Author Topic: Cannes  (Read 13634 times)

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SiliasRuby

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2009, 04:30:21 PM »
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SPECIAL SCREENINGS
"L'epine dans le coeur," France, Michel Gondry


What's this?

it's this.

- he has been shooting a documentary for a few years about his auntie who was a schoolteacher, shooting footage at various tiny schoolhouses she has worked at during her life.  he is now in the process of editing it.

he's finished.
and thats why you are the best.
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MacGuffin

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2009, 03:40:21 PM »
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Martin Scorsese guides Cannes Classics
Lineup includes films by Godard, Antonioni, Visconti
Source: Hollywood Reporter

PARIS -- Helmer and cinema historian Martin Scorsese will serve as honorary president of the sixth annual Cannes Classics sidebar at next month's Festival de Cannes, organizers said Tuesday.

This year's lineup will feature the works of such familiar names as Jean-Luc Godard ("Pierrot le Fou"), Michelangelo Antonioni ("L'avventura"), Luchino Visconti ("Senso") and Jacques Tati ("Mr. Hulot's Holiday"), while Scorsese will personally present a restored version of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's 1948 title "The Red Shoes."

Scorsese's nonprofit World Cinema Foundation will present three films: Edward Yang's "A Brighter Summer Day" (1991), Shadi Abdei Salam's "Al-Momia" (1969) and Emilio Gomez Muriel and Fred Zinnemann's "Redes" (1936).

Other special screenings include "To Hell and Back, Memories of Henri-Georges Clouzot," Serge Bromberg's recomposition of lost footage from Clouzot's mythical 1964 shoot of "L'Enfer"; and unseen footage from Ingmar Bergman home movies in "Images From the Playground," restored by Stig Bjorkman.

Cannes Classics also will celebrate Joseph Losey's 100th birthday with a Joseph Losey Centenary section complete with screenings of "Accident" (1967) and a new print of "Don Giovanni" (1979).

A list of Cannes Classics titles follows:

"The Red Shoes"
Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (1948, U.K.)

"To Hell and Back, Memories of Henri-Georges Clouzot"
Serge Bromberg (1964's "L'enfer")

World Cinema Foundation entries:

"A Bright Summer Day"
Edward Yang (1991, Taiwan, unseen version)

"Al-Momia"
Shadi Abdel Salam (1969, Egypt)

"Redes"
Emilio Gomez Muriel and Fred Zinnemann (1936, Mexico)

"Images From the Playground" (Sweden)
Stig Bjorkman -- Restoration of Ingmar Bergman home movies

Joseph Losey Centenary

"Accident"
Joseph Losey (1967, U.K.)

"Don Giovanni"
Joseph Losey (1979, Italy)

Documentaries on filmmaking

"Les deux de la vague"
Antoine de Baecque and Emmanuel Laurent

"Pietro Germi: Il Bravo, Il Bello, Il Cattivo"
Mario Bondi

A selection of restored and new prints:

"L'Avventura"
Michelangelo Antonioni (1960, Italy)

"An Uns Glaubt Gott Nicht Mehr"
Axel Corti (1982, Austria)

"Giu La Testa" (Once Upon a Time ... the Revolution)
Sergio Leone (1971, Italy)

"Loin du Vietnam" (Far From Vietnam)
Joris Ivens, William Klein, Claude Lelouch, Agnes Varda, Jean-Luc Godard, Chris Marker, Alain Resnais (1967, France)

"Pierrot le fou"
Jean-Luc Godard (1965, France)

"Prince Yeonsan"
Shin Sang-ok (1961, South Korea)

"Senso" (Livia)
Luchino Visconti (1954, Italy)

"Les vacances de M. Hulot" (Monsieur Hulot's Holiday)
Jacques Tati (1953, France)

"Victim"
Basil Dearden (1961, U.K.)

"Wake in Fright"
Ted Kotcheff (1971, Australia)

"Les yeux sans visage" (Eyes Without a Face)
Georges Franju (1960, France)
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Skeleton FilmWorks

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2009, 12:29:51 AM »
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It has begun!

Stefen

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #18 on: May 14, 2009, 12:40:29 AM »
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So Up was screened today. Any early word?

I know the one we're waiting for is Inglorious Basterds but I think that's on the last day of the festival. I'm really curious about Antichrist and Broken Embraces. Also Taking Woodstock + more.

Cannes this year is fucking stacked.
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Re: Cannes
« Reply #19 on: May 14, 2009, 01:00:10 AM »
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Hollywood Reporter says it's tha bomb

Film Review: Up
By Michael Rechtshaffen, May 12, 2009 10:57 ET

Bottom Line: Pixar again raises the bar to wondrous new heights.
More Cannes reviews

Given the inherent three-dimensional quality evident in Pixar's cutting-edge output, the fact that the studio's 10th animated film is the first to be presented in digital 3-D wouldn't seem to be particularly groundbreaking in and of itself.

But what gives "Up" such a joyously buoyant lift is the refreshingly nongimmicky way in which the process has been incorporated into the big picture -- and what a wonderful big picture it is.

Winsome, touching and arguably the funniest Pixar effort ever, the gorgeously rendered, high-flying adventure is a tidy 90-minute distillation of all the signature touches that came before it.

It's also the ideal choice to serve as the first animated feature ever to open the Festival de Cannes, considering the way it also pays fond homage to cinema's past, touching upon the works of Chaplin and Hitchcock, not to mention aspects of "It's a Wonderful Life" "The Wizard of Oz" and, more recently, "About Schmidt."

Boxoffice-wise, the sky's the limit for "Up."

Even with its PG rating (the first non-G-rated Pixar picture since "The Incredibles"), there really is no demographic that won't respond to its many charms.

The Chaplin-esque influence is certainly felt in the stirring prelude, tracing the formative years of the film's 78-year-old protagonist, recent widower Carl Fredricksen (terrifically voiced by Ed Asner).

Borrowing "WALL-E's" poetic, economy of dialogue and backed by composer Michael Giacchino's plaintive score, the nostalgic waltz between Carl and the love of his life, Ellie, effectively lays all the groundwork for the fun stuff to follow.

Deciding it's better late than never, the retired balloon salesman depletes his entire inventory and takes to the skies (house included), determined to finally follow the path taken by his childhood hero, discredited world adventurer Charles F. Muntz (Christopher Plummer).

But he soon discovers there's a stowaway hiding in his South America-bound home in the form of Russell, a persistent eight-year-old boy scout (scene-stealing young newcomer Jordan Nagai), and the pair prove to be one irresistible odd couple.

Despite the innate sentimentality, director Pete Docter ("Monsters, Inc.") and co- director-writer Bob Peterson keep the laughs coming at an agreeably ticklish pace.

Between that Carl/Russell dynamic and Muntz's pack of hunting dogs equipped with multilingual thought translation collars, "Up" ups the Pixar comedy ante considerably.

Meanwhile, those attending theaters equipped with the Disney Digital 3-D technology will have the added bonus of experiencing a three-dimensional process that is less concerned with the usual "comin' at ya" razzle-dazzle than it is with creating exquisitely detailed textures and appropriately expansive depths of field.


SiliasRuby

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #20 on: May 14, 2009, 11:04:42 PM »
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Variety also loved it...
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MacGuffin

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #21 on: May 15, 2009, 03:41:40 PM »
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Scorsese touts film preservation at Cannes

CANNES, France (Reuters) - Oscar-winning director Martin Scorsese on Friday unveiled a pact to release and promote restored, classic films at festivals, schools and online to broaden the audience for old masterpieces.

The World Cinema Foundation, which "The Departed" director founded and chairs, will now work with B-Side Entertainment and The Auteurs to release and promote films the WCF has restored.

"Restoration is meaningful only if people can see the work," Scorsese told reporters at the Cannes film festival where a new version of 1948's "The Red Shoes" will screen.

The WCF expects to premiere its titles at Cannes, the world's largest film festival, and afterward B-Side will tour them at festivals, museums, universities and movie clubs, as well as get them on websites like Apple's iTunes and Netflix.

The Auteurs will help promote the films to wider audiences online through its social networking website that it labels an "online movie theater."

Finally, the titles will be made available on DVD and in special editions through an established partnership with home entertainment company The Criterion Collection.

Restoration is a huge issue in the film industry because master copies of classic titles have either deteriorated to the point where they are no longer usable or they don't exist at all, anymore.

Scorsese said almost 90 percent of U.S. silent movies are gone, and originals of classic titles such as Orson Welles' "The Magnificent Ambersons" (1942) no longer exist.

It is important for generations of young filmgoers raised on a diet of Hollywood action flicks like "The Terminator" to see classic titles, Scorsese said, because it may inspire them to greater heights where making cinematic art is concerned.

"The more audiences see these films, the more they want to see other films like them, and then what happens is the audience changes which means the movies that are being made change," Scorsese said. "There is an audience for special movies, and good movies, for a different way of looking at the world -- and not just blockbusters."

"The Red Shoes" is one of those titles. Made in 1948 by co-directors Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, it tells of a young ballerina who longs to dance at the highest level of her art. The movie has long been considered a masterpiece that has inspired other filmmakers. Scorsese said he saw it for the first time when he was 8 years-old.
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Re: Cannes
« Reply #22 on: May 21, 2009, 01:54:01 PM »
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Director Haneke looks at roots of terror at Cannes

CANNES, France (Reuters) - Strange and menacing events in a north German village on the eve of World War One form the basis of Austrian director Michael Haneke's new film "The White Ribbon," on show at the Cannes film festival.

The film uses a group of children growing up in a morbidly repressive environment of religious hypocrisy and sexual abuse to look at the generation that made Nazi Germany.

But Haneke, whose last film at Cannes was the widely acclaimed "Cache" (Hidden), said he meant to illustrate a wider problem that did not just affect Germany.

"I don't want the film just to be taken as a film about fascism," he told a news conference.

"It was about telling the story of a group of children who take on absolutely the ideals that are preached to them by their parents," he said.

"And whenever you take an ideal in absolute terms, you make it inhuman. It's the root of any form of terrorism," he said.

The White Ribbon was applauded at its press screening and is seen as a contender for the Palme d'Or award, the top competition prize, which has so far eluded Haneke, despite repeated critical successes.

The film opens with an unexplained accident and goes on to show a series of mysterious occurrences that appear related in some way to the children of the village, who behave throughout with an unsettling mixture of subservience and secrecy.

A barn is burned down, children go missing and are found tied up and abused and the local baron is caught up in a feud with one of the peasant families who depend on him.

As the story unfolds, the self righteous cruelty inflicted by the local pastor on his family or the brutality of a local doctor toward his lover add to the uneasy feeling of threat and guilt that lies over the idyllic village.

Burghart Klaussner, the actor who plays the village pastor, said he had welcomed the chance to explore the kind of character who had stamped the world of his own childhood and youth.

"I was very glad finally to be able to play the kind of person whose impact -- in my own family and in society at large -- I felt often in the aftermath of World War Two," he said.

Haneke shot the film in black and white and said he had taken pains in casting the film to find actors whose physical appearance fit in with the images that have survived in photographs from the time.

"It's been burned into our brains, a world in black and white," he said of the contemporary imagery, adding that avoiding the "one-to-one naturalism" of color photography, allowed him to create a slightly alienated, distant feel.

Like other Haneke films, The White Ribbon leaves much unexplained and ends on an ambiguous note that makes its ultimate meaning a matter of interpretation.

"It's the duty of art to ask questions, not to provide answers," he said. "And if you want a clearer answer, I'll have to pass."
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Re: Cannes
« Reply #23 on: May 24, 2009, 11:16:40 PM »
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Cannes Film Festival prize winners

CANNES, France - Awards presented Sunday at the 62nd Cannes Film Festival, chosen by a jury headed by French Actress Isabelle Huppert:

_Palme d'Or (Golden Palm): "The White Ribbon," by Michael Haneke (Austria)

_Grand Prize: "A Prophet," by Jacques Audiard (France)

_Jury Prize: "Fish Tank," by Andrea Arnold (Britain) and "Thirst," By Park Chan-wook (South Korea)

_Special Prize: Alain Resnais

_Best Director: Brillante Mendoza, "Kinatay" (The Philippines)

_Best Actor: Christoph Waltz, "Inglourious Basterds" (United States)

_Best Actress: Charlotte Gainsbourg, "Antichrist" (Denmark)

_Best Screenplay: Feng Mei, "Spring Fever" (China)

_Camera d'Or (first-time director): "Samson and Delilah," by Warwick Thornton (Australia)

_Best short film: "Arena," by Joao Salaviza (Portugal)
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


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Re: Cannes
« Reply #24 on: January 26, 2010, 12:57:14 AM »
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Tim Burton to head Cannes jury
63rd edition of festival set to run May 12-23
Source: Hollywood Reporter

PARIS -- Director Tim Burton will head from Wonderland to the French Riviera in May to preside over the jury at the 63rd Festival de Cannes, organizers said Tuesday.

Burton is no stranger to the Croisette. He was a member of the Cannes jury in 1997 and the short film jury in 2006. His "Ed Wood" biography screened at Cannes in 1995.

"After spending my early life watching triple features and 48-hour horror movie marathons, I'm finally ready for this," Burton said of the honor, adding: "When you think of Cannes, you think of world cinema. And as films have always been like dreams to me, this is a dream come true."

Burton has 14 feature films under his belt, including hits such as "Beetlejuice" and "Edward Scissorhands." His upcoming 3D adaptation of Lewis Carroll's "Alice in Wonderland" will hit U.S. theaters March 5 before its Gallic release April 7. 

After last year's 3D "Up" opener, Cannes president Gilles Jacob and his team are once again embracing the animation genre.

"It's the first time an artist whose origins are in animation will preside over the jury of the Festival de Cannes," Jacob said. He added: "We hope his sweet madness and gothic humor will pervade the Croisette, bringing Christmas to all. Christmas and Halloween."

The Festival de Cannes is set to run May 12-23, and its official selection will be announced in mid-April.
“Don't think about making art, just get it done. Let everyone else decide if it's good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” - Andy Warhol


Skeleton FilmWorks

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #25 on: April 15, 2010, 02:00:55 PM »
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Quote
Opening film
Ridley Scott – ROBIN HOOD (Out of Competition)

In Competition
Mathieu Amalric – TOURNÉE
Xavier Beauvois – DES HOMMES ET DES DIEUX
Rachid Bouchareb – HORS LA LOI
Alejandro González Iñárritu – BIUTIFUL
Mahamat-Saleh Haroun – UN HOMME QUI CRIE (A Screaming Man)
IM Sangsoo – HOUSEMAID
Abbas Kiarostami – COPIE CONFORME
Takeshi Kitano – OUTRAGE
Lee Chang-dong – POETRY
Mike Leigh – ANOTHER YEAR
Doug Liman – FAIR GAME
Sergei Loznitsa – YOU. MY JOY
Daniele Luchetti – LA NOSTRA VITA
Nikita Mikhalkov – UTOMLYONNYE SOLNTSEM 2
Bertrand Tavernier – LA PRINCESSE DE MONTPENSIER
Apichatpong Weerasethakul – LOONG BOONMEE RALEUK CHAAT
(Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives)

Un Certain Regard
Derek Cianfrance – BLUE VALENTINE (1st film)
Manoel De Oliveira – O ESTRANHO CASO DE ANGÉLICA (Angelica)
Xavier Dolan – LES AMOURS IMAGINAIRES (Heartbeats)
Ivan Fund, Santiago Loza – LOS LABIOS
Fabrice Gobert – SIMON WERNER A DISPARU… (1st film)
Jean-Luc Godard – FILM SOCIALISME
Christoph Hochhäusler – UNTER DIR DIE STADT (The City Below)
Lodge Kerrigan – REBECCA H. (RETURN TO THE DOGS)
Ágnes Kocsis – PÁL ADRIENN (Adrienn Pál)
Vikramaditya Motwane – UDAAN (1st film)
Radu Muntean – MARTI, DUPA CRACIUN (Tuesday, After Christmas)
Hideo Nakata – CHATROOM
Cristi Puiu – AURORA (Aurora)
Hong Sangsoo – HA HA HA
Oliver Schmitz – LIFE ABOVE ALL
Daniel Vega – OCTUBRE (1st film)
David Verbeek – R U THERE
Xiaoshuai Wang – RIZHAO CHONGQING (Chongqing Blues)

Out of Competition
Woody Allen – YOU WILL MEET A TALL DARK STRANGER
Stephen Frears – TAMARA DREWE
Oliver Stone – WALL STREET - MONEY NEVER SLEEPS

Midnight Screenings
Gregg Araki – KABOOM
Gilles Marchand – L'AUTRE MONDE (Blackhole)

Special Screenings
Charles Ferguson – INSIDE JOB
Sophie Fiennes – OVER YOUR CITIES GRASS WILL GROW
Patricio Guzman – NOSTALGIA DE LA LUZ (Nostalgia For The Light)
Sabina Guzzanti – DRAQUILA – L'ITALIA CHE TREMA
Otar Iosseliani – CHANTRAPAS
Diego Luna – ABEL (1st film)
Helen O'Hara

Hong Sangsoo's new film is titled Ha Ha Ha.  Love it.  Weerasethakul's film's title's English translation is Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. Love it.  New Lee Chang-dong?  Love it.

Doug Liman in competition?  Well, alright.  Good luck sir.

Alexandro

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #26 on: April 15, 2010, 02:07:38 PM »
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I'm happy for OCTUBRE cause daniel vega is a good friend of mine from peru and that film has been in the making for AGES. I'm also familiar with the work of the screenwriter of ABEL (Diego Luna's film) and he writes some funny shit, so it will probably be good if not great.


Gold Trumpet

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #27 on: April 15, 2010, 03:39:58 PM »
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Lodge Kerrigan returning finally with a new film is a good thing. Apparently Julian Schnabel was offered Miral out of competition but he turned it down and will debut his film at Venice now. Of course, Terrance Malick couldn't finish Tree of Life in time so he would have been an easy front runner and now the field is wide open. The Guardian is reporting that Oliver Stone's Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps will close the festival.

Captain of Industry

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #28 on: April 15, 2010, 04:13:27 PM »
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Oh shit.  I was reading Lodge Kerrigan but my mind was saying Ken Loach, for some reason.  That is great news.

Reinhold

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #29 on: April 19, 2010, 02:24:48 AM »
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a short i worked on is going to the market this year... anybody else got anything headed Cannes-ward? Mac?

(yeah yeah, i know... i'm NOT a big deal.)
Obviously what you are doing right now is called (in my upcoming book of psychology at least) validation. I think it's a normal thing to do. People will reply, say anything, and then you're gonna do what you were subconsciently thinking of doing all along.

 

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