Author Topic: Netflix: Should I or Shouldn't I?  (Read 55429 times)

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jenkins

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Re: Netflix: Should I or Shouldn't I?
« Reply #360 on: December 24, 2015, 03:08:56 PM »
+1


Prince of Broadway was 2008, Starlet was 2012, and Tangerine was this year. before Prince were two other movies. in tv land he was a co-creator of Greg the Bunny and wrote the twelve episodes of Warren the Ape. Sean Baker.

he was the co-writer, director, cinematographer, and sound designer for Prince of Broadway. that’s called “bringing it.” that’s being a Carpenter.

my gateway was Tangerine, which is indeed the best movie of his i’ve seen, but i like how my backward travel allows me to know what he’ll become while i watch his earlier movies. i think he’s a miracle, he’s a hero figure to me now, and i still don’t know a lick about him, since i think he has a talent for creating selfless cinema, with characters unlike him and his life (yet richly detailed within their movie worlds).

that’s Mike Leigh and Ken Loach stuff. that sounds like people movies, and it is. and he bakes these movies in modern and effortless ways. he feels natural to his times. i think his world perspective is marvelous, as he operates in realms of morality without magnetizing himself to their analytics.

his movie are 100% about the actors on screen and exist as such. there only being people and their emotions, his movies have ended with — what does one do during one’s hard times? one moves forward along with others the same. the feels. the strong ones. i think the final texture of Tangerine is the one created with the confidence of experience. and watching Prince and Starlet i see how he gets and deserves this confidence.

this is Kenneth Turan’s LA Time Review:

Quote
"Prince of Broadway" thinks outside the box. It's an undeniably small yet almost indefinable film, warmhearted and bittersweet, laced with both humor and tough emotions. Plus it has a kind of bicoastal appeal.
  Though it won the grand jury prize at the 2008 Los Angeles Film Festival and was a nominee for the 2009 Independent Spirit Awards' John Cassavetes nod, "Prince" owes a lot of its allure to its very New York situation and state of mind.
  As directed by Sean Baker, "Prince" greatly benefits from its gritty cinéma-vérité setting on the edges of Manhattan's wholesale fashion district, a place where street-level clothing hustlers try to make a few dollars on the far side of the law.
  "Prince's" script is credited to Baker and Darren Dean, but an on-screen message tells us that the dialogue "was realized through improvisation and a collaborative process with all actors.”

New York state of mind. love it. i always miss it in LA. i usually miss this quality in LA movies, except Baker is indeed bicoastal. and transcultural. and i assume everyone is simply jealous he brought the iphone 5s to the big screen because goddamnit he did it.

in Prince what's realistic is a hustler brings customers from the street into the backroom of a store owned by Karren Karagulian (who's in Prince, Starlet, and Tangerine). the hustler sleeps on the floor of a shabby apartment in new york city, yet he dresses with style, and his style pattern is interrupted by his ex bringing him his child. escapades ensue, of both the practical and emotional variety. and the kid is a flawless actor, he's a child doing the type of acting that makes the adults jealous.

a thing i'd meant to mention while chatting Starlet is James Ransone. because this trivia for fans of The Wire:



he was Chester 'Ziggy' Sobotka in The Wire, he was in Generation Kill, and he's pitch perfect in both Tangerine and Starlet.
Every perspective is an act of creation.

wilder

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Re: Netflix: Should I or Shouldn't I?
« Reply #361 on: January 14, 2016, 02:54:58 PM »
0
Netflix Says It Will Shut Down Users Who Connect Via Proxy Or VPN
via The Playlist

Netflix is now in 190 countries, and it's widely assumed that viewers can access a wealth of streaming titles, but that's not the case. While the company's technology is advanced and its reach is global, Netflix must still observe territorial rights. To keep it simple, when studios finance films, part of the budget comes from distribution deals made in a variety of countries around the world, so while one movie may be released in the United States by The Weinstein Company, it might be handled by another company in Portugal. So when Netflix makes a deal to stream a film or TV show, it must secure rights via the distributor in each territory. For a long time, Netflix users outside the U.S. who found the company's catalog selection wanting used browser widgets, proxy servers, or VPNs to hide their IPs and gain access to the streaming site's plethora of titles. But it seems those days are over.

While it has politely looked the other way for years, Netflix VP of content delivery architecture David Fullagar revealed today that the company will be blocking access to users who to come the site through third party means. Here's a portion of what he had to say in a blog post:

...given the historic practice of licensing content by geographic territories, the TV shows and movies we offer differ, to varying degrees, by territory. In the meantime, we will continue to respect and enforce content licensing by geographic location.

Some members use proxies or “unblockers” to access titles available outside their territory. To address this, we employ the same or similar measures other firms do. This technology continues to evolve and we are evolving with it. That means in coming weeks, those using proxies and unblockers will only be able to access the service in the country where they currently are. We are confident this change won’t impact members not using proxies.


It's not exactly clear what technology Netflix will be using to block users, but the company seems confident. However, Netflix recognizes the pain some customers face in not being able to access the shows or movies they want, and Fullagar says that Netflix being able to offer the same content everywhere is "the goal we will keep pushing towards."

03

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Re: Netflix: Should I or Shouldn't I?
« Reply #362 on: February 13, 2016, 03:27:41 AM »
0
so if i play netflix and lay down in bed, it asks if i want to continue playing in less than an hour, halfway through an episode  forcing me to get up and restart it.

 i accidentally left netflix on this afternoon, left the house, and found it still playing many hours later,. like a season of a show's worth of time, still playing. what kind of bullshit is this?

is there some kind of setting for this? why would this be random, it's freaking me out

Jeremy Blackman

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Re: Netflix: Should I or Shouldn't I?
« Reply #363 on: April 07, 2016, 08:15:01 PM »
+1
New on Netflix this week:

Boogie Nights
2001: A Space Odyssey
A Clockwork Orange
The Princess Bride
Best In Show
Erin Brockovich
Sunset Boulevard
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polkablues

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Re: Netflix: Should I or Shouldn't I?
« Reply #364 on: April 07, 2016, 08:37:10 PM »
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Except for Sunset Boulevard, I already own all of those movies on disc. Netflix and I are very in sync right now. Vibing, as jenkins would say.
Now you're in the *spoiler* place.

Sleepless

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Re: Netflix: Should I or Shouldn't I?
« Reply #365 on: May 15, 2016, 07:40:33 AM »
0
Special Correspondents. Held my interest. Caused several sensible chuckles and a couple of extremely brief audible laughs. Not bad.

Sleepless

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Re: Netflix: Should I or Shouldn't I?
« Reply #366 on: June 30, 2016, 09:21:23 AM »
+1
No-one mentioned the Netflix-Disney pact due to start bolstering Netflix's movie content starting in September, so here's some info on that. There's so many Disney-related movies this year, it'll be exciting to be able to watch them all at the touch of a button.

Also, here are my three top TV shows currently streaming on Netflix that you should be watching too:
Bloodline
Les Revenants
Happy Valley

Jeremy Blackman

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Re: Netflix: Should I or Shouldn't I?
« Reply #367 on: June 30, 2016, 10:19:00 AM »
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Yes, Happy Valley is excellent! I especially love the first season. It's that rare show that seems to take its time with character moments but is actually really fast-paced. Kevin from Season 1 is the highlight for me... what a fully realized and agonizing performance.
"Hunger is the purest sin"

Jeremy Blackman

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Re: Netflix: Should I or Shouldn't I?
« Reply #368 on: November 04, 2016, 08:18:09 PM »
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New season of The Fall is on Netflix! Why did no one tell me?

I might have to watch this first, though:


"Hunger is the purest sin"

Jeremy Blackman

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Re: Netflix: Should I or Shouldn't I?
« Reply #369 on: November 05, 2016, 02:11:59 AM »
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^ "Undecided" was really good.

Very much takes the structure and format of Borat or Bruno, a mockumentary with a narrative that collides with real life. In this movie, they meet every presidential candidate, and it gets... interesting. Like Sacha Baron Cohen, some of their stunts made headlines. People didn't know they were making a movie.

Here's a good example of what they do, not from the movie. (It's best to avoid spoilers. Maybe even skip the trailer I posted.)




They also did this:



And this:

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Vire

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Re: Netflix: Should I or Shouldn't I?
« Reply #370 on: May 08, 2017, 07:34:42 AM »
0
so if i play netflix and lay down in bed, it asks if i want to continue playing in less than an hour, halfway through an episode  forcing me to get up and restart it.

 i accidentally left netflix on this afternoon, left the house, and found it still playing many hours later,. like a season of a show's worth of time, still playing. what you need to know about Gynectrol kind of bullshit is this?

is there some kind of setting for this? why would this be random, it's freaking me out

Lol, i know it's so annyoying when it asks if you want to continue playing like that.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2017, 05:05:36 AM by Vire »

Sleepless

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Re: Netflix: Should I or Shouldn't I?
« Reply #371 on: September 22, 2017, 03:25:00 PM »
+2
This article makes some great points about the lack of quality cinema currently available on Netflix, and raises worthwhile concern about the place classic cinema has in both contemporary times and the future.

On a personal level, I've long been an advocate of Netflix but its charm is seriously waning. It used to be a great place to discover both new and old films and TV, but over the past six months in particular I've noticed that it's in something of a rut. Aside from very occasional examples such as Clouds of Sils Maria or Sunset Song, there's nothing really of interest being added on the film side. Even on the TV side, too, it'd just there to fill a void. Between the quickly-binged seasons of a handful of shows I enjoy (many of which are admittedly guilty pleasures), too often I find myself scrolling through my list but find nothing I'm terribly excited to watch. A huge source of frustration has been very little information out there about the new stuff that's being added. Oh, there's a bunch of sites with lists, but not real information about what this stuff is. The originals are especially frustrating, because there's rarely any trailers, and in order to find out anything about them, you have to look them up in the app. Netflix seriously need to rethink their marketing strategy beyond simply abandoning their algorithm and suggesting every new high-profile release to their entire audience base. But I know I'll keep my subscription because it's not that much, and it's still the primary source of home entertainment for my entire family. (I'm a bad parent and let my kids be entertained by the boob tube way more that I ever thought I would.) We have Amazon Prime too, of course, but this article is (rightly) even more scathing of them. The Grand Tour may have been the straw that broke the camel's back in terms of me jumping on the AP bandwagon, but that aside, the video streaming is the aspect of AP I use the least.

I want to just bite the bullet and commit to a longterm relationship with Mubi. I've flirted with her in the past, but in truth, I was never fully committed. Absolutely me, not her. If I make a point to carve out at least one night a week for her pleasures, I think it could turn into something serious. But at the same time, I'm attracted to FilmStruck too. A 14-night-stand with her too couldn't hurt, could it?

NETFLIX, STREAMING VIDEO AND THE SLOW DEATH OF THE CLASSIC FILM

Related, I randomly and completely separately came across this article today too and now it's got me wanting to draw up business plans and figure out how to make such a thing work.

How to Start Your Own Cinema for Under $15,000

 

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