Author Topic: The Master - SPOILERS!  (Read 88516 times)

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Something Spanish

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Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Reply #375 on: January 15, 2017, 08:16:44 AM »
+4
Saw this film for the first time last night and thought the opening shot looked familiar....


Jeremy Blackman

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Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Reply #376 on: January 15, 2017, 10:32:16 AM »
0
That's even a bit like Mad Max pulling his head out of the sand.
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greenberryhill

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Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Reply #377 on: April 21, 2017, 03:19:51 PM »
+5
Nice short film about Preserving the 70mm reels of The Master!

https://vimeo.com/214155435

greenberryhill

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Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Reply #378 on: September 09, 2017, 01:55:00 PM »
+6
Finally this 2012 interview is available on Youtube :)


Lewton

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Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Reply #379 on: October 09, 2017, 05:22:40 PM »
+10
Has this been posted already? This was made by the same folks (PlanetFab Studio) that did the other, more ubiquitous kaleidoscopic poster. I had never seen this one until today. Was it ever actually used?



modage

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Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Reply #380 on: October 10, 2017, 08:17:30 AM »
0
First I've seen of it.
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ono

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Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Reply #381 on: October 22, 2017, 11:59:53 PM »
+3


So after 5 years, it's quite amusing/sad to watch this interview, because RIP PSH, and Haha @ Weinstein Q.  It's fluffy, but at least he got some press.

wilberfan

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Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Reply #382 on: December 29, 2017, 05:09:46 PM »
0
How ‘The Master’ Untangles ‘Phantom Thread’
With its themes of control and submission, Paul Thomas Anderson’s newest work acts as a companion piece to the 2012 film that might be his masterpiece

https://www.theringer.com/movies/2017/12/29/16828404/paul-thomas-anderson-the-master-phantom-thread

This one is referenced also:

https://thepointmag.com/2017/criticism/the-master-paul-thomas-anderson
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Lewton

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Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Reply #383 on: December 29, 2017, 08:08:52 PM »
+3
https://thepointmag.com/2017/criticism/the-master-paul-thomas-anderson

I haven't read that other piece from The Ringer yet, but I read Pinkerton's piece a short while ago. I was going to post it, but I forgot. There are some interesting claims in there, and it's a useful and informed summation of PTA's movies. However, I'm assuming a few of the points raised will prompt reasonable disagreement from fans. Still, even though I disagree with some of the skepticism, it's nice to see someone challenging PTA's movies.

Take this part, for example:

Quote from:
That [Plainview] should adopt the mantle of preacher (“i am the third revelation!”) in his final triumph over Sunday, who has turned would-be entrepreneur, is certainly in keeping with Anderson’s dialectical screenwriting, in which seemingly antipodal figures reach a state of synthesis. But the finale feels less dangerous than diagrammatic; like Dodd’s burst into song at the eleventh hour of The Master, it’s only as moving as the solution to a formula can be. Both movies are much better in their establishing chapters, limning out their subjects’ individual psychologies through bold images that seem to spring naturally from their interior states.

My thoughts:

  • I'm not sure when Anderson's opposed characters have ever reached a state of synthesis in any meaningful way. Synthesis is often deferred or brutally rejected in his films (I haven't seen Phantom Thread). The conflict usually doesn't relent.

  • I was thinking about Pinkerton's criticism of Anderson's "diagrammatic" storytelling, which, as noted in the article, was also brought up by Kent Jones (IIRC, Jones' review of The Master mentioned something about Anderson's character conflicts being a bit "schematic"). I can see how it's there in some of the movies, but I just don't think it's a significant problem. It's a structural technique that works to support/carry the film's risky and interesting moves. So, this criticism almost seems almost like an uncharitable non sequitur. I don't care if the endings feel inevitable or logical. The movies never feel predictable despite the oppositional structure of two characters battling each other, and they always retain a genuine, and often fascinatingly combustible, emotional credibility. Whatever schematic quality is there serves to ground the experience and centre the audience. The nitty-gritty of the character work, and the abundant performative miracles, are what lend the films much of their zest.

  • Put more simply, I don't particularly care that Plainview is so cleanly opposed to Sunday, or Quell to Dodd, etc. Plus, I don't think the opposition is that cleanly divided, anyway. We don't get synthesis, but the overlap between the combatants is always interesting.

  • The note about Dodd's singing being "only as moving as the solution to a formula can be" sounds nice, but my first thought is that it rings kind of hollow given the scene's enormous emotional heft, which is well-earned. It also seems a bit odd to refer to that scene, which offers such an unique spin on the end of a relationship, as being at all formulaic. Plus, just because you can delineate the course from A to B, that doesn't mean the results are necessarily lacklustre. The recursive state of films like TWBB, TM, and IV -- in which characters begin and end alone (I do think this is there in IV, in a manner of speaking) -- creates a very lugubrious mood, and any sense of inevitability or tonal meandering feels essential to that vibe. It's about headspace (authorial headspace and character headspace -- the overall bent of the movie). What's formed is a kind of fog or dreamscape belonging to broken-hearted people, or to people who are desperately wanting or seeking in some soul-sick manner. So, the quibble about being able to trace lines from one point to another seems almost besides the point in movies that privilege mood and the psychological/emotional ebb and flow of characters stuck in one deepening rut or another.

Drenk

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Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Reply #384 on: December 29, 2017, 08:21:37 PM »
+1
I could argue that Eli and Plainview share a lot actually.

Quell and Dodd, it's kind of obvious to me, so...

I think some people are left cold by his movies and see them in a schematic way. It's, like, do you read the plot summaries of TWBB? It does sound like a lesser movie than it is. It's very easy to watch them as being schematic. But the oppositions—the tensions—are always organic. The Master is a perfect example of that. How would you describe the relation between Freddy and Dodd? I would make a list. In the movie, it becomes something more than a succession of words.
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Lewton

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Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Reply #385 on: January 20, 2018, 11:04:58 AM »
+1
I watched this amazing Vincente Minnelli movie recently. It's called The Cobweb. The opening moments focus on this anxious character played by John Kerr. He's fleeing from a psychiatric clinic, and is seen desperately running across some fields for quite a while as the camera tries to keep up. I think this was done mostly in one take.

Anyway, it reminded me of that shot of Freddie running near the beginning of The Master. I guess there's just something cinematic about characters running in a sustained shot. The 400 Blows is probably the most famous example. Still, the overall vibe of this scene from The Cobweb -- the sense of distress and the terrain -- just struck me as being very similar to that moment from The Master.

At any rate, it's a really interesting film that reminded me of PTA in a few other ways, too. There's also a shot of a lake, near the end, that is in no way by the numbers, and that alone is worth the price of admission.

eward

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Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Reply #386 on: January 20, 2018, 12:51:19 PM »
+1
I watched this amazing Vincente Minnelli movie recently. It's called The Cobweb. The opening moments focus on this anxious character played John Kerr. He's fleeing from a psychiatric clinic, and is seen desperately running across some fields for quite a while as the camera tries to keep up. I think this was done mostly in one take.

Anyway, it reminded me of that shot of Freddie running near the beginning of The Master. I guess there's just something cinematic about characters running in a sustained shot. The 400 Blows is probably the most famous example. Still, the overall vibe of this scene from The Cobweb -- the sense of distress and the terrain -- just struck me as being very similar to that moment from The Master.

At any rate, it's a really interesting film that reminded me of PTA in a few other ways, too. There's also a shot of a lake, near the end, that is in no way by the numbers, and that alone is worth the price of admission.


YES - I recently saw another Vincente Minnelli film called Some Came Running with Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Shirley MacLaine that really evoked The Master for me in a number of striking ways - the blocking of many scenes, the color palette, the compositions - it felt like The Master if The Master had been shot in scope...

I need to watch more Vincente Minnelli movies.
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Lewton

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Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Reply #387 on: January 20, 2018, 01:14:45 PM »
0
YES - I recently saw another Vincente Minnelli film called Some Came Running with Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Shirley MacLaine that really evoked The Master for me in a number of striking ways - the blocking of many scenes, the color palette, the compositions - it felt like The Master if The Master had been shot in scope...

Sounds great. I'd like to watch this one.

I need to watch more Vincente Minnelli movies.

Same here. Luckily, TCM has scheduled some of his movies, so I'll be PVRing a few. That's how I managed to see The Cobweb.

By the way, while I actually didn't know about this when I made that post, I just searched around and found out that PTA is a Minnelli fan. I feel like I must have come across this before, but I guess I forgot about it. Back in 2002, he described Barry's blue suit as something influenced by Minnelli.

Quote from:
There's another, subtler musical element in ''Punch-Drunk Love.'' Throughout the film, Mr. Sandler's Barry Egan wears a suit made of the most amazing deep blue material. ''It's from, well, I always loved 'The Bandwagon,' the Vincente Minnelli musical,'' Mr. Anderson said. ''And if you watch 'Singin' in the Rain,' too, it's sort of indicative of these movies that there's a fantastic rich blue suit in just about every one of them. Look next time and you ll see them.

''So it's a little bit like a musical thing,'' Mr. Anderson said. ''It's an MGM suit.''

Incidentally, TCM is playing The Bandwagon tonight.

 

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