XIXAX Film Forum

The Director's Chair => The Director's Chair => Topic started by: NEON MERCURY on December 13, 2003, 08:12:27 PM

Title: John Hughes
Post by: NEON MERCURY on December 13, 2003, 08:12:27 PM
bueller barely edges out p.t.a.

i also find this a solid list of films....(omit Curly sue though).....
Title: John Hughes
Post by: Chest Rockwell on December 26, 2003, 04:23:25 PM
Ferris Bueller is obviously the best
Title: John Hughes
Post by: godardian on December 26, 2003, 04:58:14 PM
I enjoy Planes, Trains, and Automobiles once in a blue moon, but I hate John Hughes. The best John Hughes movie (Pretty in Pink) wasn't even directed by him... and it's still a pretty bad movie...  :(

Maybe someday there'll be a thread about whoever directed She's All That, who evidently was the John Hughes of the nineties...
Title: John Hughes
Post by: MacGuffin on December 26, 2003, 05:02:40 PM
Quote from: godardian
Maybe someday there'll be a thread about whoever directed She's All That, who evidently was the John Hughes of the nineties...


He's also the same guy who directed "Boys And Girls" and "From Justin To Kelly" so maybe that thread will not happen.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: SiliasRuby on March 06, 2006, 09:32:09 PM
Uncle Buck is a gem of a movie. But oviously Planes, Tranes, and Automobiles, The Breakfast Club, and Ferris Bueller's Day off are all tied for first place in the greatest John hughes movies ever.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: SiliasRuby on August 10, 2009, 09:26:56 PM
He was amazing and now he's dead. It's Time For John Hughes Marathon.....Time. I've been watching many of his films already. I'm in heavy withdrawal.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: Bethie on August 11, 2009, 12:53:29 AM
My parents never said Happy Birthday to me the other day. FACT.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: Gold Trumpet on August 11, 2009, 01:56:08 AM
I enjoy John Hughes, but he's no ornamnent in my film memory. I think Ferris Bueller's Day Off is very charming, but I hate Breakfast Club with a passion. I can't stand its conformity philosophy and cheap little melodramatics.

Movie of his I like more is She's Having a Baby. The movie is sincere and relevant with its ideas of the idealist having to deal with life after college, but the film cheapens itself with the music video odes everywhere. If those were gone I think the film could garner more public praise. Still, it's the film of his I like most which probably says I don't like Hughes very much.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: MacGuffin on August 11, 2009, 03:19:34 AM
John Hughes doc finds distributor
Alliance Films picks up 'Don't You Forget'
Source: Variety

Until a few days ago, "Don't You Forget About Me" was just another Canuck feature documentary with no distributor and an uncertain future.

But that changed Thursday, with the death of its subject -- John Hughes.

When Toronto helmer Matt Austin-Sadowski woke up Friday morning, the first email in his inbox was from CNN requesting an interview. By noon, world rights to the low-budget doc had been snapped up by Alliance Films of Montreal with a U.S. deal in the offing.

The doc looks at the life and work of the filmmaker behind teen hits "Ferris Bueller's Day Off," "The Breakfast Club" and "Sixteen Candles."

But "Don't You Forget About Me" -- a nod to the Simple Minds pop song featured in "The Breakfast Club" -- is hardly a standard biopic.

Rather it's a 75-minute, "Roger and Me"-like road trip in which Austin-Sadowski and his producers Kari Hollend, Mike Facciolo and Lenny Panzer head to suburban Illinois in their van to try to find the reclusive Hughes.

It was made without public funding, something extremely rare in Canadian cinema.

Austin-Sadowski, an actor best known for his role in the "Power Rangers: S.P.D." TV series, is thrilled his film is getting so much attention, but it's a bittersweet feeling given it took Hughes' death to spark the interest.

Austin-Sadowski, 31, said Hughes' films had a huge impact on him when he was in high school.

"He inspired me as a person, going through an awkward adolescence, as many people do," Austin-Sadowski said. "He took affairs of the heart very seriously, and no other director gave teenagers that sort of treatment at that time."

Thesps interviewed in the doc include Ally Sheedy, Judd Nelson, Mia Sara, Kelly LeBrock and Andrew McCarthy. Molly Ringwald, perhaps the actress most associated with Hughes' hits, refused to take part in the project.

Austin-Sadowski said he hopes the buzz translates into renewed interest in Hughes' films. "That's what's important to us. It's not the deal. It's not more exposure for us."
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: SiliasRuby on August 11, 2009, 11:16:11 AM
I enjoy John Hughes, but he's no ornamnent in my film memory. I think Ferris Bueller's Day Off is very charming, but I hate Breakfast Club with a passion. I can't stand its conformity philosophy and cheap little melodramatics.

Movie of his I like more is She's Having a Baby. The movie is sincere and relevant with its ideas of the idealist having to deal with life after college, but the film cheapens itself with the music video odes everywhere. If those were gone I think the film could garner more public praise. Still, it's the film of his I like most which probably says I don't like Hughes very much.
And that's why you are such a unique badass here GT, you disliked 'There Will Be Blood' AND some of the most beloved films talked about here.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: tpfkabi on August 11, 2009, 11:22:55 AM
It's hard for me to really speak of him as a director because all I've seen are panned and scanned edited versions of his films on TV.

As a screenwriter, he has given me many laughs over the years though.

I probably would have bought a John Hughes DVD collection, but I've been holding off hoping he'd consent and be involved in one.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: Neil on August 11, 2009, 11:43:49 AM
I enjoy John Hughes, but he's no ornamnent in my film memory. I think Ferris Bueller's Day Off is very charming, but I hate Breakfast Club with a passion. I can't stand its conformity philosophy and cheap little melodramatics.

Movie of his I like more is She's Having a Baby. The movie is sincere and relevant with its ideas of the idealist having to deal with life after college, but the film cheapens itself with the music video odes everywhere. If those were gone I think the film could garner more public praise. Still, it's the film of his I like most which probably says I don't like Hughes very much.
And that's why you are such a unique badass here GT, you disliked 'There Will Be Blood' AND some of the most beloved films talked about here.

Without getting too intense, let me here this fucking hate for Breakfast club. Where does it cross the line, and were you home schooled?  How old are you?  and why would such a light hearted film with great depth about children, get your passion of hatred involved.  There might be better things to be passionate about than hating the breakfast club with a passion.  I think silias is correct, i value your opinions on this board regarding film, but i'd love to know how this film doesn't work.  Kind of reminds me of that Klosterman piece where he talks about how toby keith.  I'm just interested in the so called " conformity philosophy and cheap little melodramatics."  Are you sure too many people didn't like it? and when was the last time you watched it?  Let me have it, I can't wait to hear assertions on a film, that floats like a feather, and doesn't claim to be much in 2009, but an amazing look back.

She's having a baby kicks fucking ass too, in my top 5 hughes
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: tpfkabi on August 11, 2009, 11:51:06 AM
The older edition of Ferris has a Hughes commentary - the only one I'm aware of.

Has anyone listened to it?

I have thought many times of buying the old version just to hear it.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: SiliasRuby on August 11, 2009, 12:09:17 PM
I have listened to it, its quite good and very informative.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: Neil on August 11, 2009, 12:13:14 PM
My copy was made in 1999 and it has the commentary.  "Widescreen Collection" Red band on the bottom

Fucking awesome


http://www.amazon.com/Ferris-Buellers-Day-Lisa-Bellard/dp/B00001MXXH/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1250010765&sr=8-3 (http://www.amazon.com/Ferris-Buellers-Day-Lisa-Bellard/dp/B00001MXXH/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1250010765&sr=8-3)
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: Gold Trumpet on August 11, 2009, 12:51:30 PM
I enjoy John Hughes, but he's no ornamnent in my film memory. I think Ferris Bueller's Day Off is very charming, but I hate Breakfast Club with a passion. I can't stand its conformity philosophy and cheap little melodramatics.

Movie of his I like more is She's Having a Baby. The movie is sincere and relevant with its ideas of the idealist having to deal with life after college, but the film cheapens itself with the music video odes everywhere. If those were gone I think the film could garner more public praise. Still, it's the film of his I like most which probably says I don't like Hughes very much.
And that's why you are such a unique badass here GT, you disliked 'There Will Be Blood' AND some of the most beloved films talked about here.

Without getting too intense, let me here this fucking hate for Breakfast club. Where does it cross the line, and were you home schooled?  How old are you?  and why would such a light hearted film with great depth about children, get your passion of hatred involved.  There might be better things to be passionate about than hating the breakfast club with a passion.  I think silias is correct, i value your opinions on this board regarding film, but i'd love to know how this film doesn't work.  Kind of reminds me of that Klosterman piece where he talks about how toby keith.  I'm just interested in the so called " conformity philosophy and cheap little melodramatics."  Are you sure too many people didn't like it? and when was the last time you watched it?  Let me have it, I can't wait to hear assertions on a film, that floats like a feather, and doesn't claim to be much in 2009, but an amazing look back.

She's having a baby kicks fucking ass too, in my top 5 hughes


Hey Neil, I never knew personally offending you was saying a few choice words about a teen movie. I also am obviously very young. I turned 16 the other day and I gave high school a shot, but dropped out for home schooling because I missed my mother's nipples for suckling. Obviously.

I last saw Breakfast Club two years ago on TV. The conformity philosophy relates mainly to Ally Sheedy's character. She is the real outcast of the group with her odd eating habits and little quircks that puzzle everyone else. She is also the character who is most portrayed by John Hughes in caricature fashion. We get to understand a lot about the other characters in their defeats and problems, but she continues on mostly as an image of poverty to true socialization in high school which obviously means the only transformation she needs (according to the film) to be normal is a beauty make over. Not just clean her up her looks to make her more clean, but a total makeover where she is now featuring a 1950s hairdo and even a fucking pearl necklace (if I remember correctly). It's insulting because those kids who dressed offbeat and lived by their quircks were represented more than by their physical appearances. Behind most of them are interests, hobbies and feelings that refused years before to dress according to social norms. When they are older they will most likely realize they don't need to dress so despairly and maybe they will lighten the image, but it doesn't mean they will just become a fucking version of Donna Reed and become ready to date a wrestler. It doesn't happen that way and John Hughes idea of this large group of people is ridiculous.

I think the film is melodramatic because it tries to fit in numerous end-of-movie touching moments into one film. You can argue it needs to do that because there are many high school characters, but is the film better because it tries to touch base on every social clique? I don't think so. The film could have touched a lot of high school experiences by focusing sincerely on one or two characters and how they dealt with all of high school life, but the form of the drama where every clique representative is summed up in conveniant fashions for soap opera effect is ridiculous to me. He could have focused on one or two characters and showed that there are multiple levels to every higher schooler's problem with high school, but instead he goes for the easiest problem in every high school clique. It's not revelatory because he defines every character by the problems you already assume they would have. Thus it's all cliche to me.

And I hate the film because I grew up with all my friends telling me how great it was. When I first saw it was not impressed but didn't care, but ten years of stories about its greatness can get annoying. Yes, it's me just hating a teen film in the end, but everybody hates certain films that don't deserve it for various personal reasons. To act above it is dumb.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: SiliasRuby on August 11, 2009, 01:01:45 PM
Not to be mean or anything-purely curious- but could you give us a list that actually move you emotionally?... Since so many of the films that usually would move a young man or woman (at least on here) you deconstruct...I don't want to burden you too much on this issue but it possibly (in doing so) will make others on this board not treat you so abusively when it comes to you destroying the films they adore....Again not pissed, just curious.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: tpfkabi on August 11, 2009, 01:05:57 PM
I have listened to it, its quite good and very informative.

anything you can remember specifically?

for some reason when they made a newer edition they dropped the commentary.

if it was on the newer i would have gotten it, because i think there is some kind of visual problem with the older - incorrect Widescreen, bad transfer, or something along those lines. i can't remember any more.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: Gold Trumpet on August 11, 2009, 01:31:46 PM
Not to be mean or anything-purely curious- but could you give us a list that actually move you emotionally?... Since so many of the films that usually would move a young man or woman (at least on here) you deconstruct...I don't want to burden you too much on this issue but it possibly (in doing so) will make others on this board not treat you so abusively when it comes to you destroying the films they adore....Again not pissed, just curious.

First off, it's not abusive because it doesn't really affect me. It's just stress on their part.

Second off, it doesn't matter what movies I like. All that matters is that I am going after a film someone really loves. When that happens, all bets are off about your history and whether or not you love movies. Sometimes the person will be constructive in arguing you and sometimes they have dumb ways of attacking you. But still, all that matters in that moment is that you went after their film. They could agree with you a day later on something else and make you think your opinion is valuable to them, but ultimately they want agreement on their most beloved films.

Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: Neil on August 11, 2009, 03:10:48 PM
Abusive? I just asked a few questions, and trust me GT don't flatter yourself on thinking you can upset me or whatever.  I was just asking about a film that is essentially about Saturday Detention.  Now if you think high school in its entirety can be summed up on a Saturday morning by complete strangers, yes this movie is a failure in that light.  Defining the high school experience as you want.  I wasn't condescending about age like most people used to me on this board.  i'm aware that i'm one of the younger kids on here, and therefore the things i post are merely viewed as, meh.  I just finally got the guts to post after having a membership on here for 7+ years or so, i'm still way down in number of posts.  Aside from this.  I'm sorry GT but, if you in fact are my superior  then i'll sum your post up by the opener and closer. 

Quote
Hey Neil, I never knew personally offending you was saying a few choice words about a teen movie. I also am obviously very young. I turned 16 the other day and I gave high school a shot, but dropped out for home schooling because I missed my mother's nipples for suckling. Obviously.


 I was just wondering if you saw it not as a teeny bopper or whatever, calm it.

Mixed with a little

Quote
And I hate the film because I grew up with all my friends telling me how great it was. When I first saw it was not impressed but didn't care, but ten years of stories about its greatness can get annoying. Yes, it's me just hating a teen film in the end, but everybody hates certain films that don't deserve it for various personal reasons. To act above it is dumb.



I think anyone over the age of twelve can understand that it is dated, and not 100% realistic.  We all get it, but either look at is as pop or don't.  I don't think anyone here said the movie changed their life.  A bunch of people like it, and a bunch of people around you liked it, so you got annoyed,  so you've come up with your way of
Quote
it doesn't matter what movies I like. All that matters is that I am going after a film someone really loves. When that happens, all bets are off about your history and whether or not you love movies. Sometimes the person will be constructive in arguing you and sometimes they have dumb ways of attacking you. But still, all that matters in that moment is that you went after their film. They could agree with you a day later on something else and make you think your opinion is valuable to them, but ultimately they want agreement on their most beloved films.

"their film"  -  whose is it? 

If the film did change your life, chances are you were young and impressionable, and there isn't a god damn thing wrong with that
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: tpfkabi on August 11, 2009, 03:22:23 PM
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/robert-nolan/the-early-ferris-bueller_b_256730.html
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: Gold Trumpet on August 11, 2009, 04:11:23 PM
Abusive? I just asked a few questions... I wasn't condescending about age like most people used to me on this board.

I was just wondering if you saw it not as a teeny bopper or whatever, calm it.

Yea, that makes no sense. Here is what you asked,

Where does it cross the line, and were you home schooled?  How old are you?

You aren't asking me if I saw it as a teeny bopper. You're just insinuating I am likely out of touch with the themes in the film because I must have been home schooled. Of course I was not home schooled and my age has little to do with anything, unless you want to insinuate I am young and dumb. Or old and out of touch, but I'm not sure which. But don't think your questions were innocent or have anything to do with what you are talking about in your reply.

Now if you think high school in its entirety can be summed up on a Saturday morning by complete strangers, yes this movie is a failure in that light.  Defining the high school experience as you want.

I don't think the film is trying to be a monumental work on high school, but I definitely think it is trying to reach for various experiences from various kinds of high school students for a composite viewpoint of the high school experience. No work of art can be fully complete in depicting a cross section of people, but the fact that all the students in the film specifically represent different cliques and social groups is purposeful. I think the film wants to speak about a larger climate of high school life. It's not Bergman, but it's certainly more serious than most of Hughes' other movies. Considering all of this, the film does itself a disservice by just highlighting obvious and predictable high school problems. It just isn't very interesting.

I think anyone over the age of twelve can understand that it is dated, and not 100% realistic.  We all get it, but either look at is as pop or don't.  I don't think anyone here said the movie changed their life. 

1.) I never took issue with it being dated. I like other movies from the time period that are equally dated, but more interesting than Breakfast Club. Diner (made 2 years before) is maybe my favorite movie ever.

2.) I can appreciate pop, but this isn't strictly pop. Hughes isn't replicating his Sixteen Candles or Ferris Bueller formula here. He's trying to extend himself by taking on more themes and changing the tone slightly, but I just think it all fails.

3.) It's changed the lives of people I know, but when did I ever say it did change anyone's life here? I just said some movies are beloved to people here. It seems like this could be one considering the response.

 
If the film did change your life, chances are you were young and impressionable, and there isn't a god damn thing wrong with that

I never said there was. I don't care who likes the movie as long as I can hate it. Just learn to live with the disagreements but considering you are insinuating a lot of shit on my part, maybe you can't.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: tpfkabi on August 11, 2009, 04:37:13 PM
Has anyone read where John really worked and worked on any screenplay?

From what I get, most were written over a weekend or very fast - or at least Steve Martin alluded to one after the death.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: SiliasRuby on August 11, 2009, 04:56:46 PM
'The Breakfast Club' was written in a weekend
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: Gamblour. on August 11, 2009, 07:49:17 PM
According to IMDb, Weird Science was written in 2 days. I love that movie, but yeah, 2 days sounds about right.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: SiliasRuby on August 11, 2009, 08:15:22 PM
Oh, you might be right Gamblour
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: Neil on August 12, 2009, 07:26:53 AM
Sorry, i just woke up outside of that conversation. I can't accept a lot of things. But most of that is bullshit, ride it out though.  My favorite is actually weird science. (what's that tell you about me and my film ways)  Two days does seem about right, but

 Do you think it was easy for him to pitch a film that was written in 2 days, for xxxxx amount of  $$$ (what was the budget of that film)?
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: socketlevel on August 12, 2009, 08:56:15 AM
Sorry, i just woke up outside of that conversation. I can't accept a lot of things. But most of that is bullshit, ride it out though.  My favorite is actually weird science. (what's that tell you about me and my film ways)  Two days does seem about right, but

 Do you think it was easy for him to pitch a film that was written in 2 days, for xxxxx amount of  $$$ (what was the budget of that film)?

probably didn't mention it, it's more trivia for film geeks like ourselves then a point of interest for investors.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: SiliasRuby on August 12, 2009, 01:07:00 PM
Sorry, i just woke up outside of that conversation. I can't accept a lot of things. But most of that is bullshit, ride it out though.  My favorite is actually weird science. (what's that tell you about me and my film ways)  Two days does seem about right, but

 Do you think it was easy for him to pitch a film that was written in 2 days, for xxxxx amount of  $$$ (what was the budget of that film)?

probably didn't mention it, it's more trivia for film geeks like ourselves then a point of interest for investors.
You are right.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: Neil on August 12, 2009, 04:04:26 PM
I'm interested though, does anyone know the budget, and shooting length?
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: tpfkabi on August 12, 2009, 04:20:18 PM
one thing this has reminded me of:

my family wanted to rent The Great Outdoors (i believe John wrote this) and so we did, get home and the tape is messed up. tracking does nothing.

take it back, go to another store in town. same thing. we gave up. luckily, i caught it on tv afterwards.

sincerely,
jack handey

p.s. i also remember at said rental store when my mother asked for a nice family film and the guy suggested a Richard Pryor film. we only watched about 5 mins. mom wasn't pleased.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: Neil on August 18, 2009, 03:29:43 PM
http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/370-Beech-Street_Highland-Park_IL_60035_1109385563?source=web (http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/370-Beech-Street_Highland-Park_IL_60035_1109385563?source=web)


who wants to go in on this? 


Oh yeah, i couldn't let this go.  I needed another shot.  The homeschooling thing was a joke! guess i struck a nerve.

 
Quote
I turned 16 the other day and I gave high school a shot, but dropped out for home schooling because I missed my mother's nipples for suckling. Obviously.

I last saw Breakfast Club two years ago on TV. The conformity philosophy relates mainly to Ally Sheedy's character. She is the real outcast of the group with her odd eating habits and little quircks that puzzle everyone else. She is also the character who is most portrayed by John Hughes in caricature fashion. We get to understand a lot about the other characters in their defeats and problems, but she continues on mostly as an image of poverty to true socialization in high school which obviously means the only transformation she needs (according to the film) to be normal is a beauty make over. Not just clean her up her looks to make her more clean, but a total makeover where she is now featuring a 1950s hairdo and even a fucking pearl necklace (if I remember correctly). It's insulting because those kids who dressed offbeat and lived by their quircks were represented more than by their physical appearances.

It sucks that this is what you got out of the film.  Actually that doesn't matter in the least.  What does however, is the fact you neglected to talk about the behavior of high school kids. High school is a gigantic fucking caricature.  Yeah, sure i thought that i was above being in cliques at that time, and i thought "I"M NOT GOING TO CONFORM" blah blah blah, or that dressing a certain way wasn't something to consider. I was above those things, persisting to my friends and myself.  But, regardless of whatever you thought, even if you were this elitist in high school as well, the chances are, you and I were just as cliche as any of these underdeveloped melodramatic characters in this move.  to deny it, or act above it would be dumb.  If you want to sit here and tell me you weren't wholeheartedly involved with your emotions when you were 16 or whatever in high school, whatever they might have been, get the fuck out of here.  Not everyone is on your level.  Shallow people exist.  Lots in high school especially. Seriously man, you're claiming this film to do all these things, no one brought up, check the end quote for the nail in the coffin on that subject.  When i was in high school i would have said the same thing man, something like "dude, dressing a chick up to look preppy is bullshit, this ain't hunky dory shit here etc" but don't forget all the fucking judgmental folks who rely on this type of thing to get through their lives, and all the people who looked down on others for what they wear among many many other superficial things.  It's called a commonality through all that alienation. Molly's character is dumb, let's accept it, and that's their moment, or whatever, it's fucking silly, but  If you'd like to believe that when the chick in the film gets made over, that will be the most inspiring part of the film, for me as an angst ridden kid, or most every other person then get the fuck out of here pt. 2.  There are so many more important, and sometimes little moments in this film, that makes it what it is to me.  I've spoken like this before, so if you want to take the RK approach and say these things are no excuse for the film being bad, i will not argue that one fifteen minute segment ruins the movie for you philosophically.  Aside from all that, and your poor attempt at a joke in the beginning, i was wondering when you grew up, honestly.  Sure, it came off sarcastic, but that's beside the point. I went to high school in the 00's, and those who went through that in earlier times, faced the same shit, it was just another time.  Well, as we both know, by the time the 00's rolled around, much of the surrounding world has been desensitized.  With all that in mind, i think discussing child abuse among the rebellious kid, is quite a step for two teenagers in the 80's going to a date movie.  Not to mention the whole idea of the man in power being completely abusive with his position, and nothing coming out of it, besides a bride from the custodian.  But yeah, i can't believe that PEARL necklace.

Quote
And I hate the film because I grew up with all my friends telling me how great it was. When I first saw it was not impressed but didn't care, but ten years of stories about its greatness can get annoying. Yes, it's me just hating a teen film in the end, but everybody hates certain films that don't deserve it for various personal reasons. To act above it is dumb.

You almost redeemed yourself here, but the meaningless rant killed it.  It seems that this is the antithesis to the idea you introduced involving attacking "Your movie" or someone's movie.  I mean, man it sounds like you hate it because people over hyped it, and then you wanted to never be wrong in an argument involving the film ever again, so you decided to say, the film is unrealistic, and philosophically piss poor in regards to the complexity of being in high school.  Sure, it COULD go deeper, and focus on whatever the fuck you want, but saying that the film could have have done this or that, and it could have worked is a statement that contains more ego than this board can contain.  As someone told me in another thread, you're doing it wrong.  In closing, obviously the film isn't the end all be exposition of what high school is, i'm sorry your friends said it was.
Title: Re: John Hughes
Post by: tpfkabi on September 21, 2009, 12:01:35 PM
I finally saw She's Having a Baby.

I don't remember the other Hughes films having so many montages, false dreams and comedic cutaways (I don't know the term for what Family Guy does all the time - cutting to an extreme idea of what's presently going on within the scene).

The makes the flow of the film really odd. And the title is quite misleading as I don't think a baby comes up until half or 2/3rds of the way through the film.

Elizabeth McGovern seems so subdued for most of the film and then when she blows up on Alec Baldwin it doesn't feel earned. I'm not sure I can think of any other EM performances right now. Maybe she is always like that.

The lawnmower dance and song sequence feels out of place.

I liked the scene where the office/job literally closes in on him.

From what I read about him after his death it seems this is quite a personal film, so maybe that is why it felt odd. A good deal of it is based on true life, but he wanted to marry it with what he was known for with his prior films so he injected that stuff in there. I get the feeling most of it is based on real events though.