Author Topic: INLAND EMPIRE  (Read 80276 times)

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greenowl

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #270 on: August 15, 2007, 05:48:06 AM »
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Bought the last copy @ the Best Buy on Santa Monica and La Brea ( what a nightmare... the power went out from 3:30pm until 6pm. @ 8 the main computers were still FUBAR.) before 9pm I managed to get out of there with my copy of IE.

I watched it.

Why don't i care about it?

I love Lynch. Why don't I care about this film?

It was beautiful, yes. Did i think it came from a pd150, sometimes, yes, but that didn't bother me... The post work was amazing.

I know, I know, I know... I need to watch it again, but shit...

I came out of his other films seeing life differently. And this time i came out trying to justify Lynch's film... very different.

I need a walk.



mogwai

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #271 on: August 15, 2007, 07:00:17 AM »
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who are you?

Reinhold

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #272 on: August 16, 2007, 01:50:33 PM »
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Bought the last copy @ the Best Buy on Santa Monica and La Brea ( what a nightmare... the power went out from 3:30pm until 6pm. @ 8 the main computers were still FUBAR.) before 9pm I managed to get out of there with my copy of IE.

I watched it.

Why don't i care about it?

I love Lynch. Why don't I care about this film?

It was beautiful, yes. Did i think it came from a pd150, sometimes, yes, but that didn't bother me... The post work was amazing.

I know, I know, I know... I need to watch it again, but shit...

I came out of his other films seeing life differently. And this time i came out trying to justify Lynch's film... very different.

I need a walk.


Lynch says in catching the big fish that it's good for you to mull over his films, try out different ideas about aspects of the plot, and work out the meaning over time. I think it's every bit as great as any of his other work. when i saw it, i immediately followed the film with a discussion of it and i felt like that made the overall first experience even better. do give it another shot, preferably with other people there.

as for the pd-150, it was exactly the look lynch wanted.

ps: introduce yourself in the thread in idle chatter.
Obviously what you are doing right now is called (in my upcoming book of psychology at least) validation. I think it's a normal thing to do. People will reply, say anything, and then you're gonna do what you were subconsciently thinking of doing all along.

NEON MERCURY

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #273 on: August 18, 2007, 11:22:18 AM »
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I watched it.

Why don't i care about it?

I love Lynch. Why don't I care about this film?

It was beautiful, yes. Did i think it came from a pd150, sometimes, yes, but that didn't bother me... The post work was amazing.

I know, I know, I know... I need to watch it again, but shit...

I came out of his other films seeing life differently. And this time i came out trying to justify Lynch's film... very different.

I need a walk.


i dont like your review   :whip:

i just wanted to let you guy sknow that i bought it/saw it/loved it....it is the greatest film that has ever been made (so far)

i promise to write a more lenghty/fan-boyish review soon....




SiliasRuby

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #274 on: August 18, 2007, 12:24:26 PM »
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I'll look forward to your emotional blowjob you are going to give INLAND EMPIRE pyramid machine
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Pubrick

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #275 on: August 18, 2007, 12:41:53 PM »
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beats the blowjob you give EVERYTHING ELSE, siliasruby.
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hedwig

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #276 on: August 18, 2007, 07:36:36 PM »
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has anybody here ever eaten quinoa?

the first thing i watched was DAVID LYNCH COOKS QUIONA because of the title. it is fascinating. lynch is an amazing storyteller even just sitting there with a cigarette and a glass of wine. he creates this mysterious mood.. the way he describes this incident (paper and coins), it's bizarre and beautiful, like one of his movies. i wanted to hear the story again right as it ended. and then he does some weird shit with his hands. BALLERINA was fun to watch for a minute or two. only because it looks like he's filming a soul dancing, then it's a bit boring. i will watch LYNCH 2 later tonight. lynch's voice is fun to impersonate. keeenwaaah, boy i tell ya.

MacGuffin

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #277 on: August 18, 2007, 08:03:04 PM »
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the first thing i watched was DAVID LYNCH COOKS QUIONA because of the title. it is fascinating. lynch is an amazing storyteller even just sitting there with a cigarette and a glass of wine. he creates this mysterious mood.. the way he describes this incident (paper and coins), it's bizarre and beautiful, like one of his movies.

It's funny how detailed he gets about every step in the process; "Then we're gonna put the lid RIGHT THERE."


It's as mesmerizing as watching him make the lamp on the Dynamic DVD.
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tpfkabi

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #278 on: August 19, 2007, 11:42:37 AM »
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pendereSki

lynch does not like the idea of people watching films on phones or computers. i thought that bit was funny.

as for the film - i don't know.

it seems like lynch, even in his own words, makes films like he makes his ambient music - just shoots scenes and tries to make meaning of it later.

i like ambient music in spurts, but i'm more interested in experimentation within structure instead of structural experimentation.

Beck/Black Tambourine in the middle of the film felt really out of place to me.
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MacGuffin

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #279 on: August 20, 2007, 01:15:52 AM »
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David Lynch Takes Calls on NPR and Talks INLAND EMPIRE Soundtrack

Check out the interview with David Lynch on NPR by clicking here. David makes a brief mention that the INLAND EMPIRE Soundtrack will be available in a couple of weeks.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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bonanzataz

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #280 on: August 20, 2007, 02:47:34 AM »
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what is "5.1 dolby digital far-field monitor playback?"

EDIT: nevermind, found out on my own...

"A buffet of aural options is included, with Lynch providing a pair of Dolby Digital 5.1 tracks, one tailored for near-field monitor playback and one better suited for far-field monitor playback. What that means is, basically, near-field monitors are considered to be more compact speakers and are closer to the listener, allowing them to hear less "reflected" sound while far-field monitors are larger, farther away and rely more on "reflected" sound. For this review, I sampled the far-field Dolby Digital 5.1 mix and found it to be quite bass-heavy, often very quiet during passages of dialogue and skimpy on surround effects. A Dolby 2.0 stereo track is also included, as are optional French subtitles (but, of course, no optional English subtitles)."


plus... chapter stops?! wtf?!?! so happy!
The corpses all hang headless and limp bodies with no surprises and the blood drains down like devil’s rain we’ll bathe tonight I want your skulls I need your skulls I want your skulls I need your skulls Demon I am and face I peel to see your skin turned inside out, ’cause gotta have you on my wall gotta have you on my wall, ’cause I want your skulls I need your skulls I want your skulls I need your skulls collect the heads of little girls and put ’em on my wall hack the heads off little girls and put ’em on my wall I want your skulls I need your skulls I want your skulls I need your skulls

MacGuffin

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #281 on: August 22, 2007, 09:41:08 AM »
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David Lynch On His 'Empire,' Turning Down 'Jedi' — And Cooking Quinoa
Idiosyncratic director also says he's seen 'Bourne Ultimatum': 'There's nothing wrong with a great Hollywood blockbuster.'
Source: MTV

You haven't lived until David Lynch has called you "buddy." Unfailingly polite, enthusiastic and honest, it's immediately clear in conversing with the filmmaking icon that he remains as independent as he's ever been. Just take a look at the newly released DVD of his last film, "Inland Empire." Of course, the DVD includes all 172 minutes of the perplexing story of "a woman in trouble" (the film's tag line), but it also features more than an hour of additional scenes (yes, that means more of his actors in rabbit costumes), an extended interview with Lynch and even a cooking segment with him.

Lynch took time out from his painting and daily weather reports (featured on DavidLynch.com) to discuss the new DVD, his love affair with digital filmmaking and why he turned down directing a "Star Wars" film.

MTV: Traditionally there aren't a ton of extras on DVDs of your films. Why load this one up and pull the curtain a bit on your process?

David Lynch: Pulling the curtain on some things isn't good. I always want to protect the film and experience for people. But this time there were a lot of scenes ... that formed a kind of thing that I call "other things that happened." It's like, you meet the family in the film — except for the sister who lives in Ohio. And now with this it fills that out. And then — I don't cook, but I had this recipe for quinoa. And cooking shows are very popular. So I thought I'd do a cooking thing.

MTV: Perhaps the cooking show could be a new part of your career?

Lynch: Let's talk at MTV because it could be big. It could be huge, man. [He laughs.] A black and white cooking show with stories, because there's a lot of waiting in cooking.

MTV: When you released "Inland Empire," you went on a sort of barnstorming tour, taking the film from city to city. Was that effective?

Lynch: We live in a field of relativity, so it worked out relatively well. In the Midwest, theatrically, on the seismic meter, we hardly made a blip. It's kind of sad when you go and do all these things to reach certain people that may have a great experience if they go but they just don't go. I wonder about the 17-year-old girls in the Midwest. If they could embrace "Inland Empire," I think they would have a great experience in that theater. With the DVD, now maybe there's a chance for them.

MTV: Do you think audiences are more or less apt today to go to films that revel in abstractions like yours do?

Lynch: I think there's a slight trend toward embracing new cinema, non-Hollywood blockbuster cinema. It's not erupting, but because of the Internet, I think people have more of a chance to get buzz going on alternative cinema, so I think it's hopeful out there. It just hasn't penetrated the smaller places.

MTV: In the extras it's clear that you love your actors. But I'm wondering how you convince someone like Naomi Watts to put on a rabbit costume? Did she have any trepidation?

Lynch: No. Actors are very special human beings. They yearn to take on a new character and they yearn to go deep into that and make it real. They yearn for it! It's such a thrill.

MTV: Are you planning to go back to any of your earlier work and add bells and whistles to the DVDs?

Lynch: The only one that's been talked about is "Fire Walk With Me." There are many short scenes that weren't in the final film that on their own are interesting. They just never fit in the film. There's talk of me editing and mixing those. There's a scene with Jack Nance. It's a short scene with Ed [Wright], who played Mr. Mibbler. I loved this guy. He was in "Wild at Heart" as well. Both of them are gone, so to fix those scenes, for the memory of them, it's real important.

MTV: You shot "Inland Empire" using digital technology. Will you ever go back to film?

Lynch: Never. Digital is so friendly for me and so important for the scenes, a way of working without so much downtime. It's impossible to go back. Film is a beautiful medium, but the world has moved on. The amount of manipulation we can do, anybody can do, is so much the future. Film is so big and heavy and slow, you just die. It's just ridiculous.

MTV: Do you ever find yourself drawn to Hollywood blockbusters?

Lynch: I saw "The Bourne Ultimatum." I liked the first one the best but the third one is second-best. I like entertainment. Cinema can say many things. There's nothing wrong with a great Hollywood blockbuster. But sometimes you're [into] it like crazy while it's going and when you leave it sort of pops and evaporates.

MTV: I know that controlling your films has been a big issue for you since "Dune," because that film didn't turn out as you intended. Are you ever tempted to relinquish a little control in order to have access to a bigger budget?

Lynch: Never! Never! Never! Money could never make up for dying the death of seeing what could have been and not making it that way. Maybe it's because I came from painting, but it's just theater of the absurd. The filmmaker doesn't have the final say. It's absurd! A nightmare, a horror! Why would anyone do that?

MTV: Is it true you almost directed "Return of the Jedi"? How close did you come?

Lynch: Not close at all. I had a meeting with George [Lucas]. I like George. It was his thing. I said, "You should direct this. It's your thing! It's not my thing."

MTV: Did he flat-out offer it to you at the time?

Lynch: Yeah!

MTV: But you immediately declined.

Lynch: I called him the next day.

MTV: Looking forward, do you think you'll continue to move further into experimental filmmaking, as in "Inland Empire"?

Lynch: I don't know which way anything will go because it's all about the ideas that come that you fall in love with. In between things, there are no ideas — and then suddenly there's the idea. If you fall in love with it, you know exactly what to do. Sometimes it can be surprising.

MTV: Do you ever worry the idea won't come?

Lynch: Sure, but that's how come I meditate every day, because when you meditate, you transcend and you experience the unbounded infinite ocean of creativity. And the ideas start flowing easier.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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squints

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #282 on: August 26, 2007, 05:03:17 AM »
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lynch does not like the idea of people watching films on phones or computers. i thought that bit was funny.

he says something like "you can't watch a movie on a FUCKING CELL PHONE!" and he gets visibly angry about it. That's so awesome
“The myth by no means finds its adequate objectification in the spoken word. The structure of the scenes and the visible imagery reveal a deeper wisdom than the poet himself is able to put into words and concepts” – Friedrich Nietzsche

tpfkabi

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #283 on: August 26, 2007, 02:08:00 PM »
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anyone have any comments on "More Things that Happened?"

i was thinking every cut back to the glasses guy was the same shot repeated over and over until he said, "i love (or maybe 'like') pancakes."

that would have been the funniest moment in the whole film had it made it.

i'm guessing Dern talking to that guy is the 18 minute monologue broken up?

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bonanzataz

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Re: INLAND EMPIRE
« Reply #284 on: August 27, 2007, 02:33:12 AM »
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i still dislike this movie. i have more appreciation for it now that i've watched it again, but i still don't like it.

i really hate the acting (other than laura dern, of course). everybody seems to know they're in a lynch movie. the whole affair seems to be completely aware that it's a lynch movie. it was my main complaint the first time around (page 8 for anyone who cares), it's even more apparent on second viewing. it feels like a kid who worships lynch got his hands onto a dv camera and all of lynch's resources and shot whatever came to his head til it started to make sense. some might see this as a compliment to the film, "an unfettered lynch shooting his crazy thoughts like he was a kid making eraserhead again, hooray!" to me it's the work of a talented filmmaker who is unfocused and has run completely amok. it's like what ebert said of lost highway:

"[it] plays like a director's idea book, in which isolated scenes and notions are jotted down for possible future use. Instead of massaging them into a finished screenplay, Lynch and collaborator Barry Gifford seem to have filmed the notes."

i always half-heartedly believed that about lost highway while my other half was able to follow that film's logic. the difference between empire and lost highway is that lost highway's set-pieces were inspired, mysterious, and astoundingly choreographed and filmed, whereas the big scenes in empire seem hurried and not very well planned. not only that, the "resolution" in empire is clunky and unsatisfying, while the last ten minutes of highway (for me) totally tied up everything that had preceded it with a terrifying and emotional punch, more akin to twilight zone rather than chien andalou.

and therein lies my real problem with inland empire. the emotion isn't there, both for its characters and for its audience, as it has been in every other lynch film. rather than feel for these characters, i feel that lynch uses the characters (if they can even be called that) haphazardly as pawns in his convoluted plot rather than letting the characters experience, react to, and change their environment as he has in the past. take a look at jeffrey in blue velvet. after actively working his way into a mystery, jeffrey cries and feels remorse after witnessing and inflicting violence on victimized dorothy. diane selwyn masturbates violently over the loss of a loved one. laura palmer, after having been systematically raped by her father and descending into a world of drugs and prostitution, clings to the one man she loves and who genuinely loves her back as she drunkenly stumbles off his motorcycle screaming "i love you james!!!" the scenes are over the top, the films delve into worlds outside of our own, but they always cling onto that thread of humanity so that we believe in, root for, and feel for the characters we have invested the past two hours of our life into. and in inland empire, we give the filmmaker an extra hour to make us care and it just never happens. where other lynch characters take life into their own hands, changing their environments and moving the films along, nikki sits like a duck in water waiting for something to happen to her. sure you can say that nikki grace is an oppressed aging woman in hollywood, defenseless to the world around her, but i'm not convinced. i think she's boring. i am given no reason to like nikki or feel that nikki (or any other character in the film for that matter) is anything other than a soulless vessel for lynch to carry out this concept, so why should i care? it wouldn't be so bad had the concept alone been strong enough to sustain a three hour film, but it wasn't, and i'd seen it before (with better photography) in a lynch film that had the aforementioned humanity. mulholland dr works b/c the last hour of the film explains and humanizes the motivations behind the vessels (betty and rita) who dominated the atmosphere of the beginning of that film.

lynch's films have always been heavy on atmosphere. here, the atmosphere has consumed the humanity that made his films so visceral and real and scary to me. inland empire is long, mostly unengaging, poorly filmed, and i do not understand the almost unanimous praise this board has given to it.

i realize it is late so many of my points might not be so well written or clear (also, keep in mind that the "m" "u" and "j" keys on my keyboard are broken and i had to add them in later using cut and paste), but i really would love to have somebody pick apart my argument and try to convince me why this movie is good so that i can further solidify my points or admit defeat and realize just how much of an accomplishment inland empire is.
The corpses all hang headless and limp bodies with no surprises and the blood drains down like devil’s rain we’ll bathe tonight I want your skulls I need your skulls I want your skulls I need your skulls Demon I am and face I peel to see your skin turned inside out, ’cause gotta have you on my wall gotta have you on my wall, ’cause I want your skulls I need your skulls I want your skulls I need your skulls collect the heads of little girls and put ’em on my wall hack the heads off little girls and put ’em on my wall I want your skulls I need your skulls I want your skulls I need your skulls

 

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