Author Topic: Phantom Thread  (Read 44568 times)

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BigSock

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #120 on: August 02, 2017, 10:37:50 PM »
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The calm before the storm

BigSock

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #121 on: August 07, 2017, 09:29:22 PM »
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Kyle Buchanan‏Verified account
@kylebuchanan
I keep hearing that the Paul Thomas Anderson/Daniel Day-Lewis movie is sort of an art-house FIFTY SHADES OF GREY...

https://twitter.com/kylebuchanan/status/894650152115290118

axxonn

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #122 on: August 16, 2017, 06:53:12 PM »
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Not exactly a great bump to the thread but through a bit of IMDb trawling it appears there's more film shot on PTA's Pathé camera on this one.

KJ

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #123 on: August 16, 2017, 07:17:54 PM »
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Kyle Buchanan‏Verified account
@kylebuchanan
I keep hearing that the Paul Thomas Anderson/Daniel Day-Lewis movie is sort of an art-house FIFTY SHADES OF GREY...

https://twitter.com/kylebuchanan/status/894650152115290118

This is a film I really, really want to see. More so than Inherent Vice.

BigSock

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #124 on: August 20, 2017, 06:42:55 PM »
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Kristopher Tapley‏Verified account
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Can't figure out my anticipation level of PTA's movie. I bow down, but Mike Leigh's 50 Shades?

https://twitter.com/kristapley/status/898646409208971264

Drenk

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #125 on: August 20, 2017, 06:54:08 PM »
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It's not surprising to me that he apparently made a movie about submission. Hey. Maybe it will be called The Master (for real this time).
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budwillies

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #126 on: August 30, 2017, 11:51:35 AM »
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Do you think this will play at any festivals? :ponder:

Drenk

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #127 on: August 30, 2017, 12:00:54 PM »
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Probably not. They took eight months to edit The Master and even if it is not the same editor I think he'll finish the movie a few weeks before its release.
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budwillies

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #128 on: September 04, 2017, 11:29:56 AM »
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Interview in Film Comment about the movie

https://twitter.com/jpraup/status/904696500739035136

Just Withnail

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #129 on: September 04, 2017, 02:23:06 PM »
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A Fine Cut

Oscar-winning costume designer Mark Bridges talks about developing characters through clothes

BY CHRISTOPHER LAVERTY

Film criticism often ignores how essential costume design is to creating character, but one glance at the filmography of Mark Bridges is enough to clarify its importance. Try to imagine some of the characters in his films—Boogie Nights’s Dirk Diggler and Rollergirl, There Will Be Blood’s Daniel Plainview, The Artist’s George Valentin—without their iconic ensembles. At the top of his field in creating both period and the oft-overlooked contemporary costume, Bridges spoke to us about his craft, from films past and future: his latest, Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread, coming later this year, is centered on the world of couture fashion.

How does what is required of you vary from director to director?

My process is the same with each director. I read the script, I do my research, and I make them presentations of what I think the costumes should look like. In that meeting I find out what works for them and what doesn’t. Hopefully we find a rhythm. Sometimes you have to hit the ground running. For I ♥ Huckabees [2004], my first film for David O. Russell, I was called in eight days before shooting. David and I had a concept to work with: we were doing the palette of Luis Buñuel’s film The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie. In fact, David even wanted some of the costumes re-created. David has a lot to say about costume, actually, more so than any other directors I have worked with. You’re always safe with him if you just make it real sexy. He’d yell across the set, “Bring me another top and make it see-through!”

I was surprised to see you had taken on Fifty Shades of Grey [2015]. Why did this project entice you?

It was the opportunity to work with Sam Taylor-Johnson, the director. It was also the opportunity to do a project that will be watched by millions of fans. Could I do justice to that? A college girl and a billionaire’s relationship told through the language of contemporary clothes was too good to pass up. Ultimately I think you see in the clothes that Christian Grey becomes a more regular guy and Anastasia Steele grows from a girl to a woman. And, you know, I don’t get to dress a billionaire every day. I knew it was going to be high-profile and interesting. The book’s author, E.L. James, was there all the time. There was some general guidance about what her fans would probably expect. She was particularly fond of the idea of Anastasia’s graduation dress, described as “grey chiffon” in the book, which I thought was weird for a graduation dress. So how do you solve that? I like to maneuver through things with the least amount of stress so there was that level of diplomatically getting everyone satisfied and happy—including me.

Another surprise was Jason Bourne [2016], as it felt like a very established world already in terms of costume.


I had never done the action genre. I loved working with Paul Greengrass and his team. We did Captain Phillips [2013] together, and I wanted to try my hand at an international action film to see how that would work and how I could make it look and feel real for Paul, who comes from a documentary filmmaking background. I was actually very pleased with it because I feel like it is all there but is so distilled down to the barest essentials of differentiating and speaking about character. Re-creating the riots in Greece at the beginning of the film was a fun challenge to me. How do I make that look real? If someone asks “Is that real footage?” I can say, “No, we shot it all in Tenerife!” It was the same with the Somali village in Captain Phillips. People have asked me if that’s a real village, but they’re all wearing thrift clothes from the San Fernando Valley. I like to fool the eye in a way that is believable.

You have worked for Paul Thomas Anderson on all of his feature films. What is he like in terms of preparation and execution?

I wouldn’t say that Paul is as specific as David O. Russell. He’s a writer-director with a lot on his plate but an incredibly good instinct about what’s right and what’s wrong. He does an enormous amount of research, whether it’s how an oil derrick works or how cult religions began in living rooms after World War II. We did a lot of research for There Will Be Blood [2007]. I put together a book to show him some possible images of the Sunday family and a look for Daniel [Day-Lewis]. It was an actual notebook he could leaf through that moves as the story moves. I think he gave it to Daniel to seal the deal on getting him to do the movie. With Paul there is all this meticulous preparation, but then the filming is more free-form. He creates on set, trying angles and lights and how to play a scene.

You have just finished working with Daniel Day-Lewis and Paul Thomas Anderson again on the upcoming Phantom Thread. How was it?

It had a lot of layers to figure out. Real characters that had to be believable in the world of 1955 England. Both country folk and London society. I had to tell a story with each character’s clothing and communicate the class structure of that period. Then we had to decide what are the designs of the couturier that is Daniel’s character. Are his looks like Norman Hartnell? Hardy Amies? Or is it our own thing? What level of success is he? Is he a Balenciaga? Or a John Cavanagh? It was an enormous amount of research of silhouettes and trends. We were fortunate enough that about a year ago Daniel, Paul, and I were in London and were treated to see some of the clothes that are now on display at the V&A Museum, as part of their Balenciaga exhibition. We could view the construction and embroidery—actually touch it. That was the level of research we undertook.

What are your feelings on contemporary costume being forever overlooked at the Oscars?

It’s funny, but when the Academy had two categories for Costume Design, Black and White and Color, up until 1967, most of the black and white films that won were contemporary. All About Eve, A Place in the Sun, La Dolce Vita—those all won. The films that would win in color, like Camelot, were mostly period. Camelot was the first year there was only one Costume Design category and since then, except for rare exceptions, the winners are all period. I just think what people actually think of as a “costume” is why the period stuff always wins.

You won an Oscar for your work on Michel Hazanavicius’s The Artist [2011]. Are you glad it was for this film?

The Artist was such a labor of love. It was a low-budget movie by a relatively unknown French director. By the end of the shoot crew members would come up to Michel and ask, “How are we going to see this movie?” There was a chance that if nobody picked it up it would be languishing in some French video store as a novelty art piece. There was no reading the script and thinking, “Ooh, I’m gonna get an Oscar for this.” That would be a deadly way to go into these jobs. I mean, I had a guarantee to work on La La Land, but unfortunately they didn’t end up doing it when I was scheduled to, so I did Jason Bourne instead. I wasn’t sitting there going, “La La Land is going to be an Oscar winner, so I’d rather do that.” This is show business, so anything can happen.

Christopher Laverty is an author and costume consultant. He edits the award-winning website Clothes on Film and wrote the book Fashion in Film.
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budwillies

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #130 on: September 15, 2017, 02:59:31 PM »
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Possible trailer dropping next week with the release of the Judi Dench movie?  Any word on a possible title?

Drenk

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #131 on: September 15, 2017, 03:34:35 PM »
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Probably not, we don't even have a title. And usually a teaser poster is released before the first trailer drops. I think the promotion will begin in November.
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Sleepless

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #132 on: September 15, 2017, 03:35:51 PM »
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Yep, it's called Conflagrant Chaps: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3826338/

BigSock

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #133 on: September 18, 2017, 10:20:04 PM »
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Possible trailer dropping next week with the release of the Judi Dench movie?  Any word on a possible title?

No, there is not a trailer attached to that movie in theaters

budwillies

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Re: Phantom Thread
« Reply #134 on: September 19, 2017, 03:52:44 PM »
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Someone on the pta subreddit commented that he or she saw the trailer for a survey company. Maybe it is being released soon? I dmed them to ask about it

 

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