XIXAX Film Forum

The Director's Chair => The Director's Chair => Topic started by: Mr. Brown on August 12, 2003, 06:44:02 PM

Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: Mr. Brown on August 12, 2003, 06:44:02 PM
Hey peoples, this looks like a comfy place. I'm a 24 year old screenwriter and filmmaker from the Netherlands. When i get the chance i will schowcase my latest short.

Anyhoo, what do you all think of Paul Schrader as a writer/director. Personally i think THE COMFORT OF STRANGERS may be his best directorial duty, as for screenwriting, of course TAXI DRIVER.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: chainsmoking insomniac on August 13, 2003, 08:17:31 AM
Hello.  Thanks for starting this thread.  I think Paul's the best of the best, especially when it comes to screenwriting.  But anyhoo, I don't know how familiar you are with some of his other work, but if you haven't seen them, check out American Gigolo and his recent Affliction.  Great shit.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on August 13, 2003, 09:05:55 AM
Auto Focus. Great fucking movie.

Schrader is one of my heroes of all time. My favorite writer for sure.

But don't see Touch, it was a goof he made right around Affliction. I try to pretend it never happened.

I hope everyone here has seen Blue Collar, though. Brilliant.
I wanna see Hardcore (his 2nd film), but it's not avalable anywhere. Mac -- I'll bet you know if it's coming to dvd or not...
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: Derek237 on August 14, 2003, 12:29:33 PM
I haven't seen a single Shrader directed movie yet. I've seen the Scorsese movies he's written like Taxi Driver, Bringing Out The Dead, etc. and I've actually taped American Gigilo off TV uncut but right before I was about to watch it, the VCR ate it up! I really, really want to see Auto focus though.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: MacGuffin on August 14, 2003, 03:43:11 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
I wanna see Hardcore (his 2nd film), but it's not avalable anywhere. Mac -- I'll bet you know if it's coming to dvd or not...


Great movie. I'm waiting for that one too. But haven't found any info about it making it's way to DVD.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: soixante on August 15, 2003, 12:08:29 AM
Schrader is the greatest screenwriter of all time.  In a mere four years (1976 to 1980), he wrote Taxi Driver, Obsession, Rolling Thunder, Blue Collar, Old Boyfriends, Hardcore, American Gigolo and Raging Bull.  He also directed Blue Collar, Hardcore and American Gigolo.  His record has been spotty post-Raging Bull.  Affliction is a return to his 70's form, and Auto Focus was solid.

There is a book called Schrader on Schrader, from Faber Books, which I believe is out of print, but if you can get a copy of it, read it.  Any interview with Schrader is worth reading.  He's a highly intelligent, articulate guy who is never dull.  Usually, highly creative people are not articulate about the creative process, but Schrader certainly is.

The stuff he did in the 70's was built to last.  Watching Blue Collar recently, I was struck by how well it captured what was going on in the late 70's, with manufacturing jobs going offshore, unions becoming increasingly corrupt, and workers becoming disillusioned.  A year after Blue Collar came out, Norma Rae tackled union issues in 1979.  However, Blue Collar holds up better.  Its unflattering portrait of unions is much more realistic than the simplistic melodrama of Norma Rae.

One thing I love about Schrader is how he tackles very serious issues, but doesn't resort to overheated melodrama like Oliver Stone or Spike Lee.

Schrader, perhaps better than anyone else working in the 70's, understood how the ideals of the 60's counter-culture came crashing down.  Hardcore and American Gigolo, for all their surface allure, show the emptiness of the sexual revolution.

There is a vein of Calvinist sexual repression running through his work -- especially in Taxi Driver, Hardcore and Raging Bull -- that is rather singular in American films.  Like Scorsese, Schrader had a very strict religious upbringing, and it continues to effect his work.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on August 15, 2003, 08:46:09 AM
Yeah, I've read Schrader On Schrader. It's by far the best __ on  ___ book I've seen.

It's out of print???
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: jasper_window on August 15, 2003, 09:10:17 AM
Anyone seen Forever Mine?
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on August 15, 2003, 09:13:48 AM
Nope.

Anybody seen the one he did with Michael J Fox? That's another one on my list of must-sees...
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: jasper_window on August 15, 2003, 09:47:11 AM
Yeah, Light of Day.  I saw it a long time ago when I was younger and I didn't like it much then.  Light Sleeper is another good one.  Auto Foucs is great, so is Affliction.  "I'm gettin to feel like a whipped dog.  Some day I'm gonna bite back."  Great stuff!
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on August 15, 2003, 09:50:50 AM
I think I could pick up Light Sleeper for cheap on dvd. Worth a blind buy?
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: jasper_window on August 15, 2003, 11:11:36 AM
If you like schrader's stuff, yes.  But I'd feel bad if you bought it and didn't like it.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on August 15, 2003, 11:17:38 AM
I'd feel bad as well. Money is tight nowadays.


plus i can't stand susan s, but for schrader i will give her a chance...
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: jasper_window on August 15, 2003, 11:22:23 AM
Quote from: SoNowThen
I'd feel bad as well. Money is tight nowadays.



I hear that.  enjoy!
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: Ernie on August 15, 2003, 11:24:29 AM
Raging Bull is his best work imo. He's definitely a gifted writer and storyteller, no questions. I'm not into his directing as much as his writing. After seeing Auto Focus, I haven't really been going out of my way to see his other stuff. I didn't like it that much. I thought it was a big disappointment really, cause it looked fucking gorgeous from the poster to the trailer...I couldn't wait to see it. But, ultimately, it was just a letdown...Willem Dafoe (also gifted of course) ended being the whole movie, he was the only good thing about it. Greg Kinnear is a great actor, don't get me wrong but I think he could have been a lot better. A lot could have been a lot better in that movie imo.

Anyway, I look forward to him collaborating with Scorsese again...that I would love to see. I really wanna see The Last Temptation of Christ in the meanwhile too, I think he wrote that, right?
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on August 15, 2003, 11:29:42 AM
he did a draft, yes.


run out and buy the criterion disc! you will not be sorry!!!
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: NEON MERCURY on August 15, 2003, 01:58:57 PM
i have only seen one of the films he directed......affliction.and thought is was great.....



the tooth makes me cringe
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: eward on August 15, 2003, 10:43:00 PM
would have been interesting to see how close encounters would have turned out had they stayed with his drafts...........
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: soixante on August 16, 2003, 02:34:22 AM
Light Sleeper is one of Schrader's weaker films.  No loss if you don't see it.  Light of Day with Michael J. Fox is also weak, almost a self-parody.  Cat People sucked.  Mishima was forgettable.  For his directorial efforts, focus on Blue Collar, Hardcore, American Gigolo and Affliction.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: MacGuffin on November 20, 2003, 11:40:16 AM
(http://cdn.digitalcity.com/mff_takefive/topschrader)

To his wife and fans, "Hogan's Heroes" star Bob Crane was so convincing an actor that he seemed like the rare celebrity uncorrupted by showbiz. But off-camera, Crane led a very different double life. He was both a sex addict and an early adopter of home-movie technology, a combination that suggests that even when American audiences weren't tuned in to his show, Crane was never really "off-camera." The actor painstakingly documented his sexual exploits, literally cataloging his conquests for posterity. In a provocative twist, Crane now serves as the specimen before the lens in Paul Schrader's new film, Auto Focus.

Schrader is no stranger to biopics (he co-wrote the Raging Bull screenplay) or hardcore (in fact, that's the name of the second film he directed, about a Calvinist father who sets out to rescue his runaway daughter from the L.A. porn industry). But the man who wrote Taxi Driver and The Last Temptation of Christ was a little surprised by how difficult it was to get Auto Focus past the MPAA. "I've been watching too much 'Sex in the City,'" he explains. "I thought I was dealing with an 'R.' I wasn't aware that what HBO was doing would not have gotten an 'R.' I decided to blur the offending portions, just so the audience would know that it wasn't cheesecake, that it was hardcore, but we can't show it to them." In the past, Schrader's raw subject matter has forced us to question the pleasures we get by watching movies. In Auto Focus, he expands that theme, asking us to consider why we make them as well.

Here, in his own words, Schrader recommends five films that help him to answer that question.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Conformist
(1970, dir: Bernardo Bertolucci, starring: Jean Louis Trintignant, Stefania Sandrelli)
There are certain movies I tend to re-screen when I'm getting ready to direct, which is what I'm doing now. The first one is The Conformist, which is a film that is very liberating in terms of how it uses the camera. That whole kind of fascist mentality and that mixture of talents -- [production designer] Nando Scarfiotti, [cinematographer] Vittorio Storaro and Bernardo Bertolucci -- was as perfect a visual troika as you can have. [Rather than simply borrowing the film's style, Schrader asked Storaro to shoot his next project, a prequel to The Exorcist.] It's called Exorcist: The Beginning. This takes place 25 years before the Friedkin movie. Stellan Skarsgard plays the young Lancaster Merrin during World War II when he first meets the devil. The sequels suffered from having to deal with all that baggage that's left over, but I'm in front of it, so maybe I can get away. I just have to stay clear of a lot of that stuff The Exorcist is famous for because you can't beat that film on its own turf.

Performance
(1970, dir: Donald Cammell and Nicholas Roeg, starring: James Fox, Mick Jagger)
Performance, the Nic Roeg/Donald Cammell film, is also visually very, very alive. It's absolutely fascinating. It mixes two genres; it's sort of the hippie film with the gangster film. It's about a gangster, James Fox, who's on the run and ends up living in this house -- actually it's Keith Richards's house -- with Mick Jagger and Anita Pallenberg, and a loss of sexual identity and everything like that. It's a tremendous film, and I saw it again recently. It holds up very well. I've never had the guts to quite go there, although there is a shot in Mishima that is taken from Performance. I just mention it because it is a film that you cannot watch without being invigorated visually. It sets you thinking.  

Natural Born Killers
(1994, dir: Oliver Stone, starring: Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis)
The same is true of Natural Born Killers. You can't watch that movie without thinking visually; it's so full of ideas. When you're preparing a film, that's what you want to see. You can watch it with the sound off, just have it playing in the background and every once in a while glance over, and all of a sudden, you'll see something. It's just outrageous, you know, that whole section where they portray child abuse as a sitcom. I mean, my God, just the audacity and the originality of it all. I don't care much for movies that demand that you think a certain way or feel a certain way at the end. I like it to stay a little bit open, give room for the viewer to participate in the process, rattle around inside the text of the film and come up with his or her own conclusions, which may or may not be the conclusions of the filmmaker.  

Pickpocket
(1959, dir: Robert Bresson, starring: Martin LaSalle, Marika Green)
I think the primary inspiration to me as a writer was the Bresson film Pickpocket. It made it so clear to me that you could do these kind of character studies of lesser people, people defined by their situation in life or their occupation, and sort of go from place to place and watch them. You can trace the activity of a person and gradually their interior life will be revealed. Of course, Bresson did not believe in psychological realism, and I do, so that's a huge, huge difference, but without Pickpocket, there couldn't have been Taxi Driver. There is a kind of character I keep circling around [in Taxi Driver, American Gigolo and Light Sleeper]. I want to take him into his fifties. That's the film I want to do with Kevin Kline. I've written the script. It's called The Walker; it's about a society walker, a homosexual, a fellow who squires rich ladies to the opera whose skills are more social than sexual.

Prick Up Your Ears
(1987, dir: Stephen Frears, starring: Gary Oldman, Alfred Molina)
I think with a biopic, what you're trying to do is make a film that has the power of fiction. Prick Up Your Ears, the Stephen Frears film, has a relationship at the center of it that is similar, you know, these two men, only that was Joe Orton. So with Crane and Carpenter, I was trying to do an American, middle-aged, heterosexual, TV-star version of the Joe Orton/Kenneth [Halliwell] relationship, so that was useful to see on Auto Focus. I do something that's a bit of a cheat. I sit down and I retype the whole script, rewrite all the descriptions and rewrite all the dialogue in my own words. Sometimes I don't change much at all, but I retype it, and I put in my own punctuation, so by the time I get out there to direct it, I'm looking at it and thinking, "Oh, yeah, I remember writing this."
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on November 20, 2003, 11:42:15 AM
Fuck, and I thought the Egoyan list was good.

Amazing!!!

Schrader is da man!


EDIT: can someone please give me an explanation of "psychological realism"?
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: godardian on November 20, 2003, 11:44:21 AM
All excellent choices (with the very notable exception of Natural Born Killers... yeesh, Paul!).

It's interesting that this is the only overlap in these lists (so far): He and Todd Haynes both chose Roeg's (and Cammell's) Performance.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on November 20, 2003, 12:42:37 PM
Mac, thanks for posting these Top 5 Lists.

See, stuff like this, this is what movies are all about. All these directors are talking about the film they're making now, through the prism of those that came before and influenced it. This is the point of cinema. No bullshit gossip over who has final cut, or who was doing what drug on set, or whatever, just good film talk. These are the kind of interviews I hope I get to do one day...
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: grand theft sparrow on March 18, 2004, 12:01:27 PM
The devil you'll never know
By Nick Nunziata
CNN Headline News
Tuesday, March 16, 2004 Posted: 11:28 AM EST (1628 GMT)



(CNN) -- Sometimes it's hard to decide which is truly more horrific: The world of horror or the world of the film business.

With horror you have staples to rely on. You know that the victim is going to open a closet and get startled by a cat while the real villain lurks behind them. You know that the scary voice on the phone will be revealed to be coming from upstairs in the house. You know that the little girl isn't vomiting pea soup across the room because it's fun, though I must admit that it is a hobby of mine.

The familiarity of horror is what makes the genre eternal. After a long week, sometimes we need a little shock or a little mayhem in our escapism. The horror of reality is present every time we unfold a newspaper or change the channel, so we'll take a guy in a hockey mask on film over a guy in a ski mask in real life any chance we can get.

That makes sense. The film business does us no such favors. It's a serpentine beast, impossible to predict and often one whose motives and logic seem veiled in the mire.

A perfect example would be how the upcoming "Exorcist: The Beginning" prequel has been handled through its unique and controversial existence.

For those who aren't aware, the fourth film in the successful horror series was shot last year in Italy and Morocco with respected filmmaker Paul Schrader behind the lens and the always solid Stellan Skarsgärd playing the younger incarnation of the priest that Max von Sydow played in the 1973 original.

That's a rather solid one-two punch, especially in a business where most franchises have lost all their creative steam by their second installment. This was to be a very smart and very classical horror film.

Remember, "The Exorcist" was nominated for 10 Academy Awards back in the day. This isn't a series raised upon cheap scares but rather deeply psychological terrors, things that shake people to their very core.

Most horror aficionados would be chomping at the bit to see an "Exorcist" movie from the writer of "Taxi Driver" and "Raging Bull," but because of Hollywood's penchant for all things illogical, we'll never see the film.

Even though the movie was finished and assembled, a new director and a mostly new cast has been brought on board to shoot the film anew. Who is this director brought in to make Schrader's thought-provoking cerebral horror film into a fast-paced and flashy thriller geared toward today's audience? Renny Harlin, the man behind "Cutthroat Island" and "Cliffhanger."

It makes you wonder if the powers that be felt we as an audience weren't able to appreciate a film geared more toward the motives of fear and the concept of faith. Schrader's film may have been truly special, but we may never know.

Instead, we'll see a weird amalgam of a movie, one whose behind the scenes turmoil will probably eclipse whatever terror appears on the screen.

Now, that is horror.



-------------------------------------------------------------------------

So while the rest of us are signing the petition to get this released, can someone please make a bootleg copy of this available?
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on March 18, 2004, 12:08:58 PM
Where's the petition, I wanna sign it.


And yes, a boot copy would be killer.

Btw, how the fuck does a guy like Renny Harlin prosper in Hollywood?
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: godardian on March 18, 2004, 04:42:07 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
Where's the petition, I wanna sign it.


And yes, a boot copy would be killer.

Btw, how the fuck does a guy like Renny Harlin prosper in Hollywood?


Bottom-line Darwinism and the lax standards of the filmgoing public.

I hate this whole Exorcist thing, because I know that there's an interesting Paul Schrader film out there that I'll probably never get to see. The Harlin thing is just insult to injury.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on March 18, 2004, 04:45:02 PM
Yeah, but don't a lot of Harlin movies LOSE money? Like Cutthroat Island was a bomb. Doesn't that cash out his chips? Like, you were a lucky horse for a while Renny, but now if you're not a guaranteed money-maker, why are we employing your hack ass? I doubt producers work with him for the artistic pleasure...
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: godardian on March 18, 2004, 04:51:07 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
Yeah, but don't a lot of Harlin movies LOSE money? Like Cutthroat Island was a bomb. Doesn't that cash out his chips? Like, you were a lucky horse for a while Renny, but now if you're not a guaranteed money-maker, why are we employing your hack ass? I doubt producers work with him for the artistic pleasure...


That's true... but I think if once upon a time you made them lots of money, they'll give you chance after chance.

Whereas if once upon a time you made masterpieces for them but not a whole lot of money, you have to struggle your entire career.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: grand theft sparrow on March 18, 2004, 06:59:11 PM
Quote from: godardian
Quote from: SoNowThen
Yeah, but don't a lot of Harlin movies LOSE money? Like Cutthroat Island was a bomb. Doesn't that cash out his chips? Like, you were a lucky horse for a while Renny, but now if you're not a guaranteed money-maker, why are we employing your hack ass? I doubt producers work with him for the artistic pleasure...


That's true... but I think if once upon a time you made them lots of money, they'll give you chance after chance.

Whereas if once upon a time you made masterpieces for them but not a whole lot of money, you have to struggle your entire career.


If you were a producer who wanted to make a movie that the (du)m(b)asses were going to flock to see, who would you pick to direct it, the guy who did Auto Focus or the guy who did Deep Blue Sea?   :?

I only hope that Renny Harlin's version makes SO much money that they decide to release Schrader's version on the DVD as an "alternate version."  They've got a finished film.  Why not make some money off of it and satisfy the curiosity of people who actually appreciate the work of good directors in the process?

If the infamous 4+ hour version of Apocalypse Now can float around for years before Redux came out, someone can get this out to the people.  There has to be one gofer at Warner Bros that knows where the Schrader print is and can get a copy of it on the internet to get people buzzing about it.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on March 19, 2004, 08:54:39 AM
Yeah, but the Schrader cut probably isn't properly mixed or color corrected yet...
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: lamas on March 23, 2004, 09:30:02 PM
We may see Schrader's version after all...

http://www.empireonline.co.uk/site/news/newsstory.asp?news_id=15702
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: grand theft sparrow on March 23, 2004, 09:48:20 PM
Damn, it's a good day.  First no more Valenti and now we get Schrader's Exorcist back.  What did we do to deserve this?
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: godardian on March 23, 2004, 10:29:58 PM
Quote from: hacksparrow
Damn, it's a good day.  First no more Valenti and now we get Schrader's Exorcist back.  What did we do to deserve this?


To top it all off, there are those excellent anti-Mel Gibson Schrader quotes in The Guardian today, which you can read in the Passion thread... (MacG posted 'em)
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on March 24, 2004, 09:21:09 AM
I wouldn't go so far as to paint them "anti", he was citing differences...



Anyway, to get his cut would be... man oh man.... this is a good thing. I'll keep my fingers crossed. Best case scenario is that everyone can see how much better his cut would've been, than the shit the studio will eventually throw out there (yes, I can see into the future).
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: godardian on March 24, 2004, 10:16:08 AM
Quote from: SoNowThen
I wouldn't go so far as to paint them "anti", he was citing differences...



Anyway, to get his cut would be... man oh man.... this is a good thing. I'll keep my fingers crossed. Best case scenario is that everyone can see how much better his cut would've been, than the shit the studio will eventually throw out there (yes, I can see into the future).


I don't think it's going too far to say that Schrader (politely) trashed Gibson's conception of the crucifixion... Sorry, a Paul Schrader (dignity, intelligence, passion, cinema-as-art) on one hand vs. Mel Gibson (crassness, backwardness, cinema-as-bombastic-effusion) is too irresistible a dichotomy for me to pass up.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: soixante on March 24, 2004, 11:57:02 AM
I'm a huge Schrader fan, but I don't care about the Exorcist prequel.  The first Exorcist was great, but doing a prequel is not a good idea (example:  Phantom Menace).  Schrader's last excursion into horror, Cat People, was my least favorite of his films.  He's at his best dealing with fallible human beings wrestling with moral issues -- Affliction, Auto Focus, American Gigolo, Hardcore, Blue Collar.  I am definitely not a fan of horror films, so I think Schrader should go back to making films like Affliction.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: MacGuffin on May 26, 2005, 01:58:12 PM
(http://suicidegirls.com/media/authors/1583/article.jpg)

Even though Paul Schrader came up in the 70’s with filmmakers such as Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola and many more, due to his not being allowed to see a film until he was well into his teens, he is not considered one of their generation of “movie brats.” That outsider status has allowed him to create his own niche in directing with such films as Light Sleeper, Affliction and American Gigolo.

Over the years Schrader has flirted with the mainstream mostly with screenplays such as Raging Bull and The Mosquito Coast. After the critical success of Auto Focus, Schrader decided to again work within the studio system and direct the Exorcist prequel, Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist.

After finishing his movie Morgan Creek, the production company, decided to not release it and make the movie again with [The Adventures of Ford Fairlane director] Renny Harlin. After that movie tanked both Morgan Creek and Schrader saw the chance to get his version out there.

Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist is a wild film that tackles many of Schrader’s prominent themes such as religion, violence and death. It stars Stellan Skarsgård as Father Lankester Merrin and his first encounter with the devil in Africa.

Daniel Robert Epstein: The situation that happened with the release of the Exorcist prequel is unique.

Paul Schrader: Yeah but it would be a much better story if it happened to someone else.

DRE: [laughs] Are you a magnet for this sort of thing?

PS: Well I don’t know. Every film has its horror tales. Some are just more unique than others and this really was unique. It was the first one.

DRE: How do you feel about it finally getting out?

PS: The dominant feeling is really just one of relief. Once you’ve made a film that has been discarded you cannot convince anyone that it was any good. You spend the rest of your life trying to explain what you had done. I just dreaded doing that. So more than anything else it feels like a millstone has been removed from my neck.

DRE: Is this any kind of admission of guilt from a Hollywood studio?

PS: No I don’t think so. This would not happen at a studio per say. This was from a one man company, Jim Robinson at Morgan Creek International. When you have a studio you have a system of checks and balances and a board of executives. So if one person says, let’s remake a whole thing, another person would say, if you do that I’ll be here to take your job when you’re finished.

Whereas with a one man company, he’ll just reach into his other pocket and pull out another $40 million to make it again. I think that Jim feels that he made the right decision once he was stuck there. I think that he feels we should have never gotten into this whole situation in the first place three or four years ago.

So the decision to release my film is not an admission of having made a mistake but it is simply a way to make money.

DRE: It’s always that way.

PS: I would have been foolish to appeal to anyone’s altruism or artistic sensibilities. My goal last year to try to create an environment where there was a financial incentive to release the film and the DVD.

DRE: When you do studio work it’s usually in terms of a screenplay or a contribution to a screenplay.

PS: It was really for Morgan Creek who has a deal with Warner Bros. They do higher budget films but Warner Bros has no say in the films they do. Warner Bros doesn’t pay one penny at any point in the process, they just take a distribution fee.

DRE: I could not think of a more polar opposite of a filmmaker to you than Renny Harlin. Have you ever seen a Renny Harlin film?

PS: Oh yeah, I’ve met Renny and in fact we almost did something together a few years ago. But Mario Kassar’s company Carolco went under and it never got done.

DRE: Did you see Renny Harlin’s version of the Exorcist prequel?

PS: Yes. It was interesting because I went down to Bethesda and saw it with William Blatty [writer of the original Exorcist novel and screenplay]. We watched it together on opening day. He had directed The Exorcist III which was taken from him, another ending was added and his original version was lost. He still had a lot of sore feelings about. As Renny’s film progressed he was getting more and more upset because it was all coming back to him. Whereas I was sitting next to him feeling better and better because as I watched Renny’s film I realized how bad it was. I figured if it got any worse there might be curiosity about the film that I made. When the Linda Blair makeup showed up it did get worse and so I figured there was a way to bring my film back from the dead.

DRE: You started your film career during a time when William Friedkin was huge so you must have met him.

PS: My goal when I came to this film was to stay as far away from Friedkin and Friedkin’s Exorcist as possible. I didn’t think you could compete with it because it is such a classic and icon in film history so if you try to compete with it you will lose. I tried to make a film that looked different, felt different and works different. The fact that it was set in the 40’s enabled me to create a film that felt more old fashioned.

DRE: That’s interesting because you aren’t known for doing that. Were you trying to do a noir?

PS: No I was trying to do a western. I had that landscape, the military outpost and the natives. I had Shane there who had given up the cloth then the bad guy comes into town and Shane has to put his guns back on [laughs].

DRE: As someone who was once a film critic, how do you feel the Exorcist prequel fits in with your other work?

PS: I guess one of the reasons I wanted it to come out was to let history judge that.

DRE: Has this sent you back to wanting to do films independently again?

PS: Basically I do films anyway I can. I was presented with the Exorcist script when they were already in preproduction. From the time I read the script until the time I started shooting was only three months. So one of the great attractions of it was that it was a go picture, it was classy and it had done right then. I did not conceive of the idea for this script, I don’t think it’s the kind of idea I could have come up with. Maybe in retrospect if it hadn’t been so tempting and so immediate I might not have done it. It was just an irresistible temptation.

DRE: I got to speak to Willem Dafoe in the past year and since he starred in the film you wrote, The Last Temptation of Christ so he always gets asked if he has seen The Passion of the Christ. Have you seen it?

PS: Yeah, in fact Mel [Gibson] was shooting that right across from us In Cinecitta when we were shooting the Exorcist prequel. Occasionally our devil and their Jesus would cross paths.

DRE: What did you think of that film?

PS: I thought it was medieval. It was quite extraordinary for what it is but I don’t particularly care for that notion of Christianity. That medieval notion of blood. Mel says he doesn’t like Sebastian 2 but I think he has a problem with the enlightenment. It is a kind of 14th century movie.

DRE: I read that next you are working again with [City Hall director] Harold Becker on Torch.

PS: I did that script and that was supposed to be for Pacino. But it’s already gone away.

DRE: What are you working on then?

PS: I’m working on something but I’m going to keep it to myself.

DRE: The term Auto Focus has become some synonymous with a sex party. On Curb Your Enthusiasm Larry David used it as a term when he and friend were going to look for women. He called it an Auto Focus party.

PS: [laughs] I like that film a lot and I’m very happy with it.

DRE: Do you think you would do another biopic in the future?

PS: I don’t think I would come up with one. But then on the other hand if someone offered it to me I would consider it.

DRE: You’ve had so many great collaborations with Martin Scorsese and recently he’s been working with screenwriters half your age.

PS: That’s the way it is in this business. You eat your young.

DRE: Have you and he talked about doing something else?

PS: I don’t think so. I think that collaboration has run its course.

DRE: Did the collaboration run its course naturally?

PS: I felt it ran its course after The Last Temptation of Christ then Marty asked me to write Bringing out the Dead. That didn’t do that well commercially so I would be surprised if we worked together again.

DRE: What do you do when you’re not making films? What’s a Paul Schrader day like?

PS: As I’ve gotten older I’ve been watching less and less television and reading a lot more.

DRE: What are you reading?

PS: I just finished the new Ian McEwan [Saturday] and now I’m reading the novel Berlin Noir by Philip Kerr.

DRE: When you are reading does it come into your mind that you might want to make the book into a movie?

PS: I just read for curiosity.

DRE: Is it tough to be curious when you reach a certain age?

PS: That’s a great blessing to be eternally curious about how things work and why people do things, including yourself.

DRE: Do you have any tattoos?

PS: No I don’t.

DRE: If you ever got a tattoo, what would it be?

PS: I don’t think I would ever get one. Unless I tattooed on my forehead in reverse “Go back to bed.” I could get up in the morning, look in the mirror and have a reason to turn around [laughs].
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: soixante on May 27, 2005, 02:47:53 AM
Schrader has a unique take on things.  I can't think of any other major filmmaker who studied theology before getting into film.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: bonanzataz on May 27, 2005, 03:37:49 AM
Quote from: MacGuffin
PS: Oh yeah, I’ve met Renny and in fact we almost did something together a few years ago. But Mario Kassar’s company Carolco went under and it never got done.


yeah, cuz renny harlin's 'cutthroat island' bankrupt that studio. dirty mutha fucka, tryin' to shut down little companies.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: Pubrick on May 28, 2005, 08:44:54 AM
Quote from: soixante
I can't think of any other major filmmaker who studied theology before getting into film.

malick. studied and taught.
Title: hardcore...
Post by: Thebirdinsectman on June 07, 2005, 02:10:13 AM
What'd anyone think of 'hardcore'...i think it's underrated in terms of craft. it's pretty thoughtful and fresh, i thought...
Title: Re: hardcore...
Post by: soixante on June 07, 2005, 01:56:52 PM
Quote from: Thebirdinsectman
What'd anyone think of 'hardcore'...i think it's underrated in terms of craft. it's pretty thoughtful and fresh, i thought...


Loved it.
Title: Paul Schrader
Post by: MacGuffin on September 13, 2005, 12:09:52 AM
Bleiberg taps Schrader for 'Adam' helm

Ehud Bleiberg has signed on Paul Schrader to direct "Adam Resurrected," the first film for Bleiberg's new production and sales company that was announced last month. The film, based on a novel by Yoram Kaniuk, was one of the titles Bleiberg took with him when he split from Dream Entertainment, the company he co-founded with Yitzhak Ginsberg. "I have long admired Paul's work and am thrilled that he has agreed to direct this film," Bleiberg said. "We have a complex script that is compassionate, tragic and inspiring at the same time, and we are pleased that Paul will bring his immense artistic abilities to our film."
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on November 16, 2005, 02:22:25 AM
So I blind bought Dominion and finally cracked it open the other day.

I'm a BIG fan of Paul Schrader, and a major defender of almost all of his work, even the obviously shitty stuff. I find it's better to have a guy like Schrader making bad movies than not making them at all.

However... this was easily -- mark that ABSOLUTELY SURELY -- the FUCKING WORST movie I have ever seen. Not just a low for Schrader, but a low for movies, period. I actually don't think it's possible that the Harlin version could be any worse than this. Possibly just as bad, but not worse. The acting in this movie makes my short films look like Cassavetes. I'm pretty sure that Storaro didn't shoot this either, I think it was his Mexican equivalent. Funny thing is, I looked at some of the deleted scenes, and at low resolution, before they were cleaned up, it looked pretty good. So maybe whoever made the dvd just boosted and flattened whatever my favorite DP actually lit. Who knows. All I can say is that all involved better distance themselves as much as possible from this damnable piece of garbage. Can't believe Paul fought for this one to see the light... the studio tried to do him a favor...
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: cron on November 16, 2005, 09:28:42 PM
I'm pretty sure that Storaro didn't shoot this either, I think it was his Mexican equivalent.

rodrigo prieto?
emmanuel lubezki?

just saying.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: godardian on February 05, 2006, 02:00:30 AM
-SNT, did you get your Dominion in the "4 for $20" pre-viewed movies at Hollywood? I got mine that way, sight unseen, 'cos it's basically free as the fourth one. I didn't hate it as much as you did, but I will say that it has got to be Schrader's worst film, and I include Light of Day in that assessment. It wasn't entirely devoid of interesting moments, I didn't think, but that CGI was horrific (as per usual--so rarely does anyone use it properly). Free was definitely the right price.

-Anyone watch Schrader's intro to Pickpocket? That alone makes up for Dominion, and then some. He truly loves movies, even if he's disappointingly capable of making a bad one.

-Has anyone here seen Schrader's Patty Hearst? I'm kind of obsessed with the whole SLA/kidnapping-an-heiress episode--I've read Joan Didion's essay on it, "Girl of the Golden West," dozens of times--and I'd love to see Schrader's take on it.

-Schrader's top 10 of 2005, from Film Comment:

1. Saraband

2. Palindromes

3. Brokeback Mountain

4. The Aristocrats

5. Syriana

6. Thumbsucker

7. 2046

8. Pride and Prejudice

9. Me and You and Everyone We Know

10. The Upside of Anger
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: soixante on February 05, 2006, 02:57:42 AM
I haven't seen Patty Hearst, but I know some people who saw it when it came out and liked it.  Even though I'm a Schrader fan, I skipped Patty Hearst when it came out because it was his first film since Light of Day, a film I didn't care for.  Now I want to see it, but I can't find it in any video stores.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: SoNowThen on February 08, 2006, 05:27:12 AM
-SNT, did you get your Dominion in the "4 for $20" pre-viewed movies at Hollywood? I got mine that way, sight unseen, 'cos it's basically free as the fourth one. I didn't hate it as much as you did, but I will say that it has got to be Schrader's worst film, and I include Light of Day in that assessment. It wasn't entirely devoid of interesting moments, I didn't think, but that CGI was horrific (as per usual--so rarely does anyone use it properly). Free was definitely the right price.

-Anyone watch Schrader's intro to Pickpocket? That alone makes up for Dominion, and then some. He truly loves movies, even if he's disappointingly capable of making a bad one.

-Has anyone here seen Schrader's Patty Hearst? I'm kind of obsessed with the whole SLA/kidnapping-an-heiress episode--I've read Joan Didion's essay on it, "Girl of the Golden West," dozens of times--and I'd love to see Schrader's take on it.

Haven't seen PH. I'd like to see Light Of Day, just to see MJ Fox directed by Schrader.
Anyway, I paid full price for my ripoff Prequel dvd. suck suck suck. The CGI I don't blame them, because that was a patchwork just to release the dvd... I don't care how bad that looks. It's just that the movie was terrible. The opening was terrible. The repeated characters were so stupid and cliched and trite. So un-Schrader.

Yeah, his Pickpocket intro was great. I double bought the Pickpocket dvd JUST for that intro. Why didn't they get him to do a commentary on this and Diary...., would have been top.

Godardian, what did you think of Light Sleeper? There are moments of brilliance, but the jury's out...
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: grumpus on March 27, 2006, 11:04:56 AM
Woody Harrelson will play the title role in "The Walker," a film Paul Schrader wrote and will direct in the U.K.
Kristin Scott Thomas, Lauren Bacall, Ned Beatty, Moritz Bleibtreu, Willem Dafoe and Lily Tomlin round out the cast, and shooting begins next week.

Pic is produced by Deepak Nayar ("Bend It Like Beckham"), whose Kintop Pictures is partnered with Ingenious Media, Isle of Man, Parseghian Planco and Willi Baer. Pathe Pictures Intl. is selling overseas territories, and John SlossJohn Sloss is brokering the domestic deal.

Harrelson will play an escort of society ladies in D.C. Schrader said the character is his vision of what his "American Gigolo" protag would have become when he hit 50.

"His gifts are now more social than sexual. He's this society walker who has his lady friends, and a boyfriend on the side," Schrader said.

While Harrelson seems a surprise to play the gay lothario, Schrader said he had elements that made him ideal.

"His wittiness is the initial point of entry for the viewer into a story which takes a dark turn. This will be quite a transformation for him, from the hairpiece and his manner to the clothes he wears," Schrader said.

Harrelson is in London completing his stage run in "The Night of the Iguana
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: MacGuffin on July 11, 2006, 09:52:12 PM
Goldblum gets "Resurrected" for Bleiberg

Jeff Goldblum has signed on for the title role in "Adam Resurrected," a World War II Holocaust drama that Paul Schrader is directing.

"Resurrected" is based on the acclaimed 2000 book by Israeli novelist Yoram Kaniuk.

It centers on Adam Stein, a former circus clown who was spared the gas chamber so that he might entertain thousands of Jews as they marched to their deaths. He becomes the ringleader at an asylum in the Negeve desert populated solely by Holocaust survivors and struggles to makes sense of the world. The novel has been translated into 20 languages.

Production company Bleiberg Entertainment is eyeing a spring 2007 production start date for the film, which will be shot in Germany, Romania and Israel.

Goldblum, whose screen credits include "The Fly" "The Big Chill" "Jurassic Park" and "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou," is starring in "Raines," an upcoming NBC series, and next appears on the big screen in Barry Levinson's comedy "Man of the Year."

Schrader's directorial credits include "American Gigolo," "The Comfort of Strangers" "Affliction" and "Auto Focus."
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: Weak2ndAct on July 11, 2006, 11:17:34 PM
Odd... that's the exact same plot as the infamous Jerry Lewis project that will never see the light of day, 'The Day the Clown Cried' (I think that's the title).
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: pete on July 12, 2006, 04:07:29 AM
yeah I remember someone writing to ebert way back in the days asking him what's the difference between the day the clown cried and life is beautiful, ebert said, the day the clown cried is leading children to the chamber, while life is beautiful is trying to save the boy.
or something like that.  this sounds different though, this sounds like it's focusing on the asylum rather than the camp.  most holocaust movies all sound pretty similar, they only have a few angles, but I'm sure this story can be very different from the jerry lewis one.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: Pubrick on July 13, 2006, 04:56:14 AM
jerry lewis must be rolling in his bed.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: MacGuffin on July 16, 2006, 08:35:37 AM
Odd... that's the exact same plot as the infamous Jerry Lewis project that will never see the light of day, 'The Day the Clown Cried' (I think that's the title).

yeah I remember someone writing to ebert way back in the days asking him what's the difference between the day the clown cried and life is beautiful, ebert said, the day the clown cried is leading children to the chamber, while life is beautiful is trying to save the boy.
or something like that.  this sounds different though, this sounds like it's focusing on the asylum rather than the camp.  most holocaust movies all sound pretty similar, they only have a few angles, but I'm sure this story can be very different from the jerry lewis one.

Source: Hollywood Elsewhere --

"We've had Life is Beautiful and Jakob the Liar," a Guardian item reads, "and now the list of movies mixing clowning with the Holocaust is to grow with Adam Resurrected, a Paul Schrader film that will adapt a book by Israeli novelist Yoram Kaniuk." The item says "the story [is about] on a Jewish circus clown" -- to be played by Jeff Goldblum -- "who is kept alive by the Nazis to entertain his fellow Jews as they march to the gas chambers."
 
"Obviously-no-shit-Sherlock, this calls to mind that early '70s Jerry Lewis fiasco called The Day the Clown Cried, an unseen, never-distributed film that Lewis starred in and directed. The dark drama is described by a Jerry Lewis website as being "about a German clown who was arrested by the Gestapo, interred in a concentration camp, and used to march Jewish children into the ovens."

But maybe they're not quite so similar. An Amazon.com description of the Kaniuk book says it's about "a former circus clown named Adam Stein who was spared the gas chamber so that he might entertain thousands of other Jews as they marched to their deaths," but it takes place after World War II and is about how Stein "is now the ringleader at an asylum in the Negev desert populated solely by Holocaust survivors...alternately more brilliant than the doctors and more insane than any of the patients, Stein struggles wildly to make sense of a world in which the line between sanity and madness has been irreversibly blurred."

Lewis's Clown flick has long been regarded as on the worst all-time debacles and pratfalls ever suffered by a major "name" director, which Lewis definitely was in the late '50s and '60s.

"In 1971, producer Nate Waschberger asked Lewis to direct and star in The Day the Clown Cried, based on Joan O'Brien's book by the same name, about a German clown who was arrested by the Gestapo, interred in a concentration camp, and used to march Jewish children into the ovens," the site's description reads.

"Jerry lost close to 40 pounds to play the role. The shooting began in Stockholm, but Wachsberger not only ran out of money to complete the film, but he failed to pay Joan O'Brien the money she was owed for the rights to the story. Jerry was forced to finish the picture with his own money.

"The film has been tied up in litigation ever since, and all of the parties involved have never been able to reach an agreeable settlement. Jerry hopes to someday complete the film, which remains to this day, a significant expression of cinematic art, suspended in the abyss of international litigation."

According to Film Buff Online, Harry Shearer, one of the very small handful of people who has actually seen Clown in rough-cut form, described it thusly in an interview on "The Howard Stern Show": "If you say `Jerry Lewis is a clown in a concentration camp' and you make that movie up in your head, it's so much better than that. And by better I mean worse. You're stunned."
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: MacGuffin on November 25, 2008, 12:09:50 AM
Paul Schrader: Bollywood, here I come
'Taxi Driver' scribe leaves Hollywood for 'Extreme City'
Source: Hollywood Reporter
 
Paul Schrader is taking a taxi to Bollywood.

Saying he feels the U.S. film market has become "barren," the writer of classics "Taxi Driver" and "Raging Bull" is packing his bags for Mumbai to write and direct the Bollywood action movie "Extreme City."

"I've been getting indie movies made for 20 years," he said. "But I take a good look around and what I see is a barren, barren place -- in terms of the financial community, in terms of audiences, in terms of distribution. It's cold out there."

In India, on the other hand, he says there are ways to gain both creative freedom and audiences.

"City" is a cross-cultural tale that will center on an American man who travels to India to help resolve a kidnapping case for his father-in-law, only to get caught up in a gangster plot.

There likely will be some musical numbers, and dialogue will be spoken in English and Hindi. Schrader is working on the script.

While the story combines various elements, it's "not a Masala movie," Schrader said, referring to the term for a kitchen-sink Bollywood film that tosses in action, romance, family drama and other genres in one big stew.

"City" will be produced by Anubhav Sinha, the noted Indian director (he most recently directed the Bollywood action movie "Cash") who is looking to grow his producing slate and evolve from a more action orientation.

Schrader and Sinha are in talks with a number of Bollywood stars; the movie could get greenlighted at a bigger Bollywood studio or go the indie route.

Schrader, who made his name as a writer on classics like "Raging Bull" and as a writer-director on Oscar winner "Affliction," is the latest film figure seeking to build a bridge to India.

One of the fall's nascent hits is "Slumdog Millionaire," Danny Boyle's romantic-action tale set in India. Indie director Jennifer Lynch is making the India-set mystery "Hisss." Will Smith's Overbrook Entertainment has a deal with Indian entertainment company UTV to produce two movies.

And DreamWorks is, of course, now financed by India-based Reliance Big Entertainment.

Still, Schrader is the first major contemporary U.S. writer or director to migrate to Bollywood, a trend he said could continue given the trajectory of both film cultures. "Old Bollywood will never go away," he said, "but it's changing. Movies can be shorter than two hours. There doesn't need to be singing and dancing."

Schrader is promoting "Adam Resurrected," a Holocaust drama starring Jeff Goldblum that he directed about a German-Jewish performer who survives the war by performing for a Nazi commander.

"At first I thought, 'The world has a lot of Holocaust movies. It doesn't need one from Paul Schrader.' But I started to read the script and got 65 pages in and thought, 'I need to do this.' It's such an original story."
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: MacGuffin on October 06, 2009, 11:39:24 PM
Paul Schrader looks to India
Writer-director teams with Bollywood on 'Xtrme'
Source: Variety

A year after reports surfaced that Paul Schrader had abandoned Hollywood, the writer-director has been busy merging East and West.

Schrader's latest film, "Xtrme City," is a bilingual collaboration with Bollywood scribe Mushtaq Shiekh, creative director of media conglom Sahara One, with financing from former sports agent Dwight Manley.

Pic, budgeted at about $10 million, will start casting soon, with Shiekh seeking marquee thesps from India and the West.

Story centers around a former U.S. ranger who joins forces with an Indian commando to rescue the ranger's sister-in-law, who's been kidnapped by a crime lord in Mumbai's underworld.

Schrader said he was approached with a proposal for a Hindi film when he attended last fall's Osian Film Festival in New Delhi.

"I didn't think it was very good, so I came up with a better film," he said.

Schrader and Shiekh are working with producers David Weisman ("Kiss of the Spider Woman") and Anubhav Sinha ("Dus") on the pic, which is aiming for a late 2010 shoot in Mumbai, New York and the Persian Gulf. They hope for a 2011 release. As with many Bollywood films, "Xtrme City" will integrate thriller, drama and comedy elements, Schrader said. Like most Hindi cinema, the movie will be family-friendly, which means that while there may be violence, the sex will be downplayed, and there will be song-and-dance routines.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: SiliasRuby on January 03, 2010, 04:30:55 PM
(http://content.vcommerce.com/products/525/43711525/main-205.jpg?450717938)

This is an intricate portrayal of a writer's soft and turbulent life done with elegance and grace. He doesn't stereotype or condescend to this world at all. The film is so seem-less it doesn't have the impression of being made by an american. It does have the touch of Paul though, don't get me wrong and I'm all the better for seeing it.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: Pubrick on January 04, 2010, 10:28:31 PM
your reviews aren't really reviews.

you're just reporting that you saw the film.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: Neil on January 05, 2010, 11:09:09 AM
your reviews aren't really reviews.

you're just reporting that you saw the film.

Dear P,

Stick to tactful posts that only take you a couple minutes to construct.

This approach isn't working, although this is on the edge of constructive criticism.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: Pubrick on January 05, 2010, 11:20:07 AM
your posts aren't really posts.

you're just assembling random words.

and you don't know how to use a comma.

EDIT: you fixed it. well done!
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: Neil on January 05, 2010, 11:26:49 AM
Wow, that's a fresh couple of jokes.

An attack on grammar and something about a "random assemblage of words"

What fresh and original jokes will you come up with next?

You're worse than dane cook.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: Pubrick on January 05, 2010, 11:33:01 AM
your comebacks aren't really comebacks.

you're just making sarcastic comments about a grammatical correction which you took onboard, thereby making no sense and continuing to live up to your trademark.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: Neil on January 05, 2010, 12:57:22 PM
your comebacks aren't really comebacks.

you're just making sarcastic comments about a grammatical correction which you took onboard, thereby making no sense and continuing to live up to your trademark.

No, it's just that the text that appears on this board is super important.

How can I include it in my professional portfolio with typos?



Edit: I've been trying to decide which post is more worhtless...Discussing how the Na'vi would speak Jake Sully's name, or this:
your reviews aren't really reviews.

you're just reporting that you saw the film.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: MacGuffin on January 24, 2012, 06:52:20 PM
Bret Easton Ellis Penning A L.A. Noir For Paul Schrader, Wants Porn Star James Deen To Star
Source: CinemaBlend

Famed novelist Bret Easton Ellis and influential writer/director Paul Schrader have a film in pre-production called Bait. The film takes place at a high-end resort where, after being humiliated, an employee takes his revenge by leading the guests out to shark infested waters. High-end. Humiliation. Revenge. That definitely sounds like an Ellis story and one perfectly suited for a director like Schrader. A well matched pair, it should come as no surprise that the two, according to Ellis at least, are planning to work on another film after their collaboration - a film described as a micro budget L.A. noir where "nudity and acting are a must..."

The details of this newest collaboration are pretty thin at the moment as most of the information is coming from Bret Easton Ellis' Twitter account. As you can see below, yesterday the author mentioned how he was hoping to cast porn actor James Deen in either of two male roles for an upcoming indie film he's writing for Schrader to direct. Only a day before, the author mentions Taxi Driver hinting that he's obviously got Schrader on his mind, and with Bait on the way it stands to reason that this next collaboration isn't just wishful thinking on Ellis' part. It's also interesting that the writer would be watching the seminal Schrader-penned New York film while crafting his L.A. noir. And again, a few days before the Taxi Driver tweet, Ellis drops another hint at what to expect and why: he's thinking about James Deen to star. The porn actor has acknowledged all this on his own twitter account, while adding a simple "Party" in regards to the "full frontal naked banging guys and girls."
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: wilder on June 05, 2013, 04:59:02 PM
Paul Schrader To Direct 'The Dying Of The Light,' Nicolas Winding Refn May Produce
via The Playlist

It's coming on five years since 2008's "Adam Resurrected," writer/director Paul Schrader's last feature film, but he's returning in a big way. Later this summer, his independently financed and Kickstarter-assisted "The Canyons," starring Lindsay Lohan and porn star James Deen, will see a release by IFC Films as well as make a splash overseas playing out-of-competition at the Venice Film Festival (where he'll also serve as President of the International Jury for the Orizzonti section of the fest). And lucky enough for fans of the director, we won't be waiting another five years for Schrader to mount his next feature.

Catching up with the filmmaker by phone today to talk about "The Canyons," we asked him about his script for "The Dying Of The Light," a project Nicolas Winding Refn was gearing up to direct a couple of years back, until it fell apart. And the good news is the project is back on, though some of the job titles have been switched around. "I'm gonna make that this winter," he said.

"I think Nic Refn will be exec producer or something, [and] we have gotten an A-actor for that. He's agreed to the terms, but we're still negotiating the perks. I'll do that film starting at the end of the year," he added.

Originally set to star Harrison Ford and Channing Tatum during the Refn incarnation, the story centers on a C.I.A. agent who starts to become afflicted with blindness while on his last mission. So why did it fall apart? Well, simply put: Ford bailed.

"It was a wonderful, wonderful script about a C.I.A. agent who goes on an existentialistic journey and dies at the end," Refn told an audience at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in the fall of 2011. "And I thought, 'If I could do a movie where Harrison Ford dies, I would contribute to society.' So I was really into making this film. And I had gone to Los Angeles for short periods at a time to work with him. And you know, because it's Harrison Ford and you sit around in his big hangar with all his private planes and you hang out with Harrison Ford. Then he realizes that he doesn't want to die. Then it's like, 'Fucking hell. Okay, then there's no movie, Harrison.' Well he'd been thinking about it and 'Wasn't there another way?' and back and forth. And I thought, 'Oh God dammit.' So I was so angry at myself for buying into the illusion of Hollywood and of course, nothing ever happens."

Well, the silver lining is that it is happening once again. Unlike "The Canyons," this project has financing from traditional channels, though Schrader suggested the budget will still be lean, comparative to what studio pictures are made for these days. But either way, we're glad this movie is back on track and in the hands of the man who wrote the script.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: wilder on July 30, 2013, 06:34:36 PM
Nicolas Cage To Star In Paul Schrader's Next Film 'The Dying Of The Light'
via The Playlist

With "The Canyons" wrapped, packaged and now ready to hit theaters and VOD this weekend (you'll see our review soon), Paul Schrader is already looking ahead to his next project. Last night at the New York premiere of the film, when asked if he would ever do a movie like "The Canyons" again (a low-budget indie), Schrader said he would, but it would have to be under the right set of circumstances. He then went on to reveal his future plans, which include a project with a bit more financial muscle behind it. "The next movie I'm doing is with Nicolas Cage and it's a much more conventional process," he shared. So what is that movie?

When we spoke to the director last month (full interview coming soon), he revealed that his next directorial effort was "The Dying Of The Light," a project that Nicolas Winding Refn was originally gearing up to direct a couple of years back. "I'm gonna make that this winter," Schrader told us, adding: "I think Nic Refn will be exec producer or something, [and] we have gotten an A-actor for that. He's agreed to the terms, but we're still negotiating the perks. I'll do that film starting at the end of the year." It's likely safe to say that Cage is the actor he was lining up.

The story centers on a C.I.A. agent who starts to become afflicted with blindness while on his last mission, and Refn's incarnation infamously fell apart when he couldn't convince Harrison Ford (who was set to star alongside Channing Tatum) about the fate of his character. But presumably, Schrader—who also wrote the script—will have no such trouble here with Cage on board.

According to Roger Friedman, the project is set up at Red Granite, the upstart production house whose upcoming slate includes Martin Scorsese's "The Wolf Of Wall Street" and Scott Cooper's "Out Of The Furnace." More details likely to come, but with five years since his last feature, "Adam Resurrected," it looks like Schrader isn't wasting a moment in utilizing his newfound momentum.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: wilder on August 19, 2014, 01:08:52 PM
Paul Schrader’s ‘Dying Of The Light’ Acquired By Lionsgate Home Entertainment
via Deadline

Lionsgate Home Entertainment has acquired the Over Under Media/Tin Res Entertainment/Grindstone Entertainment pic Dying of The Light, starring Nicolas Cage and Anton Yelchin, announced today by producers Scott Clayton, Todd Williams and Gary Hirsch. The film will be released by Lionsgate Home Entertainment.

Paul Schrader wrote and directed it. Cage plays a veteran CIA operative, Evan Lake, who goes on a global manhunt when his old nemesis resurfaces. It’s a race against time because the op has a deteriorating mental condition that puts a real ticking clock on this. Yelchin plays the CIA protégé, with Irene Jacob playing Lake’s ex-lover.

“We are thrilled to have acquired “Dying of the Light,” a suspenseful, thrill ride in which Schrader has captured one of the best performances of Cage’s career,” stated Barry Brooker, President & CEO of Grindstone Entertainment Group. Clayton added, “We are confident that our collaboration with Grindstone will give the film the exposure it deserves and continue to increase the momentum we are building for the release.”

The exec producers are Barry Brooker, Stan Wertlieb, Nicolas Winding Refn (Drive) and Steve Schwartz (The Tree Of Life).
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: Jeremy Blackman on August 19, 2014, 06:33:21 PM
Based on the poem?
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: max from fearless on September 16, 2014, 03:56:14 PM
Just watched 'Hardcore', another random shoutbox recommendation, again from Jenkins after I got blown away by 'Blue Collar'. A few thoughts, the movie feels like the connective tissue between blue collar and the tortured Calvinist Schrader i know.

It has some strange music cues, like schrader hadn't fully disgested the music/culture of the time (like his main character) I loved the shots through the mirrors and Peter Boyle was great as always. Some of the garish lighting was cool.

Thought of 'Drive' a lot, as i watched it and obviously 'The Searchers'.

George C Scott was cool in it, his repression, obsession and his not fitting in, although i thought it could've gone further.

Really wanted it to become as daring and free flowing as 'Blue Collar' in that regard, loved the prostitute who helped him, was hoping she was going to become a surrogate mother or daughter, the ending felt too easy and slightly too well crafted, nonetheless it had some great stuff making it another cool recommendation...
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: ElPandaRoyal on September 21, 2014, 03:28:07 AM
I saw it a while ago and remember liking it very much. The calvinist repression made it almost hard to watch sometimes and I loved the performance by Scott. I think American Gigolo is going to be my next Schrader.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: wilder on September 24, 2014, 07:05:44 PM
First Look At 'The Dying Of The Light,' Paul Schrader Quits Film Over What Nicolas Winding Refn Calls "Artistic Disrespect"
via The Playlist

(http://i.imgur.com/Jvb5qqF.jpg)

Paul Schrader is no stranger to editing room battles. His travails during the production of "Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist" are well documented, and in the case of last year's "The Canyons," screenwriter Bret Easton Ellis described the film Schrader turned in versus the one his script envisioned, and a similar scenario seems to have occurred during production of the director's upcoming movie, "The Dying Of The Light."

Penned by Schrader, the film follows a C.I.A. agent who is afflicted with blindness while on his last mission. At one point a few years ago, Nicolas Winding Refn was slated to direct, but the project collapsed when Harrison Ford (who was set to star alongside Channing Tatum) and the filmmaker couldn't come to terms about the fate of his character. The movie was revived recently with Schrader now directing his own script, Refn staying on as a producer, and with Nicolas Cage and Anton Yelchin in the lead roles. Filming proceeded at the beginning of the year, and by all accounts it went smoothly, but problems began when Schrader went into the editing room. After delivering his first cut, "extensive" notes from the film's producers arrived .

“We made suggestions, which Paul to a large extent didn’t approve of, and so he refused to make the changes that we all wanted, despite the fact that the changes we were looking for were very much in line with the script that he wrote and shot,” producer Gary Hirsch told Variety. Producer Todd Williams added, “Paul’s cut of the movie deviated substantially from his own script. It was a completely different movie from the movie that was greenlit, the movie that was discussed and the movie that was shot.”

Of course, there are two sides to every story, and Schrader claims he was effectively locked out of the editing process after handing in a second cut that only made some of the requested changes. “I was never asked back. They finally showed me their cut only as they were entering final post-production. It was a fait accompli,” he states. Meanwhile, the producers assert that Schrader handed in his second cut and then left the project in their hands.

According to Hirsch and Williams, the two versions —theirs and Schrader's— "are 80 percent the same," perhaps failing to recognize that 1/5 of a movie being taken away from a director is still fairly substantial. Accounts from those who have seen the producers' cut say it doesn't have the trademark stamp of Schrader's work and is a far more "conventional" movie. And some of the changes to Schrader's movie included "tightened pacing, the recutting of several action scenes, and the removal of a voiceover narration." But, 80 percent the same, right?

For his part, Refn calls the dispute "artistic disrespect," siding with Schrader in the matter, and notes Cage is upset as well, adding that the actor “is very frustrated because, in his mind, he and Paul made a great movie that both of them are very proud of —and for that to be taken away from them, it doesn’t make any sense.”

No word yet on an official release date for "The Dying Of The Light," though the producers say "it’s coming out before the end of the year." But we'd reckon there's probably a lot more to come from all sides before the film arrives in cinemas.
Title: Re: Paul Schrader
Post by: wilder on May 17, 2015, 04:50:46 PM
Paul Schrader Gets Final Cut On L.A. Noirish ‘Dog Eat Dog’ From Eddie Bunker
via Deadline

(http://i.imgur.com/ueYlX76.png)

EXCLUSIVE: Arclight Films and Pure Dopamine are teaming director Paul Schrader with Nicolas Cage for Dog Eat Dog, a gritty crime thriller based on the celebrated book by Eddie Bunker. The film, just acquired by Arclight, will be scripted by Matt Wilder and Paul Schrader. Set deep in the underbelly of Los Angeles, pic is a gritty contemporary crime thriller about a trio of ex-cons hired for a kidnapping. When the abduction goes awry and gets completely out of control, the cons find themselves on the run, vowing to stay out of prison at all costs. Production begins in October.

“Ed Bunker is the crime writer’s crime writer,”‘ said Schrader. “He’s in the pantheon and one of the main people who define modern crime writing. He lived the life and lived to tell the story. Dog Eat Dog is Bunker at his best.”

Producers are Mark Earl Burman and David Hillary of Pure Dopamine. Executive Producers are Gary Hamilton, Don Rivers, Tim Peternel, Shaun Redick and Ray Mansfield.

“We’re absolutely thrilled to be working industry legends like Paul Schrader and Nicolas Cage as well as accomplished producers Mark Earl Burman and David Hillary of Pure Dopamine,” said Gary Hamilton, Managing Director of Arclight Films. “Dog Eat Dog has all the elements of a global commercial hit and the team to make it happen. We’re excited to introduce the film to buyers for the first time in Cannes.”

Arclight Films is handling international sales and introducing the film here at Cannes. Movie Packaging Co is handling additional sales. Cage is repped by CAA and at Link Entertainment. Schrader is repped by Parseghian Planco, and Jeff Berg at Resolution. Bunker and his Estate are represented by Jeanne Field at Windfall Management.

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Eddie Bunker (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Bunker) has been a consultant on many of Michael Mann's movies. I'm a big fan of his book No Beast So Fierce (http://www.amazon.co.uk/No-Beast-Fierce-Edward-Bunker/dp/1842432664/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1431899429&sr=8-1&keywords=no+beast+so+fierce), which served as source material for Straight Time (1978) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4WzmOBGw2E) and later as a reference point for DeNiro's character in Heat. Here's hoping Schrader can pull himself from the depths this go around.