XIXAX Film Forum

The Director's Chair => David Lynch => Topic started by: modage on December 09, 2010, 03:29:08 PM

Title: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: modage on December 09, 2010, 03:29:08 PM
(http://www.gooddaytoday.info/images/gdt_cover.jpg)

David Lynch, Seminal Musician
Source: Vulture

If I told you I've spent this week obsessing over David Lynch's new electro-pop single, "Good Day Today," you might be forgiven for guessing it's some kind of novelty or absurdity or vanity project. (An oddball 64-year-old film director with an electro-pop tune? On which he sings? In a processed, vocoderish voice?) Maybe that's a little true; I'm not sure how much attention this track would be getting if someone you'd never heard of had made it. But it's not exactly a novelty. Here's the thing: I would like to submit to you that David Lynch has had a music career that’s nearly as interesting as his directorial one — or that his general weird “Lynchian” aesthetic has had as profound an influence on recorded music as plenty of beloved bands and producers. Or something like that. Let’s not get too bogged down in the exact terms: Point is, Lynch gets our attention for a two-track single because the guy is more or less a music legend.

The core of that reputation is probably the music he wrote and produced with Angelo Badalamenti for the TV show Twin Peaks. (It even won a Grammy!) The music on that soundtrack ties together exactly as many strange moods as the show itself did, all the different elements that somehow combine to create something “Lynchian” — dreamy tenderness, lurking dread, fifties greaser cool, soap-opera sentimentality so over-the-top that it starts to feel slightly grotesque. I don’t think I’d be alone in saying that the soundtrack is a pretty crucial document, the kind of thing you might put on a list of the eighties’ best albums. Especially if you combined it with Floating Into the Night, the album Lynch and Badalamenti made with Twin Peaks vocalist Julee Cruise — and “Mysteries of Love,” the song Cruise sang for Blue Velvet, a track the late David Foster Wallace once suggested had “acquired an underground reputation as one of the great make-out tunes of all time” (at least if you were in grad school for the arts in the later eighties) … we could go on.

Lynch and Badalamenti have staged "industrial symphonies." Lynch has an ear for mood and music that lets the soundtrack for Lost Highway make aesthetic connections between free jazz, Rammstein, and This Mortal Coil. And you can track this stuff’s influence through massive amounts of pop music: For instance, the fact that anyone’s heard of Moby has a lot to do with a single called “Go,” which was built around a sample from Twin Peaks’s ominous love theme. “In Heaven,” a song from Lynch’s Eraserhead, has been covered by the Pixies, Bauhaus, and Devo. This is just scratching the surface, and not counting the basically countless musicians who have ever sat around stoned watching something of Lynch’s, tried to work the mood into a song, and maybe thrown in a few lines about owls for good measure.

All of which is how Lynch can wind up heavily involved in music projects like Mark Linkous and Danger Mouse's Dark Night of the Soul, and why, when he feels like sitting down and making some electro-pop tracks, a niche label is happy to release them — and Vaughn Oliver, one of the three or four cover artists music geeks actually know by name, is happy to do the design.

And also, perhaps, why I’ve been obsessing over “Good Day Today." The song is very straightforward: mostly just a sedate, pulsing synth and a simple lyric. There’s totally something Lynchian about it, though, and I’m pretty sure it’s just the strangeness of hearing the director’s high-Midwestern accent squeaking through electronic processing — the blurry robot voice of a guy who actually sounds like he prefers his coffee to come from Bob’s Big Boy. The flip side, “I Know,” does the kind of moody roadhouse rock that’s always been in Lynch’s wheelhouse (it’s very Lost Highway/Fire Walk With Me), but we’ll have to wait for January to get the full release, complete with remixes. And I’m going to take a wild guess that some very good producers have been more than happy to hop on that package and flesh out Lynch’s sound.

Listen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPmTRKB5Bdg
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: RegularKarate on December 09, 2010, 05:01:03 PM
Whether it's valid or not for Lynch to be recording music (I buy it, he's always been huge on sound) doesn't have anything to do with the fact that this is a pretty boring song.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: socketlevel on December 10, 2010, 10:40:16 AM
the cover art is so boring too.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: polkablues on December 10, 2010, 05:03:15 PM
Awwwwwwful.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: children with angels on December 10, 2010, 05:51:25 PM
It's most definitely not better than Kanye, who has a real feel for beats, texture and mood. This is just dull 80s/90s-throwback electropop like any number of people are making right now. Honestly, if no one knew it was Lynch it wouldn't be given the time of day. Plus, the backing track is essentially the Twin Peaks theme, which was already used much better twenty years ago by Moby.

EDIT: This one is better, in my view: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=soClkzqJSZs&feature=channel
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: Reelist on December 10, 2010, 06:21:35 PM
I'm gonna listen to it all the time now when I drink my coffee....black

This one is better, in my view: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=soClkzqJSZs&feature=channel

Yeah, it is better (than kanye)
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: RegularKarate on December 13, 2010, 12:56:19 PM
These are the lyrics:

So tired of fire, so tired of smoke (x2)
Send me an angel, save me (x2)

I wanna have a good day today (x3)
Good day today

Tired of ... goes so low (x2)
Send me an angel, save me (x2)

So tired ..... (repeat)

Send me an angel, save me (x3)


I wanna have a good day today (x3)
Good day today

So tired of fearing, so tired of dark
So tired of fearing, so tired of dark
Send me an angel, save me (x2)

I wanna have a good day today (x3)
Good day today

You forgot:

I gotta feeling that tonight's gonna be a good night
That tonight's gonna be a good good night
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: tpfkabi on December 21, 2010, 04:24:01 PM
I haven't heard his new single yet, but I have been listening to Dark Night of the Soul.

I'm trying to figure out what Lynch does to his voice, as it's hard to imagine that singing voice coming out of him. I think somewhere he said he would never perform live, so maybe it is very heavily manipulated and he couldn't really do it live.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: Sleepless on June 28, 2011, 04:33:06 PM
Don't know if anyone has been over to davidlynch.com recently, but it's undergone a redesign and seems almost entirely featured on music. Haven't been able to fully explore it yet, but the home page is dedicated to Lynch's remixes of Twin Peaks score, but there's also bits on other musicians (Duran Duran, The Avett Brothers).
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: polkablues on June 28, 2011, 04:54:58 PM
Does anybody follow David Lynch on Twitter?  It's like the periodic interjections of somebody's bored grandpa, with occasional reference to the fact that he makes movies.

Sample tweets:
Quote from: @DAVID_LYNCH
Dear Twitter Friends, I just got a new bathrobe that I LOVE from Jami and her place called http://t.co/sWXuf1v

Quote from: @DAVID_LYNCH
I worked some on a lamp using Fix-All impregnated w/some universal colors. It rained on Sunday. Today is much nicer, but somewhat chilly.

Quote from: @DAVID_LYNCH
My father wanted me to become an Eagle Scout & when I think about being an Eagle Scout I think of my father & it makes me happy.

Quote from: @DAVID_LYNCH
Someone asked if I liked wool as well as wood. The closest I've come to this is many times, I've felt like a sheep in today's world.





Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: Stefen on June 28, 2011, 04:59:27 PM
I wish more filmmakers were like Malick.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: Mr. Merrill Lehrl on June 28, 2011, 05:03:35 PM
I wish more filmmakers were like Malick.

(http://cdn.inquisitr.com/wp-content/national-high-five-day.jpg)

Also, I wish my grandpa was more like Lynch. Among the living but also other Lynchian things.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: Sleepless on June 28, 2011, 09:37:23 PM
Yes, I follow him on Twitter. His infrequent tweets are mostly pimping some random product, some sprinklings of TM nonsense, and once in a while he'll ask a general open-ended question like "what's up?" and presumably get intimated by the vast number of responses and retreat to his LA cave for several weeks to get wanked off by interns.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: cronopio 2 on June 28, 2011, 11:31:37 PM
fuck david lynch's face.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: tpfkabi on August 08, 2011, 05:20:35 PM
http://stereogum.com/774601/progress-report-david-lynch/franchises/progress-report/

"However, this fall Lynch will finally release his first full-length album — a mysterious affair recorded among friends at his own home studio in Los Angeles. Details on just exactly what a full-length David Lynch album will sound like and what guests might be involved are still mostly being kept under wraps, but I was still thrilled when Lynch called me up to discuss the pleasures of making music and have a nice chat about the weather."

STEREOGUM: Do you have an ETA for when you think it will come out?

DAVID LYNCH: I think it’s going to come out, Cole, in the fall. Either October or November, I think.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: MacGuffin on August 15, 2011, 08:33:04 AM
David Lynch Announces HisDebut Album, Featuring the YeahYeahYeahs' Karen O
Source: Pitchfork

We've been hearing about it for a long time, and now it's finally here: David Lynch's solo album of electronic pop. Here's the first thing you need to know about this album: It's called Crazy Clown Time. And here's the second thing: It features guest vocals from Yeah Yeah Yeahs leader Karen O on a song called "Pinky's Dream". Those are two very good reasons to get excited.

Crazy Clown Time arrives November 8 from Sunday Best Recordings. (In the U.S., it will be co-released by PIAS America.) Lynch wrote, produced, and performed the entire thing with help from engineer Dean Hurley, who also plays guitar and drums on several songs.

Crazy Clown Time:
01 Pinky's Dream
02 Good Day Today
03 So Glad
04 Noah's Ark
05 Football Game
06 I Know
07 Strange and Unproductive Thinking
08 The Night Bell With Lightning
09 Stone's Gone Up
10 Crazy Clown Time
11 These Are My Friends
12 Speed Roadster
13 Movin' On
14 She Rise Up


Interview:
http://pitchfork.com/news/40872-david-lynch-talks-new-music-projects/
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: KJ on August 15, 2011, 09:10:09 AM
This will be the new Pet Sounds.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: tpfkabi on August 15, 2011, 11:13:32 AM
Hmm...that title, I don't know.
I bet it will sound a lot like Sparklehorse with all vocals processed to sound like they're coming through a CB radio and have a lot of static and crackily vinyl sounds.

If I had Photoshop it sure would be fun to make fake covers for this album Ratner style.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: squints on August 15, 2011, 05:58:37 PM
I bet it will sound a lot like Sparklehorse with all vocals processed to sound like they're coming through a CB radio and have a lot of static and crackily vinyl sounds.

i have a feelin' this will be spot-thefuck-on.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: Pubrick on August 15, 2011, 06:43:24 PM
Crazy Clown Time arrives November 8 from Sunday Best Recordings. (In the U.S., it will be co-released by PIAS America.)

I think they mean Sunday Worst Recordings.

And I think they mean POS America.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: Pas on August 15, 2011, 07:04:03 PM
Crazy Clown Time arrives November 8 from Sunday Best Recordings. (In the U.S., it will be co-released by PIAS America.)

I think they mean Sunday Worst Recordings.

And I think they mean POS America.

HAHA
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: MacGuffin on October 26, 2011, 03:26:55 PM
INTERVIEW | David Lynch Talks “Crazy Clown Time” and Why Singing is “so embarrassing”
by Nigel M Smith, Indiewire

David Lynch, the beloved auteur behind “Mulholland Drive” and “Blue Velvet,” hasn’t directed a feature since 2006’s “Inland Empire.” Since then he’s been peddling his own brand of coffee, shooting a campaign for Lady Dior starring Marion Cotillard, doing daily on-camera weather reports from his home (a practice, alas, he appears to have abandoned) and developing a documentary about Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the founder of Transcendental Meditation.

What’s currently attracting the most attention, however, are his forays into the music world. This year saw Lynch helm a live Duran Duran concert, shoot an experimental short with the band Interpol, aid in launching his first music nightclub in Paris and collaborate on vocalist Chrysta Bell’s album “This Train.” And on November 8, you can purchase Lynch’s debut solo album, “Crazy Clown Time,” an appropriately haunting and challenging work of 14 original songs. Karen O of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, guest vocals on the stark opening track, “Pinky’s Dream.”

indieWIRE spoke with Lynch about his album, his custom-built music studio and why he’s still drawn to Mulholland Drive.

So you’re currently in Paris?

Right.

Your Club Silencio just opened this past summer there. How’s it been going?

Well, it’s not my club, I just designed the look of it. But I hear it’s going real good.

How involved have you remained since it opened its doors?

Well, my job is done. Four times a year they ask someone to do what they call ‘Carte Blanche,’ which is to pick some films and some bands. They program a week of things at the club and that’s what I’m starting to do today.

What’s your vision for the program?

The bands that are coming so far are The Kills tonight, Au Revoir Simone tomorrow night, Kitty Daisy and Lewis the next night, Gary Clark Jr. the next night, ending up with Lykke Li.

Your work with the club doesn’t mark your only musical endeavor this year. On top of it and “Crazy Clown Time,” you’ve collaborated with Chrysta Bell, Duran Duran and Interpol. Why have your musical aspirations taken on a more visible life this year?

I don’t know, Nigel. With Duran Duran, I don’t know quite how it happened, but it happened. What are the other things you said?

Ms. Bell?

Oh, I’ve been working with Chrysta Bell for 10 years. Finally her album is finished and out. It’s really, really, really beautiful. Bell is someone people should look out for and listen to. She’s a great singer and performer.

This album, “Crazy Clown Time,” has been worked on for a while and it happens to be coming out this year.

When you say worked on for a while, how long have you been working on the album?

I don’t know exactly. What we’re saying is 1.75 years.

So when your single “Good Day Today” came out last November, you were then in the midst of recording a full-fledged album?

Yeah, but not on purpose. Through the years Dean [Hurley, who contributed additional guitar and drums] and I had been working on music. This album’s probably more recent, but there’s lots and lots of unfinished and finished things that aren’t on this album.

Did you employ a free-form style in making this album, akin to the way you made “Inland Empire” without a script?

This question has come up before. It has nothing to do with “Inland Empire.” You sit down and make a song. And then lo and behold you make a second song and then one day you have 14 songs. And then they go onto an album.

Even though the album was crafted in this way, it comes off as a really cohesive work.The tracks bleed into one another. Do you see it as one in its own right?



I sort of do, Nigel. I’m glad you said that. There’s something that connects it all. There’s some connecting tissue, but I don’t know exactly what it is. It feels good. Always on an album, the sequence of the songs is very critical. So we did work on getting a sequence that felt correct. I think the thing holds together if you listen to it in a sitting. If you listen to it later track by track, you wouldn’t necessarily experience the sequence, but you could experience the songs that you liked.

The album opens on a very brash note with Karen O’s vocals on “Pinky’s Dream.” How did you snag her?

My friend and music agent Brian Lox brings people by for me to meet and possibly work with. He had brought Karen O over to the studio about 10 years ago, but nothing happened that time. This time when she came over, I had the lyrics to “Pinky’s Dream.” Karen sat with the lyrics for about half an hour. We just kept playing the track, playing the track, playing the track. And then she said, “I want to go in the booth.” Into the booth she went and out she came with “Pinky’s Dream.”

What was it like listening to her interpret your words?

I was next door to heaven. Her voice when she says Pinky… It almost makes me cry. I know Pinky. Such a special person, Pinky is. It’s because of her voice. I really love Pinky and what he’s going through.

What artists did you listen while preparing for the album and/or during the recording process?

No other people. I think what we’re saying is, the whole thing sort of wants to be connected to a kind of electric blues that kind of starts the sound we’re looking for.

How did you foster that electric blues sound you’re speaking of?

All I have to do is light that guitar. Light it up.

Can you tell me a bit about your own studio, in which you recorded the album?

Well, it’s in my house. The room was designed by an acoustic architect. It’s a room within a room. There’s three ceilings, there’s two floors and there’s two walls. So it’s very, very quiet when everything’s shut off. The speakers are theater speakers. They’re always tuned so what you hear is really true to what you have.

Listening to the album, I pictured you recording it into the wee hours of the night.

Sometimes we recorded during the day.

How long have you been living on Mulholland Drive?



I live near Mulholland Drive and I’ve lived here for many years since the ‘80s.


Your milieu has obviously influenced your work so much over the years. What is about that area that keeps feeding you?

There’s a breeze there and there’s a smell in the hills and a feeling that’s very nice. It’s in the city, but it’s in the country at the same time. It has a feeling that’s conducive to making things.

Did you experience a freedom in making this album that’s harder to manifest on film sets?

No. I found it very difficult to sing. It’s so embarrassing. So that was the hardest part. On a film set, I feel very, very good now. You get used to working with lots of people around. Singing is really, really frightening.

How did you get over that fear?



I haven’t gotten over it. I just got more comfortable singing in front of Dean. He’s the only person I sing in front of.

With that said, do you see yourself ever touring with this album?

No.

The Guardian published an interesting piece a few months back where they dubbed this fall as the autumn of David Lynch due to your influence on the musical scene, notably on popular newcomers like Lana Del Ray and Chelsea Wolfe. Are you familiar with any of these young singers?

Lana Del Ray, I am.

What do you make of her saying you’re a huge influence?


Well, all the girls are pretty enamored by me.

Why do you think that is?

(Laughs.) I’m just joking with you, Nigel. I don’t know what it is. Maybe we love the same kinds of worlds, I’m not sure.

Have you ever met Lana?

No, I’ve seen her on the Internet. I’ve seen her video.

What kind of audience are you hoping to attract with this album?

I think it’s a definite crossover album and it will reach millions of people.

I have to ask, you haven’t released a feature since “Inland Empire.” Is your documentary on Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the founder of Transcendental Meditation, still in the works?

Yes, but it’s far from being finished. And I’m trying to catch ideas for another feature film, but that hasn’t happened yet.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: Just Withnail on October 26, 2011, 04:12:24 PM
Quote from: David Lynch
I’m trying to catch ideas for another feature film, but that hasn’t happened yet.

Try writing them, see how that goes.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: Fernando on October 30, 2011, 11:15:03 AM
listen here (http://blogs.indiewire.com/theplaylist/archives/listen_david_lynchs_pinkys_dream_from_crazy_clown_time_featuring_karen_o/) lynch's pinky's dream from crazy clown time.
Title: Re: Good Day Today [Lynch's electro-pop single]
Post by: Fernando on November 03, 2011, 01:20:36 PM
Exclusive stream of Crazy Clown Time in full:

http://www.empireonline.com/news/story.asp?NID=32384
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time, Good Day Today, etc.)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on November 03, 2011, 03:24:50 PM
My first response to that post was "wow, someone got an exclusive stream before NPR Music?" But sure enough, NPR had the exclusive First Listen (http://www.npr.org/2011/10/30/141598329/first-listen-david-lynch-crazy-clown-time) up 4 days ago (and it's still up).
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on November 06, 2011, 06:24:16 PM
Wow.

I was completely prepared to be disappointed, but this is easily one of the best albums of the year.

I found myself saying "holy crap" after songs ended and laughing out loud during some songs. It's all wonderfully bizarre and sometimes mindblowing, not unlike a Lynch film. I'm very impressed.

And no, "Good Day Today" is not representative of the album. Most of it sounds like the Mulholland Drive music.
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: RegularKarate on November 07, 2011, 03:30:08 PM
this is easily one of the best albums of the year.

You already regret typing that so quickly, don't you?

This album is complete garbage.  This just sounds like a stoner just discovered garageband. 
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on November 07, 2011, 04:19:54 PM
Don't regret it at all... this completely works for me. I'll have more to say when the album is released.
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: Reelist on November 09, 2011, 10:50:37 AM
This just sounds like a stoner just discovered garageband. 

I agree.


I guess we'll never see eye to eye on music, JB. I LOVED the music in this, but Lynch simply does not need to be singing on it. The entire thing sounds like he ad-libbed it fucked up on promethazine. If he didn't soil it with his voice, I'd have this on constant rotation. Great mood music.

best lyric on the whole album:

" I heard you fucked Al, he's supposed to be my pal. I guess I'm sort of stalking you..."
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on November 09, 2011, 11:40:45 AM
This just sounds like a stoner just discovered garageband. 

I agree.


I guess we'll never see eye to eye on music, JB. I LOVED the music in this, but Lynch simply does not need to be singing on it. The entire thing sounds like he ad-libbed it fucked up on promethazine. If he didn't soil it with his voice, I'd have this on constant rotation. Great mood music.

best lyric on the whole album:

" I heard you fucked Al, he's supposed to be my pal. I guess I'm sort of stalking you..."

The lyrics are hilarious. Even many of the lyrics in "Strange And Unproductive Thinking" are intentionally funny.

His voice is an acquired taste, but it's really great on some tracks. My favorite vocal on the record is "Crazy Clown Time."

I also loved the music (most of it). Some of the bass lines are amazing (it's what drives "Strange And Unproductive Thinking" for example), and the guitar work is beautiful.

Like I said, I was 100% prepared to dislike this, but I'm really pleasantly surprised. I'm even more surprised that people are surprised that this is a challenging album.
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: Pubrick on November 10, 2011, 12:27:24 AM
have you ever NOT completely loved something by david lynch?

even i can admit that clockwork orange is not perfect.

i still worship my deity, but you know, it's ok to see flaws now and then.
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on November 10, 2011, 12:37:22 AM
Dune is horrible.

Eraserhead is tedious.

The Elephant Man doesn't do much for me.
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: RegularKarate on November 10, 2011, 10:35:01 AM
Dune is way better than this album.
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on November 10, 2011, 10:49:35 AM
I really don't expect people to like this album generally. I can imagine that if it doesn't work for you, it doesn't work for you violently.

I'd still be curious to know which songs you hate the most.

Sure there are tracks like "Crazy Clown Time" or "Strange And Unproductive Thinking" (my two favorites at this point), but many of the tracks are very straightforward guitar and bass songs, pretty much right off the Inland Empire or Mulholland Drive soundtracks (leaning closer to Mulholland Drive).
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on November 12, 2011, 06:31:23 AM
I agree that Lynch's voice is kind of an aquired taste, but I think the whole album is very interesting. Sounds very Mulholland Drive-ish, some of the song are hilarious, some are very dark, and Pinky's Dream is, to me, one of the best songs of the year.
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: wilder on April 02, 2012, 09:22:49 AM
Well, here's this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6QJpY2VNP0E
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on April 02, 2012, 10:05:18 AM
 :shock:

I'm scared now...
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on April 02, 2012, 11:28:20 AM
OMG  :yabbse-thumbup: :bravo:

I love the literalism. And the added sound design.
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: tpfkabi on July 27, 2012, 01:10:34 PM
I just pre-ordered this. Looks amazing. $25 + shipping.

http://www.undertheradarmag.com/news/david_lynchs_eraserhead_soundtrack_gets_the_vinyl_treatment/

(http://www.undertheradarmag.com/uploads/article_images/eraserhedadpackagingsmall.jpeg)

On August 7 Sacred Bones (home to David Lynch-friendly artist Zola Jesus) will release a deluxe vinyl version of the Eraserhead soundtrack. Limited to a run of 1500, the deluxe album will include will feature a 16-page booklet, three 11-inch prints, and 7-inch single of previously unreleased cut, “Pete’s Boogie.”
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: MacGuffin on August 03, 2012, 09:57:06 PM
Music: David Lynch Presents New Muse Chrysta Bell in L.A.
Source: Rolling Stone

Though David Lynch last released a feature film in 2006, the acclaimed director of Blue Velvet and Mulholland Dr. hasn't exactly been quiet. He's embarked on a long season of musical experimentation, from his own Crazy Clown Time album to organizing a series of concerts in support of his foundation for transcendental meditation. Last night Lynch hosted a "coming out party" in Los Angeles for a new collaborator, singer Chrysta Bell.

Standing onstage at the Bootleg Theatre in downtown L.A., Lynch smiled as he introduced the tall, redheaded torch singer. "This is going to be a great night for me, because I love Chrysta Bell," he declared to cheers. "Chrysta Bell is round and fully packed. Sometimes people dream, or sometimes people walk down the street and wonder: What is that shape? What is that sound?"

What followed were songs that were at times dreamy and torrid, smoky and tortured, drawn mostly from Bell's solo debut, This Train, which Lynch produced. Standing on studded stiletto heels, Bell began her hour-long set with a brooding "Real Love," performed with grinding finesse by her trio. Before "Friday Night Fly" and a lovesick "Be Bop A Lula," she stripped off her skirt and slowly shimmied behind the microphone, singing in a voice soft, soaring and wounded.

Bell and her band played to a full house of about 500. Standing among the crowd was David J, formerly of Bauhaus and Love and Rockets, who came after hearing the album. "I love what she does, especially at midnight. That's when it all makes sense," he says. "She's truly strange and otherworldly and occupies this parallel universe. It's a dream world that's real."

The Bootleg show was part of an achingly slow roll-out of Bell as a solo artist, following the self-release of her album in late 2011. Aside from a short tour of Europe, a showcase performance at SXSW in March and a handful of other stops, her live performances of the Lynch material are only beginning.

The genesis of This Train stretches back a decade, from the first time the singer visited Lynch at his home recording studio in Hollywood. They wrote and recorded their first song that day, "Right Down to You," which appears on the album.

"When I went to David's place, he opened the door and he had his arms out, and he gave me a hug and said, 'Chrysta Bell!'" she recalled. "He gave me so much love in that first moment."

Lynch built his home studio more than a decade ago to create music and sound for his films. "It's really good when the people are all there all together. It's the best," said Lynch, sitting with Bell backstage after her set. He wore a black suit over a crisp white shirt, his gray hair combed back into thick wave. "I'm a director. The actor has got to be able to deliver. It is so much the same thing. It's an idea, it's a mood, and you want to communicate that. Once you click into that" – he snaps his fingers – "then they take it."

But the San Antonio-born Bell remained based in Texas most of the years since meeting Lynch, so their collaborations were sporadic. It took a full decade to complete the album. She now lives in San Francisco.

Describing the sessions, Bell said, "I'm feeling this track, and I'm feeling in the moment and singing, and David's going, 'Yes, yes.' . . . There's this dance that happens. I let the music speak to me because it always does. That's ingrained. I feel it."

Bell said Lynch's influence on her actually began while she was a child, seeing Twin Peaks on TV and hearing the director's haunted collaborations with composer Angelo Badalamenti. "It was the theme song from Twin Peaks that literally opened me up to a new realm of what music was in my life," she said backstage. "It made me viscerally feel things. It felt absolutely right."

Lynch is hardly new to making music. He calls longtime soundtrack collaborator Badalamenti "my brother," adding that "he brought me into the world of music." Lynch's film work has also brought him into direct collaborations with artists ranging from Roy Orbison to Trent Reznor.

"I always say I'm not a musician," Lynch explained. "But it's so much like actors. It's a feel and a communication, and sometimes you hit gold."

Last year's Crazy Clown Time is being reissued in an expanded edition online on Tuesday, the same day the Eraserhead soundtrack is being released in an elaborate limited edition with previously unreleased material. While music and painting continue to occupy him, Lynch hasn't yet found his next movie project. He's waiting for the right idea.

"It's a process," he said. "I always say it's like fishing. Little fish are swimming in. Some of them I love, but I need the big unifying fish, and it hasn't swum in yet."

Lynch said had not heard of the Pittsburgh-based tribute band to his and Badalamenti's many music projects together, but he was intrigued by their choice of band name – Silencio, a word lifted from his 2001 film Mulholland Dr.

'There's something about the word 'silencio.' It's a beautiful, beautiful word for human beings," he said, relating it to last night's performance. "This thing of infinite silence coupled with infinite dynamism is what this whole show is about."
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: MacGuffin on May 31, 2013, 02:57:09 PM
David Lynch Teases Possible New Music Release With 43-Second Video

A short video took over the website of the David Lynch Music Company (davidlynch.com). The 43-second clip was uploaded to David Lynch‘s YouTube channel managed by Sunday Best, the UK label that released Crazy Clown Time in Europe back in 2011.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3bgoRGqHwBE

The short clip, titled TBD716, looks like a flip book’s pages being turned, revealing an animated electrical shock hazard sign.

What does the title stand for? To be determind? Test by David? To be destroyed? To be decided? To be dated?

And is 716 a release date of a new song? Perhaps July 16 2013?
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: Tortuga on June 02, 2013, 12:08:36 PM
But of course! David Lynch is Boards of Canada. Everything suddenly makes sense.
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: MacGuffin on June 03, 2013, 12:27:18 PM
David Lynch Announces New Album The Big Dream, Shares Track Featuring Lykke Li
Source: Pitchfork

Legendary director and musician David Lynch is readying his second solo LP following 2011's Crazy Clown Time. The album is called The Big Dream, and it's out July 15 in Europe via Sunday Best and July 16 in the U.S. via Sacred Bones. If you're a Spotify user, you can stream a bonus cut from the album, "I'm Waiting Here" featuring Lykke Li.

Update: You can preview 90 second clips of all of the tracks on the album via iTunes now.

The Big Dream features 11 original songs, plus a cover of Bob Dylan's "The Ballad of Hollis Brown". In a press release, Lynch described the music of the album as "modern blues" and said, "Most of the songs start out as a type of blues jam and then we go sideways from there. What comes out is a hybrid, modernized form of low-down blues."

The vinyl edition of the album will come with a bonus 7", which will feature the Lykke Li track on the A-side and an etching hand-inscribed by Lynch on the B-side. The digital version will contain the Lykke Li track as well. Lynch said of Lykke Li in a press release, "She brought her own style to this song, which has a doo-wop sort of thing going on, but in a way it’s far-removed from the 50s."


The Big Dream:

01 The Big Dream
02 Star Dream Girl
03 Last Call
04 Cold Wind Blowin
05 The Ballad of Hollis Brown (Bob Dylan cover)
06 Wishin' Well
07 Say It
08 We Rolled Together
09 Sun Can't Be Seen No More
10 I Want You
11 The Line It Curves
12 Are You Sure
13 I'm Waiting Here [ft. Lykke Li] (bonus track)



http://ingrd.com/

http://open.spotify.com/album/5qni96cAGN87aMyIgsEtJF
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: Lottery on June 03, 2013, 09:45:58 PM
Dammit, I was hoping for another Duran Duran collaboration.
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: MacGuffin on June 24, 2013, 04:04:29 PM
Star Dream Girl


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tTDxSdudNM
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: MacGuffin on July 08, 2013, 10:41:13 AM
The Big Dream, full album stream:

http://pitchfork.com/advance/158-the-big-dream/
Title: Re: Lynch's Music (Crazy Clown Time etc.)
Post by: jenkins on March 16, 2015, 02:12:57 AM
THE MUSIC OF DAVID LYNCH

8PM - Wed Apr 01, 2015

$45 - $1000 - The Theatre at Ace Hotel, Los Angeles

WITH PERFORMANCES AND INTERPRETATIONS BY:
ANGELO BADALAMENTI, CHRYSTA BELL, REBEKAH DEL RIO, DONOVAN, DURAN DURAN, JIM JAMES, JULEE CRUISE, KAREN O, KINNEY LANDRUM, MOBY, ROB MATHES, SKY FERREIRA, TENNIS, TWIN PEAKS, WAYNE COYNE AND STEVEN DROZD OF THE FLAMING LIPS, ZOLA JESUS, PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS.

Be it the synthesized echo of the Twin Peaks theme song, the Angelo Badalamenti score to Blue Velvet or Mulholland Drive's "Llorando," David Lynch deploys music in his work to stirring effect, creating layers of meanings in a sequence of melancholic minor chords or startled key changes. On April 1, the David Lynch Foundation celebrates its 10th Anniversary with The Music of David Lynch, an exploration of the director's use of immersive and ambient sound in his films, Twin Peaks and original catalog. All proceeds benefit the non-profit Foundation to bring Transcendental Meditation to at-risk populations suffering with PTSD.

You can purchase a ticket.

$1,000 VIP includes the best seats, a private pre-concert event with David Lynch, top shelf cocktails and crafted hors d'oeuvres, and a limited edition concert poster designed by Shepard Fairey

$125 Reserved Orchestra

$75 Reserved Front Balcony

$45 Reserved Rear Balcony