthony clip I posted pages back no, just dirty slave feet walking through the mud.


I don't know after hearing what all you guys have had to say, all I can think of is:


" Watch a Freed slave kill white people and get paid for it, what's not to like? "


..I'll weigh in on my thoughts about Tarantino in general after I've seen the movie, leave you foreigners to bicker about that.


and as an aside, I've been having a lot fun on twitter lately telling Jonah Hill I can't wait to see his fatass get killed.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: polkablues on December 19, 2012, 05:09:13 PM
Is he fat again?  I can never keep track.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Alexandro on December 19, 2012, 05:50:27 PM
About the meathead part of my brief rant: I'm just commenting on some vibe I've been picking up concerning this, particularly after the response to that comment about how the film was gonna win more awards and generate more discussion, the one with the pic of the meathead defending QT and recommending Boondock Saints. I think there's that perception of Tarantino being a director for meatheads, and not particularly for bright or film cultured people, that those who dig his stuff are in love with stylization of violence and like things that are "cool", but that behind that there cannot possibly be anything else. That is all fetishistic impulses and cinematic masturbation. I can't enumerate specific comments I've seen of this here or elsewhere, it's just something I feel happening sometimes regarding this guy, it may or not be "real".

Just Withnail, maybe you don't feel a giddy excitement to write or read about films by QT, but the material (not written by you of course) is around. I used to believe QT was just about crime scenarios and movie universes, but reading some stuff by other people about his films made me appreciate his work on other levels.

I don't want to shit on Wes Anderson cause I like his films, but where I find Tarantino branching out and finding new spins on those "revenge" stories I find Wes just changing settings to explore the "asshole dad / abandoned child" theme. Despite being variations on the same revenge theme, QT's films always surprise me. I keep talking about Inglorious Basterds because that film is filled with subtext and explores a bunch of subjects that he never really tackled on before, particularly the idea of film as an agent of power and as a weapon in war. Even though I don't like Kill Bill Vol. 2, I appreciate the deconstruction of the super hero mythology he makes during the course of the two parts: one as a full action film, the other dialogue driven.

Also, of course he's no fucking Kubrick! Who is? But I guess he's as interesting if not more interesting than Sergio Leone.

I'm not trying to convince anyone of suddenly liking these films, but to say "oh no he's boring, there's nothing there, he keeps doing the same shit", well, I completely disagree.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Just Withnail on December 19, 2012, 06:05:43 PM
Quote from: Alexandro
Just Withnail, maybe you don't feel a giddy excitement to write or read about films by QT, but the material (not written by you of course) is around. I used to believe QT was just about crime scenarios and movie universes, but reading some stuff by other people about his films made me appreciate his work on other levels.

And where you find the commentary interesting, I don't, and his films don't get me excited enough to warrant re-watching.

Quote from: Alexandro
I don't want to shit on Wes Anderson cause I like his films, but where I find Tarantino branching out and finding new spins on those "revenge" stories I find Wes just changing settings to explore the "asshole dad / abandoned child" theme.

But material exploring other angles than that is around, so why don't you appreciate his films more?

Anyway, I want to talk about things I like now.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on December 19, 2012, 10:48:07 PM
I keep talking about Inglorious Basterds because that film is filled with subtext and explores a bunch of subjects that he never really tackled on before, particularly the idea of film as an agent of power and as a weapon in war.

OK, so while I grant you this. most write ups regarding IB I've seen involve comparisons and nods that QT used stylistically in Ib and the other topic focused on the stigma behind such a loaded theme (Hitler etc).

Now here is where I address the idea of this film as an agent of, " power as a weapon against war."  I believe he dealt with this theme the way Truffaut dealt with a bunch of powerful themes, and that is they deal with them briefly. These are themes you could focus a whole movie on.

 Now with this being said, that idea you've presented is barely a footnote in IB. I mean come on. You yourself say, that he's not "serious," yet this film is making a very potent/serious statement? There is thought provoking shit peppered into his films but they, almost always take a backseat to the spectacle/style that he's always been pushing. I'm not saying every message has to be heavy handed didactic preaching, but I do expect more than brushing the surface.

Again I like the guy, but much like Pete mentioned about, "Treme," is it not okay to expect more? Shouldn't this art lead somewhere?

I'd call him a genius, and that's why I get let down.

post script, Alexandro, link up any other articles that got your gears turning. I'd love to check'em out.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Alexandro on December 19, 2012, 11:43:57 PM
Well, just to clarify, Neil, that part when you're quoting me is a little wrong. I said "film as an agent of power and as a weapon in war"...not "against" war...

That film is all about cinema's power and it makes total sense that it takes place in WWII because that's when cinema was first used as a weapon. In the film, cinema is an agent of power: starting off as a place of hiding and rebuilding life for the french girl, propaganda used by the nazis in their own films to give the impression of more victory, actors, directors and "film people" working in the resistance and using their talents to those ends, film itself is used as a weapon in the climax, not only physically but intellectually as well. It's also the engine of the whole story. Characters meet their faiths because of some relationship in their lives to cinema, they start up film conversations and film related actions that lead to the climax in the movie theatre. And of course in a meta super obvious touch, the movie IB is used to rewrite history itself. This is a combination of ingredients that only a nerd like Tarantino, who obviously never leaves his movie bubble for too long could come up with. You have to breathe cinema and find true peace and solace only in cinema to conceive a film like this.

I don't have them right here, but I remember some of the essays Jim Emerson wrote on IB were pretty neat. Here's one: http://blogs.suntimes.com/scanners/2009/08/some_ways_to_watch_inglourious.html#more

I'm sure there are more and a lot will come with Django because at this point, his work is highly discussed in those terms.

Also about him not being "serious", I meant in the classical, let's get serious way. Let's grow up and make adult films, subtle, understated stuff so everyone can say I'm mature...that's what I meant...And that's my point precisely, that just because some director chooses to let himself go creatively with conviction in a style like his, doesn't mean that by default, his work carries no weight or is just a wank...In this case is Tarantino, but I've heard people give similar opinions on people like Michael Mann, David Cronenberg and Christopher Nolan (for different reasons) and I just think that's kind of bullshit.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on December 20, 2012, 12:10:25 AM
it makes total sense that it takes place in WWII because that's when cinema was first used as a weapon.

It's not my intention to distract yourself or others from larger points by nitpicking, it's just that this caught my attention, as I'm a fan of many wonderful Russian filmmakers from the silent era, and they used film as a tool of revolution. Battleship Potemkin is nodoubt the most famous example. Curious about why you chose to call WWII the beginning.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on December 20, 2012, 12:20:01 AM
Not to mention that hollywood in the early days was funded by government in many cases in order to promote messages like, "pulling yourself up by your bootstraps," and USA being good guys etc. That's in like 1910-20, if i remember correctly

i apologize for the misquote.  you're right and i've been pwned in most instances here because reading over my previous post, there's a lot i'd take back. I type most of my shit on the fly and that's why i'm a thread killer and hated on lots, i get that.

I've read that link you posted and that's great, i enjoyed that. But, there's just still something about the parrellels in the film that just don't do it for me. I think it's neat. But i'll have to meditate on it for a while and see what i can come up with

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Alexandro on December 20, 2012, 12:33:06 AM
yeah, you guys are right. I was just thinking of the massive effort deployed by germany just before and during the course of the war to use film as propaganda. there's a reason goebbles is studied around the world for this. with triumph of the will, I would say they really rewrote the book. Film was one of the main tools that the Nazis used to spread their doctrine, and I don't think it had been done on that scale and with such "positive" results until then.

I was under the impression that Potemkin and other russian revolution films were made once they were in power, not in the middle of the battles (maybe I'm wrong). In the case of hollywood I would argue that they started to really follow on germany's footsteps once the nazi party rised to power. one of my favorite stories is about how the us government asked disney to make "the three caballeros" and "saludos amigos" as a way to achieve good relations with the people of latin america before the germans could get to us.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on December 20, 2012, 01:01:12 AM
Potemkin was an anniversary film, yeah, and although I know it was somehow relevant to politics when it was released (as a people's revolution, was it important to keep the people interested?), the truth is my knowledge of Russian history leaps from Bolsheviks to stone-washed jeans.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Just Withnail on December 20, 2012, 04:02:42 AM
I don't have them right here, but I remember some of the essays Jim Emerson wrote on IB were pretty neat. Here's one: http://blogs.suntimes.com/scanners/2009/08/some_ways_to_watch_inglourious.html#more

Emerson is excellent! And so is that essay. This quote here sums up a lot of my view on Tarantino:

Quote from: Jim Emerson
He provides textural and intellectual pleasures, but little in the way of complex emotion. I suppose it is possible for, say, a Warhol silkscreen or a Schwitters collage or a Lichtenstein comic-painting to get an emotional response from you, but that's not really what they're particularly good at. Like them, Tarantino is a conceptual talent, an abstract pastiche pop-artist, and that's primarily how his films function.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Alexandro on December 20, 2012, 10:10:14 AM
I like this one too:

http://www.reverseshot.com/article/inglourious_basterds
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on December 20, 2012, 11:50:41 AM
My roommate writes movie reviews, sometimes 'cause people ask him to, and I guess I'd introduce that aspect of him by saying he doesn't read books and he subscribes to Entertainment Weekly.

Anyway, I think he already cracked the subtext, guys, don't worry:

Quote
stinging satire on slavery as dehumanizing series of business transactions.

If he's right, this could be the movie that destroys slavery's good reputation, once and for all.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on December 21, 2012, 11:54:22 PM
Take off the Jackie Brown hat when Charlie Rose is interviewing you, dummy



Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Kellen on December 22, 2012, 04:57:51 PM
Spike Lee: "I'm not gonna see it." (http://www.vibe.com/article/spike-lee-slams-django-unchained-im-not-gonna-see-it)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on December 22, 2012, 06:01:59 PM
Just like I'm not gonna see his "remake" of OLD BOY...   Talk about being disrespectful.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ono on December 22, 2012, 06:41:21 PM
Sheesh, Spike's a crotchety old man now.  As full of hot air as ever, though.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: matt35mm on December 22, 2012, 08:33:31 PM
I think his opinion is perfectly reasonable. That doesn't mean I have the same thoughts about it, but no one is under any obligation to watch any movie. Someone asked him about it and he said that he's choosing not to go see it. The concept of this movie is clear, and if the thought of a Leone-style piece of entertainment set around slavery pisses you off, then it's smart to just not go see this movie.

I love Spike Lee.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on December 23, 2012, 12:51:10 AM
to my knowledge, Spike Lee's always been ambivalent towards Tarantino, as opposed to antagonistic. He seems more baffled by Tarantino's take on race than vindictive.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Alexandro on December 23, 2012, 08:13:19 PM
hopefully, just like when clint eastwood made his two WWII films, this compels him to make his own film about slavery in the 1800's. hopefully of course, it will be better than fucking miracle at st. anna.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Cloudy on December 24, 2012, 12:14:53 AM
This is an amazing interview. Samuel L. Jackson DP/30 Django

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMyjYCuYKEM
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: matt35mm on December 25, 2012, 03:39:11 PM
I thought this movie was OKAY, in the sense that there are several parts of the movie that are entertaining. That's about all I can really say for the movie, though.

I have mixed feelings about what it's doing in its portrayal of slavery, but the Sam Jackson character turns that mixed feeling into a strength by deliberately complicating it. That said, I think that Spike Lee is right about it being disrespectful. That's not a giant problem except for when lip service is being paid to being respectful. It also does that thing of making every white character (except for DiCaprio's character) a total buffoon, which is too easy and makes them nothing but white bags of blood to shoot down, and there's not much satisfaction it in. It's just a series of "Hoo, that white guy's head blew up real good!"

Anyway, worth watching, but at the end of the day, it's my least favorite Tarantino movie. It is very similar to INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS in spirit, shape, and themes, but it's sloppier. Pacing's weird. Characters less defined. Humor less sharp.

Like I said, it's an okay movie, but I'm certainly hoping that Tarantino does something very different after this, because I think he's tapped this revenge flick well for all it's gonna give him.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on December 25, 2012, 04:29:45 PM
Spoiler time,

I'd like to hear you expand your thoughts about Jackson's character and how he's a strengthening complexity, like what aspect of him strikes you harder than Mandingo fighters and black slavers. Just like what you're thinking.

Edit -- where I'm coming from, where my thoughts are: I wish there was a character to add another point of contact or to somehow enlarge this world, which is a horrible and small world. He's terrible, his situation is terrible, his response is terrible, but all that's terrible about him is in his world. These are my initial thoughts about him.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: matt35mm on December 25, 2012, 08:55:01 PM
SPOILERS I GUESS

I don't see how the Mandingo element complicates anything. It's just more of white people being bad to black people. The thing that's complicated about Sam Jackson's character (Stephen) is that he's a black person being bad to black people out of loyalty to the white person. The movie shows all the other black people as feeling deeply wronged by slavery--give any of them a gun and they wouldn't hesitate to kill whitey. Give Stephen a gun and he'll kill the black folks to protect whitey. He buys into the idea of the natural right for white people to own black people.

What you said is another aspect of his character that is complicated. Are his actions against Django totally his fault, or is it simply due to having been born into a world where slavery is the norm? Within that world, Sam Jackson is actually doing pretty well. He gets to the boss of the other slaves, and even gets to pal around and get emotionally close to Candie. His motivations are understandable, and in a sense, pure, but that's all the worse because he is merely believing what he's been told all his life. He truly believes that he is a lower form of the species than white people, despite his great intelligence (the only one to figure out Django's plan). Candie is an idiot by comparison.

And yet, while many audience members will straight up root against Stephen, that's hard to justify because he is a tragic figure. His life has been demeaning. Candie asks why the black people don't just rise up and kill the white people--Stephen is an example of why. He took care of Candie. He loved Candie. He believed that people like Candie possessed the natural right to be the master. That's very complicated and very tragic. Rising up and killing the whites is an easy modern answer, and indeed the movie gives this easy answer through Django, a super-modern and supernaturally-capable character dropped into this old world to deliver justice.

Stephen is also an example of the insidiousness of authority, because he has some. How do you maintain a whole institution of slavery? Give some of the black people a little bit of power over the others. Now they've got a sense of righteousness and a taste of power, and this simple notion of white people v.s. black people is complicated. The final "battle" of the movie is Django v.s. Stephen, two victims of slavery. That's more complicated than Django v.s. Candie. I can't say that the movie handles it in a terribly interesting way, though, and maybe it didn't need to.

So I say that Stephen's character strengthens the film because there's nothing else worth talking about in the movie, but I obviously could write some things to say about Stephen, the only complicated, layered character in the whole movie. Everyone else is just a mouthpiece for clever dialogue, which is fine because the dialogue is clever.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on December 25, 2012, 08:59:32 PM
Just like I'm not gonna see his "remake" of OLD BOY...   Talk about being disrespectful.

not sure if you're being tongue in cheek, but I do appreciate the comparison between slavery and the remake of an ok movie.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on December 25, 2012, 09:18:22 PM
Thanks Matt, well said.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Kellen on December 26, 2012, 05:49:03 PM
Just got out of the theater here are some random thoughts (spoilers obviously):

This lands somewhere in the middle of Tarantino's filmography for me.  On one hand I thought there were some really brilliant moments in here the taxi driver-ish shoot out at candy land. The brittle brother being shot off the horse with the blood splattering onto the cotton field was cool. DiCaprio's scene with the skull and hammer was good.  Some of the stuff I didn't like:  The scene with the eye holes on the masks felt like to took forever and was almost a some kind of cheap knock off of the Reservoir Dogs scene when they're arguing over why someone was named Mr. Pink. The only other Tarantino cameos/roles I liked were Pulp Fiction and His stint as Richie Gecko in From Dusk till Dawn this one was terrible, Waltz was good but he's almost doing the exact mannerisms/acting job that he did in Inglorious Basterds.  The soundtrack was pretty much hit and miss for me. Also, I don't know why but I felt right after the huge shoot out at the plantation that the film started to drag on a bit.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Brando on December 26, 2012, 08:20:46 PM
SPOILERS


The people in the theater loved the film, thought it was hilarious and a few even clapped when the credits started rolling.  That makes me wonder if this might end up being Tarantino's biggest blockbuster.  I've never seen a Tarantino film where the entire theater was enthralled from beginning to end.

I thought it was very funny, good but way too long.  I imagine the film could be cut down a lot and be better. I read the script and know he cut out a lot but it still dragged. I did become uncomfortable in a couple of spots.  The mandingo fight in the Cleopatra club and the dog scene.  They were a different kind of violence from the rest of the film. The violence in the rest of the film is over the top and revenge amusement.  Those two scenes were too real and made you remember the true horrors of slavery.  Inglorious Basterds completely ignored concentration camps and the holocaust cause of that reason. I would place it in the middle of his filmography. I'm no where the Tarantino fan I was six years ago.  I would have been going crazy when I heard Tarantino was making a western. I think my expectations now was perfect Django.



Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Kellen on December 26, 2012, 08:40:23 PM
SPOILERS


The people in the theater loved the film, thought it was hilarious and a few even clapped when the credits started rolling.  That makes me wonder if this might end up being Tarantino's biggest blockbuster.  I've never seen a Tarantino film where the entire theater was enthralled from beginning to end.

I thought it was very funny, good but way too long.  I imagine the film could be cut down a lot and be better. I read the script and know he cut out a lot but it still dragged. I did become uncomfortable in a couple of spots.  The mandingo fight in the Cleopatra club and the dog scene.  They were a different kind of violence from the rest of the film. The violence in the rest of the film is over the top and revenge amusement.  Those two scenes were too real and made you remember the true horrors of slavery.  Inglorious Basterds completely ignored concentration camps and the holocaust cause of that reason. I would place it in the middle of his filmography. I'm no where the Tarantino fan I was six years ago.  I would have been going crazy when I heard Tarantino was making a western. I think my expectations now was perfect Django.


People in my theater were into the Mandingo fight scene, and Leo cheering em on, Some even clapped when the one slave broke the others arm.  The scene with the dog pretty much shocked most of the audience here though -- the room felt uncomfortable during that moment which is telling because everyone was into all the other scenes.   I agree with you about the film maybe being trimmed down a tad.

Did anyone have walkouts during their showing?  A group of four people left right after the scene in which Jamie Foxx is captured and upside down in the shed. 
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Kellen on December 26, 2012, 08:51:15 PM
Tarantino on John Ford (http://movieline.com/2012/12/26/quentin-tarantino-vs-john-ford-i-hate-him-django-unchained-birth-of-a-nation/)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on December 26, 2012, 09:37:49 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cS-PmU7IKnE





MINOR SPOILERS
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on December 27, 2012, 12:06:31 AM
SPOILS

Things I liked.

I enjoyed the few jabs that were made with regards to those who are social slaves and not necessarily legal slaves.  For Instance Candie's lawyer, and "Moonlight." Django makes it clear that both of their lives parallel those who are legally enslaved, not treated as harshly, but their socially enslaved, just like their beliefs.

I enjoyed the Phrenology scene.  it is great in showing that the argument of blacks being inferior, specifically to Europeans is based on complete bullshit.  I loved how you can just sit and watch a villain and know their entire perspective is based on nonsense.  Neat touch, he should've done more things like this.

I'm not sure how much complexity is added to the film with Stephen, but I enjoyed that he was the true enemy of Django in the end.  It seemed to me that Stephen was threatened because he was the, "1 N***** out of 9,999" until Django stepped in. 

Personally, I thought the bag head scene was great, and I actually thought I heard QT talking there, but then that Aussie bullshit happened.

Not sure about the rick ross song. Just seemed bizarre. not out of place, but wasn't expecting it.

I will say that there is more importance to the dog scene than the last few folks are letting on.  To argue it's too graphic is something not worth addressing in my opinion, no offense.

Like most of the film, that scene is paralleling the German myth that Django is undertaking.  As you can see Dr. Schultz can't handle the stuff that Django is bearing and any respectable man, certainly one who's been in that position wouldn't be as cold as Django was. The mountain to Candie land is very tall. You could argue that he is desensitized to it, but I'm not sure there is such thing as being desensitized to something of that magnitude and nature.  django deserves redemption.

I enjoyed the fact that when Candie found out that he was being played for a fool, that didn't start the shoot-out-pay-off.  I felt as if that was to be expected, it was great in building tension. I also liked the anti climactic death of Schultz and subtle nature of Candie's death. It was suspenseful, but not because you knew Schultz was trying to pull something, it actually felt like Candie was up to something. Really well done.


The movie has its problems but my brain tended to focus more on the things I enjoyed. 
more if i see it again.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Cloudy on December 27, 2012, 04:54:58 AM
That was a lot of fun! Seriously entertaining film. It'll probably be my least favorite of Tarantino's good films (RD, PF, JB, IB), but everything's relative.
I personally agree with those two scenes, they were out of context. They kind of reminded me of that scene in Boogie Nights PTA talks about in commentary where the test-crowd was laughing during a scene he thought they should've been horrified by. I shut the hell up during those scenes, but then I hear a crowd of people in the audience rooting on this horrifying slavery violence. I don't think QT showed the right kind of respect in a movie like this.

SPOILERS





Nice bit of trivia about Leo's hand bleeding:
http://movies.yahoo.com/blogs/2013-golden-globes/leonardo-dicaprio-real-blood-django-unchained-scene-201237591.html
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: RegularKarate on December 27, 2012, 10:59:09 AM
I enjoyed the hell out of this movie, but I'm pretty torn. I definitely need to see it again (fuck, I wish it were showing in 35MM here).

I don't think this is a revenge movie. I think this is a story about a man in love who will stop at nothing to get his wife back. He just happens to get some revenge along the way.

I actually think it could have been longer. I felt like there was a lot more in there wanting to burst out. Changing editors really hurt this one.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on December 27, 2012, 12:00:00 PM
spoils

I loved it. Just like with The Master I was laughing my ass off the first time, the whipping scene by Django had me dying and I think Schultz picking off the last Brittle brother trying to get away on the horse was my favorite moment. I went into a later show to watch the Phrenology scene onward and it was interesting to gage the crowds reaction. People were dead silent in that scene, and once Django's wrath takes over everybody's guard went down because they were finally getting to see the carnage they'd expected after 2 whole hours. The loudest and longest laugh it got in that screening was the first dick shooting, because I was watching this movie with children ( yes, there were goo goo, ga ga's at this show. HOW DO YOU BRING A KID TO THIS FUCKING MOVIE?!?! ) I feel like that got such a huge reaction that when Django shoots Billy Crash in his dick it didn't have the same impact, there shoulda just been one dick shooting. I will see this as many chances I can get and share my thoughts on how it works overall as a movie then.

Few things:

1. Reading the script is what got me the most excited for this, but I really wished I didn't now. Totally killed the element of surprise for me. If I hadn't read it, I'm sure I'd be raving a lot more about this. That's a bad habit of mine and I'm not gonna read scripts anymore before I see the movie unless it's one of your guys'.

2. I didn't get to see Jonah Hill's fatass get killed.

3.
Personally, I thought the bag head scene was great, and I actually thought I heard QT talking there,

Yep. That was him. In the Charlie Rose interview above your post, he confirms that he made TWO cameo appearances.

4.
Nice bit of trivia about Leo's hand bleeding:
http://movies.yahoo.com/blogs/2013-golden-globes/leonardo-dicaprio-real-blood-django-unchained-scene-201237591.html

"As his hand bled quite visibly, DiCaprio kept going, even using the hand as a new dramatic prop. At one point he smears his bloodied hand over Broomhilda's face in an act of evil dominance. And Broomhilda (Washington) looks horrified as he does it. (Perhaps Washington wasn't acting!) And that was the take that director Quentin Tarantino kept in the film."

Come on, dude. How about a warning? Or QT, how about you cut and cover his hand with fake blood before he does that? Hope those test results come back negative, Kerry.

5.
People in my theater were into the Mandingo fight scene, and Leo cheering em on, Some even clapped when the one slave broke the others arm.

Glad to see that racism is alive and well in America ( I'M KIDDING OF COURSE! ) Seriously though, what part of the south are you from?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: squints on December 27, 2012, 12:19:38 PM
I'm officially over QT until he does something interesting again. Which, because of his fear that he'll be a shitty old filmmaker, we'll probably never see.

David Eddelstein's NYT review pretty much hits it right on the head (and i've heard this opinion about QT reflected on this board in the past). -

"For all its pleasures, Django Unchained feels too easy, too dead-center in Tarantino’s comfort zone. He’s not challenging himself in any way that matters. He has become his own Yes Man."

Quentin's been playin the same damn song for almost 10 years now. Time to switch it up.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on December 27, 2012, 12:48:19 PM
spoilers

This time,

more impressed by the large number of characters. so many background characters you feel you know a thing or two about, thinking about Betina, Sheba, Big Fred, the Marshall, the woman with the crutches in the background who runs away, Old Man Carrucan. it's flatout amazing how large this world is, really, how massively imagined the thing is.

more impressed by the big daddy house sequence -- the music that plays when django walks over, the girls in the background (girl on the swing), django's first payback, and then his second payback, wow, the whipping, his face, the way django calls out to the onlookers to watch, firing off all the rounds. 'cause he's qt you know this scene was built to seed the later madness, and it totally works. notice also how when big daddy comes out to see what's happened, in his inner circle are black men holding guns.

I don't think this is a revenge movie. I think this is a story about a man in love who will stop at nothing to get his wife back. He just happens to get some revenge along the way.
the parallel with the Broomhilda legend is a romantic feature of the movie, and i like it, but fact is she's chillin' on a horse at the end, waiting for django to kill everyone. can't really call it along the way if he goes out his way.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Kellen on December 27, 2012, 01:49:28 PM
Quote
5.
People in my theater were into the Mandingo fight scene, and Leo cheering em on, Some even clapped when the one slave broke the others arm.

Glad to see that racism is alive and well in America ( I'M KIDDING OF COURSE! ) Seriously though, what part of the south are you from?


My family had to move to Missouri about 4 or 5 years ago when my dad got a new job.  I'm originally from Chicago, and I lived in NY for about a year.  But yeah to say we have some knuckleheads here would be putting it kindly.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on December 27, 2012, 03:45:19 PM
Spoilers

An aspect of analysis that remains unmined for me is Django's trickery with the lequint people. Can I outsource thoughts again (busy, matt?)

Things this sequence does --

1 emphasizes a division in lines of loyalty. they could become partners, like Schultz, but unlike Schultz they are involved in slavery. No allies with the enemy

2 something to do with the slaves in the wagon. They must admit, yes, he is different, he rode in on a horse, he is a bounty hunter. Django seems permanently released from the shackles. unchained, right. He is forever something else.

3 related to 2, even if we guessed it, now we see, Django absorbed Schultz.

Others?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: RegularKarate on December 27, 2012, 05:53:35 PM
spoilers
the parallel with the Broomhilda legend is a romantic feature of the movie, and i like it, but fact is she's chillin' on a horse at the end, waiting for django to kill everyone. can't really call it along the way if he goes out his way.

He was definitely getting some hardcore revenge there, but he was there for a reason other than revenge. He had to get Broomhilda's papers and then make sure that there wasn't anyone who would tell the authorities about them.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on December 27, 2012, 06:02:15 PM
spoilers

hm, i had wondered about the papers in that they have schultz's name, but i hadn't considered that the ending was related to the papers. interesting. not really sure how slave records worked and if that was an intended connection, if it was necessary beyond possessing the papers, but it sounds plausible. conversely, he already possessed the papers and was waiting for everyone to return from the funeral and like, isn't exploding the mansion kind of worse than leaving someone? you done confused me. either way he now has people coming after him, as stephen notes.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: modage on December 27, 2012, 06:33:55 PM
LIGHT SPOILERS

The thing nobody seems to be talking about still is how the cameo nearly ruins the movie.

If put on the spot to list my favorite filmmakers working today, I doubt I’d get to five names without including Quentin Tarantino’s. “Pulp Fiction” is probably the single most important film of the 90’s (just go ahead and put it in the time capsule), “Kill Bill: Volume One” was one of my favorite cinematic experiences of the 00’s and “Inglourious Basterds” proved the filmmaker’s best work could still be ahead of him. Tarantino has talked a lot about his legacy (and talked a lot, period), promising to retire before he becomes an “old man filmmaker” and his work starts slipping. “Django Unchained” is his 8th film and Tarantino is not quite 50 years old but already the signs of age have begun to show. Besides “Death Proof, still his worst, ‘Django’ is probably his next weakest effort overall despite some great moments throughout.

In the film, Jamie Foxx stars as Django, a slave freed by a German bounty hunter named Schultz (Christoph Waltz, obviously) who is tracking The Brittle Brothers, the same trio of rednecks who sold Django and his wife Broomhilda (Kerry Washington) into slavery. Initially Django is wounded and unsure of himself, he’s never been free before after all, but very quickly adjusts to the lifestyle of a bounty hunter. A little too quick in fact, because Schultz and Django catch up to the Brittle Brothers fairly early on and Django gets his revenge, killing all of them. It’s actually one of the most successful sequences in the film because the violence acts as emotional catharsis. It’s impossible not to feel that justice is being served as Django whips one of them repeatedly. It’s a true Tarantino moment: uncomfortable, thrilling, emotionally affecting and unfortunately it’s all downhill from there.

After this sequence, Django and Schultz head off to buy back Broomhilda but the stakes are never quite as personal again. The love story that the film supposedly hinges on just doesn’t really work. Lovely Kerry Washington is wasted here as Broomhilda, a disappointingly one dimensional love interest only really allowed to cry and suffer. (Especially after the kick-ass heroines in ‘Bill’ and ‘Basterds’ I would’ve hoped fro better.) The biggest problem with the film is that Tarantino can’t seem to decide whether to use the slavery-era setting as a backdrop for a fun shoot-em-up revenge film (a la “Kill Bill”) or go a little darker and dig a little deeper into some of the more upsetting aspects of that period. He tries to do both and doesn’t succeed wildly at either. It’s not as fun as it should be and fails to gain any emotional traction (after stirring up some deep feelings early on).

Django himself is forced to play second fiddle to Schultz for most of the film so we don’t get to know much more of what’s going on in his head beyond the tough-guy exterior he displays. Waltz is good but familiar, though his character on the surface is quite different from Hans Landa, his rhythms are a little too similar to distinguish himself. Leonardo DiCaprio, on the other hand, is a total scene-stealer. Playing boy-prince Calvin Candie, a plantation owner who’s taken ownership of Broomhilda, the second half of the film is a stand-off between Candie and our heroes as they try to outsmart him into selling them Broomhilda. Like Brad Pitt in ‘Basterds,’ it’s great to see DiCaprio (usually saddled with the serious leading man role) cutting loose and really having fun playing a supporting character and his scenes are among the highlights of the film.

For a director known for his impeccable soundtracks culled from various forgotten pop hits and unknown Ennio Morricone cuts, ‘Django’ is probably his most scattershot and weakest to date. Several contemporary rap songs seem shoehorned in and out of place. Perhaps most disappointingly is that until the end of the film when shit really starts to hit the fan, the whole thing is just a bit too restrained. It feels a little long, a little disjointed, not quite as epic as it could be. When you’ve got an ego as big as Tarantino does, you’d better deliver the goods and unfortunately ‘Django’ just doesn’t quite get there. The most horrible moment in the film comes towards the end of the film when the director chooses to insert himself into the most egregious and distracting cameo in recent memory (complete with Australian accent). While the film isn’t a total wash, lapses in judgement like that make you wonder if maybe he shouldn’t have pushed up his retirement.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Kellen on December 27, 2012, 06:47:30 PM
Maybe it was the random Rick Ross song that just starts banging out of  the speakers but looking back on it I think this was the weakest QT soundtrack.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on December 27, 2012, 06:50:48 PM
one thing that stands out as bizarre to me is that character with the bandanna covering their face.  It appears as though this person is going to be a serious nemesis, wielding an axe, and a special costume that stands out, but then nothing.

Did anyone else notice this, or know what i'm referencing here?

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Brando on December 27, 2012, 08:07:49 PM
one thing that stands out as bizarre to me is that character with the bandanna covering their face.  It appears as though this person is going to be a serious nemesis, wielding an axe, and a special costume that stands out, but then nothing.

Did anyone else notice this, or know what i'm referencing here?

I did notice.  I thought it was a woman. I read the script and didn't remember that character but thought there was going to be some kind of later reference to that character since it seemed she was singled out and unique compared to the rest of the characters in the shack. 

Maybe it was the random Rick Ross song that just starts banging out of  the speakers but looking back on it I think this was the weakest QT soundtrack.

I saw the film with a predominately black audience. I don't go the theater often but when I do it's for something like the master which is a predominately young and white audience or a blockbuster like Dark Knight which has a variety of people.  The audience loved it when that black coffins song came on.  From a director that has long stated his influences and love is in black cinema and culture, his films never really crossed over into a large black audience. Judging from the reaction of the theater I was in, He might have finally done that.  The soundtrack went over well as long with the humor. I remember being in the largely white audience of Inglorious Basterds and being the only person laughing at the jokes.  You would have thought this was a full blown comedy from the audience in Django.


I'm officially over QT until he does something interesting again. Which, because of his fear that he'll be a shitty old filmmaker, we'll probably never see.

David Eddelstein's NYT review pretty much hits it right on the head (and i've heard this opinion about QT reflected on this board in the past). -

"For all its pleasures, Django Unchained feels too easy, too dead-center in Tarantino’s comfort zone. He’s not challenging himself in any way that matters. He has become his own Yes Man."

Quentin's been playin the same damn song for almost 10 years now. Time to switch it up.

I remember a friend telling me years ago that Tarantino mentioned he planned on retiring young because he felt a lot of directors lose their touch in old age.  I guess that's what you were referring to and it seems you're right.  While I enjoyed the film it's not worth the hype every Tarantino film receives.  I don't see a huge different between the Tarantino films of the past 10 years and the other Tarantinoesque filmmakers out there now.  Minus Inglorious Basterds, which I loved but not as much as others, is there really a huge gap between Tarantino's films and the other filmmaker's he's inspired? There is but I think there should be a much larger gap. The big difference really is that Tarantino is able to get his films made with big budgets, stars and studio backing. Is there another filmmaker in history that could have gotten Django Unchained made with an estimated $80 million budget? 
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on December 27, 2012, 08:20:36 PM
Gotta admit this movie is growing on me big time. I've found thoughts back on the movie pleasurably rewarded with new discoveries, and there are many textures to investigate. The movie feels living and breathing to me, that's nice.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on December 27, 2012, 09:09:02 PM
one thing that stands out as bizarre to me is that character with the bandanna covering their face.  It appears as though this person is going to be a serious nemesis, wielding an axe, and a special costume that stands out, but then nothing.

Did anyone else notice this, or know what i'm referencing here?

I did notice.  I thought it was a woman. I read the script and didn't remember that character but thought there was going to be some kind of later reference to that character since it seemed she was singled out and unique compared to the rest of the characters in the shack. 


That was Zoe Bell, stuntwoman from Kill Bill and star of Death Proof. Maybe they were just trying to hide the fact that it was her? She's too pretty to be involved with that gang of miscreants.


so many background characters you feel you know a thing or two about

wasn't until the second viewing that I realized Billy Crash is gay. I thought he just had a funny walk.

the woman with the crutches in the background who runs away

no idea who this is, what scene?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on December 27, 2012, 09:39:06 PM
I think it's a revenge movie because all the set pieces hinged on the suffering/death of the villains for the enjoyment of the audience. every bad guy is guilty of being complicit in slavery or murder, so in that sense, the transgression may be less personal - but they spend way less celluloid and ink celebrating love than punishing the characters, and they made sure, like an old exploitation film - that every carnage is more or less justified. the love story is just a way to carry the characters to certain places.

I think this film, even moreso than his other films, has the engine of a comedy, in that every scene is a setpiece where all the mechanics work to deliver "punchlines" to the audience, but the punchlines aren't always funny - they can be elicit other emotional responses, but it's a movie that's packed with moments aimed at eliciting very specific responses (I think there was an interview in which he can be heard saying how he wants to conduct the audience like an orchestra). The film is more audience-oriented (and more skillful at audience manipulation) than any other movie I'd seen this year. A lot of them big summer tentpole movies share the same aim, but are burdened by the traditional script structure, which actually don't allow for all the setpieces and payoffs that will satisfy the audience, hence most of the summer blockbusters either fall apart or hedge all their bets on a very drawn out and spectacular climax. QT's a guy who's figured out how to circumvent Save The Cat formula and still hold a layman's attention, and he's only getting better at the latter (or the audience is really coming around to his style of filmmaking through the aid of current television climate and other films that imitate him).

So, as much as I enjoyed the film, and as much as I (and I assume many other filmmakers and writers) aspire to be that adept at audience communication, there's still something unsatisfying about watching a film where the director's every intention is not a mystery. Even Superbad had messy, personal moments.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: samsong on December 28, 2012, 01:31:48 PM
i'll join the ranks of the underwhelmed here, which seems to be the only response you can have if you aren't black or have seen more than 10 movies.  this really is like watching tarantino shoot fish in a barrel.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: RegularKarate on December 28, 2012, 03:09:08 PM
spoilers
 he already possessed the papers and was waiting for everyone to return from the funeral and like, isn't exploding the mansion kind of worse than leaving someone? you done confused me. either way he now has people coming after him, as stephen notes.

But Stephen mentioned that assuming that someone would live to report him. The only ones he lets live are the slaves and I don't think they're going to report him. People will look for him, but they won't know who they're looking for... this is unless I'm forgetting something (and I usually am).
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: tpfkabi on December 28, 2012, 04:41:06 PM
Still not getting Notifications and I don't know why.

SPOILS



I agree that the QT cameo is horrible. It was a mostly fun escape for 2+plus hours (until I had to pee with a large chunk left). It doesn't feel fully 'masterful' as IB or other Tarantino, but even off a bit is better than a good deal of others.

I wonder, too, how big of a part Menke played as editor.

Was anyone else thinking Samuel L. was about to totally change his character when he threw down his cane? Was he faking a bad back? After we saw Django pretend to be mean to the slaves, I almost expected SLJ to reverse character and say that he was pretending all this time just to try to stay alive.

That tooth boucing around was pretty funny.

Still can't fathom the nutsack shot.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on December 28, 2012, 05:33:02 PM
I wonder, too, how big of a part Menke played as editor.

None, I'm sorry to say.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: JG on December 29, 2012, 11:04:46 PM
reiterating what others have that said, that its mostly boring and predictable.

also, i'd like to think i'm a pretty open minded and lax dude, but in what world is girls lambasted for not featuring a black character, but this is not getting more shit for being unfunny and kinda in bad taste? NOT IN MY WORLD.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on December 30, 2012, 12:18:21 PM
The first words that occurred to me when it ended: "that was a nearly perfect movie." And I very rarely feel that way. I was fully prepared to agree with all the mixed reviews, but to my surprise I loved it almost unreservedly.

Yes, the QT cameo was sort of horrifying, and the 2 or 3 clips of fake slow motion were even moreso (pet peeve I guess). But that's pretty much it... I have no other complaints. It was such a beautiful film with so many stunning cinematic flourishes, the kind that really send a tingle up your leg, as the kids say. It certainly is a popcorn movie, but what a glorious one it is.

It derives incredible power from its simplicity and precision. I don't want it to be anything more than it is. Tarantino is not really equipped to make profound statements about slavery, so he doesn't. How can you not respect that?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on December 30, 2012, 12:42:33 PM
you just liked it cuz you're black...
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: polkablues on December 30, 2012, 01:18:17 PM
I'm pretty much with JB on this one. I have very mixed feelings about Inglourious Basterds, but I felt like this one was the perfected version of what he was trying to do with IB. It's also the most focused film QT's made since Reservoir Dogs.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: JG on December 30, 2012, 05:50:16 PM
focused how? cos its linear?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ono on December 30, 2012, 06:22:45 PM
I saw this the day after Christmas and wasn't quite compelled to post anything then.  I guess that tells you how lukewarm my reaction was.  Seeing the accolades this is getting then seeing how some are ignoring The Master while a few aren't letting anyone forget, it made me want to rethink my apathy.  I enjoyed myself, sure.  But I predicted most steps before they were made (I whispered to the girlfriend "Schultz has a bounty for the sheriff he just shot" minutes before he revealed that that's exactly how he'd get out of that situation).  The only time I was surprised was when Schultz killed Candie, and that was because it was out of character -- the character had been painted throughout the whole film to have more control than that.  I thought I was done with Tarantino after Kibble 2.  Killer Crow sure doesn't excite me any.  I want to see Patton Oswald's take on what Tarantino should do next: his take on women's suffrage to premiere in 2015: UNCORSETTED BITCHES.

There are no nuances here (heh, I just watched Diner this afternoon and early on one character pontificates about the nonword nature of the word "nuance").  He stopped being able to tread that line after Jackie, and the only reason he was able to was because it wasn't his material.  He makes popcorn films very well now, but that's all he makes.  A perfect, cleaned, spit and polished popcorn film, replete with Django in blue suit.  Shiny, but absolutely ridiculous.

On another tangent, the guns used back then in no way had the firepower Tarantino purports them to have in this film.  An anachronism, sure.  Sort of fun, I guess, but it took me out of the film.  Sure, we all laughed when Django blew away Candie's sister (creepiness +1, that).  But it just goes to show he'd be just as adept at scripting new Warner Bros. cartoons.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: polkablues on December 30, 2012, 07:16:46 PM
focused how? cos its linear?

Because it has a clear protagonist with a clear goal and arc and doesn't meander off from that goal for long tangents.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on December 30, 2012, 07:42:25 PM
On another tangent, the guns used back then in no way had the firepower Tarantino purports them to have in this film.  An anachronism, sure.  Sort of fun, I guess, but it took me out of the film.  Sure, we all laughed when Django blew away Candie's sister (creepiness +1, that).  But it just goes to show he'd be just as adept at scripting new Warner Bros. cartoons.

Were you surprised? He's been doing cartoon violence at least since Kill Bill. I think it really works here.  *SPOILERS*  The way Candie and Big John Brittle fall over dead is straight out of cartoons. The violence itself is something else... it's like gunshots cause blood and guts to come splurging out of bodies in a kind of syrup, as if internal organs are just waiting to burst out of the body. Reminds me of some of the Starship Troopers violence. I'm not sure why it works so well. Maybe it takes things more fully into the realm of fantasy, which is good because it's basically a full-blown cartoon Western.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: polkablues on December 30, 2012, 07:51:30 PM
The whole movie is about myth-making. Django is a tall-tale character, like John Henry or Paul Bunyan. The heightened, unrealistic nature of the violence is in keeping with this theme, which I think is the master key to a proper reading of the film.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on December 31, 2012, 01:11:38 PM
Saw this at a record store yesterday, it's 5/6 letters on topic
(http://i.imgur.com/98pwv.jpg)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: RegularKarate on December 31, 2012, 04:49:41 PM
I watched this again yesterday and now I think I love it.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Kellen on January 02, 2013, 03:50:46 PM
Katt Williams Threatens To Punch Quentin Tarantino Over N-Word (http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/katt-williams-threatens-to-punch-quentin-tarantino-over-n-word-in-django-unchained-sam-jackson-baits-reporter-to-say-it-20130102)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: modage on January 02, 2013, 04:11:39 PM
I watched this again yesterday and now I think I love it.
I'm gonna give this a second chance on Friday but if its still one of his weaker films, you owe me $12.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on January 02, 2013, 05:38:21 PM
Katt Williams Threatens To Punch Quentin Tarantino Over N-Word (http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/katt-williams-threatens-to-punch-quentin-tarantino-over-n-word-in-django-unchained-sam-jackson-baits-reporter-to-say-it-20130102)

Katt Williams' cracked out ass was more exploited in that video than any black character in Django Unchained
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on January 02, 2013, 07:17:08 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdRxPWiwfPE



Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: polkablues on January 02, 2013, 07:23:56 PM
I watched this again yesterday and now I think I love it.
I'm gonna give this a second chance on Friday but if its still one of his weaker films, you owe me $12.

At this point, I'm comfortable in saying it's BY FAR the best film of his revenge era.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ono on January 02, 2013, 07:27:08 PM
This... (that video) does nothing for me.  Except point out how hollow all of his references are out of context.  Which I guess is something.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on January 02, 2013, 08:31:24 PM
Katt Williams Threatens To Punch Quentin Tarantino Over N-Word (http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/katt-williams-threatens-to-punch-quentin-tarantino-over-n-word-in-django-unchained-sam-jackson-baits-reporter-to-say-it-20130102)

Katt Williams' cracked out ass was more exploited in that video than any black character in Django Unchained

if Herzog still had balls he would be directing Katt Williams right now.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on January 02, 2013, 11:09:03 PM
Katt Williams Threatens To Punch Quentin Tarantino Over N-Word (http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/katt-williams-threatens-to-punch-quentin-tarantino-over-n-word-in-django-unchained-sam-jackson-baits-reporter-to-say-it-20130102)

Katt Williams' cracked out ass was more exploited in that video than any black character in Django Unchained

On jesus' birthday no less!
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on January 03, 2013, 08:29:08 AM
Tarantino on Fresh Air:


http://www.npr.org/player/v2/mediaPlayer.html?action=1&t=1&islist=false&id=168200139&m=168460506

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on January 03, 2013, 09:17:05 AM
I heard that last night. That interview takes an interesting turn... definitely worth a listen.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on January 04, 2013, 01:37:43 PM
Finally watched it....

It was great. Entertaining, funny, great performances. I don't feel QT's cameo "ruined" the movie, as someone said. It was distracting yes, but I'm satisfied with seeing QT get blown the fuck up.

I gotta say, with all due respect to Leo's great performance, that I was more blown away by Sam Jackson. It's been a while since I've seen him be this good. Also, for some reason I was expecting the film to be a bit more violent than it was. "Basterds" was more violent and graphic.

I agree with Modage in the sense that the music choices are not that good. They seem to be all over the place. When the Rick ross song came on, some dude behind me yelled "REALLY!?", it made me LOL.

The only bone I have to pick with this movie is that the editing is FUCKING AWFUL. It's so jumpy, at times it felt like the first 20 minutes of THE MASTER, When Joaquin is going from place to place. Except PTA had a reason to do it that way (To give the audience a sense of Freddie's drunk "come-and-go" episodes), but Tarantino had no reason to do it here. A lot of scenes end up feeling rushed because of it. And not only that, but IN THE TRAILER they use BETTER takes than in the actual fucking movie. The "You had my curiosity, now you got my attention" is one example. Sally will be deeply missed. 

I might go watch the movie again tomorrow just to watch that "Bag scene" again Haha.  "Don't ask me and mine for nothing!"
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on January 04, 2013, 08:57:30 PM
I've been thinking long and hard about the "Pre-KKK guys" scene all day. Not only because it's a fucking hilarious scene, but because when I was sitting in the theatre I thought the piece of music QT uses to introduce them sounded extremely familiar. But I couldn't quite remember where I'd heard it before... And then, it hit me:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfLg1Tvnl28


Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: modage on January 04, 2013, 10:50:24 PM
I watched this again yesterday and now I think I love it.
I'm gonna give this a second chance on Friday but if its still one of his weaker films, you owe me $12.
I saw this a second time tonight and honestly really went into it just wanting to have fun because everyone but me seems to really just be having a great time with it but instead felt trapped in my own head for half the movie trying to figure out why it doesn't work better than it does. So, I felt exactly the same about it. It's not a bad movie, it's got some great parts but to anyone who doesn't think this is one of QT's weakest efforts with some MAJOR missteps throughout, I WILL FIGHT YOU.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: squints on January 05, 2013, 12:00:06 PM
i seem to be in the same boat. everyone i know loves this except me. and i feel my reasons for not loving are valid so i've had to have quite a few long winded discussions about it.

just wish everyone would see movies the same way david edelstein and i do.  :yabbse-undecided:
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: HeywoodRFloyd on January 06, 2013, 12:09:35 AM
Anyone else notice that James Remar plays two different characters in the film?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on January 06, 2013, 10:20:34 AM

The loudest and longest laugh it got in that screening was the first dick shooting, because I was watching this movie with children ( yes, there were goo goo, ga ga's at this show. HOW DO YOU BRING A KID TO THIS FUCKING MOVIE?!?! ) I feel like that got such a huge reaction that when Django shoots Billy Crash in his dick it didn't have the same impact, there shoulda just been one dick shooting.


Actually, there were 3 dick shootings.  First was the snowman, then the naked dude, then finally Billy Crash.

Just like PTA shows the shot of a ship's wake 3 times in "The Master" and just like Kubrick shows the Alien Monolith 3 times in "2001"..... A dick getting blown off is Tarantino's monolith.  :)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: BB on January 06, 2013, 05:36:26 PM
...just like Kubrick shows the Alien Monolith 3 times in "2001"

For some reason, many people are mistaken about this. The monolith is shown four times: the apes, the moon, floating through space preceding the Stargate sequence (which is the one everybody seems to forget), and the end when Bowman is on his deathbed.

As for DU, it lands squarely in the middle of the Tarantino oeuvre for me. Below his 90s output and Kill Bill 1, above the rest. Found it mostly entertaining. A little purple and overwritten (though much less so than IB). Distractingly bad editing at points (you can see how much his earlier stuff really depended on Sally Menke's judiciousness). But overall, pretty good. Much like everybody who kinda, sorta doesn't like Tarantino maybe, I enjoy being proven wrong.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: HeywoodRFloyd on January 07, 2013, 05:07:41 AM
Some might say 5 times if you count the opening black screen which plays the Ligeti piece before the blue MGM logo. One might say that it's like that because the curtains were still meant to be down back in the theatres in the 60's, in an overture like fashion, but I think the 2.21:1 black screen is also the monolith, otherwise why would Kubes play the same track that only accompanies the Monolith throughout the film.

In regards to Django, I enjoyed it, but from this first viewing I can say it's his weakest from his Vengeance Trilogy. The violence in this film is artful, I loved every single over exaggerated blood splatter and bullet penetration that left an array of human limbs as projectiles. But I was hoping for something more, more story. But I still loved the film, probably on my second viewing i'll go into it knowing what it is and appreciate it even more, but at the moment I have to say I was expecting the resurgence of Sergio Leone, but that didn't happen. I couldn't help but want another The Good The Bad and The Ugly, and what I mean by that is, twists and turns all over the place, something QT handles so well, but it felt relatively linear, 'The creation of Django' is the first half, 'Redemption at Candieland' the second half. I just wanted that redemption to sprawl with heaps of different dynamics, perhaps the fact it all happens on the same day they arrive to Candieland limits that, let's say if they did leave and come back in 5 days (Like Django said), I was eager to know what their plan was, and how it was gonna turn out, but good ol' Samuel L Jackson pulled a cinematic cockblock on me. This is not to say this film isn't enjoyable, it really is, just not the masterpiece people made it out to be. Tarantino said this was the most violent western since the The Wild Bunch, and I'll have to give him that crown, it's quite a splatter fest.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on January 07, 2013, 06:33:48 AM
Some might say 5 times if you count the opening black screen which plays the Ligeti piece before the blue MGM logo. One might say that it's like that because the curtains were still meant to be down back in the theatres in the 60's, in an overture like fashion, but I think the 2.21:1 black screen is also the monolith, otherwise why would Kubes play the same track that only accompanies the Monolith throughout the film.



ROB AGER:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P95NWAHWLrc
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on January 07, 2013, 04:28:01 PM
SPOILERS

I really liked it, though I will talk about the problems I had with it mainly. What I did like is short. When I saw the trailer I was like oh-shit, it's another one of these tarantino shit shows. The best part for me is how the trailer is actually quite different than the final product. It looks glossier, the film was treated in a very studio style of perfect contrast and little grain. The film itself didn't look anything like what we were led to think it was. Also, a lot of the takes used in the trailer were close ups, with over the top performances. Again, the final film had much of the same dialog delivered from afar, and with understated performances of the very same lines. Almost always a better way of handling it.

I actually think the film is much more gentle with the tarantinoisms in regard to character and dialog, partially due to the time and place it's set; which was refreshing.

My problem is twofold. The early draft of the script was vastly different than the final product. Sadly he made changes that I don't think he needed, and actually worked against the narrative. First and foremost, I really miss the Broomhilda backstory sequence. The performance for the character was strong enough that it wasn't needed to put the audience on the side of Django, as I'm sure was the major reason for it existing at one time, but it was such an interesting little subplot to how Broomhilda got to Candyland. These deviations from the script left me wanting more. It feels like instead of including Broomhilda's backstory Tarantino opted to include the penultimate shootout scene (the one right after Kristof Waltz dies). So instead of getting a cool subplot we got a pretty cool shootout. However, the entire story was building up to the point of the final scene, so in essence, we got our release before it was warranted. In the initial script, Waltz turns to Fox, apologizes because he "couldn't help himself" and they knock Django out. By having the shootout, we're given the catharsis of Django kicking ass too early and we care less at the end of the film. Tarantino just made us cum too soon...

The final shootout... beyond what I just mentioned (the fact that we cared less by the time it got there), in the original screenplay the final shootout consists of Django meeting the six people as they come up the road to their plantation house and all the men pull out their guns, Django only has one gun himself. Then the film cuts back to what we now saw in the final moment; Waltz saying the world will remember him as the fastest gun. After the flashback it cuts back to the standoff and Django kills all six guys before they can shoot him. Six bullets, six dead racist mother fuckers. I understand by including the previous shootout (another crazy 88 scene no less) we already know he's super talented with a gun, so logically Tarantino had to change the ending. I do like the ending as it is, especially when he asks the maid to say goodbye to her madam... too good, but the whole build up of the script was showing how Django became a legend. In the last moment he delivers a flurry of unmatched marksmenship. So again, the penultimate gunfight ruined the film in another way.

The second issue is a strange one, because it's not an issue of story it's one of great acting. When I initially read the screenplay, and Waltz's character dies, it felt like a cool as shit way of offing the protagonist, so in turn another one could step up to the plate. I love how tarantino plays with the expectations of protagonists, much like he did with Death Proof; we follow the villain instead of the heroes. In this case we're following a great man, who is so great it's almost to a fault, and he ultimately pays the price for his great sense of honor and character (which is nice to see the same actor in back to back QT films stand for polar opposite values). But only then can Django rise up to fight for what's good. Looks great on paper... Doesn't work when you got Kristof fucking Waltz killing a performance. Strangely it reminds me of when I was younger and watched Scream 3 in the theatre, as soon as Parker Pose's character died, I just didn't give a shit anymore about anyone else. She just stole the film from everyone. Now it's not as bad with Django Unchained, but I gotta admit, with Waltz (not to mention Dicaprio) dead, I gave a little less of a shit.

I still think it's amazing that Tarantino, in about 5 seconds of screen time, killed the protagonist and antagonist off with 1/3 of the film left to go. He is one of very few film makers who can make it still work. However, it did change the film. I was still with it till the end, but a little less than I would have hoped.

Has anyone else read the early draft?

anyway, that's my 2ps.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: HeywoodRFloyd on January 07, 2013, 04:54:38 PM
Nice writeup man, I read the first half of the early draft (didn't want to spoil the film entirely) and I too really did miss the Broomhilda backstory subplot, I really wanted to see that segment.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on January 07, 2013, 06:16:31 PM
SPOILERS

Nice writeup man, I read the first half of the early draft (didn't want to spoil the film entirely) and I too really did miss the Broomhilda backstory subplot, I really wanted to see that segment.

thanks man. you never know that might be one of the scenes on the cutting room floor and they actually shot it. it does cut back to some of it, the part where she is whipped.

the best part of that missing segment is that other character, the one who buys her and falls in love with her (but she is also his pony) and then loses her in a card game. It's so dark and in some ways the most racist part because it plays it off as somewhat sweet, in an almost Shakespearian way. First off he bets her, showing that she's only a commodity of his (but also maybe that he's full of pride and is egged into it/has a massive gambling problem). Then the scene ends so well. too bad it's gone.

Like I get that the film is not really her story and that's another reason to not include it, but damn it's so well written.

It'd be a nice internet kinda thing, like a short film about her past. they shoulda released it that way, much like the short film for darjeling.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on January 08, 2013, 02:02:05 AM
I didn't realize the script was so different from the final product, though I imagined it would be. Maybe it's because I read it like a year and a half ago, but I thought that most of what was in there ended up on screen. I'm gonna have to flip through it again anyways. I was picturing Will Smith in the leading role the whole time, after all.


Anyways, Tarantino did this hour and a half 'commentary' on the soundtrack that was up on sound cloud and everyone was promoting it last week, but now it's been taken down. I never got a chance to listen and it's not on iTunes or Youtube or anything. Can any of you fuckwads find that for me?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: RegularKarate on January 08, 2013, 10:58:09 AM
This is why I don't read screenplays before seeing movies I know are getting made.
You can't call the differences in the screenplay a problem with the film. It's a problem with your expectations.
It's the same thing with your issue with Waltz. It's not what you wanted... to me, that's part of what makes it so good.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on January 08, 2013, 11:28:09 AM
This is why I don't read screenplays before seeing movies I know are getting made.
You can't call the differences in the screenplay a problem with the film. It's a problem with your expectations.
It's the same thing with your issue with Waltz. It's not what you wanted... to me, that's part of what makes it so good.

naw it's not a problem with my expectations, i think i was descriptive enough in how it didn't work.

I decided to read the master and django about a year ago. I've never done it that way, and it was a learning experience. I got to cut the movie before they did, so I learned a lot about writing and directing in the process. reading it first also gave me the ability to put (or not put) emotion into scenes. when you see the final product you're wowed by how little you have to write. most people overwrite because they think emotions come from words and descriptions, when most often they come from reactions/motivation and actors. the master is so bare bones that way. I learned a huge lesson in the process.

If you want to write and make films it's hard to learn from screenplays if you always read them after watching the film. You always end up seeing the scene in your head with the same delivery each time. I got my version of the films, and then I got theirs. I can see how they differed.

but ultimately the point is, Tarantino made changes and in my opinion some were for the better and some hamstrung the film from the original concept. Paul Thomas Anderson on the other hand made 100% of his changes for the betterment of the story. It's not as simple as I wanted something, because I loved the master in script form too, one improved upon the source material and the other (slightly) worsened.

feels like you didn't read my post, it's exactly what i wanted from the waltz character, i just wanted django to be as good so when he passes the torch I'm still totally on board. I was on board, but had my eye on the safety boats. waltz was so what i wanted, so great in his performance, foxx couldn't hold a candle.

oh and btw, if it wasn't clear, I really liked the movie!  :yabbse-grin: I'd give it a 7.5/10, and if it didn't do what i was saying it woulda been higher.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: RegularKarate on January 09, 2013, 12:32:20 PM
I read your post. I still think that you set your own expectations when you read a screenplay before the movie. You have a good point about learning from reading screenplays before seeing the movie (though I don't fully agree that knowing what sets and actors look like affects what you learn about words on paper)...

SPOILER

...using your example: to me, as someone who did not read the screenplay, Waltz's death made me more interested in the story. His performance was amazing and I was moved by his death, but I liked the shift, I was affected by it more because his performance was so strong.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on January 10, 2013, 02:59:23 PM
SPOILERS

I read your post. I still think that you set your own expectations when you read a screenplay before the movie. You have a good point about learning from reading screenplays before seeing the movie (though I don't fully agree that knowing what sets and actors look like affects what you learn about words on paper)...

SPOILER

...using your example: to me, as someone who did not read the screenplay, Waltz's death made me more interested in the story. His performance was amazing and I was moved by his death, but I liked the shift, I was affected by it more because his performance was so strong.

exactly, that's why I loved it in the script, protagonist and antagonist are killed, and the two sidekicks battle it out. The problem is, I found waltz and dicaprio to be far more three dimensional than foxx and jackson. I think we both find the device that Tarantino used to be highly engaging and original (or at least uncommon), I guess I only differ in that I feel jackson and more so foxx didn't quite deliver enough early in the film to totally take control of the film at that point. I might just be splitting hairs, because they did a great job. I'm just going over in my head how I thought their performances were dwarfed by the other two.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: RegularKarate on January 10, 2013, 04:51:46 PM
It's not a spoiler to say that this was Jackson's best performance in over a decade and I completely disagree. He was incredible... far more evil than DiCaprio
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on January 11, 2013, 01:09:25 PM
Quentin Tarantino Snaps at Interviewer Over Violence in Film Question
The Oscar-winning "Django Unchained" director was having no part the inquiry, telling a journalist, "I'm not your slave."
Source: THR

Quentin Tarantino is officially done talking about the violence in his films.

A master of heightened (and often comedic) carnage on celluloid, the release of the Oscar-winner's latest film, Django Unchained, coincides with a bloody streak of mass shootings in America, a calendar fluke that has put him in the crosshairs of the latest debate on the impact of violence in entertainment. This does not amuse him, as he made clear in an interview with a British journalist for Channel 4.

Tarantino said the violence in his and other films are based in fantasy, the sort of unlikely escapism that allows one man to take on twenty in a fair fight. When pressed further, he declared, "Don’t ask me questions like that. I’m not biting. I refuse your question."

As the questioning continued, his protests grew. "I’m not your slave and you’re not my master. You can’t make me dance to your tune. I’m not your monkey," he said, sitting up in his seat.

The director, whose film garnered Oscar nominations on Thursday for best picture, screenplay and supporting actor, is a 20-year veteran of the film junket, and made it clear he was the one in control, calling the interview simply a "commercial" for his movie. Channel 4's interviewer, Krishnan Guru-Murthy, fought that contention, saying that he worked for a serious news program, with interest in exploring relevant social debate.

Tarantino then pointed out that he has been questioned up and down about the violence in his films, and even as his interviewer cited Vice President Joe Biden's meeting with the entertainment industry over guns in its products, Tarantino said that it was not his responsibility to address the issue once again.

No stranger to controversy, Tarantino's Django has touched off more social debate than perhaps any of his previous films, with only 1997's blaxploitation Jackie Brown coming close. Earlier, the director weathered the storm of racial outcry, thanks to the western slave-revenge epic's depiction of bondage and use of epithets.

"Not one word of social criticism that's been leveled my way has ever changed one word of any script or any story I tell," he told The Hollywood Reporter late last month, referring both to discussions of both his dealings with race and gunplay. "I believe in what I'm doing wholeheartedly and passionately. It's my job to ignore that."
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on January 11, 2013, 01:24:15 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jRiwQRVIlI
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: diggler on January 11, 2013, 02:43:03 PM
It's definitely an overreaction, the reporter didn't really seem to be up to anything (his quaint British accent makes it seem even less offensive). I'm amazed at how anyone can keep their composure while answering the same question a thousand times. Luckily, there's no such thing as bad publicity (thanks for that lesson, Canyons).
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on January 13, 2013, 10:10:22 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TP-KgA4uYo
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on January 14, 2013, 07:07:22 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPFBglXcGJg 



 :?     
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on January 14, 2013, 08:06:24 AM
What the fuck was that??!!
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on January 14, 2013, 09:39:29 AM
I think a reporter pissed in his champagne
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on January 23, 2013, 07:54:04 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-bPjtUvWTg



QT talks about Django, choking a bitch and eating pineapple to make his semen taste better. James McAvoy is also there.

British TV is fucking awesome.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on January 24, 2013, 05:42:50 AM
guys. i don't know what the fuck just happened.

i think i sorta kinda like a tarantino movie. i haven't felt this way in 15 years.

i must be getting old/stupid.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on January 24, 2013, 06:48:39 AM
SPOILERS MAYBE! Definitely!!

Apart from a few moments where it seemed to drag a little bit, especially after the big shootout (including the first ever Tarantino role that actually bothered me), it was as enjoyable as expected.

What I think it's great about this, just as I thought about Inglourious Basterds, is that it's all very entertaining and even silly, but at the same time it tackles very interesting subjects. It's about slavery, but it's also about friendship, class struggle, justice and, of course, just like Inglourious Basterds, about communication. About creating a character to save your life and get what you want. It's all about how you present yourself to others, with words and appearances being the key.

As for the violence, I think its attitude towards it is fantastic. It's funny and over the top when it needs to, but it's also very hard sometimes. And contrary to what some of you thought, it has to be hard. Why? Because one thing is our heroes killing those racist sons of bitches (the most basic level of entertainment: terrible villains who need to go done outrageously) and other thing is the violence the slave owners inflict on the slaves. If you think about it, the toughest scenes to watch are the Mandingo fights and the dogs, and those have our characters not as participants of the action, but merely as observers. That's what enrages them, those disturbing moments are what makes Schultz throw away his plan for killing that villain. He, a very rational man, prefers to die than to shake the hand of a man who treats people like that. That's why, I think, those scenes needed to be almost unbearable to watch.

I just don't think the movie gives you a great deal of substance after that big shootout apart from what was mentioned by someone a few pages ago: that Django absorbes Schultz, and just like him, he gets away of torture by talking - again, communication as a way to save your ass. Now that I'm thinking about it more clearly, I'm almost positive that after I rewatch this, I'll have no problem whatsoever with that last part.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on January 24, 2013, 12:26:09 PM
^ A few responses...

Where you're saying the movie drags, I think it needs to. We need to feel the despair in that passage. I certainly did.

Concerning the violence, I pretty much agree. Tarantino says in interviews that the movie very intentionally has two different types of violence... (1) violence against the villains, which is cartoonish and fun... (2) violence against the slaves and protagonists, which is more realistic and disturbing. It's fascinating how he pulls that off. Can anyone name other movies that do this? I'm curious.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on January 24, 2013, 04:47:08 PM
^ A few responses...

Where you're saying the movie drags, I think it needs to. We need to feel the despair in that passage. I certainly did.

I don't know. I kind of didn't. It just got to a point where, after that shootout, I thought: "OK, we're done, end of story, bad guys are gonna die here". After that, and knowing almost for sure that our hero is gonna be reunited with his lady, I was just thinking he was gonna go through the exact same thing, there's gonna be another shootout and this time he'll come out on top. But Tarantino does that. His climaxes are never what you expect exactly. I may not loved the final 20 minutes as much as the rest of the movie, but I can see why they're there. Now when I think about what I really didn't like in those final minutes was Tarantino's cameo. His character was really off: the accent was really weird (let me remind you guys that English is not my main language and even to my ears that sounded terrible), and his clothes were way too clean compared to the other two guys. Something just felt very odd. And I'm a dude who even enjoyed his performances in From Dusk Till Dawn and Death Proof. Maybe it's not so much that it dragged as it was that this time his cameo really rubbed me the wrong way...

Concerning the violence, I pretty much agree. Tarantino says in interviews that the movie very intentionally has two different types of violence... (1) violence against the villains, which is cartoonish and fun... (2) violence against the slaves and protagonists, which is more realistic and disturbing. It's fascinating how he pulls that off. Can anyone name other movies that do this? I'm curious.

Didn't read many interviews before I saw it, but having watched the movie now, that's what I took from it. And it's one of the best things about it.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on January 24, 2013, 04:55:21 PM
Qt also mentioned that the character, in these types of films at least, will typically get caught and find himself in in such a predicament as to make the audience wonder, "how will our hero escape?"  I find that this is good enough reasoning alone for why the film plays out the way it does.
 Staying true to the genre.


But don't mind me, continue you on with the adult conversation.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: squints on January 24, 2013, 05:29:37 PM
Does anybody see that this film has more in common with Blazing Saddles than it does any spaghetti western?? At least the ones I've seen. 

It may just be the white guilt talking, but i was kind of astonished that one of the first scenes in the movie is a big nigger joke. They roll in to town and the main point and the main "joke" of the scene is "Gasp! Look at that nigger on a horse!" People are laughing at it the same way they're laughing at Blazing Saddles and it unsettles me.

I still can't believe the sheer volume of people I know who are just in love with this movie. I still don't get it, how is this any different from anything he's ever done? How is this even the slightest bit better than anything he's ever done?

I had so much more fun with "gleeful violence" in a film like Dredd than i did with this.

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on January 24, 2013, 05:48:21 PM
excellent dredd bomb!
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: socketlevel on January 24, 2013, 06:09:22 PM
ah man, really?

Most people are not laughing at the racism cuz they're thinking "fuck ya what's a nigger doing on a horse?!" they're laughing because A - it's a very different world down south, and that long ago (should be mentioned independently yet not always exclusively) B - The audacity of the statement which is said so nonchalantly, and C - The utter ignorance of this old white dude.

sure sure, some are laughing cuz of some form of mild passive aggressive racism, and sadly it makes the laughter all sound like one voice. But really what's the alternative? Political Correctness in a time when people just didn't think that way? should we be revisionist? or maybe you'd like a didactic approach? I agree its sad that it'll get some real racist laughter, but I don't think by making a point less sophisticated and appealing to a broad audience will help. It'll just skirt the issue and pretend like it never existed.

Blazzing saddles was pointing out this same irony.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on January 24, 2013, 07:36:56 PM
seems ok to be repulsed by repulsive behavior. your alt interpretations are based on a flawed perspective (not yours, theirs), which you find humerous, but like while acknowledging its imperfectness. i don't think the rejection of any punch line that requires that kind of perspective should be met with shock. both sides could relax?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pozer on January 24, 2013, 11:18:44 PM
guys. i don't know what the fuck just happened.

i think i sorta kinda like a tarantino movie. i haven't felt this way in 15 years.

i must be getting old/stupid.

just wait till your married status like polka and me. youll find yourself enjoying crap like premium rush.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on January 25, 2013, 03:14:52 AM
Qt also mentioned that the character, in these types of films at least, will typically get caught and find himself in in such a predicament as to make the audience wonder, "how will our hero escape?"  I find that this is good enough reasoning alone for why the film plays out the way it does.
 Staying true to the genre.


But don't mind me, continue you on with the adult conversation.


It makes sense, it's just that I don't really love the way he does it. He actually made me think that right after he seemed to be trapped and out of bullets in that shootout. "What will Django do now? How will he escape?" And then he didn't escape, just to be captured, and escape later. Tarantino could have found a way for him to talk his way out of that situation right there, thus avoiding the scene with his cameo. It would have had the same effect and be 20 minutes shorter.

EDIT: A few points about squints's comment. First, I still don't understand the "how is this any different from anything he's ever done?" comments as reasons for not liking a movie. If I like chocolate, why would I expect to eat a chocolate hoping it tastes like pizza and be disappointed to find out it tastes like a chocolate. I like Django Unchained because it feels like a Tarantino movie. The stories and themes are way different from other movies of his, the setting is different, so are the actors, but it is Tarantino and that's enough for me.

Then, about the racist jokes, what socketlevel said. I much prefer to watch a movie about controversial issues that's actually controversial, than something like The Help, that treats such things ever so carefully, passes as very serious, but in the end what they do is treating a subject as terrible as racism in such a way that makes white people feel good about it. Racism makes me sick, yet I laughed at that scene. Why? Well, because stupidity can be funny, and because for someone like me, the mere idea that a person seems so shocked that a black man is riding a horse is so removed from my ideals it makes it funny. You said you had lots of fun with the violence in Dredd (which was great, I liked that movie), well, don't you have living person guilt to have fun at a movie where people are dying? Some of the deaths in both movies are hilarious, and yet I despise guns and violence in real life.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: squints on January 25, 2013, 01:13:58 PM

EDIT: A few points about squints's comment. First, I still don't understand the "how is this any different from anything he's ever done?" comments as reasons for not liking a movie. If I like chocolate, why would I expect to eat a chocolate hoping it tastes like pizza and be disappointed to find out it tastes like a chocolate. I like Django Unchained because it feels like a Tarantino movie. The stories and themes are way different from other movies of his, the setting is different, so are the actors, but it is Tarantino and that's enough for me.

Look at PTA's filmography, i'll admit Magnolia and Boogie Nights have a similar vibe going on as far as style, but going from Punch Drunk to There Will Be Blood and we're dealing with films that absolutely feel different from each other.

Substitute slaves owners with nazis and slaves with jews and we have ourselves Djanglorious Basterds.
I'm not gonna let Tarantino slide just because he's Tarantino and that's what he's expected to make. I loved Kill Bill and i loved Jackie Brown and those two are so different from each other. Kill Bill is the pinnacle of his career from the last 10 years and he went "safe" with Inglorious and Django, there is nothing new about those two, nothing refreshing, nothing to keep me interested. I go to a Michael Bay movie to see a Michael Bay move, knowing exactly what to expect. I've gone to Tarantino's movies for the last decade expecting greatness from one of the most interesting and original filmmakers working today and I've been let down. This man is a golden child with relatively infinite resources at his disposal, a privilege virtually no other filmmaker in the world has and this is what he gives us?  So now I'm just supposed to be satisfied with his homogenization?

My initial problems with Tarantino all started with the end of Basterds, Motherfucker actually wrote down in his fucking screenplay "I think this may be my masterpiece." Seriously?! The nerve of this dude! And no quentin, that was NOT your masterpiece, Django is NOT your masterpiece. And with all these comments about not being an old boring filmmaker make it seem like he isn't even trying anymore. Like he's satisfied with what he's done to this point and he's deathly afraid of making a shitty old man movie.


I've definitely realized I've been pooping on everyone's party lately (here and irl) about this film and i really should just let it go but (along with The Dark Knight Rises and Prometheus) the hype i'd built for myself for this and other movies this last year was absolutely unobtainable. There's no way they could have lived up to my expectations. I just wanted more
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: modage on January 25, 2013, 01:27:05 PM
Thumbs up to that post.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: matt35mm on January 25, 2013, 01:44:54 PM
Now I'm wondering why P liked this but hated INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS. They just don't seem that different, except that IB feels tighter and DU feels looser.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on January 26, 2013, 04:53:20 AM
It seems it all comes down to what you think the experience offers you in the end. For me, Django Unchained was different enough from Inglourious Basterds to validate its existence. Yes, there are similarities, which in some cases make it all the more interesting. I think that by having a german actor who previously played a hateful Nazi now appearing as a slave savior QT is making a big balls statement comparing slavery no the Holocaust, slave owners to Nazis. With his last two movies, he's been trying to make us look at History from a different perspective and I love that. You don't, there's nothing more I can say about it. I don't give him a pass because he is Tarantino, I give it because his movie was a riot. Whenever he makes one I don't appreciate, I'll be the first to admit it, just like after I loved every Nolan movie to that point, and when The Dark Knight came out I had no problem admitting it was shit.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on January 26, 2013, 01:20:56 PM
what about the cinematic grammar? is the cinematic grammar much different between ib and du?

i think the cinematic grammar is much different between ib and du. by accident this is a kind of huge topic -- i'd be interested in reading a long piece that talks about the development of qt's cinematic grammar in a way that isolates it from the grammar he buckets from the well, what seems to be a personal voice and what seems to be a community voice, and how those interact, etc.

i don't think the same moviemaker who made reservoir dogs made du, no way. that's obvious. but i also have suspicions that there are meaningful disparities between ib and du. in an overall sense they're two movies about historical revenge fantasies. but smaller patterns exist.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: wilder on January 26, 2013, 03:27:05 PM
what about the cinematic grammar? is the cinematic grammar much different between ib and du?

i think the cinematic grammar is much different between ib and du. by accident this is a kind of huge topic -- i'd be interested in reading a long piece that talks about the development of qt's cinematic grammar in a way that isolates it from the grammar he buckets from the well, what seems to be a personal voice and what seems to be a community voice, and how those interact, etc.

i don't think the same moviemaker who made reservoir dogs made du, no way. that's obvious. but i also have suspicions that there are meaningful disparities between ib and du. in an overall sense they're two movies about historical revenge fantasies. but smaller patterns exist.

Do it start the thread.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: jenkins on January 26, 2013, 05:38:30 PM
thread, more like life project. i'd at least need to be able to screencap. so i'll keep it under my hat and maybe let's do it after home release.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on January 26, 2013, 07:39:31 PM
Inglorious has show-stopping setpieces. Several strands of plot. Overall a very mixed-up approach. Django is slavishly focused on one plot, and intensely linear.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on February 01, 2013, 04:14:48 AM
I just remembered something I felt while watching this. Just a curiosity, really.

Near the end of the movie, when Django comes back to rescue Broomhilda, there's a shot from inside the room she's in where we can see him slowly riding his horse outside. Did anyone else think of There Will Be Blood for a second, considering how the shot is framed and whatnot?
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Drenk on February 01, 2013, 06:45:43 AM
Yes, I thought of There Will Be Blood (that shot scared me the first time I saw TWBB), and I think Tarantino thinks of PTA.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on February 01, 2013, 09:06:41 AM
I just remembered something I felt while watching this. Just a curiosity, really.

Near the end of the movie, when Django comes back to rescue Broomhilda, there's a shot from inside the room she's in where we can see him slowly riding his horse outside. Did anyone else think of There Will Be Blood for a second, considering how the shot is framed and whatnot?


Yes!... It's just like the shot when Daniel goes to talk to Bandy and the grandson tells him that Bandy's not there. There were other moments that reminded me of TWBB too. Like when Django is walking through the field and Bacalov's "La corsa (2nd version)"  plays.  QT said that TWBB inspired him to take it to the next level with "Basterds", I think their friendship also plays a role into it.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: squints on February 01, 2013, 01:48:25 PM
QT said that TWBB inspired him to take it to the next level with "Basterds"

PSSSHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHAW  :yabbse-undecided:
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Alexandro on February 03, 2013, 01:11:06 AM
To me this film was an experience akin to Kill Bill 2, because it suffers from the same problem: it just goes on and on and end ups becoming tiring.

Beyond the any criticism one may have on the "ideas" Tarantino may be juggling with here, the film has some great moments that only a filmmaker like him could achieve. However, those moments are almost diluted because it's all so overwritten.

SPOILERS

The first hour or so was where I mainly found the problems. Scenes are so much longer than needed, dialogues over explain and repeat everything, sequences seem to appear capriciously and jokes tend to not be that funny. There is A LOT of stuff in this part of the movie that could just go and it all would be better. Dr Schultz is an extremely talky character, and every time he started with one of his long clever monologues I kept thinking how much more interesting it would be if he were silent and only spoke so much when it was necessary, keeping in with the film's subject of playing a character to survive. Did he really HAD to explain Django his line of work in that bar, drinking a beer, while waiting on a sheriff? Was the Broomhilda story really necessary? The Klan scene?

Thankfully, once they enter the Mandingo fighting part of the story it all feels vital and on point. Even in the microcosmos of Candyland, the whole slavery operation is shown at it's most cruel and stupid, and DiCaprio really injects a lot of energy to this film with his performance. The bit when he talks about nigger love literally cracked me up just by looking at his mannerisms and faces. I don't think he's ever been this loose in anything, or this funny. Also, Sam Jackson has the sad and disturbing role of the piece. All the elements fit together so well here, and up to the point where they cut the deal and buy Broomhilda. Even Waltz manages to find a core to his character and gives probably the best emotional reward of the film. Tellingly, he speaks very little at this moment.

Obviously for everyone else in the world but Tarantino, the film should end with a shoot out right after hell breaks loose in this sequence. But no. Not Tarantino. He has to keep talking and talking through his characters for almost 25 more minutes, and with a terrible cameo in a sequence that truly makes no sense being there whatsoever. And he needs his hero well groomed for the climax. It's all very dumb, and all the joy that I felt for the previous hour was threatened because of this, one of the worst sins of cinema: having a climax, then going back to whatever, and having a second climax...This is the same problem that Kill Bill 2 had. I will contextualize this to my own experience: i love Kill bill 1, i believe is one of those perfect films. It just flows from one sequence to the next so effortlessly, and ends with an awesome classic cliffhanger. But Kill Bill 2, over the years I have tried several times to enjoy it, and it just doesn't do it for me. I admire it, but I get bored by it. It keeps going forever, with characters talking and having long conversations and then ends up in what I'm pretty confident in calling it an anti climax. Those last 25 minutes here are just superflous. I just can't come up with any good enough reason for their existence.

That said, when the film works, it works very well. Tarantino is wise to make the last confrontation between the two main black characters, and early on he has the fantastic moment when Django whips the guy who whipped Broomhilda before. That is the kind of stuff the movie should have been about, because after that Django's process is pretty muddled, and usually feels like secondary to whatever Schultz is doing.

Overall, it's an ambitious popcorn film with great moments, many awesome performances and is enjoyable, but it's too long and not that fun, so it's not the masterpiece I was expecting. It's linear and that should make it a light affair, and I miss the Tarantino of Kill Bill 1, who could just string together one spectacular action sequence after another.

We can compare this to IB but I don't see it. That one is a much more complex, fun and surprising film. This one is a little too indulgent. I've seen it twice and I don't know if I would see it again. Nevertheless, is not some bore fest as I've read, is pretty ballsy, and I would recommend it...

Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: modage on February 03, 2013, 07:36:35 AM
Well said.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on February 03, 2013, 09:35:38 AM
Yes, I definitely agree with the final 25 minutes being too much. I wrote a few posts ago why I think Tarantino chose to not end the movie at the shootout, but I still don't think it's effective.

However, the first hour I think was spot on. I loved the pace, dialog, humor and overall acting. I think the Broomhilda story worked quite well, and the Klan was a touch of genius, the whole bit about them not being able to see through those masks was not only funny but a great metaphor for racism.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Gold Trumpet on February 03, 2013, 10:06:37 AM
SPOILERS

The first hour or so was where I mainly found the problems. Scenes are so much longer than needed, dialogues over explain and repeat everything, sequences seem to appear capriciously and jokes tend to not be that funny. There is A LOT of stuff in this part of the movie that could just go and it all would be better. Dr Schultz is an extremely talky character, and every time he started with one of his long clever monologues I kept thinking how much more interesting it would be if he were silent and only spoke so much when it was necessary, keeping in with the film's subject of playing a character to survive. Did he really HAD to explain Django his line of work in that bar, drinking a beer, while waiting on a sheriff? Was the Broomhilda story really necessary? The Klan scene?

I thought it's stuff like this is what makes Tarantino Tarantino? Not trying to imply he has to be boring, but that he circles his violence with effects of everyday life. More to the point, he loves to dabble in a story's cultural formalities and tendencies before he rips off the violent undertones possible and goes nuts. For me, all his films are extended marches through everyday life for the characters and how violence is possible in the quickest and most unlikely ways.

Now, mind you, since he has gone historical, Tarantino has been focusing more on the norms of meet and greets and how people present themselves. Inglorious Basterds is very repetitive with introductions of all sorts between very different characters. In Django Unchained, it's extending out how the German is a performer with presenting himself in numerous situations. Still, even though part of me thinks he was doing this in both films because he isn't as culturally flexible with the story like he was with the story and characters in Pulp Fiction, I appreciate the dedication to seeing tone through since it set a precedent for how the violence would be portrayed. If Tarantino is only showing the standard story details to get to his violent moments, he's just emulating the genre films he says is transforming. 

My disagreement with Tarantino is based in how interesting all of it is to me. But if Tarantino got rid of these things, he would be disregardful in more senses and a lot more boring.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Alexandro on February 04, 2013, 08:36:16 PM
(welcome back GT)


I agree with what you say as far as the "Tarantino style" goes. Yes, he does that, yes, this is what makes him "Tarantino". But my complaint is not agains his style. I'm also avoiding discussion on how "serious" the conversation can get dealing with slavery in Django Unchained. I'm speaking purely from pace and structural choices that I found wrong. Look, the second hour is even more talky and "wastes" more time with introductions and all that stuff, but it felt to me much more vital, much more as it should be. They talk and talk, but it all feels like a clock and it works. But in the first hour it didn't feel like that. Setting aside my wishful thinking of Walt'z playing a silent type kind of dude, who only has verbal diarrea when playing another character for survival purposes, I noticed scenes that could have been one sequence turned into two. They get to the first town (nigger town), without Waltz explaining him he is a bounty hunter because is more "cool" or whatever, that he does this at the bar, while serving beers. It's a moment played for laughs, but it's not that funny...They have two sequences by the fire where they talk about Broomhilda, one where Waltz know of her existence, and another one later, inexplicably, where he tells the Broomhilda legend. Now I'm reading the scrip and apparently this two sequences were just separated by a time cut there, so that makes sense...

By the end, when the scene with Sam Jackson and Jamie Foxx hanging with his balls in the air takes place, I was thinking: "Damn, this is a great scene with a great monologue in it, but right now it feels like this should have ended by now, why isn't this scene somewhere before?" It's just a weirdly structured film that presents a problem Tarantino has sometimes with extending stuff way too much. In this case, this film could have been a 105 minutes masterpiece, but to me it's more of a 2 hours 40 minutes good movie...
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Gold Trumpet on February 04, 2013, 09:24:21 PM
(welcome back GT)

Thanks! And thanks to kind words from all others. It's funny, I replied to a question from Squints on facebook and someone else made an XIXAX mention in the post and I thought, "Oh yea, I used to post there. Might as well wander back." Even my computer's history lost all track of me at this site. Definitely returning to something I had no plans to return to, but it's nice.

Just no idea what's up with this respect thing.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on February 05, 2013, 04:38:20 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXp-UHJR3Mw
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on February 06, 2013, 01:47:22 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRv6i_NpKdk




Prepare yourself for all the ass-kissing.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Tictacbk on February 08, 2013, 01:39:16 AM
For the love of god, is it so much to ask for a brief description to go along with a youtube link?  An idea of what to include in said descriptions:

1. What the video is.
2. Why I should care about watching it.

For those of you wondering about the above videos, Howard Stern liked Django, Robin had her reservations.  Also the people in the film thought it was a good script.


Ok, I'm done.  Sorry.  And Django was fine.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on February 08, 2013, 04:50:16 PM
man, i haven't been that bent out of shape about a youtube video since...ever.

I guess, "Howard Stern Reviews Django Unchained," as a description wasn't blatant enough for you.

Ok, i'm done, sorry. Django was fine.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on February 08, 2013, 07:19:33 PM
man, i haven't been that bent out of shape about a youtube video since...ever.

I guess, "Howard Stern Reviews Django Unchained," as a description wasn't blatant enough for you.



Hahaha.  +1 man.     

"Haters gonna hate, Tomatoes gonna tomate, Potatoes gonna potate... and dogs are gonna bark."
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on February 08, 2013, 08:05:54 PM
You constantly post videos without description. I don't think oldmate's request was that ridiculous. if you've already seen the video you're posting why not offer a brief summary or your own observations at least for the sake of discussion?

 it would be like wilderesque posting a million interviews without so much as an introduction and expecting people to just trudge through them. I wouldn't have read that epic So-done-bergh interview if the introduction hadn't  piqued  my interest with the highlights.

 the only videos that should be posted without any context or summary are viral videos that go for less than a minute. errbody's got time for dat.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Lottery on February 10, 2013, 02:31:02 AM
Good movie. Final 30 minutes of the film loses almost all of the momentum previously built up. But is necessary for Django's arc. Oh well.

Christoph Waltz is so lovely.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: pete on February 10, 2013, 04:33:25 AM
man, i haven't been that bent out of shape about a youtube video since...ever.

I guess, "Howard Stern Reviews Django Unchained," as a description wasn't blatant enough for you.

Ok, i'm done, sorry. Django was fine.

that description doesn't pop up for everyone.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on February 10, 2013, 05:15:49 PM
Pubes, how much did QT's Aussie accent bother you?

any aussie is welcome to answer, now that we have all of you.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Lottery on February 10, 2013, 06:04:17 PM
Pubes, how much did QT's Aussie accent bother you?

any aussie is welcome to answer, now that we have all of you.

It's pretty atrocious. QT is kind of a 'meta-comic relief' in this film.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: 72teeth on February 10, 2013, 06:06:33 PM
you gotta admit tho, the man knows how to exit.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on February 11, 2013, 05:06:48 AM
John Jarratt was fucking unrecognizable to me, but it has been awhile since I've seen Wolf Creek. Not surprised in the slightest that QT used him though, since his quote about Jarratt giving "The best horror performance of the past 25 years" in WC is what got me to the theater!!

I love when he goes "You're alright for a black fella."

QT's an idiot thinking he could pull off that accent with an authentic Aussie in the same scene. Maybe if he played it retarded or something I'd understand.

 
Just looked up Jarratt and he's gonna be in Wolf Creek 2

 http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0418877/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1 (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0418877/?ref_=fn_al_nm_1)     

cool.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pubrick on February 11, 2013, 06:19:12 AM
it was fucking embarrassing.

it made an already cringe worthy cameo in an unnecessary scene utterly unbearable.  everyone in the cinema laughed when QT spoke, they thought it was a huge joke. the more i think about how STUPID he is for putting himself in the movie, with that accent, in that scene, the more i think i hate this movie. it really is bad enough to ruin the whole thing. it shows that he has no idea what he's doing, that what simple entertainment the film provided until then was nothing more than a fluke result of alcohol and lowering my expectations MASSIVELY after the turds he's plopped onscreen in the last 10 years.

still not as bad as every scene in the dark knight rises.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on February 11, 2013, 08:59:16 PM
They get to the first town (nigger town), without Waltz explaining him he is a bounty hunter because is more "cool" or whatever, that he does this at the bar, while serving beers. It's a moment played for laughs, but it's not that funny...

For some reason I feel like you're not giving an accurate account of what happens.  This is like the second scene in the film with dialogue and it also does at least 3 important things for pushing the film forward.

1st- When the bartender sees that Django has come inside the bar got a laugh each time i saw it, not to mention that his arrival to this first town really drives home the outsider that Django is given his current situation.
2nd - we understands how Schultz views slavery and what his intentions are and what purpose Django will serve.
3rd - we see a starting point for the hero and his journey, which is a long way from when Schultz has taught him to read and he reads the handbill that later saves his life.

I just don't feel like one has to, "let tarrantino slide," in order to enjoy this film. I'm fine with the length and the pacing.

still not as bad as every scene in the dark knight rises.

Ha. Fantastic +1 just for this.

it was fucking embarrassing.

it made an already cringe worthy cameo in an unnecessary scene utterly unbearable.
Terrible cameo aside, the sequence you're referencing seems necessary, and I'll say especially considering my 3rd point above.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Alexandro on February 12, 2013, 01:32:11 AM
They get to the first town (nigger town), without Waltz explaining him he is a bounty hunter because is more "cool" or whatever, that he does this at the bar, while serving beers. It's a moment played for laughs, but it's not that funny...

For some reason I feel like you're not giving an accurate account of what happens.  This is like the second scene in the film with dialogue and it also does at least 3 important things for pushing the film forward.

1st- When the bartender sees that Django has come inside the bar got a laugh each time i saw it, not to mention that his arrival to this first town really drives home the outsider that Django is given his current situation.
2nd - we understands how Schultz views slavery and what his intentions are and what purpose Django will serve.
3rd - we see a starting point for the hero and his journey, which is a long way from when Schultz has taught him to read and he reads the handbill that later saves his life.


I didn't mean to say there should not be a scene with dialog with this info or advancing the plot. I meant to say that this same info and dialogue was put there against all logic purely for style and coolness sake (and humor). It just seems a little too much for me that  after a sequence of the heroes arriving to town in which everyone who comes across them points out the "nigger in a horse", the same joke has to be repeated one last time when they enter the bar, so that the bartender can leave in the most cartoonish possible way to get the sheriff...and then Waltz says something like "get the sheriff, not the marshall"...you would think they would get ready for the sheriff in some way, but they serve beers and THEN he explains everything to django, who he is, what he does, why, etcetera...I understand it's supposed to be clever, but I was mostly waiting for the scene to end...

to be honest...whatever. It's not a deal breaker but it does bring down the film a notch or two for me when these things happen.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Neil on February 12, 2013, 04:09:55 PM
I understand your point, and although it may be cartoony and illogical, I'm just not sure that this film is very interested in that kind of logic. I'm not sure how many outs the guy had with creating humor in such a situation and at this point it's safe to assume that QT will be fairly heavy handed when it comes to the dialogue in his films, and for every time he has his characters go on and on and on, you still get simple lines of dialogue that are very telling, "Stop playing Beethoven," or, "there's nothing worse than a house master."

I don't know, even with regards to how long this film was, i enjoyed the ride.  I was still invested after Schultz's exit, but that was merely because I had no idea where the film was heading.  Never had a problem with the pacing. Also, the thing i really liked was how the protagonist plays out his role. Despite how menacing Candie is, he still keeps his cool, and it isn't until his untimely death that we see Django in real trouble.  I like this approach. 

I may have said this earlier, but the tension that builds from the, "old Ben" scene is great.  In my opinion the conventional approach that we are used to is that the protagonist has a chip on his shoulder anytime he's made to look like a fool, and once Candie finds out from Stephen that Schultz and Django are trying to pull a fast one on him, rather than this being the catalyst for all hell breaking loose, it actually just builds this tension and then the heroes just get ripped off for some cash.  I love that this leads to Candie's death.  The Dumas punchline was great too, "soft frenchy..."

anyhow, I liked this better than IB.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on February 19, 2013, 01:57:23 PM
I haven't seen SNL in forever, but a friend sent me this today:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CknpHpmIJtI


Fucking hilarious.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Pwaybloe on February 20, 2013, 03:22:13 PM
Really?  I would say it belongs at home with the rest of the parodies on YouTube.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Frederico Fellini on February 27, 2013, 12:17:25 PM
Now that Tarantino has his Oscar for best ORIGINAL screenplay. We can finally discuss all the shit he ripped off from this episode of the boondocks:

“THE STORY OF CATCHER FREEMAN”


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDYblwe96-o



“The freeman is silent” (Yeah, they actually say that at one point Lol).
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: AntiDumbFrogQuestion on March 02, 2013, 12:07:27 PM
I felt as if all the writing/plotting of the film was necessary...although I DID feel strangely jittery once Tarantino started "acting". 
I figured with the confidence he bestowed upon us in, oddly enough, "From Dusk Till Dawn" and "Four Rooms", that by this point in time we would feel confident with his performance onscreen. Knowing he was there kind of felt like watching a Jesse Eisenberg interview. Just couldn't get comfortable.

And on the topic of "The Boondocks"....damn I love that show. Not surprised they tread that ground already. So glad MacGruder gave up the strip for TV.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on March 18, 2013, 04:22:10 PM
Ennio Morricone is not feuding with Quentin Tarantino over ‘Django’ song — EXCLUSIVE
Source: EW

Just two months ago famed composer Ennio Morricone presented Django Unchained director Quentin Tarantino with a lifetime achievement award in Rome.  But last week, American outlets picked up on a small story in the Italian press where Morricone had allegedly told a group of students at Rome’s LUISS University that he did not care to work with Tarantino again, and that he was unhappy with how he used his song “Ancora Qui” in Django Unchained.

Known for his Spaghetti Western scores for Sergio Leone, and his work on films such as Terrence Malick’s Days of Heaven and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, Morricone has gained modern prominence through Quentin Tarantino’s reappropriation of his songs in Kill Bill Vol. 1 and 2, Inglorious Basterds, and Django Unchained.  Everyone was quick to jump on a portion of Morricone’s lecture, but Morricone was addressing a group of television and film students in Italy. He was not crafting remarks intended for a national audience – and certainly not trying wage a media war of words with Tarantino. Not only that, he says his remarks were taken out of context.

In a statement to EW, Morricone wrote:

What I read about my statements on Quentin Tarantino is a partial writing of my thoughts which has deprived the true meaning of what I said, isolating a part from the rest. In this way my statement sounds shocking, penalizing me and bothering me a lot.

I have a great respect for Tarantino, as I have stated several times, I am glad he chooses my music, a sign of artistic brotherhood and I am happy to have met him in Rome recently. In my opinion, the fact that Tarantino chooses different pieces of music from a work in a film makes the pieces not to be always consistent with the entire work.

The risk for me, when I compose, is not to be consistent with the film work and my desire is that the director accepts my consistency.

Tarantino proposed me to work for Inglorious Basterds, which I consider a masterpiece, but I could only had two months to work since I had to compose the soundtrack for “Baaria” directed by Giuseppe Tornatore and it was not possible.

Regarding Django, the thing is that I cannot see too much blood in a movie due to my character, is how I feel and impress me especially with a film that is made very well and where the blood is well shot. But this has nothing to do with my respect for that Tarantino which remains great.

This is consistent with what Morricone has said in the past. In an interview with The Quietus in 2010, he said that Tarantino’s reappropriation of his songs for Inglorious Bastereds wasn’t a problem.  ”Actually, I was really happy with what he did and I thought it really worked well. The thing is that as what he did was take the different scores from different films and put them all together…what I think he did was just to put them in the right place and used them in the right way,” Morricone told the interviewer. In Inglorious Basterds, Tarantino used “Dopo La Condanna” (from 1966′s The Big Gundown), “Un Amico” (from 1973′s Revolver) and “Rabbia E Tarantella” (from 1974′s Allonsafan).

Morricone went on to explain: “if you are talking about coherence, it was not really there in terms of ideas and conversation because those things are different and taken from different ideas and films. But I think it really worked well though.”

This is not a fight. It’s hype and misinterpretation.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Reelist on March 18, 2013, 04:31:08 PM
I didn't really like the use of 'ancora qui'. Kinda brings the movie to a halt. I always skip it when I listen to the soundtrack.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on March 26, 2013, 03:37:33 AM
Will Smith on turning down ‘Django Unchained’: ‘I needed to be the lead’
Source: EW

When Quentin Tarantino’s western revenge-fantasy Django Unchained was first announced, casting rumors pegged Will Smith as the titular slave-turned-vigilante. But Smith, who teams with his son Jaden in this summer’s sci-fi epic After Earth, tells EW that he turned down the part because his character would’ve been second fiddle to the bounty hunter (played by Christoph Waltz) who teaches Django his trade . “Django wasn’t the lead, so it was like, I need to be the lead. The other character was the lead!” says the Men in Black star, whose departure opened the door for Jamie Foxx to play the role.

Smith says that before he left the project, he even pleaded with Tarantino to let Django have a more central role in the story. “I was like, ‘No, Quentin, please, I need to kill the bad guy!’” (Ironically, Waltz was considered a supporting actor during his Oscar-winning award season, while Jamie Foxx was promoted as the movie’s lead.)

But no hard feelings: Smith was a big fan of the final product. “I thought it was brilliant,” he says. “Just not for me.”
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on March 26, 2013, 05:22:54 AM
Is he joking or what? Does an actor actually turn down a role he apparently likes very much because he doesn't get to kill the bad guy and has to share a big amount of screen time with another actor? Maybe that's the difference between real actors and movie stars? I'm honestly confused.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Lottery on March 26, 2013, 05:54:34 AM
I wish Smith would take a supporting role, being the biggest movie star in the world really got to his head. But then again, he did admit this just there. It's interesting because this is the first supporting role DiCaprio has had in over a decade- and I previously thought he too was stuck in this leading role mindset (but clearly he isn't).
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: MacGuffin on May 23, 2014, 02:54:07 PM
Quentin Tarantino Wants a ‘Django Unchained’ Miniseries on Television
Oscar winner wants to put 90 minutes of extra footage to good use
Source: TotalFilm

Hold off on buying that “Django Unchained” Blu-ray. Quentin Tarantino says he wants to release 90 minutes of new footage to include in a four-hour television miniseries.

“I have about 90 minutes worth of material with ‘Django.’ It hasn't been seen. My idea, frankly, is to cut together a four-hour version of ‘Django Unchained,'” USA Today reports Tarantino told an audience at the Cannes Film Festival on Friday. ”But I wouldn't show it like a four hour movie. I would cut it up into hour chapters. Like a four-part miniseries. And show it on cable television. Show it like an hour at a time, each chapter.”

“Django Unchained,” a slavery revenge tale starring Jamie Foxx, Kerry Washington, Leonardo DiCaprio, Cristoph Waltz and Samuel L. Jackson, was a winter hit in 2012 before winning two Oscars.

Foxx played a freed slave who joins a bounty hunter (Waltz) in a quest to save his long-lost wife (Washington) from a sadistic plantation owner (DiCaprio).

Tarantino said he prefers packaging the extra footage as a miniseries because releasing a four-hour cut of the film would “be an endurance test” for audiences.

“We'd use all the material I have and it wouldn't be an endurance test. It would be a miniseries. And people love those,” Tarantino said. ”People roll their eyes at a four-hour movie. But a four-hour miniseries that they like, then they are dying to watch all four parts. That's how I thought it could work.”

Tarantino was in France to host a 20th anniversary screening of “Pulp Fiction” on Friday, and will be paying tribute to Sergio Leone's “A Fistful of Dollars” on Saturday.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: SailorOfTheSeas on May 24, 2014, 01:26:53 PM
That could actually really improve it. Hopefully Broomhilda and the final fifth of the film will be more fleshed out.  Seems like QT is branching out from usual film structure. First the proposed stage version of Hateful Eight and now this.
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: Drenk on May 24, 2014, 01:33:20 PM
Tarantino is angry. That's all he's doing. Being angry. Waiting for the world to burn.


(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Boa2O-PCAAAJ_Rd.png:large)
Title: Re: Django Unchained
Post by: 03 on May 24, 2014, 02:04:01 PM
hes mad he has the buttocks of an old black woman that works at circle k