Author Topic: 13 Conversations About One Thing  (Read 6797 times)

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chainsmoking insomniac

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13 Conversations About One Thing
« Reply #30 on: May 06, 2003, 11:14:57 PM »
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*Yawn*
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cowboykurtis

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13 Conversations About One Thing
« Reply #31 on: May 07, 2003, 01:07:41 AM »
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Quote from: Mesh
Quote from: cowboykurtis

my opinion has a good deal to do with magnolia -- i think the script is half-baked and unoriginal and the film could've used a more dynamic director.


thanks for changing my words you little bitch -- go fuck yourself.
...your excuses are your own...

Mesh

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13 Conversations About One Thing
« Reply #32 on: May 07, 2003, 11:21:51 AM »
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Quote from: cowboykurtis

thanks for changing my words you little bitch -- go fuck yourself.


Grow up.  It's called fake quoting and it's a humorous way to say what I think as opposed to what you think.

Get it?

There, there.

cowboykurtis

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« Reply #33 on: May 07, 2003, 05:02:13 PM »
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Quote from: Mesh
Quote from: cowboykurtis

thanks for changing my words you little bitch -- go fuck yourself.


Grow up.  It's called fake quoting and it's a humorous way to say what I think as opposed to what you think.

Get it?
.


i got it the fist time -- go fuck yourself, you little bitch.
...your excuses are your own...

Mesh

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13 Conversations About One Thing
« Reply #34 on: May 08, 2003, 11:43:05 AM »
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Quote from: cowboykurtis

i got pissed the fist time -- "go fuck yourself," I said. Then I repeated myself, calling Mesh a "little bitch."


It's pretty funny that stuff like this riles you.

Calm down, and go edit your "film."

cowboykurtis

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13 Conversations About One Thing
« Reply #35 on: May 08, 2003, 03:04:56 PM »
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Quote from: Mesh
[

Calm down, and go edit your "film."


your other attempts at insulting me were very easy to understand...however this one seems to come out of left field -- can you explain to me where this came from? im not sure i understand...thank you
...your excuses are your own...

godardian

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13 Conversations About One Thing
« Reply #36 on: May 08, 2003, 03:29:16 PM »
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I enjoyed this film and Sprecher's other one (Clockwatchers) very much. They may be a little too delicate ("precious" would be the word if one were criticizing) for some, but I enjoyed its evenness of tone.

By the way, I thought there was humor in it. Did everyone else miss Arkin's curmudgeonliness? And I think that was present in both the script and the direction. I sort of thought of it as a black comedy (not laugh-out-loud, though) with dramatic overtones. I can tell you the director herself does have a very nicely developed sense of absurdist gallows humor.

I understand people not liking "philosophical" films like this; I imagine the great Pauline Kael would've hated it to its core. But I do happen to enjoy them. I like Another Woman plenty, too. I like the intimacy and the quietness of them. I like the tone, but I don't take it as patronizing and self-impressed, as I think some people do.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

Mesh

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13 Conversations About One Thing
« Reply #37 on: May 12, 2003, 03:25:36 PM »
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Quote from: cowboykurtis
Quote from: Mesh
[

Calm down, and go edit your "film."


your other attempts at insulting me were very easy to understand...however this one seems to come out of left field -- can you explain to me where this came from? im not sure i understand...thank you


"Occupation:   writer/director"

 :roll:

cowboykurtis

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13 Conversations About One Thing
« Reply #38 on: May 12, 2003, 06:36:04 PM »
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Quote from: Mesh
Quote from: cowboykurtis
Quote from: Mesh
[

Calm down, and go edit your "film."


your other attempts at insulting me were very easy to understand...however this one seems to come out of left field -- can you explain to me where this came from? im not sure i understand...thank you


"Occupation:   writer/director"

 :roll:


r u bitter?
...your excuses are your own...

filmcritic

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William Wise
« Reply #39 on: June 14, 2003, 10:41:30 PM »
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I met William Wise at the Crossroads Film Festival this year. William Wise played Wade "Smiley" Bowman (the happy guy) in "13 Conversations". He also had a role in "In the Bedroom" playing Tom Wilkonson's friend. I always admired him as an actor and I was so thrilled when I met him. I noticed him and I ran up to him telling him how much I appreciated his work. He asked me if I saw "13 Conversations" and I said I did. He was really impressed and we had a couple of long talks. He is a really underrated actor (many of you probably don't know of him). But go back and watch his work, you'll be impressed.
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sexterossa

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Re: 13 Conversations About One Thing
« Reply #40 on: June 19, 2003, 01:47:32 AM »
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Quote from: Mesh
A.  Dull, depressing, cliched script made barely tolerable by decent performances from Alan Arkin, Matthew McConaghey, and John Turturro.  Sort of a poor man's Magnolia, except with a lukewarm, cliched redemptive ending (that holds only the palest candle to PTA's frog-rain/Amy Mann singalong masterstroke).  Personally, I wouldn't waste my time with 13CAOT, if I were you...



agreed. i thought more people on this board were going to like it though. also, the movie totally felt like it was made by women. everything was so sappy and sentimental. like a soap opera.
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godardian

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Re: 13 Conversations About One Thing
« Reply #41 on: June 19, 2003, 01:56:42 AM »
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Quote from: sexterossa
also, the movie totally felt like it was made by women. everything was so sappy and sentimental. like a soap opera.


 :evil:

Mary Harron, Penelope Spheeris, Agnes Varda and Kimberly Peirce are on their way to wherever you live to kick your ass right now. As are James L. Brooks, Rob Reiner, Steven Spielberg, and the trillions of other directors who've foisted more than their share of sap and sentiment onto the public and have now had their very gender identity called into question by your regressive generalization...

Jill Sprecher, who co-wrote and directed the film, claimed her biggest inspiration was Schopenhauer. I see more of that than anything "sappy" or "sentimental." I really think it works; it was one of my favorites last year.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

chainsmoking insomniac

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13 Conversations About One Thing
« Reply #42 on: June 19, 2003, 07:14:10 AM »
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Agreed.  And to call it "a poor man's Magnolia" isn't accurate, IMO.  And would the film have been better if there wasn't a redemptive ending?  I thought the film was great, and whoever said that they could tell it "was made by a woman" should be hit.  
In the immortal words of Dr. Gonzo: "Have we degenerated to the level of dumb beasts???"
Grow up and shove those regressive stereotypes up your ass.
"Ernest Hemingway once wrote: 'The world's a fine place, and worth fighting for.'  I agree with the second part."
     --Morgan Freeman, Se7en

"Have you ever fucking seen that...? Ever seen a mistake in nature?  Have you ever seen an animal make a mistake?"
  --Paul Schneider, All the Real Girls

kotte

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13 Conversations About One Thing
« Reply #43 on: January 20, 2004, 12:55:51 PM »
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Saw it last night.

Terribly uninspired direction. Looked like a Movie-of-the-week on telly. The script deserved better more inventive direction.

The film had the feeling and mood of Storytelling.

I laughed at the 'Smiley' storyline. Filled with heart. It's so true to what actually happens today, how people react to genuinely happy people.

Finn

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13 Conversations About One Thing
« Reply #44 on: January 20, 2004, 03:00:15 PM »
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My favorite story was defintely the Alan Arkin one. William Wise is so good in his role as Smiley. I agree with kotte on that one.
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