Author Topic: Terrence Malick  (Read 38116 times)

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Ernie

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #15 on: June 13, 2003, 01:56:53 PM »
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Quote from: Pastor Parsley
Quote from: ebeaman
Yeah, I blind bought True Romance before I saw Badlands and thought it was decent. Then when I heard about how it ripped it off, I saw it and fucking threw TR away. I still have to buy Badlands actually.


The only two things I really like about TR is the scene where Alabama is getting beat up in the hotel room, it's so wrenching to watch ......and Brad Pitt's little bits. "don't condescend me..."  He's great in that part.


Yeah, those are great. It's really pretty boring at the beginning though. That's what makes it kinda hard to wanna watch.

MacGuffin

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #16 on: July 17, 2003, 03:06:13 AM »
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Terrence Malick Directing Del Toro's Che
Source: The Hollywood Reporter

Reclusive filmmaker Terrence Malick may be starting to pick up the pace.

Although 20 years passed between his 1978 film "Days of Heaven" and 1998's war film "The Thin Red Line," he's already contemplating another stint in the director's chair.

Malick (The Thin Red Line) is attached to helm Benicio Del Toro in Che. The film is an epic about the life and death of Cuban revolutionary Che Guevara.

Steven Soderbergh was originally considering helming the project but now is likely to be involved in a producing capacity. Che is not yet set up at a studio, but if Soderbergh continues his involvement, one likely possibility is that Warner Bros. Pictures might step in.

The studio houses Section Eight, the production company headed by Soderbergh and partner George Clooney. At this point, however, neither Warner nor Section Eight is part of the picture.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Pubrick

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #17 on: July 17, 2003, 03:09:03 AM »
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wow. malick can do no wrong.
endless 'nothing is what it seems'-isms

rustinglass

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #18 on: July 17, 2003, 04:42:14 AM »
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Quote from: xerxes
one of the funniest moments i've ever had in a theater happened when i saw the thin red line.

i won't say which, but there is a scene near the end of the film that looks like it could be a final scene... like it looked like it was going to end there... so we get to that scene and everyone in the theater thinks it is going to end, but it goes on to another scene, and as it does the entire audience lets out a collective groan. it was amazingly funny.


Are you talking about a certain actor that comes out only in the last 2 minutes?
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Pwaybloe

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #19 on: July 17, 2003, 08:21:29 AM »
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Quote from: MacGuffin
Terrence Malick Directing Del Toro's Che
Source: The Hollywood Reporter

Reclusive filmmaker Terrence Malick may be starting to pick up the pace.

Although 20 years passed between his 1978 film "Days of Heaven" and 1998's war film "The Thin Red Line," he's already contemplating another stint in the director's chair.

Malick (The Thin Red Line) is attached to helm Benicio Del Toro in Che. The film is an epic about the life and death of Cuban revolutionary Che Guevara.

Steven Soderbergh was originally considering helming the project but now is likely to be involved in a producing capacity. Che is not yet set up at a studio, but if Soderbergh continues his involvement, one likely possibility is that Warner Bros. Pictures might step in.

The studio houses Section Eight, the production company headed by Soderbergh and partner George Clooney. At this point, however, neither Warner nor Section Eight is part of the picture.


Holy shit.  If that's true...  Man, I hope that's true.

Ghostboy

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #20 on: July 17, 2003, 10:07:43 AM »
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This is exciting to the max. All of Malick's films are brilliant. The Thin Red Line was my introduction to him...it completely blew me away. Between him and Kubrick (who was still alive at the time), I was like "Hot damn, I think I need to become a reclusive director."

dufresne

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #21 on: July 18, 2003, 01:51:58 AM »
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in finally saw Days of Heaven a month ago and it blew me away.  I love this guy.
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jokerspath

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #22 on: July 21, 2003, 10:39:51 AM »
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Oh Christ, this better happen...

aw
THIS IS NOT AN EXIT

ono

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #23 on: November 14, 2003, 05:07:54 PM »
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Holy fleurking schnit.  I just watched Badlands.  What an awe-inspiring movie.  It's so slow, so dreamy, so eerie, so strange.  You've never seen a film like this before.  You've never seen characters like this before.  They're despicable.  They drift through life without any purpose.  They're stupid.  Yet, you can't help but like them.  And the cinematography is orgasmically delicious.  Soderbergh, The Coens, and Malick: three geniuses with brilliant debut films.  (PTA, too, but that goes without saying.  ;))  Anyone who wants to make a film should really, REALLY see how this is done.  Because in all the struggling for style and standing out, there's nothing like seeing a story told well and in a leisurely fashion.  Sadly, I don't think much would be made of a film like this these days.  It's way too ponderous for most people to appreciate.

godardian

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #24 on: November 14, 2003, 05:20:44 PM »
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Quote from: Onomatopoeia
Holy fleurking schnit.  I just watched Badlands.  What an awe-inspiring movie.  It's so slow, so dreamy, so eerie, so strange.  You've never seen a film like this before.  You've never seen characters like this before.  They're despicable.  They drift through life without any purpose.  They're stupid.  Yet, you can't help but like them.  And the cinematography is orgasmically delicious.  Soderbergh, The Coens, and Malick: three geniuses with brilliant debut films.  (PTA, too, but that goes without saying.  ;))  Anyone who wants to make a film should really, REALLY see how this is done.  Because in all the struggling for style and standing out, there's nothing like seeing a story told well and in a leisurely fashion.  Sadly, I don't think much would be made of a film like this these days.  It's way too ponderous for most people to appreciate.


Unfortunately, that's probably true. Badlands is really wonderful, though. Probably my favorite Malick, though Days of Heaven is something, too.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

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ono

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #25 on: November 14, 2003, 05:27:27 PM »
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By the way, what is the theme song for Badlands called?  It's such a great little ditty, but I can't seem to find it anywhere.  I think the credits said "Migration" by James Taylor, but that doesn't seem to help.  Is that correct?

godardian

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #26 on: November 14, 2003, 05:45:49 PM »
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Quote from: Onomatopoeia
By the way, what is the theme song for Badlands called?  It's such a great little ditty, but I can't seem to find it anywhere.  I think the credits said "Migration" by James Taylor, but that doesn't seem to help.  Is that correct?


No, it is a section of "Musica Poetica" by Carl Orff, a classical piece also used in Lynne Ramsay's Ratcatcher (a film that stands with anything by Malick- if you love Malick, you'll probably love it), and also Gus van Sant's Finding Forrester (blech- but he did use the music).
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

MacGuffin

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #27 on: November 14, 2003, 06:13:20 PM »
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Quote from: godardian
Quote from: Onomatopoeia
By the way, what is the theme song for Badlands called?  It's such a great little ditty, but I can't seem to find it anywhere.  I think the credits said "Migration" by James Taylor, but that doesn't seem to help.  Is that correct?


No, it is a section of "Musica Poetica" by Carl Orff, a classical piece also used in Lynne Ramsay's Ratcatcher (a film that stands with anything by Malick- if you love Malick, you'll probably love it), and also Gus van Sant's Finding Forrester (blech- but he did use the music).


Now go watch "True Romance" and you'll see where Hans Zimmer's inspiration for that score came from.
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classical gas

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #28 on: November 15, 2003, 05:47:40 AM »
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okay, i've never seen a film by this guy and i consider myself to be a cinephile.  is he really that great?  compared with....the other great directors.  how would you guys place him and his movies among others?  i need some modivation to see his films....

godardian

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Re: Terrence Malick
« Reply #29 on: November 15, 2003, 01:11:52 PM »
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Quote from: classical gas
okay, i've never seen a film by this guy and i consider myself to be a cinephile.  is he really that great?  compared with....the other great directors.  how would you guys place him and his movies among others?  i need some modivation to see his films....


He belongs to a naturalist-photogenic school that includes Nic Roeg, Hal Ashby, some Robert Altman, bits of Pakula... very seventies, very Easy Riders, Raging Bulls. An extremely visual director. He's definitely "in" with the seventies zeitgeist, in my view.

David Gordon Green hasn't nearly reached the confidence and assurance that Malick had, but he owes him a huge debt for tone, tempo, and lighting/compositional influence.

Any true cinephile should at least have seen Badlands, if not all three of his films. I mean, how easy is it for people who will watch a dozen films by one director to keep up with one who only made three in a twenty-five year career?
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

 

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