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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Other actors/directors/etc. who mention PTA
« Last post by wilberfan on Today at 03:00:47 PM »
This may have been quoted here before.  We've been busted, gentlemen.

AN OPEN LETTER OF THANKS TO THE MEN WHO TELL ME WHO PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON IS

https://www.mcsweeneys.net/articles/an-open-letter-of-thanks-to-the-men-who-tell-me-who-paul-thomas-anderson-is

Dear Men,

Thank you for telling me who critically acclaimed, Academy Award-nominated writer/director Paul Thomas Anderson is. Thank you for telling me he’s your favorite director — you must really know your stuff. Here I was floating around with no clue who this guy is — that must be why I literally have a huge gaping hole in my brain: all the missing Paul Thomas Anderson information!

Thank you for making sure I realize I don’t know anything at all about anything and especially not anything about your boy “P.T.” I really am learning so much about film from you, a financial consultant at Goldman Sachs!

I love hearing your hot-take on how Punch-Drunk Love was the film that finally legitimized the career of actor Adam Sandler (star of The Waterboy and Hotel Transylvania 2). About time someone broke that glass ceiling!

I have zero opinions about anything in my teeny Paul Thomas Anderson-less head. Please, tell me more about Boogie Nights. Quote it for me! There wouldn’t be any chance you have fun facts about Mark Wahlberg? I love that. Open your mouth and never close it until you have told me every single thing you know about Boogie Nights.

Thanks for stopping me from blabbering on with my “female” or “professional” perspective (I am a woman and work in the film industry but that’s so random of me to mention I’ll shut up). I like hearing what someone with a Blu-Ray DVD player and one idea for a screenplay about a guy who gets broken up with by a woman with big boobs but still smells her perfume everywhere he goes, like even his barrels of hand-rolled cigarettes start to smell like her, has to say about Boogie Nights.

I haven’t seen Phantom Thread yet, so thank you for describing each scene in detail. I probably wouldn’t have fully understood it on my own. I already forgot what a Paul Thomas Anderson is can you tell me again?

Thanks for still talking about Boogie Nights. Thank you for telling me how perfectly paced Paul Thomas Anderson’s screenplay is. I feel like I’m comprehending words for the first time because it’s coming from the mouth of someone whose mother once told him he’s very artistic.

Thank you for showing me your Magnolia poster.

Thanks for giving me your list of Paul Thomas Anderson’s films ranked best to worst according to you, owner of a Magnolia poster. Thank you for telling me that Boogie Nights is at the top of that list. Thank you for telling me Mark Wahlberg is your favorite actor because of Boogie Nights. Thank you for giving me more fun facts about Mark Wahlberg in Boogie Nights. I love that. Thanks for explaining the gritty sensitivity of Boogie Nights. Thank you for Boogie Nights. Thanks Boogie Nights. Boogie Nights Boogie Nights. Boogie Nights. Boogie Nights. Boogie Nights. Boogie. Nights. Boogie. Nights. Boogie. Nights. Boogie Nights. Boogie Nights. Boogie Nights. Boogie Nights. Boogie. Nights. Boogie. Nights. Boogie. Nights. Boogie. Nights. Boogie. Nights Boogie Nights Boogie Nights Boogie Nights Boogie Nights Boogie Nights Boogie Nights Boogie Nights Boogie Nights.

Sincerely,
Woman who’s never seen Boogie Nights

[I actually have a female friend that could have written this--based on my PTA blather.  I better go check... ]
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The Small Screen / Re: The X-Files
« Last post by Jeremy Blackman on Today at 10:47:03 AM »
I appreciated Roi and Jessa's perspective on the romance (or lack thereof, apparently). Glad I'm not the only one who was utterly confused by that scene. Last episode they were living together, cuddling on the couch, and making sex jokes. Now they're talking about how they sort of regret never being together? WHAT? It was complete nonsense. I'm sure Chris thought he was throwing a bone to the shippers, too. He should not be writing this show.
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The Grapevine / paddinngton 2
« Last post by samsong on Today at 02:11:29 AM »
an immaculate confection, and exceptionally well crafted.  watched the first one after the superlative reviews for this one came flowing in (it’s on netflix), and it’s delightful.  this is completely next level and brilliant.  one of the best kids movies ever made, and one of the most disarming, charming, fun, silly movies ive ever seen.  hope paul king’s career takes off after this, as hes clearly an enormous talent.  i genuinely loved this movie.  see this in theaters.
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread
« Last post by Ravi on Yesterday at 04:21:53 PM »
https://slate.com/culture/2018/01/the-secrets-behindphantom-threads-evocative-sound-design.html

How Phantom Thread Made Toast Irritating

By Jackson McHenry
Jan 18, 2018

 In Phantom Thread, Daniel Day-Lewis’s quiet, meticulous dressmaker Reynolds Woodcock falls hard for a young, mysterious woman named Alma (Vicky Krieps). As with any fall, what results is bruising and chaotic—and a significant amount of noise. Reynolds is graceful and exacting. Alma is clumsy and clamorous. He works quietly; she walks heavily, trips, drop things. He insists on eating breakfast in total silence. She chews so loudly even the audience starts to grimace. It’s through these small, bothersome sounds—Alma scraping butter across her toast at breakfast and slowly pouring tea, or Reynolds aggressively cutting his asparagus—that the movie unnerves you, traps you inside the couple’s shared psychosis. The sound is as much a part of the story as the couture, or the characters themselves.

In order to learn the secrets behind Phantom Thread’s evocative sound design—and figure out how they made that toast so damn annoying—Vulture spoke with sound designer and rerecording mixer Christopher Scarabosio. Scarabosio, who’s worked with director Paul Thomas Anderson ever since Punch-Drunk Love and earned an Oscar nomination for There Will Be Blood, developed a plan for Phantom Thread’s specific sound design after watching the complex relationship between the characters play out in an early cut of the film. “I thought, I’m going to base my sound design on the these characters, and way they’re building tension,” he explained.

 Scarabosio has previously worked on blockbuster films like The Force Awakens and Rogue One, and noted that a film like Phantom Thread requires a different sort of approach to sound. “Nothing can take you out of the film,” he said. “With a blockbuster, we know we’re going into an action sequence, or a mind-altering sequence, and it’s all about creating exciting and cool sound-design-y moments.” In a film like Phantom Thread, however, with a director like Anderson, the goal is to stay within the story—and match the director’s aesthetic.

Scarabosio began by using rerecorded sounds, or matches, and integrating them into the film with the production sound, i.e., what was recorded on set. That initial sound “was a little rough to start,” Scarabosio said, and since Anderson prefers not to use a lot of additional dialogue recording or Foley effects to reproduce sounds, a lot of Scarabosio’s work involves finding sounds that feel real, like they were recorded in the moment. Because he’d worked with Anderson before, he also knew that the director preferred a “messy” and “not overly polished or produced sound to things,” as he did in Punch-Drunk Love or There Will Be Blood. In essence, the directive was to bring on the irritation, with one caveat—“the fabrics, those have to sound really beautiful.”

The noise created by moving fabric can seem like indistinct white noise—fuzzy, without a lot of definition. In order to capture the textures of Reynolds’s dresses with exactitude, the sound department composed a collection of “satins and silks and cottons and linens and fabrics with textures and some that were smoother.” “Everything that Reynolds is making has to be of the highest quality, and we started building a library of different textures for various fabrics,” Scarabosio said. The team had to be exact; the way that silk might sounds as it moves or is cut, for example, is different from the way cotton or linen might sound. The same conscientiousness is necessary when scoring different types of sewing machines, differentiating between the sound of machine and hand sewing, and even contrasting various types of needles and threads. Each gets its own place in the library. “We’re trying to make it as distinctive as possible,” Scarabosio said.

Scarabosio was also charged with establishing character and tone through sound. In scenes where Alma finally stops pushing up against Reynolds’s strict lifestyle and conforms to his expectations, she becomes nearly silent, and the noises she produces—opening or closing a door, for instance—are far softer. “This is her way of saying, ‘You’re going to have your time and I’m going to have my time,’” explained Scarabosio. Reynolds’s officious sister Cyril (Lesley Manville), in contrast, is “disruptive and deliberate.” “Earlier in the film, every time that she enters, she breaks the moment,” Scarabosio said. “She’ll come in with loud footsteps or she’ll slam a door or she’ll start talking, and all those moments break the initial spell.”

Many of the film’s most crucial scenes take place while Reynolds and Alma are eating around a table, where the familiar noises of chewing, cutting, and scraping soon become overwhelming. In one scene—which Scarabosio said was one of the most difficult to get right—Alma eats breakfast across from Reynolds and his sister Cyril, and in a key moment, scrapes butter across her toast in a way that’s especially grating, both to Reynolds and viewers.

“That was one of those moments where we really had to intensify what was happening in the scene,” Scarabosio said. He and his team tried cutting out all production sound and focusing recorded effects, but instead settled on “a combination of reality and enhanced reality,” which meant finding and recording the right noises to match what was happening in the scene. “We recorded a bunch of various things—plates clacking and silverware dropping and toast being buttered—as did the Foley [artists].” Then, in the studio, the team combined and exaggerated these noises, so they might be as irksome as possible to Reynolds.

And as for how he made that toast-buttering so unbelievably loud? Scarabosio did his diligent carb research. “We buttered a lot of different toasts,” he said. “We did bagels. We did rye. We did sourdough. We tried them all.” The bread that worked best: “Plain white toast,” he said. “When you toast it and get it to that nice dark brown—that and some good sourdough, with a really thick crust.”
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread - Interviews
« Last post by wilberfan on Yesterday at 01:14:38 PM »
A lovely interview with everyone's favorite Luxumbourgian.

Actor Vicky Krieps: ‘I spent a whole day staring into greenery to avoid Daniel Day-Lewis’

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/jan/21/vicky-krieps-daniel-day-lewis-interview-phantom-thread

Quote
...there was a day before filming when there was a danger of them meeting but swears she spent it “looking at my feet. I thought: if that is the rule of the game, I’ll play it. I spent a whole day staring into greenery to avoid him.” She also took herself off on long walks by the sea, calming herself that way. She knew that once she became Alma, she would have to meet Reynolds’s gaze incessantly, and the man who started out charming would turn out to be overbearing, testy and needle-sharp. Day-Lewis plays him with a compelling inwardness. His eyes are hypnotic (his eyebrows incredible). Would she say their relationship devolved into a power struggle as Reynolds became less flirtatious, more despotic?
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread - SPOILERS!
« Last post by wilberfan on January 20, 2018, 08:55:43 PM »
-The sound mixing was great. What an ingenious move to make certain things very loud and apparent. These sounds, such as the Alma buttering her toast or pouring water, actually convey what the characters are experiencing and become a part of the story. I love that sound was used as sort of another dimension to the story.

More on the sound design of the film:

How Phantom Thread Made Toast Irritating

http://www.vulture.com/2018/01/how-phantom-thread-made-toast-irritating.html
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Last post by Lewton on January 20, 2018, 01:14:45 PM »
YES - I recently saw another Vincente Minnelli film called Some Came Running with Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Shirley MacLaine that really evoked The Master for me in a number of striking ways - the blocking of many scenes, the color palette, the compositions - it felt like The Master if The Master had been shot in scope...

Sounds great. I'd like to watch this one.

I need to watch more Vincente Minnelli movies.

Same here. Luckily, TCM has scheduled some of his movies, so I'll be PVRing a few. That's how I managed to see The Cobweb.

By the way, while I actually didn't know about this when I made that post, I just searched around and found out that PTA is a Minnelli fan. I feel like I must have come across this before, but I guess I forgot about it. Back in 2002, he described Barry's blue suit as something influenced by Minnelli.

Quote from:
There's another, subtler musical element in ''Punch-Drunk Love.'' Throughout the film, Mr. Sandler's Barry Egan wears a suit made of the most amazing deep blue material. ''It's from, well, I always loved 'The Bandwagon,' the Vincente Minnelli musical,'' Mr. Anderson said. ''And if you watch 'Singin' in the Rain,' too, it's sort of indicative of these movies that there's a fantastic rich blue suit in just about every one of them. Look next time and you ll see them.

''So it's a little bit like a musical thing,'' Mr. Anderson said. ''It's an MGM suit.''

Incidentally, TCM is playing The Bandwagon tonight.
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Last post by eward on January 20, 2018, 12:51:19 PM »
I watched this amazing Vincente Minnelli movie recently. It's called The Cobweb. The opening moments focus on this anxious character played John Kerr. He's fleeing from a psychiatric clinic, and is seen desperately running across some fields for quite a while as the camera tries to keep up. I think this was done mostly in one take.

Anyway, it reminded me of that shot of Freddie running near the beginning of The Master. I guess there's just something cinematic about characters running in a sustained shot. The 400 Blows is probably the most famous example. Still, the overall vibe of this scene from The Cobweb -- the sense of distress and the terrain -- just struck me as being very similar to that moment from The Master.

At any rate, it's a really interesting film that reminded me of PTA in a few other ways, too. There's also a shot of a lake, near the end, that is in no way by the numbers, and that alone is worth the price of admission.


YES - I recently saw another Vincente Minnelli film called Some Came Running with Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Shirley MacLaine that really evoked The Master for me in a number of striking ways - the blocking of many scenes, the color palette, the compositions - it felt like The Master if The Master had been shot in scope...

I need to watch more Vincente Minnelli movies.
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: The Master - SPOILERS!
« Last post by Lewton on January 20, 2018, 11:04:58 AM »
I watched this amazing Vincente Minnelli movie recently. It's called The Cobweb. The opening moments focus on this anxious character played by John Kerr. He's fleeing from a psychiatric clinic, and is seen desperately running across some fields for quite a while as the camera tries to keep up. I think this was done mostly in one take.

Anyway, it reminded me of that shot of Freddie running near the beginning of The Master. I guess there's just something cinematic about characters running in a sustained shot. The 400 Blows is probably the most famous example. Still, the overall vibe of this scene from The Cobweb -- the sense of distress and the terrain -- just struck me as being very similar to that moment from The Master.

At any rate, it's a really interesting film that reminded me of PTA in a few other ways, too. There's also a shot of a lake, near the end, that is in no way by the numbers, and that alone is worth the price of admission.
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Untitled PTA Project (2020)
« Last post by Tdog on January 20, 2018, 09:36:48 AM »
He talked about working on material about feuding families around the time of There Will Be Blood. I imagine parts might have made it into the movie but a lot of it was shelved/drawered.
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