Recent Posts

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 [10]
91
David Lynch / Re: The Official Twin Peaks Thread (TOTPT)
« Last post by jenkins on December 07, 2017, 12:30:35 PM »
is each Star Wars movie a self-contained thing? is each Godfather movie a self-contained thing? what of the Lord of the Rings?

the distinction will prevail jb.
92
David Lynch / Re: The Official Twin Peaks Thread (TOTPT)
« Last post by Jeremy Blackman on December 07, 2017, 12:23:03 PM »
I bet even Sight & Sound could bring themselves to slum a little and make a short TV list, if they want to talk about a TV show.

I think the distinction protects film, if anything. The constraints of the medium help make it what it is — something you could reasonably watch in a theater in one sitting. The duration of the thing is actually important! You can simply do a lot more in a full season of television. It’s strange to put a movie up against TPTR, which contains the content and power of multiple movies.

Another central and defining characteristic of a film is that it should hopefully work as a self-contained thing. Twin Peaks: The Return is violently the opposite. It does not work without Season 1, Season 2, and Fire Walk With Me.

Basically, I just still believe in the distinction.
93
Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread - Critic's Reviews
« Last post by budwillies on December 07, 2017, 12:06:38 PM »
Another masterpiece from Anderson. One of his best, according to the reviews thus far.
94
David Lynch / Re: The Official Twin Peaks Thread (TOTPT)
« Last post by jenkins on December 07, 2017, 12:02:07 PM »
yes, i believe that Sight & Sound and Cahiers du cinéma self-identify as film people, so much so that they don't make a tv list. yes that's accurate. but the Twin Peaks distinction won't be denigrated by these accolades. to reference Dekalog again, everyone knows it was tv. all these years later, everyone still knows Dekalog was tv.
95
David Lynch / Re: The Official Twin Peaks Thread (TOTPT)
« Last post by Jeremy Blackman on December 07, 2017, 11:48:03 AM »
i don't think they're calling it a film to praise it.

That's kind of exactly what samsong said:

doesn't listing a season of tv as a film inherently acknowledge its accomplishment as a tv series? . . . twin peaks: the return will be at the top of my best films of 2017 list, as it was the best work of image and sound to be released this year

He also said that The Leftovers wouldn't be eligible because he didn't like it.

i think they're praising it because it's awards season, and awards are how you praise. they're saying "great job." and, what, only tv people can say "great job"?

Do people actually self-identify so strongly as “film people” that they can’t bring themselves to make a list of the best TV? Not even a top 3 or 5? Is it like, I haven’t seen enough television, so I’m going to put this on my movie list?

I guess that’s fine, but what frustrates me is that words have meaning. A 2-hour movie is a different thing than an 18-hour season of television, and I think it’s worth respecting the distinction.
96
David Lynch / Re: The Official Twin Peaks Thread (TOTPT)
« Last post by Sleepless on December 07, 2017, 11:26:18 AM »
Cinematic in terms of quality and ambition? I honestly thought we were done being surprised that could be done on TV. Beyond just how good it is, TPTR is a season of television in every conceivable way. I genuinely don’t understand how it’s meaningful or useful at all to call this a film.

Cinematic as in pure cinema. That's a squishy definition, and completely subjective, I grant you. I liked what Rian Johnson said about PTA: "The truth is I don’t know how great music does what it does, and I don’t know how Paul’s movies do that voodoo that they do." Yes, there's plenty of other great stuff on TV (Breaking Bad, Game of Thrones) but I don't think of anything else that has transcended the medium quite like TPTR did. Regardless of whether you want to consider the medium TV or film. To clarify, again, I recognize that TPTR is TV and not a film. But I think what the S&S and Cahiers lists were trying to do was acknowledge it as one of the very best examples of cinematic art from over the past year. Regardless of what size screen it appeared on.

To elaborate... I think there are better ways to sing its praises than calling it something it’s not, just to make a point about its quality and ambition.

Calling something a film is not an effective way to praise it, anyway. Justice League was a film. It was a cinematic film, too. And by that same standard, X Files: I Want To Believe was definitely not a film, for example.

I agree that calling something a film is not a form of praise. That makes no sense to me. I think you just want things to stay in their box and to be neatly categorized. I get why you're uncomfortable with all this. I don't take this as an issue of film versus TV, simply acknowledgment of what TPTR achieved.

no one is saying it's meaningful or useful to call it a film. i didn't hear anyone say that. i don't think they're calling it a film to praise it. i think they're praising it because it's awards season, and awards are how you praise. they're saying "great job." and, what, only tv people can say "great job"? well that's silly.

Exactly.
97
David Lynch / Re: The Official Twin Peaks Thread (TOTPT)
« Last post by jenkins on December 07, 2017, 11:15:00 AM »
no one is saying it's meaningful or useful to call it a film. i didn't hear anyone say that. i don't think they're calling it a film to praise it. i think they're praising it because it's awards season, and awards are how you praise. they're saying "great job." and, what, only tv people can say "great job"? well that's silly.

99
David Lynch / Re: The Official Twin Peaks Thread (TOTPT)
« Last post by Jeremy Blackman on December 07, 2017, 11:06:13 AM »
To elaborate... I think there are better ways to sing its praises than calling it something it’s not, just to make a point about its quality and ambition.

Calling something a film is not an effective way to praise it, anyway. Justice League was a film. It was a cinematic film, too. And by that same standard, X Files: I Want To Believe was definitely not a film, for example.
100
The Small Screen / Re: Game of Thrones (spoilers)
« Last post by Fernando on December 07, 2017, 10:52:08 AM »
Variety Interview.

‘Game of Thrones’: Sophie Turner Talks Pivotal Scenes, Season 8 Premiere

What was your favorite scene from last season?
It was probably the moment that you realized that Sansa was going to kill Littlefinger [Aidan Gillen] and does kill him, and when you realize that Sansa and Arya Maisie [Maisie Williams] had been scheming behind Litlefinger’s back, which is a pretty impressive thing to do for two young girls against a master manipulator. It was just a really powerful moment for her, to have used up all of her master’s lessons and finally discard him. The student becomes the master now.

That scene was your last with Aidan Gillen, who you’ve worked with a lot over the series. What was it like to be working with him for the last time.
It was really hard, because out of all the people I’ve worked with on the show, he has been the one who was consistent throughout, from season one to season seven. He has been my “Game of Thrones” experience. He’s been the backbone of it for me. So to say goodbye to him was pretty hard, especially because life imitated art in a way, because he was also my mentor. I learned so many lessons just by watching him act. It was this weird parallel, and an emotional thing for everyone.

What has it been like for you to work through your formative years as an actor on a show like this with so many very good veteran actors?
My standards have definitely been raised. It’s a blessing and a curse, “Game of Thrones” being my first job and working with such incredible scripts and such incredible veteran actors, and working with the best crew. It makes you a bit of a snob, I think. And because it was my first job, the actors on “Game of Thrones” are the people I learned to act from. I learned to act watching Lena [Headey] and Peter [Dinklage] and Maisie and Kit [Harrington] and all of these different people. I put them all on such pedestals. The thought of not working with them is almost excruciating to me. They’ve been my growing up.

How will Sansa fare next season without Littlefinger in her ear?
It’s going to be tricky for her, because at the end of last season, she felt that she had everything set up. She had her family back together. They were in control of the North again. This season, there’s a new threat, and all of a sudden she finds herself somewhat back in the deep end. And without Littlefinger, it’s a test for her of whether she can get through it. It’s a big challenge for her, without this master manipulator having her back. This season is more a passionate fight for her than a political, manipulative kind of fight.

Is that because this season she faces less a political threat and more an existential, zombie sort of threat?
Well, I don’t know. We’ll have to see.

Where are you at in production on season eight?
We started in October, so we’re maybe like a tenth of the way through. [Laughs.] No, no, we’ve got six or seven months left.

Is there a consciousness on set of the fact that this is the last season?
There definitely is. When we all had the read-through for the final season, it was very, very emotional. For the first time in “Thrones” history, we had everyone there. All of the Americans wanted to come over. Every single cast member was pretty much there. We’re all kind of feeling the end of it coming. We’re all staying in town a little longer, going out for more meals, trying to get together more. We’re all trying not to take it for granted any more.

You’ve been able to do the “X-Men” movies. Now that you won’t have “Thrones” anymore, what else do you want to do?
I kind of want to do everything. I feel this sense that everything  is over “Game of Thrones”-wise. I have nothing to lose right now, because I don’t have “Game of Thrones” anymore. I’m kind of born again, because I’m at a different stage of my career now — not necessarily at a higher level, I just find myself at a different version of my career. So I’m going to try my hand at everything.

Are you excited for next year, with “X-Men: Dark Phoenix” and season eight of “Game of Thrones” set to premiere?
Yeah, I’m really excited. “Game of Thrones” comes out in 2019. “Dark Phoenix” is in November. Then I have a couple indie movies coming out. I’m a producer on my next movie [“Girl Who Fell From the Sky”]. So I’m really excited about the future.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 [10]
DMCA & Copyright | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy