XIXAX Film Forum

The Director's Chair => The Director's Chair => Topic started by: Duck Sauce on February 01, 2003, 08:29:30 PM

Title: Godard
Post by: Duck Sauce on February 01, 2003, 08:29:30 PM
Playing off of my embarrassment of never seeing any Godard movies, I have decided that I have waited long enough. Recommend me the best Godards.
Title: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on February 01, 2003, 08:58:15 PM
I'm not a Godard expert at all. But my recommendation is to start with the first Godard and most straight forward of them all, Breathless. Then look through his classics of the 60s and watch movies like My Life to Live and Weekend. But, start with Breathless for sure.

~rougerum
Title: Godard
Post by: Cecil on February 01, 2003, 11:13:44 PM
Quote from: The Gold Trumpet
I'm not a Godard expert at all. But my recommendation is to start with the first Godard and most straight forward of them all, Breathless. Then look through his classics of the 60s and watch movies like My Life to Live and Weekend. But, start with Breathless for sure.

~rougerum


im a godard nut and i agree with that 100%.
Title: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on February 02, 2003, 03:18:07 PM
If Cecil gives permission on something Godard, then it must be right.

~rougerum
Title: Godard
Post by: Rudie Obias on February 02, 2003, 04:35:23 PM
i love BREATHLESS but the first godard film i saw was BAND OF OUTSIDERS.  that's also my favorite, i don't know anyone who hasn't seen and didn't have a crush on odile (anna karina).  also ALPHAVILLE and CONTEMPT are good.  if you like watching godard films you should also check out  françois truffaut's THE 400 BLOWS, JULES AND JIM and FAHRENHEIT 451.

enjoy!

*rudie*
Title: Godard
Post by: Duck Sauce on February 02, 2003, 05:49:05 PM
Quote from: rudieob
if you like watching godard films you should also check out  françois truffaut's THE 400 BLOWS, JULES AND JIM and FAHRENHEIT 451.


I have, with great delite.
Title: Godard
Post by: Ghostboy on February 02, 2003, 10:04:33 PM
I haven't seen too many Godard movies. Breathless and Alphaville...which are both terrific. Oh, and his latest, In Praise Of Love, which is so vague that it's hard to form an opinion on it. Did anyone else see it when it sped through theaters last fall?
Title: Godard
Post by: Cecil on February 03, 2003, 01:27:32 AM
Quote from: Ghostboy
I haven't seen too many Godard movies. Breathless and Alphaville...which are both terrific. Oh, and his latest, In Praise Of Love, which is so vague that it's hard to form an opinion on it. Did anyone else see it when it sped through theaters last fall?


i saw it. pretty good.
Title: godard films
Post by: soixante on February 03, 2003, 09:01:59 PM
I have been watching nothing but Godard films the past month, so I'd like to offer some recommendations.  I would concentrate on his 1960 to 1967 output (15 movies).  Breathless, My Life to Live, Band of Outsiders, Pierrot Le Fou, Alphaville, Weekend and Every Man For Himself are the best ones, in my opinion.
I haven't seen A Married Woman, Two or Three Things I Know About Her, or La Chinoise in many years, but I remember liking them, and I hope someone puts them out on DVD soon.
11 of his films are available on DVD:  Breathless, Le Petit Soldat, Une Femme Est Une Femme, Vivre Sa Vie, Les Carabiniers, Le Mepris, Band A Part, Alphaville, Pierrot Le Fou, Prenom Carmen, Soigne Ta Droit.
Title: Godard
Post by: Ernie on February 14, 2003, 07:34:53 PM
I saw Breathless first, fell in love with it, bought it, bought the poster...took a break...blind bought Band of Outsiders, watched it and loved it.

That's as far as my Godard timeline goes so far man. See Breathless and Band of Outsiders. I'm sure they are not his only cool films but they're the only ones I can really recommend.
Title: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on February 14, 2003, 08:06:51 PM
I finally got the criterion dvd of Band Of Outsiders. I must say, of all the Godard films i've seen, I enjoyed this one the most and was most enthralled by it. The film had a very rare narrative and visual poetry that seemed so seemless and authentic but yet speaking in a film language of artificiality that didn't intrude for the most part. I do have quibbles about the film, and that was my general annoyance with the voice over. Yes, I understand it plays in part to the concept of adapting the pulp novel to screen and trying to show it in the film, but it intrudes way too much of the natural feeling of the movie and just the pure story. When I was excited to see so much explained through facial gestures and actions, I was dissapointed for a lot of questions to be answered with a few sentences. It didn't really flow with the film. I don't mind trickery and felt the minute of silence sequence was absolutely perfect in showing the lack of patience these men have and also letting the audience know that the film had a freedom to it. I just wished the trickery would be spread far and wide so the audience would be gripped by the story and come to be astounded when the film showed them something new. But, a bigger focus on trying to be helpful to the flow of the story. That's all though, but really, a magnificent Godard movie.

~rougerum
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on March 13, 2003, 02:18:40 PM
I've been hitting Godard hard for the last two months -- reading every book on/by him, watching whatever is available for rent. I must say, though I don't recommend it be the first of his to watch, My Life To Live is by far and away the most amazing Godard film. Other movies that are great right off the bat are: Band Of Outsiders, Pierrot Le Fou, Le Petit Soldat (probably his most underrated), and A Woman Is A Woman. Ones that take a few viewings, but definitely deliver: Contempt (a must-buy on Criterion), Alphaville, Masculin Feminin, Breathless (for some reason I had to watch this twice to love it...??). And check out La Carabiniers too, if you like anti-war films, it's about as anti-war as they come.

Can someone seriously try and tell me that Weekend is actually as good as the above mentioned films? I know it's important, but do you actually get the same joy out of watching it as the earlier Godard? Personally, I liked First Name:Carmen better than Weekend.
Title: Godard
Post by: cine on April 07, 2003, 12:09:55 AM
Both really good films but I'd personally vote "Weekend" over "First Name: Carmen" for the traffic jam scene alone.
Title: Godard
Post by: cowboykurtis on April 07, 2003, 12:12:57 AM
ALPHAVILLE -- I LOVE YOU
Title: Godard
Post by: Ernie on April 21, 2003, 07:31:30 PM
Quote from: cowboykurtis
ALPHAVILLE -- I LOVE YOU


Saw that on Sundance awhile ago -- LOVED IT! Can't wait to buy it.

Contempt is on my netflix list...doesn't  the Casino soundtrack have an excerpt from it's score??? If it does, I'm renting it next...anything Scorsese likes is cool.
Title: Godard
Post by: cowboykurtis on April 21, 2003, 07:33:06 PM
Quote from: ebeaman69
Quote from: cowboykurtis
ALPHAVILLE -- I LOVE YOU


Saw that on Sundance awhile ago -- LOVED IT! Can't wait to buy it.

Contempt is on my netflix list...doesn't  the Casino soundtrack have an excerpt from it's score??? If it does, I'm renting it next...anything Scorsese likes is cool.


i love contempt SO much. jack palance is fucking hilarious in it. the criterion disc is definately worth the cash.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on April 21, 2003, 07:52:57 PM
yes, i believe that is right about the Scorsese using the score......he also put up his own cash to help get the film restored.

========================
mixing the hitchcock thread with this one for you ebeaman. scorsese loves Vertigo. i remember reading a forward by him in one of the books on it. see that. it is my favorite film.
Title: Godard
Post by: MacGuffin on April 21, 2003, 08:18:05 PM
Quote from: bigideas
scorsese loves Vertigo. i remember reading a forward by him in one of the books on it.

(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0312264097.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg)
Title: Godard
Post by: Victor on April 21, 2003, 11:18:16 PM
the score for contempt is one of my favorite scores. it just gets in your grill and doesnt let go.
Title: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on April 21, 2003, 11:29:02 PM
I really didn't care much for Alphaville at all. Minimal work by Godard that plays out like bad science fiction in having limited imagination and just repeating a general scientific idea like the difference between a society of freedom and one of not. It ran its course in showing how the world was not open and all, when it could have identified that in the first 5 minutes and realized talking about it so generally is not interesting. Anna Karina, just even looking at her face, is worth while though.

~rougerum
Title: Godard
Post by: cowboykurtis on April 21, 2003, 11:33:45 PM
Quote from: The Gold Trumpet
I really didn't care much for Alphaville at all. Minimal work by Godard that plays out like bad science fiction in having limited imagination and just repeating a general scientific idea like the difference between a society of freedom and one of not. It ran its course in showing how the world was not open and all, when it could have identified that in the first 5 minutes and realized talking about it so generally is not interesting. Anna Karina, just even looking at her face, is worth while though.

~rougerum


i liked it for the very reason you disliked it -- i think the whole feeling of "bad science fiction" was intentional and is what made it soo fun. the interesting part of it is you have this hard boiled detective character thrown into a science fiction plot -- i fucking love it.
Title: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on April 22, 2003, 09:22:34 AM
If it was intential, then I would have liked to see the movie have more fun with the idea instead of trying to play it serious. Playing serious just makes the material believe the quality of what it is showing. Band of Outsiders also seemed to be adapting bad literature, but played with it in a great different way in making it much like a silent film with moments of pure freedom and dealing with a kind of realism in the sloppiness of things humans do that can't really be drawn out in most novels, because they do seemed planned out. I didn't feel anything new or exciting to Alphaville to make it stand out in such a refreshing way in juncture with bad literature.


~rougerum
Title: Godard
Post by: Ernie on April 22, 2003, 03:17:25 PM
Quote from: cowboykurtis
Quote from: The Gold Trumpet
I really didn't care much for Alphaville at all. Minimal work by Godard that plays out like bad science fiction in having limited imagination and just repeating a general scientific idea like the difference between a society of freedom and one of not. It ran its course in showing how the world was not open and all, when it could have identified that in the first 5 minutes and realized talking about it so generally is not interesting. Anna Karina, just even looking at her face, is worth while though.

~rougerum


i liked it for the very reason you disliked it -- i think the whole feeling of "bad science fiction" was intentional and is what made it soo fun. the interesting part of it is you have this hard boiled detective character thrown into a science fiction plot -- i fucking love it.


This is exactly what I thought too...I'm not saying that just to side with anybody on the matter. This really was exactly what I thought from the first time I saw it. There's no way some of the stuff in that movie was meant to be taken seriously...but it's all fucking awesome.
Title: Godard
Post by: Ernie on April 22, 2003, 03:20:07 PM
Quote from: bigideas
yes, i believe that is right about the Scorsese using the score......he also put up his own cash to help get the film restored.

========================
mixing the hitchcock thread with this one for you ebeaman. scorsese loves Vertigo. i remember reading a forward by him in one of the books on it. see that. it is my favorite film.


Oh, cool man, thanks. I've always wanted to see that, now more than ever cause of Scorsese's name even being in the same sentence as the movie...I'm going to blind buy Contempt now.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on April 22, 2003, 07:21:46 PM
i meant that Vertigo was my favorite movie. i bought the Contempt Criterion and it's pretty cool. you may want to rent Contempt first(if possible) since it'll be close to 40 bucks though.
Title: Godard
Post by: modage on January 20, 2004, 09:10:52 PM
just watched My Life To Live.  i did not like it at all.  how the hell did this make the top 15 over Amelie or Big Lebowski?
Title: Godard
Post by: cine on January 20, 2004, 10:48:34 PM
Quote from: themodernage02
just watched My Life To Live.  i did not like it at all.  how the hell did this make the top 15 over Amelie or Big Lebowski?

 :evil:
Title: Godard
Post by: Pubrick on January 20, 2004, 10:58:21 PM
Quote from: themodernage02
just watched My Life To Live.  i did not like it at all.  how the hell did this make the top 15 over Amelie or Big Lebowski?

i havn't seen it.

i assumed it was the godard film of the moment to be watching in film schools across the nation.
Title: Godard
Post by: SHAFTR on January 20, 2004, 11:05:06 PM
Quote from: themodernage02
just watched My Life To Live.  i did not like it at all.  how the hell did this make the top 15 over Amelie or Big Lebowski?


b/c it's better.
Title: Godard
Post by: modage on January 20, 2004, 11:15:05 PM
Quote from: SHAFTR
b/c it's better.

how?  what is better about it?  what is even good about it?
Title: Godard
Post by: SHAFTR on January 21, 2004, 12:58:00 AM
Quote from: themodernage02
Quote from: SHAFTR
b/c it's better.

how?  what is better about it?  what is even good about it?


http://www.xixax.com/viewtopic.php?t=1414&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=210

2nd post Up (from the bottom) onward.
Title: Godard
Post by: classical gas on January 21, 2004, 02:42:31 AM
i was going to make my case for this film, but i think the above link provided by shaftr makes my point...
of course, there's nothing wrong in not liking the film, but i personally love it.  maybe godard is an acquired taste....and i'm really not trying to be snobbish here...really any film director can be an acquired taste.
i like godard for the new reality he put into films...Pierrot le fou is a good example...
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on January 21, 2004, 08:56:30 AM
I think it's one of the most perfect films ever made.

Most Godard's take me a few watchings. The first time I saw Vivre Sa Vie, I was wired and stayed up most of the night, pacing the room, and thinking "that's exactly how I wanna make films"...
Title: Godard
Post by: modage on January 21, 2004, 12:03:19 PM
well, i happen to agree with GT on this one.  i just didnt enjoy watching the movie, (and i liked Breathless and Contempt).  but i think that personally, film is an entertainment medium, where you can still get ideas across, but it should be in a way that is firstly interesting to watch.  i didn't find the film to be very interesting.  i dont want to watch somebody writing a letter for 8 minutes or somebodys back for 10, and have some hasty resolution come out of nowhere with no drama.  shit, if all the film does is thumb its nose at convention, i could go out right now and film a movie entirely upsidedown where everyone speaks a made up language because that would really BREAK THE RULES.  but that doesnt mean anyone will want to watch it?  does it?  i guess if i'm not interested in the characters, then it doesnt matter to me WHAT the film did for history, cause it just doesnt interest me enough to find out what makes it important.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on January 21, 2004, 12:10:49 PM
I don't think of it so much as breaking the rules to break the rules, but more as making up new, better rules that are fresh and interesting.

When Godard cuts to a CU in this film, it means so much more to me and produces such a greater emotional reaction than in the countless thousands of movies I see where they use standard set-ups and cutting, and are ALWAYS showing various CU's. Also, I find the 12 tableau division to be a great way of structuring an episodic story. I hope at least you found the cafe conversation interesting...?? :oops:
Title: Godard
Post by: modage on January 21, 2004, 12:21:52 PM
i did not HATE the film.  i just didnt enjoy it.  i felt the most emotionally for the character at the beginning of her journey, and the longer he told the story the less i felt because it was being done in such a way to drain any investment in the character.  so by the time the resolution came around i practically laughed it off.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on January 21, 2004, 12:30:57 PM
*spoileroos*

Yeah, he's using the good old Brechtian distancing there. I'm kinda happy it ends like that. There's no sappy-pappy bunk going on. Instead we get the pulpy, almost fake-looking instant ending. Basically because we're told she's in for it twice before in the film. That last tableau is like an afterthought "because it's gotta end that way" kinda thing. For me, the story ends in the cafe section, then the film about a film idea ends with the oval portrait section.
Title: Godard
Post by: godardian on January 21, 2004, 01:11:51 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
*spoileroos*

Yeah, he's using the good old Brechtian distancing there. I'm kinda happy it ends like that. There's no sappy-pappy bunk going on. Instead we get the pulpy, almost fake-looking instant ending. Basically because we're told she's in for it twice before in the film. That last tableau is like an afterthought "because it's gotta end that way" kinda thing. For me, the story ends in the cafe section, then the film about a film idea ends with the oval portrait section.


I hear the French version lingered on the last shot- Karina's body shot down tragically in street- for a good two minutes, and the American one leaves it short. Anyone else heard this? I wonder if the old Vivre sa Vie Criterion laserdisc is the "original" or the American version?

Godard is anything but sentimental, but I find a good deal of tenderness in Vivre sa Vie. The police interrogation scene and the scene at The Passion of Joan of Arc are among my favorites in the film, because you do see that emotion, and it's part of what's going on- Godard just has a bigger picture in mind, and he doesn't limit himself to that. In a way he's talking about the characters and situations, in a way he's talking about the lawlessness of the human spirit (which would lead to the many "political" interpretations of the film), and in a way he's talking about the relationship between the audience and the film. In a way, he's challenging the "completeness" of any film by leaving in what's left out of most narrative fictions, and giving it to us in evenly divided fragments- his film may seem arbitrary, but he's simply calling attention to the arbitrariness at the heart of any made-up story while still giving credence to the need to tell them. This is a very similar impulse to the nouveau roman novelists, like Robbe-Grillet, who were coming to prominence at the time. "Why, exactly, is one thing "interesting" and fit for a fictional narrative, and another isn't?" That also ties in with Andrew Sarris's thing about "It's not the what, it's the how."
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on January 21, 2004, 01:31:47 PM
Truffaut once said he was interested in the stuff that happened after the scene ended.

One of the delights of Tarantino's films is he shows you the "in-between" stuff -- rather than just showing hired killers or professional thieves doing their jobs, he shows them waiting, philosophizing in restaurants, etc.

As for My Life to Live, it is the most emotionally powerful film Godard has made.  Usually, Godard's films are an intellectual experience, and this one was too, but I also felt genuine sadness at the end.  There is a genuine sense of a loss of innocence.
Title: Godard
Post by: SHAFTR on January 21, 2004, 05:14:46 PM
modernage, what about Gerry?  Did you enjoy that film...to me that lingered way beyond the fact and just became extremely boring.

Some more tidbits about My Life to Live I enjoyed.
In his early films, Godard likes to play with the Hollywood conventional endings and he does so here as well.  She is a prostitute so she must die...it's her punishment according to hollywood.

Also, the last section with Godards voice reading the (story or poem, not remembering) about painting an image of your wife, etc.  Interesting.
Title: Godard
Post by: MacGuffin on January 21, 2004, 05:36:43 PM
Quote from: SHAFTR
modernage, what about Gerry?  Did you enjoy that film...


Quote from: In the Bottom Ten - 2003 thread, themodernage02
allow me to revise my list and remove Spider (since it was 2002), and replace it with probably (trying not to exaggerate) the worst movie i've ever seen in my entire life Gerry.

10. once upon a time in mexico
9. the matrix revolutions
8. daredevil
7. the singing detective
6. jeepers creepers 2
5. irreversible
4. northfork
3. t3: rise of the machines
2. house of 1000 corpses
1. gerry

what a piece of shit. i dont even know where to begin.  first of all, the only reason anyone is sitting through this 100 minutes of garbage in the first place is that its Gus Van Sant and has 'real stars' in it.  if this exact EXACT same movie were made by some kid in college and starred his two buddies.  not only would no one be talking about how good it was, but no one would be able to sit through it EVER.  no studio would look at it and agree to put it out, no one would give them another job to ever work again after watching it.  it was terrible.  

i was prepared for a movie with no story about two guys wandering around talking about nothing.  i was not prepared for unbroken shots that went on for 10 minutes and more that contained no talking or a still camera.  if i want to look at a photograph ill do that.  when i want to watch a movie, you better fucking have somebody talking or move the camera or SOMETHING.  tell me a fucking story already!??  i dont want to watch somebodys art project, i want to see a movie.  

this is an example of the absolute worst 'independent film' has to offer.  a fucking bullshit 'art' movie with two assholes wandering around the desert.  how so many of you were tricked into thinking that this was in any way 'good' i have no idea.  who are you kidding?! this thing blew the hardest of any movie ever.
Title: Godard
Post by: modage on January 21, 2004, 05:46:39 PM
so, in summary, i enjoyed Gerry immensely.  

but, no like i said above (about My Life To Liv), i didn't hate the film.  (at a brisk 85 minutes, i barely had time to register that i didnt care for it, until it was almost over), so i didnt hate it.  i just didn't think it was very good.  i couldnt relate to the characters, because the filmmaker seemed to not take them seriously, and that forced me out of believing in the film.  macguffin, have you seen this, and if so, what did you think?

also, this ties into my SECOND QUESTION in my 'what makes a film great' thread.  is a film great because it IS, or because of what it does?  if i had seen this in the 1962 or whenever it came out, i might've loved this movie, but as it may have influenced tons of movies i DO like, it is neccesary for the doors it helped to open.  however, looking back on this movie, its hard for me to see what made it so important because i've seen other movies that took ideas from this one.  does that make any sense?
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on January 21, 2004, 10:01:13 PM
i love the film.
part of it might be that it was my first time to see Anna Karina *wowsers*
i love the camera work. i wonder how the gunshot / coffe shop editing was done? at first, i thought he had just removed a few frames, but when i watched it slowly, it looks like alternate shots from different distances.

and i love when she's writing about herself and measures her height like she's doing "itsy bitsy spider"
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on January 22, 2004, 09:09:49 AM
Quote from: themodernage02
so, in summary, i enjoyed Gerry immensely.  

but, no like i said above (about My Life To Liv), i didn't hate the film.  (at a brisk 85 minutes, i barely had time to register that i didnt care for it, until it was almost over), so i didnt hate it.  i just didn't think it was very good.  i couldnt relate to the characters, because the filmmaker seemed to not take them seriously, and that forced me out of believing in the film.  macguffin, have you seen this, and if so, what did you think?

also, this ties into my SECOND QUESTION in my 'what makes a film great' thread.  is a film great because it IS, or because of what it does?  if i had seen this in the 1962 or whenever it came out, i might've loved this movie, but as it may have influenced tons of movies i DO like, it is neccesary for the doors it helped to open.  however, looking back on this movie, its hard for me to see what made it so important because i've seen other movies that took ideas from this one.  does that make any sense?


Oh yeah, that makes sense. It's like, I know that Nosferatu (the original) and Metropolis have influenced a ton of films I like, yet, watching those two movies, I wanna gouge my eyes out from boredom.

But I certainly think that Vivre Sa Vie IS a great film, and DOES things that make it great, all at the same time. I really wanna make movies like this now, with this exact type of feeling, but something tells me modern audiences wouldn't stomach it, or they'd say "it's so amatuerish, the guy doesn't know what he's doing".

I'm prepping a feature, and a buddy of mine from LA wants to produce it. So I'm trying to tell him how I want the script to look and feel. I made him watch Band Of Outsiders. He phones me and goes "yeah, there's lots of cool stuff, but if you just set up the tripod like Godard, and it's not even level, I'm gonna fucking kill you". And when I say stuff like "it doesn't really matter if the tripod isn't on the exact eyeline, or it isn't exactly level, or the dolly is bumpy, or we don't cut into a CU on the emotional moment, it doesn't have to look or cut crisp like a commercial"...  he thinks I'm crazy. :)

Godard sets us all free...
Title: Godard
Post by: modage on January 22, 2004, 11:15:33 AM
oh well.  no biggie.  Band Of Outsiders is up next...
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on January 22, 2004, 06:52:50 PM
Quote from: themodernage02
oh well.  no biggie.  Band Of Outsiders is up next...


i've seen Breathless, My Life to Live and Contempt......i like them all......is it safe to say i should just go ahead and buy the B of O Criterion?
i'm a little leery of Alphaville since there are no extras.

another good thing about My Life to Live - the Fox Lorber DVD is around 9 bucks!
Title: Godard
Post by: modage on January 22, 2004, 07:36:25 PM
but its cropped.  FULL-SCREEN!
Title: Godard
Post by: ShanghaiOrange on January 22, 2004, 07:47:21 PM
Well, Godard likes to defy genre conventions.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on January 22, 2004, 10:10:35 PM
Quote from: themodernage02
but its cropped.  FULL-SCREEN!


i'm guessing that was the original ratio. Shoot the Piano Player is widescreen and it's done by Fox Lorber. for me FL is awesome because there are no good rental places here with any decent foreign films. so.....for me to see them, i have to buy them.......(i might have to try out  Net Flix).......of course i would prefer a Criterion one, but if Fox Lorber didn't make these, how would we see them? i guess i would have to bid on eBay for a crappy VHS copy.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on January 23, 2004, 08:50:44 AM
Yes, 1.33:1 is the correct ratio for Vivre Sa Vie.
Title: Godard
Post by: cron on January 23, 2004, 11:06:44 AM
hey, check this out, nothing newsworthy but interesting still.

Jean-Luc Godard
French Cinema's Reluctant Genius Makes Incomprehensible Films Appreciated by Tiny Audiences, and He Has No Intention of Changing
by Scott Kraft
Cigar Aficionado magazine, September/October 1997

The town of Rolle, on the shores of Lake Geneva, is the kind of stern, no-questions-asked place that makes Switzerland the hideaway of choice for so many people who have been made rich and famous by the movies. The French filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard makes this his home even though, as it happens, he is neither rich nor famous. Rather, Godard is known. Known and unknown, in fact, but we'll get to that shortly. Here in this quiet village, the reclusive maestro finds his creative space.

With some difficulty, I find the short, featureless apartment building where Godard lives and works. The sun has just set on his narrow street and I grope through a dark foyer to find his door. At my knock, Godard himself answers. The man many regard as the genius of twentieth century French cinema is a slightly built 66-year-old, standing about 5-foot-6 with wild gray hair thinning on top, long sideburns and a day or two's growth of beard. A tweed jacket and large, dark-rimmed glasses give him the air of a college professor. Wordlessly, he leads me up a short flight of stairs to his office and settles behind a wooden desk, bare save for an old green pencil sharpener and a rotary dial telephone.

He holds up a long, slim Cohiba and asks, "Ca vous derange?" (Would it bother you?) Assured that it wouldn't, Godard lights the cigar with a single stick match, letting the smoke rise, and intones softly, now in English, "Let's start."

Thus begins a rare, three-hour-long interview that evokes nothing so much as a Jean-Luc Godard film, with jump cuts and sharp diversions, thoughtful ruminations on life and bright insights into the state of what the French call "the cinema" and its dour future.

"I never understand why I am remembered, why I am still known," he says, reflecting on why I have come to see him. Eventually, he offers an answer of sorts. "I think only just because, at the beginning, I was doing something that people liked. I think I'm proving by my existence that I am still very alive, and that making a good picture is still possible. Maybe that's why I still have a name. But I'll always wonder why I'm known, because nobody sees my movies. Well, almost nobody."

Jean-Luc Godard is one of the best-known names in film history even though, as he correctly surmises, his audiences are small. His name is synonymous with the boldest, and most inaccessible, of French film. He still makes movies as nobody else does, and critics still enjoy dissecting them. But it isn't easy. Although a treasured French icon, he is viewed, even in France, as someone who toils just outside the bounds of conventional filmmaking. He is a relic from the days when the most popular movies made audiences do some of the work, and his films are often incomprehensible, even for his fans. For Godard, "interesting" has always been high praise.

"I'm always doing what is not done," he says. "What I never do is what everyone else is doing. I always begin with ideas and that doesn't help with the audience. But I always prefer a good audience. I'd rather feed 100 percent of 10 people. Hollywood would rather feed 1 percent of 1 million people. Commercially speaking, my way is not better."

A walk past the movie houses on the Champs-Élysées in Paris confirms that. American movies, and especially blockbusters, are the ones selling most of the tickets. Last year, the top-grossing movies in France included The Hunchback of Notre Dame, Independence Day, Mission Impossible and Seven. Diabolique, starring Sharon Stone, the American remake of a 1955 French thriller, sold 171,471 tickets in its first three weeks in 1995. That was nearly three times the box office for Godard's 1994 feature film, Hélas pour Moi (Unfortunately for Me), which had the drawing power of Gerard Depardieu in the lead role.

"It is more difficult to attract audiences today," Godard says. "Of course, it has always been difficult. The people interested in good movies are very disseminated, and it doesn't make a good audience. My audience has always been small and it's even smaller now. So to exist you have to make a fuss at festivals and things."

For the French, filmmaking remains a part of the culture, irrespective of mass appeal. Many in France blame Hollywood's skillful marketing for killing the film industry in Europe. But it remains very much alive in France, due in part to government subsidies of films, a practice that draws cries of "unfair competition" from Hollywood. But helping fund films hasn't made them more popular. In the United States, foreign movies, whether dubbed or subtitled, have an appeal limited mostly to art houses. Moviegoers in America, and elsewhere in the world, criticize French films as being difficult to follow, self-conscious and too short on action.

Godard believes that it is the world's moviegoers, and not the filmmakers, who have changed. They prefer big-budget Hollywood spectaculars and they rely on the big screen to escape, rather than to discover universal truths. "Movies are not as good as they should be," Godard says. "Actors work, but they don't know how to be better. And people don't find in the French movie the things that interest them. Even when they find them, the material is too difficult. They prefer an American movie. The world audience has become an American audience.

"These days a 'good movie' is defined as one that makes money," he adds. "In literature, never. In movies, always. Culture is business. Art is something different."

But, obviously, Godard admits, French directors are not giving people "what they need in the way they need it." And it's only because of French subsidies that the industry survives. "We're like sick people being given medicine to survive," he says. "We're surviving, but until when? Nobody knows. As long as the hospital lasts, the sick people will survive."

In a career that has spanned four decades, Godard has made more than 100 films and directed France's most celebrated actors, from Depardieu to Brigitte Bardot. But only one film, Breathless, his first feature, was a financial and critical success.

"All the other ones were not good results," Godard says. "There was a lot of praise and glory, aesthetic glory. But they weren't commercially successful."

Breathless, known in French as A Bout de Souffle, captured the world's attention when it opened in 1959, earning Godard a place in the New Wave of French directors, alongside Eric Rohmer and the late François Truffaut. The black-and-white film starred the handsome young Frenchman Jean-Paul Belmondo as a young hoodlum undone by his love for an American girl, played by the French-speaking American actress Jean Seberg. "A generation of film critics had their lives changed by that film," Variety said.

At the time, Godard was 29 years old, writing film essays for Cahiers du Cinema, the most influential film journal of its time. The New Wave filmmakers, most of whom, like Godard, had begun as film critics, expanded the bounds of film theory and proved that it was possible to make interesting pictures inexpensively.

After Breathless, Godard made such New Wave classics as Une Femme est une Femme (A Woman is a Woman), in 1961, and Pierrot le Fou (Pierrot the Fool), in 1966. Segments of his early films, from the mid-scene jump cuts in Breathless to the 10-minute tracking shot of a summer traffic jam in the 1967 film Weekend, remain an important part of modern cinematic technique.

Since 1974, Godard, working often with his companion and co-director, Anne-Marie Mieville, has broken new ground with works that fuse film and video. Once content to playfully mock Hollywood stories, he has moved into devastating critiques of politics, capitalism and image making.

Godard's films open and close in France these days with barely a whisper. One of his more recent feature films, Hélas pour Moi, starred Depardieu as a man whose body is taken over by God. The Paris daily newspaper Le Figaro reviewed it under the headline: "Hélas pour Nous" ("Unfortunately for Us"). It sold 70,000 tickets in France, a respectable run, due largely to Depardieu's following. By comparison, the top-grossing French film of all time, the 1993 comedy Les Visiteurs, has sold 13 million tickets.

Godard calls Hélas pour Moi "a complete flop." "It was 100 percent for 1,000 people, that's all." He blames that on Depardieu, who was contracted to work for six weeks and left after four, leaving most of the work to extras. "The fight was lost from the beginning. It was too hard to make," Godard says. "It could have been a good movie if Depardieu was willing to try. But he was not interested in the movie, in working to make it right. Of course, he said, 'Godard is a genius.' He was just making it for my name." But, Godard adds, without Depardieu, he couldn't have gotten the $2 million financing.

However, when Hélas pour Moi opened at a French film festival in New York in 1995, The New York Times praised both the film and Depardieu's performance. The movie "is not easy to slip into, but the rewards are profound," the review said. Stuart Klawans, writing in The Nation, called the film, with its "delirious collage effect," "so beautiful, playful, heartbroken, hopeful, multilayered and elusive that I'd better drop it at once." Of course, that is the problem with Godard. His films can be so difficult that the audiences give up, leaving it to the critics and students of film to praise and appreciate.

An example is Godard's JLG by JLG (Jean-Luc Godard by Jean-Luc Godard), which earned good notices when it appeared in American art houses in 1995. Godard says the film is not an autobiography but a "self-portrait," showing, accurately, the director living a life of quiet anonymity. "Now, at my age, I'm finally able to make a self-portrait that is faithful to what I think," he says. The New Yorker film critic Terrence Rafferty described the action in JLG this way: "He seems to be working on a script, but if he is, the process is indistinguishable from depression. He's restless, solitary, wary; the artist at work looks like a lonely child consoling himself with imaginary friends. Even while you're being seduced by Godard's vision of himself, part of you is saying, 'Come off it.' What's wonderful about JLG is that, as it turns out, Godard is saying the same thing to himself."

Jean-Jacques Beneix, whose 1981 film Diva was one of the few French successes in U.S. release, says Godard "is like an elite. It's not cinema anymore. It's Godard. His films are part of him." Sitting in his office in Rolle, though, Godard isn't much for introspection. Asked for an assessment of his career, he says: "I won't speak of success. Sometimes I feel I'm doing well. Sometimes not."

The son of a Red Cross doctor, Jean-Luc Godard was born Dec. 3, 1930, in Paris. He attended the prestigious Lycée Buffon and studied at the Faculte des Lettres, the leading Paris arts university, though he never received a degree. At age 19, he began writing film critiques for the Gazette du Cinema and later for Cahiers du Cinema. Two years later, he left for a yearlong journey across North and South America and, returning to Europe, rejoined the staff of Cahiers du Cinema in 1956 and began directing short films. Among those early works were Tous les Garçons s'Appelent Patrick (All the Boys Are Named Patrick), with a screenplay by his friend Eric Rohmer, and Une Histoire d'Eau (A History of Water), with a screenplay by François Truffaut.

Breathless was his first feature film and it won him the best director prize at the Berlin Film Festival in 1960. France has decorated him as a Chevalier of the National Order of Merit and, in 1987, with an honorary Cesar, the French equivalent of the Oscar.

He has been married twice, to the actress Anna Karina in 1961 and to Anne Wiazemsky, the granddaughter of the French writer François Mauriac, in 1967. Both marriages ended in divorce, with no children.

Although Godard maintains an office in Paris, which he visits frequently, he prefers the solitude of Switzerland these days. "My mind is in France, even though my body is here," he says. He is a man without pretension. He toils in his second-floor office in Rolle, beneath a poster for Le Mepris (The Contempt), which starred Brigitte Bardot. He takes his meals alone or with Mieville, his longtime girlfriend, in the local hotel. In his view, when you become a media celebrity "you are destroyed."

"I'd like to have done all sorts of films, to have been in all films, to be known and unknown. To do everything," Godard says. "I'd like to be one of the filmmakers who discovered sound," he adds, veering down a new road. "But I'd also like to have known the sadness of those people who discovered sound. Now I have that feeling, too--that feeling that I'm being thrown out. Because it's Apple computers that are doing movies today. Not me."

When it comes to dealing with the public, Godard can have sharp mood swings. He will spend hours with a young film student one day, and not answer his phone the next. He didn't show up for a retrospective of his work in New York, but appeared at a roundtable discussion in France on the future of cinema.

For years, he has smoked Cohibas, which run about $20 apiece in Switzerland, though he is a languid practitioner of that art. During our interview, he had to relight his cigar a dozen times, finally finishing it after three hours. Smoking expensive Cuban cigars would seem to be his only bourgeoisie weakness, and it's not one he chooses to discuss. Asked later, by telephone, to talk about his evident love of cigars, he demurs. "I'm not in the mood to answer questions," he says. His assistant in Paris explains that Godard is depressed over his film Forever Mozart. He had waited until just before shooting to write the script, as is his custom. (He also is known for encouraging actors to ad-lib their lines.)

Forever Mozart turned out to be a devastating portrait of French intellectuals wringing their hands over the war in Bosnia but doing nothing to help end it. The movie had its world premiere during a film festival in Sarajevo last year. "Before showing my film in Strasbourg, capital of Europe, I wanted to give it to Sarajevo, capital of suffering," Godard says. "It was the people of Sarajevo who inspired this film." The reactions in Sarajevo, though, were typically mixed: some in the audience praised it as evocative and powerful, while a few people walked out, finding it too dense and bloody. Godard himself couldn't make the Sarajevo opening, having been called upon at the last minute to take over the male lead in Nous Sommes Tous Encour Ici (We Are All Still Here), a film being shot under the direction of Mieville.

Most of his movies these days are funded by Gaumont, the French cinema chain, and Canal Plus, the French cable movie channel. Although his films are not box-office hits, he completes them in six weeks and they cost less than most television movies, about $2 million each, so they usually break even. "When someone gives me 10 million francs [about $2 million] to make a movie, I never say it's not much," Godard says. "I can still spend 10 million francs and do something interesting. Then you discover that it is a lot of money. Of course, if you hire 40 people and want a helicopter in the Sahara, you can't do it."

Godard doesn't think much of actors, especially those who he says are more interested in reading lines than in creating lines. He expects his actors to be willing to collaborate with him in the pursuit of art; hence his reluctance to begin with a firm script. He is, in fact, most truly at home in the editing room, which makes him something of a dinosaur in the business. "With television and computers, the art of editing has disappeared," he says. "Now there are just lawyers and agents. It's over for me. I still have the same enthusiasm, though not the same strength. It's very physically exhausting, making movies. I'm more tired."

In 1995, France marked the 100th anniversary of the first film shown by the Lumière brothers to a paying audience. In celebration after celebration, French film industry leaders have patted themselves on the back for their rich history.

Godard, ever the paradox, doesn't buy it. For him, the history of cinema is a story of failure, brought on by the pursuit of profits. "The child is suffocating under the sweets," he once told a French newspaper interviewer. "I don't see what we are celebrating. Cinema is ultra-celebrated. I think it is the celebration of an idea that has died in those who celebrate it. They want to believe it is alive, but they are the dead ones.

"Before the war," he tells me, "there was a difference between bad American movies and bad Swedish movies and bad French movies. But, little by little, America has taken over world culture. American culture is all over. Blue jeans. Cigarettes. It's too much. I think we should have the right to bad Spanish movies, not only bad American movies. I have nothing against blue jeans. I just don't like them on everyone. It's too disgusting."

That dour view of cinematic history comes through clearly in Histoire(s) du Cinema, a two-part video documentary Godard directed several years ago. The series was greeted with interest, but also bafflement, in France. In the United States, Katherine Dieckman, writing in the magazine Art in America, described it as "expansive, densely layered and elegiac--at once an idiosyncratic version of film history and a brooding autopsy of it."

In a strange way, though, Godard seems to love film's failure as well as its success. "I like everything in movies," he says. "The old Indian movies, the dreadful Hollywood production. There is such a circus. That's why I'm still well known, because I'm probably the only one who loves movies in every sense."

The problem for all moviemakers today, Godard says, is the information explosion. "Pictures no longer bring anything new to the audiences, because they have it 100 times a day on TV," he says. "It's like flowing water. The only thing left is to show more truth about people's lives, but they don't want the truth about that."

Godard doesn't see as many movies as he'd like, holed up in Rolle for most of the year. But he still loves the medium. His favorite directors include Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock and, like every true Frenchman, Jerry Lewis, "a great director and a great character actor. Brilliant. A huge clown. I loved Hardly Working." But of Steven Spielberg, Godard says: "It's all fakery. It's false. I know the difference between Beethoven and Spielberg. I know why the dinosaurs disappeared. And Beethoven was a dinosaur." In other words, the true artists are facing extinction.

The gulf between Hollywood and Godard is really the difference between escapism and truth. Godard has said that film is "the truth 24 times a second," and he believes that Hollywood has buried cinema's search for truth beneath the search for marketable "concepts." Most American directors "are like orphans," he says. "They have no parents, no history. There's no story, so they have to invent one. I was always accused of doing pictures with no plot. But a picture is first a story, second a story and third a story. The Americans just spread their stories all over the world, hoping that a majority of the audience will buy them the history they don't have."

Tired of answering questions, Godard places the rest of his cigar in an ashtray. Putting on a trench coat, he heads into the dark Swiss night to a nearby restaurant, where the genius of French cinema dines alone with his dark thoughts.
Title: Godard
Post by: ono on January 26, 2004, 07:54:10 PM
I just saw Vivre sa vie.  Spoilers possible.  Where did that 83 minutes of my life go?  Such pretentious boredom ensued from the moment I popped the DVD in.  There were only two scenes worth noting in this lifeless film: the one where the man explains to Nana how life as a prostitute works, and the one where she dances in the billiard hall.  It provided some much needed life to this film, but it wasn't enough to really pick it up.

Like mod-age, I didn't hate the film.  I just didn't care.  It was full of long shots of people not doing anything, backs of people's heads, off-kilter framing, and people philosophizing about, well, nothing.  I did learn one important lesson from this film: if you're going to try to be philosophical, don't put the philosophy in the foreground or you'll bore your audience to tears.  GT is right: film is not a medium for conveying ideas directly.  It's too sparse.  It's not a novel.  The idea should be the undercurrent only, and should be uncovered by attentive audiences.  It should not be what the entire film is about, or the film will be empty.

The people in this film talk, and talk, and talk, and Nana becomes a philosopher ... and then she DIES!  It's so incredibly ... well, I won't even say infuriating because I didn't care about her all too much ... but frustrating could be a word.  But I can see where Polanski stole the ending from his crappy film Chinatown from.  Well, sort of.

I guess from what I've said above, I've been rather harsh, but I guess it's because the people of Xixax have agreed that this is one of the best fifteen films of all time.  I object.  On what could you all possibly base this on?  Useless, rather obvious fact: Anna and Nana are anagrams.  This film is nowhere near in the realm of the wonderfulness of The Big Lebowski and Amelie (two films that continue to baffle me as to why they were shafted).  Eyes Wide Shut, too, but Kubrick got his kudos.  "I demand a recount."  **½ (6/10)
Title: Godard
Post by: cine on January 26, 2004, 08:05:14 PM
Quote from: Onomatopoeia
I just saw Vivre sa vie. Where did that 83 minutes of my life go?  

 :cry:
Title: Godard
Post by: ono on January 26, 2004, 08:13:50 PM
Care to elaborate on that ":("?  I mean, I definitely want to hear from people who love the film explain why they think it's so great.  I try to keep an open mind about these things.
Title: Godard
Post by: cine on January 26, 2004, 09:15:13 PM
Well did you enjoy Breathless?
Title: Godard
Post by: ono on January 26, 2004, 09:22:45 PM
It was alright.  I liked it better than My Life to Live, but I thought it, too, had the same problems, and it did a worse job overall of keeping my interest than this did.  That sounds rather contradictory, I know.  Problem is, I don't remember enough about Breathless to be able to say much about it.  I seem to recall I wasn't too fond of Breathless' ending.  The most interesting part of that film, though, was the long conversation inside the hotel room, but like I said, it's all a bit too blurry for me now.
Title: Godard
Post by: SHAFTR on January 26, 2004, 09:32:21 PM
Quote from: Cinephile
Well did you enjoy Breathless?


I love Breathless.
Title: Godard
Post by: cine on January 26, 2004, 09:57:20 PM
Quote from: SHAFTR
Quote from: Cinephile
Well did you enjoy Breathless?


I love Breathless.

As do I. Some people love Godard, some people don't. It's depressing when people don't like Godard's great pictures of the early French New Wave period. But to each his own.
Title: Godard
Post by: SHAFTR on January 26, 2004, 10:01:57 PM
Quote from: Cinephile
Quote from: SHAFTR
Quote from: Cinephile
Well did you enjoy Breathless?


I love Breathless.

As do I. Some people love Godard, some people don't. It's depressing when people don't like Godard's great pictures of the early French New Wave period. But to each his own.


I guess, even when they are wrong  :?
Title: Godard
Post by: modage on January 26, 2004, 10:10:29 PM
Quote from: Onomatopoeia
This film is nowhere near in the realm of the wonderfulness of The Big Lebowski and Amelie (two films that continue to baffle me as to why they were shafted).  Eyes Wide Shut, too, but Kubrick got his kudos.  "I demand a recount."  **½ (6/10)

i would like to know who voted for this, other than those here already passionately defending it, (and why).  i am shocked that it made the top 15, when i had scarcely even heard of it before this board.  and it was the only one of the 50 i hadnt seen.
Title: Godard
Post by: SHAFTR on January 26, 2004, 10:13:02 PM
Quote from: themodernage02
Quote from: Onomatopoeia
This film is nowhere near in the realm of the wonderfulness of The Big Lebowski and Amelie (two films that continue to baffle me as to why they were shafted).  Eyes Wide Shut, too, but Kubrick got his kudos.  "I demand a recount."  **½ (6/10)

i would like to know who voted for this, other than those here already passionately defending it, (and why).  i am shocked that it made the top 15, when i had scarcely even heard of it before this board.  and it was the only one of the 50 i hadnt seen.


although I enjoy The Big Lebowski, to even think it even touches the realm of Godard's My Life to Live (or Breathless or Band of Outsiders) baffles me.
Title: Godard
Post by: ono on January 26, 2004, 10:15:18 PM
Quote from: SHAFTR
although I enjoy The Big Lebowski, to even think it even touches the realm of Godard's My Life to Live (or Breathless or Band of Outsiders) baffles me.

Yet no one yet has given us any reason why Vivre sa vie is so great, whereas I could write pages on The Big Lebowski or Amelie if asked.  That's all I'm asking is for; some sort of justification.  I've read some of the stuff SNT and godardian have said for it, and some of what GT has said against it, but I just really want someone to be specific for a moment.
Title: Godard
Post by: SHAFTR on January 26, 2004, 10:20:58 PM
Quote from: Onomatopoeia
Quote from: SHAFTR
although I enjoy The Big Lebowski, to even think it even touches the realm of Godard's My Life to Live (or Breathless or Band of Outsiders) baffles me.

Yet no one yet has given us any reason why Vivre sa vie is so great, whereas I could write pages on The Big Lebowski or Amelie if asked.  That's all I'm asking is for; some sort of justification.  I've read some of the stuff SNT and godardian have said for it, and some of what GT has said against it, but I just really want someone to be specific for a moment.


In GT's thread, I thought I was pretty specific about what I loved about the film.
Title: Godard
Post by: Sleuth on January 26, 2004, 10:33:13 PM
Quote from: Cinephile
Well did you enjoy Breathless?


*sigh*
Title: Godard
Post by: cine on January 26, 2004, 10:50:45 PM
Quote from: Slorg
Quote from: Cinephile
Well did you enjoy Breathless?


*sigh*

Problem with the question?
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on January 26, 2004, 11:30:32 PM
no that was an exhale
Title: Godard
Post by: Pubrick on January 27, 2004, 12:55:51 AM
breathless i could understand if it made it cos it's good and many hav seen it.

my life to live prolly got in there cos of the snob factor, it must be doing the rounds in film schools or sumthing. just like PDL made it cos of the "boogie nights is too ancient to vote for and i hav no memory" crowd..
Title: Godard
Post by: SHAFTR on January 27, 2004, 01:12:13 AM
Quote from: P
breathless i could understand if it made it cos it's good and many hav seen it.

my life to live prolly got in there cos of the snob factor, it must be doing the rounds in film schools or sumthing. just like PDL made it cos of the "boogie nights is too ancient to vote for and i hav no memory" crowd..


for the record, Punch-Drunk Love is fast becoming my favorite film, and I still think it's PTA's best.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on January 27, 2004, 08:54:53 AM
Quote from: P
breathless i could understand if it made it cos it's good and many hav seen it.

my life to live prolly got in there cos of the snob factor, it must be doing the rounds in film schools or sumthing. just like PDL made it cos of the "boogie nights is too ancient to vote for and i hav no memory" crowd..


*sigh*

No, no, no... y'know, there is the possibility that My Life To Live is just a damn fine masterpiece, and deserves to be on the list. We never got to watch any Godard in film school. They made us watch The Big Chill, and Butch Cassidy, and most of the other students went to all the new movies in the theatre. All my Godard watching came 2 years after film school, when I decided to actually watch some movies, not just the usual stuff. People may not like My Life To Live, but there's no fucking reason to pick this one, of all on the list, to harp on. It's stood the test of time, it's regarded as a masterpiece of world cinema. Quite honestly, I didn't even think it would get on the list. I hadn't really talked to anyone about it, but it's always been my favorite Godard. I figured 8 1/2 might have a chance, because of the Criterion dvd, which brought many more to it than if it would have been an obscure alt video rental. But for the few hardcore fans of Godard on the board, for My Life To Live to make it, must say something about the quality and staying power of this movie, at least among his fans. Breathless may have been hugely influencial on cinema, but it is an amateur hack job compared to My Life To Live. And the list wasn't "most influential" anyway, we were picking our favorites.

So enough with the snob comments. They're derogatory, and they're hurtful.  :wink:
Title: Godard
Post by: Sleepless on January 27, 2004, 09:37:10 AM
Haven't seen My Life To Live, but since the discussion on here I've ordered it and looking forward to seeing it myself. Only seen five Godard films so far - and although all the books etc focus on Breathless, there is a huge gap between that and Bande A Part. Shall return with informed opinion soon...
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on January 27, 2004, 01:36:13 PM
My Life to Live is my favorite Godard film.  While it is detached in terms of technique and storytelling (breaking the story into episodes that give it a sense of Brechtian distancing), it is also Godard's most emotionally engaging film, due to Karina's wonderful performance, and the sense of doom that descends upon the loss of innocence.  Karina's character is rather naive and blase about sexual depravity, yet the full realization of the error of her ways hits her (and the viewer) in a particularly strong way.  Then there is the whole issue of pimps and prostitutes as a comment on the capitalist economic system.
Title: Godard
Post by: ono on January 27, 2004, 03:35:27 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
No, no, no... y'know, there is the possibility that My Life To Live is just a damn fine masterpiece, and deserves to be on the list.

Why?
Quote from: SoNowThen
People may not like My Life To Live, but there's no fucking reason to pick this one, of all on the list, to harp on.

Why?
Quote from: SoNowThen
It's stood the test of time, it's regarded as a masterpiece of world cinema.

Why?

Color me dense, but I still don't get it.  How can you possibly put this film in the same ranks as the other complex and layered works on the list?
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on January 27, 2004, 03:47:41 PM
At the risk of repeating myself (because I've gone over this in 3 threads now), I'll PM you.

And it'll be why I like the movie. If you want critical reactions, check out Sontag's and Sarris' essays on it. They talk about the intellectual stuff much better than I ever could, but I'll give you my emotional blah blah.

Fair?


Oh, and as a side note, I think at least two of the top 15 are totally bunk and don't belong there, but I'm not harping on about it or challenging the films. Not liking something personally does not a bad film make...
Title: Godard
Post by: Henry Hill on January 27, 2004, 05:44:41 PM
BREATHLESS and CONTEMPT are both great films. I have never even heard of MY LIFE TO LIVE. there must be some inner-circle type conspiricy going on in  xixax in regards to said LIFE. i can't believe it made the list myself.
Title: Godard
Post by: Sleepless on February 02, 2004, 09:36:35 AM
Does anyone know where I can get a copy of Une Femme Mariee from? I've looked on amazon, ebay... no luck. Any ideas?
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on February 02, 2004, 09:40:51 AM
Keep checking ebay. I was looking this weekend, and they had a surge of hard-to-find Godard tapes. I think it's catch as catch can. Didn't see Femme Mariee though...
Title: Godard
Post by: modage on February 19, 2004, 10:57:48 PM
i have a question and it may seem sort of stupid/naive, but here it is.  because this is my theory.  did godard really set out with his first film or two to break all the rules and such?  like, was it intentional from the very start.  or was he just somebody who decided 'hey i'm going to make a movie too', and did.  except for he didnt have a clue how to, and it was littered with errors and such like jump cuts because he really wasnt aware of them or how to tell a story coherently.  because like, fellini, in his early efforts you can see understands how to tell a basic story, and later gets weirder with his narrative etc., but godards early movies (from what i've seen) just seem like maybe he didnt know HOW to play by the rules and when his movies came out and were critically acclaimed it was a sort of pat on the back to keep going in that direction.  like, 'oh yeah, i'm trying to break all the rules!' you know (happy accidents)?  like taking it further.  because his later movies like contempt seem to be more straighforward as far as understanding how movies are made but earlier ones ive seen Band of Outsiders, Alphaville, My Life to Live, Breathless seem like a guy who didnt really know how to make a 'normal' movie if he wanted to.  and these 'mistakes' became good because they broke rules and freed up filmmakers etc.  does anybody see what i'm talking about?
Title: Godard
Post by: godardian on February 20, 2004, 01:07:56 AM
Quote from: themodernage02
i have a question and it may seem sort of stupid/naive, but here it is.  because this is my theory.  did godard really set out with his first film or two to break all the rules and such?  like, was it intentional from the very start.  or was he just somebody who decided 'hey i'm going to make a movie too', and did.  except for he didnt have a clue how to, and it was littered with errors and such like jump cuts because he really wasnt aware of them or how to tell a story coherently.  because like, fellini, in his early efforts you can see understands how to tell a basic story, and later gets weirder with his narrative etc., but godards early movies (from what i've seen) just seem like maybe he didnt know HOW to play by the rules and when his movies came out and were critically acclaimed it was a sort of pat on the back to keep going in that direction.  like, 'oh yeah, i'm trying to break all the rules!' you know (happy accidents)?  like taking it further.  because his later movies like contempt seem to be more straighforward as far as understanding how movies are made but earlier ones ive seen Band of Outsiders, Alphaville, My Life to Live, Breathless seem like a guy who didnt really know how to make a 'normal' movie if he wanted to.  and these 'mistakes' became good because they broke rules and freed up filmmakers etc.  does anybody see what i'm talking about?


The reason it's thought to be intentional on his part is because of the tremendous astuteness of his Cahiers du Cinema pieces and things he'd written/said before he ever made a film, which definitely lend credence to the generally accepted claim that he spent most of his life absolutely steeped in both cinema itself and cinematic theory. Because of his "cinematheque education" and all the time/effort he spent on cinema before he picked up a camera, it's safe to say he knew most cinematic "rules" and conventions inside and out and backwards and forwards before he made his first feature.

And he always said his films were "essays" rather than "fiction," so of course with that aim, none of the "storytelling" rules apply anyway. Godard is one of the finest and probably the single best-known avant-garde filmmaker in movie history, probably because he made features rather than shorts, a much more typical avant-garde format.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on February 20, 2004, 09:16:10 AM
The jump cuts were not planned. He had over a three hour cut of the film. He asked people, included Melville, how to shorten it, and they all said "cut out the scenes that are not necessary to the story". This bothered him, so he decided instead to just cut out arbitrary chunks here and there. Now we have the jump cut.

Thing is, like Godardian said, JLG was a (somewhat) respected critic. The reason I can respect him as a rule-breaker is that he saw ALL THE FILMS, he knew just as much or more than the top cinephiles of his time, he was a walking encyclopedia. So he knew film history, and style, upside down. He was able to take this incredible knowledge and subvert it, as opposed to his pretenders that came later, who just broke the rules without knowing the rules. Plus I think of lot of his style wallowed in that low budget life, simply out of necessity. Contempt showed he could do a polished film (if still keeping his quirky mise en scene) when he had the crew and the money.
Title: Godard
Post by: modage on February 20, 2004, 11:43:18 AM
thanks, godardian and sonowthen.  i found a quote of his that i think explains one of my problems with him.  "I don't think you should FEEL about a movie. You should feel about a woman. You can't kiss a movie."
i like feeling in my movies and thats why for me, i just cant enjoy some of his movies.  thanks for the explanation, though.
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on February 20, 2004, 12:24:18 PM
Alphaville is filled with exquisite compositions and brilliant camera movement.  Watch it with the subtitles off, and just experience it visually.  Also, My Life to Live is a very measured, highly stylized film.

Breathless took its cue from low-budget American B-movies, so it reflects that style.

Godard was working with extremely limited resources, so he made the best of what he had.
Title: Godard
Post by: Sanjuro on February 21, 2004, 02:45:41 AM
i remember him saying in the band of outsiders dvd ,something like he just shot things like that because its what looked nice to him.  its what appealed to him, what looked beautiful.  its plainly a matter of what interests you and thats what you show and how you show it.  (i think kubrick said this also regarding the controversial subjects of his films).
Title: Godard
Post by: SHAFTR on April 16, 2004, 11:52:08 AM
Le Petit Soldat is on tonight at 2am ET on Turner Classic Movies.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on April 16, 2004, 11:55:22 AM
All who haven't seen before should WATCH!
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on April 18, 2004, 02:03:32 PM
i bought the Band of Outsiders Criterion a month or so ago.
the first time i watched it, i was kinda pissed.......i felt i had kinda blown my money.
in BofO there are no compositions like in My Life to Live or Contempt, and that's one of my fav things about Godard.
then, for some reason, i decided to give it another try.
and i really loved it.....i enjoyed it so much that i watched it the next day again...it seems this happens with all New Wave films........same thing happened with Shoot the Piano Player and My Life to Live.
soooooo, so far i've seen these Godard films:
Breathless
Contempt
My Life to Live
Band of Outsiders
i actually think Breathless is my least favorite of all of them. i don't hate it, i just enjoy the others so much more.
i can't wait for the Criterion for A Woman is A Woman coming out soon. i want to see Alphaville badly, but i hate to spend that money on a disc w/o any extras........i really wonder why Criterion didn't put anything else on there......i kinda fear in the future they might though.

one thing that always jars me in Godard's films is his music editing. music never fades out or coincides with visuals......it just randomly stops.....has he ever explained this?
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on April 18, 2004, 10:57:22 PM
I don't think he's ever specifically explained it beyond the fact that he wants to use sound as something more than just a "helper" of the image. Even beyond juxtaposing the image, sound can tell it's own story. See later Godard to experience the height of crazy sound.

Buy Alphaville, you will not be sorry. The transfer alone is worth the money.

And I agree with you about Breathless: good, but not even close to his other great movies.
Title: Godard
Post by: The Silver Bullet on April 21, 2004, 05:51:41 AM
As far as I'm concerned, of the films I've seen, Godard's four-out-of-four-star masterpieces are Bande à part, Alphaville, The Little Solider and Breathless [and in that order].

I love My Life to Live and Contempt, of course, but there's distance there, a seemingly detached "coldness," that makes them harder to connect with than those other four. But, or so I suspect, that same "coldness" is probably just a misconception that one makes upon their first viewing. Both My Life to Live and Contempt are, in retrospect, very emotional films, perhaps even more emotional than the other films. Thus, I need to re-watch them both.

That said, The Little Solider is relatively cold as well and I utterly love that one...
Title: Godard
Post by: cron on May 05, 2004, 03:51:51 AM
(http://www.lesinrocks.com/picts/visuels/20045/43049.jpg)

An interview with Godard is on this week's edition of the French magazine Les Inrockuptibles.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on May 05, 2004, 09:07:43 AM
Transcribe in english, please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Title: Godard
Post by: El Duderino on May 05, 2004, 09:49:32 AM
I've never seen a Godard film. where do you think is a good place to start?
Title: Godard
Post by: cine on May 05, 2004, 09:51:07 AM
Quote from: El Duderino
I've never seen a Godard film. where do you think is a good place to start?

Breathless and then My Life to Live.
Title: Godard
Post by: cron on May 05, 2004, 10:16:10 AM
Quote from: SoNowThen
Transcribe in english, please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



As soon as I get it, of course.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on May 05, 2004, 10:19:22 AM
Yes, of course.

 8)


Oh, and Duderino, don't start with My Life To Live. Save it at least until you've seen some others.
Title: Godard
Post by: cine on May 05, 2004, 10:20:08 AM
Quote from: cronopio
Quote from: SoNowThen
Transcribe in english, please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

As soon as I get it, of course.

 :embrace:
Title: Godard
Post by: cron on May 05, 2004, 10:40:52 AM
Quote from: Cinephile
Quote from: cronopio
Quote from: SoNowThen
Transcribe in english, please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

As soon as I get it, of course.

 :embrace:


(http://www.beavis-butthead.ru/images/capture/spit.jpg)


hehe, i'm just funnin' ya
Title: Godard
Post by: SHAFTR on May 05, 2004, 11:18:52 AM
Quote from: El Duderino
I've never seen a Godard film. where do you think is a good place to start?


i normally try to start chronologically with directors.
Title: Godard
Post by: El Duderino on May 05, 2004, 01:45:24 PM
Quote from: SHAFTR
Quote from: El Duderino
I've never seen a Godard film. where do you think is a good place to start?


i normally try to start chronologically with directors.


i never thought of that, it is a good idea, maybe i'll do that or maybe i'll do the list SoNowThen sent me. hmm.....decisions that change your life. :?
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on May 05, 2004, 01:46:33 PM
Chronological is a great idea.


It's not a rule I would apply to many directors, but with Godard it would work out well.
Title: Godard
Post by: El Duderino on May 05, 2004, 01:47:23 PM
then it's settled!  :-D
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on May 05, 2004, 07:56:08 PM
dont watch hail mary first
Title: Godard
Post by: Ordet on May 26, 2004, 04:14:07 PM
So we know Bergman thinks Godard is boring and snobbish. What does Luke think of Ingie? Did he ever review him in Cahiers? anythinh would be nice.
Title: Godard
Post by: Ordet on May 26, 2004, 04:17:09 PM
iT JUST HIT ME THERE SHOULD BE A MOVIE

BEEF
FILM DIRECTORS
Title: Godard
Post by: SHAFTR on May 26, 2004, 06:13:03 PM
Quote from: Roman Cibeles
So we know Bergman thinks Godard is boring and snobbish. What does Luke think of Ingie? Did he ever review him in Cahiers? anythinh would be nice.


I like how you just nicknamed Jean Luc Godard 'Luke'.  Are you two bros?
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on June 14, 2004, 10:38:29 PM
i just put in my order for the Criterion of A Woman is a Woman.
i'm so excited......and i just can't hide.it.......i'm about to lose.....
that's enough.

i don't want to rehash the thread, so if this film has been talked about........eh, fahget aboud it..........your mind might have changed between now and then..........so, what do/did you think of A Woman is a Woman? i have yet to see it, but i shall contribute after i watch it.
Title: Godard
Post by: The Silver Bullet on June 15, 2004, 01:59:54 AM
I just finished reading Colin McCabe's Godard: A Portrait of the Artist at Seventy and found it, to a point, quite inspiring.

Has anybody else here read it?
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on June 15, 2004, 10:47:44 AM
i bought it and ive read through most of it, and it is indeed quite inspiring
Title: Godard
Post by: Just Withnail on June 23, 2004, 11:22:32 AM
Just finished watching the Une Femme est une Femme for the first time. Deliciously over the top with Godardisms. Watching this the same week as Les Carabiniers makes me wonder if Godard had a split personality.
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on June 23, 2004, 11:58:52 AM
Godard is amazingly versatile -- from the verite feel of Breathless and Les Carabiniers to the carefully arranged widescreen compositions of Contempt, from the looseness of A Woman is a Woman to the Bressonian formality of A Married Woman and My Life to Live.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on June 26, 2004, 11:43:46 PM
i watched A Woman is a Woman today, too.
I loved the 180 degree pans and titles when they were waiting for Alfred to come to their apartment.

what is Les Caribiniers like?
looks like i need to see Alphaville, Pierrot Le Fou and Weekend as well.

Godard seems to be my favorite director at the moment.
so far i've seen:
Breathless
Contempt
My Life to Live
Band of Outsiders
A Woman is a Woman

all are interesting and unique in their own way
any more Godard Criterions in the near future?
Title: Godard
Post by: Ghostboy on August 12, 2004, 11:04:42 PM
I decided I needed to catch up on Godard, so I've recently seen My Life To Live, Band Of Outsiders and, just tonight, Contempt. As stated on the first page of this thread, I'd previously seen Breathless and Alphaville, although I watched them so long ago and so early in my career as a serious moviegoer that, while I liked them a lot, I don't trust my opinion and need to revisit them. And In Praise Of Love was too recent to be considered classic. So anyway....

My Life To Live blew my mind. I just loved it. I felt so immediately connected to the character and her feelings, and almost entirely through Godard's lens and editing, rather than the dialogue -- the Passion Of Joan Of Arc sequence being a prime example, and my very favorite scene in the film. What a beautiful movie.

Band Of Outsiders was a fun subversion of pulp standards. I see why Tarantino loves it.

Contempt is the only one to leave me cold. I loved the central conversation between the writer and Camille that takes up the middle thirty minutes of the film -- it reminded me somewhat of the confessional conversation in Eyes Wide Shut, and it was wonderfully probing. The rest of it...well, I need to see it again. I enjoyed it, but I think I nede to see it again. Loved the opening credits and the score and the photography, and Bardot of course, but I think I must have missed something central.
Title: Godard
Post by: modage on August 13, 2004, 02:27:11 PM
thats funny.  we've seen the exact same 5 godards.
Title: Godard
Post by: cine on August 13, 2004, 02:31:04 PM
Alright you two break it up.
Title: Godard
Post by: Just Withnail on August 14, 2004, 11:36:00 AM
Quote from: themodernage02
thats funny.  we've seen the exact same 5 godards.


Maybe you're soulmates.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on August 14, 2004, 01:35:56 PM
everybody needs to see weekend
Title: Godard
Post by: samsong on August 14, 2004, 03:48:32 PM
Quote from: eward
everybody needs to see weekend


If you want to send me a copy I'll glady watch it.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on August 14, 2004, 06:42:10 PM
still waitin for my copy from ebs
Title: Godard
Post by: The Silver Bullet on August 15, 2004, 02:14:30 AM
Quote from: Ghostboy
Contempt is the only one to leave me cold.

I originally felt this way as well, but have found that Contempt has a way of growing on you over time. More and more I remember just how rich and sad it was and now need to see it again myself to actually determine what I really think of it.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on August 24, 2004, 04:07:24 PM
the trailer for his new film, notre musique, can be found here  

http://www.festival-cannes.fr/films/fiche_film.php?langue=6002&partie=video&id_film=4183970&cmedia=5722

i hope this is released in the US sometime soon
Title: Godard
Post by: samsong on October 15, 2004, 10:56:04 PM
Week End may be the most important and greatest film I've ever seen, which is probably presumptuous for me to say because even after seeing it twice I still don't completely "get it"... I also have to wonder if that's even possible.  But I've never been as challenged or invigorated while watching a film as I was during this one.  It does more for the medium -- in terms of everything: narrative, aesthetic, content -- than I could have ever imagined and its cultural/historical importance is undeniable and most definitely a force to be reckoned with (I got crushed by it).  There's a reason why "god" is in Godard... oooh shit, you know you like that one.

I feel compelled to say something about the traffic jam scene just like everybody else that writes about the film.  It's as if the tracking shot was specifically invented for that scene.  There were tracking shots before Week End, and there are tracking shots after.  

Notre Musique is playing here in a month... can't wait.
Title: Godard
Post by: Pedro on October 16, 2004, 11:12:44 AM
did you watch it on vhs?
Title: Godard
Post by: samsong on October 16, 2004, 02:32:16 PM
yea
Title: Godard
Post by: 03 on October 22, 2004, 01:30:55 PM
samsong have you seen 'hail mary'? i think you will be just as conflicted by it.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on October 22, 2004, 07:03:01 PM
Quote from: The Silver Bullet
Quote from: Ghostboy
Contempt is the only one to leave me cold.

I originally felt this way as well, but have found that Contempt has a way of growing on you over time.


Too true. It's most rewarding right after a whirlwind reading of The Odyssey.

And GB, push away that recent blah blah blah stuff about In Praise Of Love. We need to raise that to classic as fast as possible. The more I watch it, the more I think it just might be Godard's masterpiece...
Title: Godard
Post by: SHAFTR on October 22, 2004, 07:06:52 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen


And GB, push away that recent blah blah blah stuff about In Praise Of Love. We need to raise that to classic as fast as possible. The more I watch it, the more I think it just might be Godard's masterpiece...


I thought In Praise of Love was awful.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on October 23, 2004, 06:34:26 AM
Yeah? Yeah?!!! Well... uh.... well, YOU'RE AWFUL!!!

um...


 :wink:

But no, seriously, give it another chance. Or two more. It just gets better and better and better.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on October 24, 2004, 10:32:42 AM
really?  i love godard to death, but In Praise of Love just felt so empty to me...i don't know, maybe i'll give it another shot, but not any time soon...and mind you, this is coming from somebody who liked Keep Your Right Up! too
Title: Godard
Post by: The Silver Bullet on November 04, 2004, 08:47:04 AM
Five very beautiful words: Une femme est une femme.
Title: Godard
Post by: cowboykurtis on November 04, 2004, 11:11:54 AM
overindulgent
Title: Godard
Post by: samsong on November 04, 2004, 04:14:53 PM
Quote from: cowboykurtis
overindulgent


but oh so lovely.
Title: Godard
Post by: The Silver Bullet on November 04, 2004, 09:22:18 PM
Quote from: cowboykurtis
overindulgent

Better to be overindulgent than grossly untalented.
Title: Godard
Post by: Ghostboy on November 04, 2004, 09:39:16 PM
I can't wait until I have a steady enough paycheck to resubscribe to Netflix -- my introduction to Godard was cut far too short.

BUT! I'm very excited that I'll be able to see a good print of Alphaville on the big screen in the next few months. When one of your art film buff friends also manages a movie theater, only good things can come of it.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on November 04, 2004, 10:10:16 PM
is it playing in Dallas?
Title: Godard
Post by: Ghostboy on November 04, 2004, 10:14:56 PM
Yep. The next midnight movie schedule for the Inwood should be announced shortly. Although there's a slight chance Alphaville might be replaced with Band Of Outsiders.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on November 04, 2004, 10:40:20 PM
i haven't seen Alphaville yet, so it would be cool to see it in a theatre first.
my first taste of Godard was seeing Contempt in a theatre.
convince them to do a double feature :-D
Title: Godard
Post by: The Silver Bullet on November 04, 2004, 10:43:07 PM
Quote from: Ghostboy
I'm very excited that I'll be able to see a good print of Alphaville on the big screen...

:!:

I adore Alphaville!
Title: Godard
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on November 04, 2004, 11:09:34 PM
Quote from: The Silver Bullet
Quote from: Ghostboy
I'm very excited that I'll be able to see a good print of Alphaville on the big screen...

:!:

I adore Alphaville!

I've been debating on whether or not I should just go ahead and buy that.
Title: Godard
Post by: samsong on November 05, 2004, 12:17:43 AM
Quote from: ranemaka13
Quote from: The Silver Bullet
Quote from: Ghostboy
I'm very excited that I'll be able to see a good print of Alphaville on the big screen...

:!:

I adore Alphaville!

I've been debating on whether or not I should just go ahead and buy that.


Buy it.
Title: Godard
Post by: Just Withnail on November 05, 2004, 07:19:24 AM
Alphaville is actually the only Godard I've really disliked. I think you'll be more impressed if they screen Band of Outsiders, Ghostboy.
Title: Godard
Post by: The Silver Bullet on November 05, 2004, 07:29:41 AM
Bah!

Alphaville's one of his very, very best pre-'68 films.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on November 05, 2004, 09:37:18 AM
Quote from: Withnail & Garfunkel
Alphaville is actually the only Godard I've really disliked. I think you'll be more impressed if they screen Band of Outsiders, Ghostboy.


i hated it upon first viewing too...but i saw the criterion for about 8 dollars in a local video store (excellent condition) and figured 'what the hell' and upon two subsequent viewings, i absolutely love it.
Title: Godard
Post by: Just Withnail on November 05, 2004, 09:49:22 AM
For me it was the first Godard that didn't resonate some way or another. What else I've seen of his have always left strong impressions on first viewings, then gotten better for each one. Perhaps eward's right and a second and third viewing is fitting, but that'll have to wait, as it's not long since I saw it, and would want to wash away as much of my memory of it as I can before my second go.
Title: Godard
Post by: cowboykurtis on November 05, 2004, 10:02:58 AM
Quote from: The Silver Bullet
Quote from: cowboykurtis
overindulgent

Better to be overindulgent than grossly untalented.


good one
Title: Godard
Post by: cowboykurtis on November 05, 2004, 10:04:51 AM
Quote from: Withnail & Garfunkel
Alphaville is actually the only Godard I've really disliked. I think you'll be more impressed if they screen Band of Outsiders, Ghostboy.


i think alphaville is one of the few godard films i really like
Title: Godard
Post by: Ghostboy on November 05, 2004, 05:47:29 PM
Quote from: Withnail & Garfunkel
Alphaville is actually the only Godard I've really disliked. I think you'll be more impressed if they screen Band of Outsiders, Ghostboy.


Well, I've seen both of them, although Alphaville was so long ago, and I was so young in my cineaste-ness (I think I was 15 and prior to that had only seen Breathless) that I don't trust my reaction. I read the screenplay, too, actually. All thanks to Tarantino, of course.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on November 05, 2004, 07:31:25 PM
do you think they will screen one of these in the next few weeks, or are we talking about early next year?

i'm tempted to come to Dallas and see I Heart Huckabees and Undertow. Godard on the big screen would be a big time motivation!
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on November 21, 2004, 03:06:53 PM
new interview with godard for notre musique:

http://www.nytimes.com/2004/11/21/movies/21darg.html
Title: Godard
Post by: Ghostboy on November 21, 2004, 05:49:00 PM
Quote from: bigideas
do you think they will screen one of these in the next few weeks, or are we talking about early next year?

i'm tempted to come to Dallas and see I Heart Huckabees and Undertow. Godard on the big screen would be a big time motivation!


Hmm, my apologies for missing this query. The answer is early next year. The Inwood is closed for renovations until Jan. 12.
Title: Godard
Post by: The Silver Bullet on November 21, 2004, 09:17:46 PM
Quote from: eward
new interview with godard...

It's a fine interview, if a little short. He can be such a jerk, but so effortlessly funny [and right] at the same time; I love it:

Quote
Q. Are you still passionate about movies?

A. Yes, but it's difficult because one can't see many.

Q. Because they're not being made or you don't have the time?

A. Because generally they're all American films.

Q. I understand. I'm a movie critic.

A. Americans don't have critics. For me, there are only two, James Agee and Manny Farber. The rest are reviewers.

Q. O.K., I am a reviewer, that's fine...
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on November 21, 2004, 09:53:50 PM
Quote from: Ghostboy
Quote from: bigideas
do you think they will screen one of these in the next few weeks, or are we talking about early next year?

i'm tempted to come to Dallas and see I Heart Huckabees and Undertow. Godard on the big screen would be a big time motivation!


Hmm, my apologies for missing this query. The answer is early next year. The Inwood is closed for renovations until Jan. 12.


yeah i saw that in the last e-mail. i just ordered Alphaville Criterion and some others with the 20% discount at Deep Discount DVD. can't wait to see it!
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on November 22, 2004, 11:33:17 PM
another new interview:

http://www.wellspring.com/movies/text.html?page=interviews&movie_id=59
Title: Godard
Post by: ᾦɐļᵲʊʂ on December 01, 2004, 08:37:00 PM
I just saw my first Godard.

"Weekend"

I feel a little confused and dirty.  Therefore, I will watch it again.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on December 01, 2004, 08:47:21 PM
where did you find a copy of it?
i wonder why this doesn't come to DVD?

is it true that there's something about a fish and the femal anatomy?

i'm playing 20 questions (or 3 rather). :?:
Title: Godard
Post by: ᾦɐļᵲʊʂ on December 01, 2004, 09:20:49 PM
Quote from: bigideas
where did you find a copy of it?
i wonder why this doesn't come to DVD?

is it true that there's something about a fish and the femal anatomy?

i'm playing 20 questions (or 3 rather). :?:
\

1) My library has has these old dusty shelves (No joke, they're ancient) of foreign films that groups have donated to the library at some point or another, and almost all of them haven't been checked out more than twice.  It's a goldmine for me to reap in some free culture.  They've got almost every Kurosawa, and always surprises me what I find the next time.

2) I can only seem to find it on VHS.

3) SPOILERS...sort of Basically, these cannibal guerillas have these people kidnapped, and they are preparing this woman to be eaten, so they crack some eggs over her, and then it appears that they wedge a fish into her vagina.  Of course, you just seem the man force it down, and her knees sticking up, but I guess that's up to your imagination.  
Oddly enough, that isn't even the weirdest part of the movie.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on December 01, 2004, 10:43:39 PM
weekend is brilliant and repeated viewings only yield more of its treasure.  except that one section with the two political speeches.  that's boring.  but i'm pretty sure it's supposed to be a joke.  so whatever.

haha and weekend should NOT be anyone's first experience with Godard.
Title: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on December 05, 2004, 01:46:58 AM
Quote from: bigideas
i wonder why this doesn't come to DVD?


New Yorker [supposebly] is releasing it early next year.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on December 06, 2004, 06:56:35 AM
i finally watched Alphaville. i'm not sure what i think yet.
i'm trying to figure out where the Alpha 60's voice is coming from. am i supposed to assume there are speakers placed everywhere or what?
Title: Godard
Post by: modage on December 06, 2004, 09:50:03 AM
Quote from: bigideas
i finally watched Alphaville. i'm not sure what i think yet.

haha, another way of saying you dont like it, although you feel that you are somehow supposed to.  dont worry a handful of us felt the same way (atleast the first time we saw it).  i guess wait a while and try watching it again, (although i have yet to give it another try).
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on December 06, 2004, 03:20:34 PM
yeah, i felt the same, too.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on December 06, 2004, 06:46:07 PM
Quote from: themodernage02
Quote from: bigideas
i finally watched Alphaville. i'm not sure what i think yet.

haha, another way of saying you dont like it, although you feel that you are somehow supposed to.  dont worry a handful of us felt the same way (atleast the first time we saw it).  i guess wait a while and try watching it again, (although i have yet to give it another try).


not exactly. if you do a search of the board of me and new wave films you will see this is my usual reaction. i'm confused about the Alpha 60 voice. it would just come out of nowhere.
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on December 10, 2004, 03:41:54 AM
Criterion is releasing Tout Va Bien in February, Godard's 1972 film starring Jane Fonda.  I've never seen it, but I'll blind buy it.

Alphaville requires patience and repeated viewings -- it is one of Godard's best films.  Scorsese took camera moves from Alphaville and used them in Taxi Driver.  Alphaville's sterile and despairing view of technology and the future influenced not only THX 1138 but also The Conversation.

Simply from a visual, spatial, and graphic design standpoint, Alphaville is worthy of close study.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on December 10, 2004, 06:46:21 AM
doesn't Lemmy drive a Mustang? that's kinda funny.

spoilers




explain to me the guy in the hotel after the woman ask if he wants to take a bath. is this just a gag sort of? it was funny to me when he smashed through the door windows. it made me think of that doorin the apt. in Contempt.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on January 15, 2005, 11:11:13 AM
new interview

http://www.mcnindie.com/
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on January 15, 2005, 03:43:05 PM
Godard's films are filled with digressions, in which characters give long speeches about politics and so forth.  One of his recurrent themes is prostitution, which for him is a metaphor for capitalism (at least, that's my interpretation of it).

I guess the best way to approach Godard is to expect digressions in his storylines, along with jump-cutting, background music that stops and starts for no reason, and self-conscious filmmaking techniques (whether in staging, framing, lighting or camera moves) that make the viewer aware he's watching a movie.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on January 15, 2005, 04:07:39 PM
yeah. that sounds like you just watched My Life to Live.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on January 15, 2005, 09:25:08 PM
ahh what a gratifying experience it is to watch that film.
Title: Godard
Post by: modage on January 15, 2005, 11:42:04 PM
Quote from: eward
ahh what a gratifying experience it is to watch that film.

you mean grating (sp) ?  :saywhat:
Title: Godard
Post by: cron on January 16, 2005, 01:17:18 AM
Quote from: eward
weekend is brilliant and repeated viewings only yield more of its treasure.  except that one section with the two political speeches.  that's boring.  but i'm pretty sure it's supposed to be a joke.  so whatever.

haha and weekend should NOT be anyone's first experience with Godard.


that's odd 'cause when i saw it i though that part of the movie was one of the most impressive. I doubt very much that he was joking about that, remember that he did a film concerning the arab/israeli conflict "Ici et Ailleurs".
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on January 16, 2005, 10:02:06 AM
yes, but if you actually listen to the two speeches you may think differently...like really go back and listen to them word for word...and also, theyre placement and execution i think were supposed to be kinda funny...

and mod, what'd u ask, if i accidentally said gratifying instead of grating?  gee, i dunno, lemme check....nope, nope, i meant gratifying.  there is so much greatness and beauty in that film that i couldn't have possibly meant anything less than gratifying.  :-D
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on February 07, 2005, 08:04:59 AM
http://rialtopictures.com/masculine.html

fun little thing.  and god dammit, the two closest theaters playing this near me are about three hours away.  all the theaters around me suck.
Title: Godard
Post by: SiliasRuby on March 10, 2005, 11:51:25 PM
I just saw Contempt. Brilliant Film, but it took a lot out of me emotionally. I don't think I could watch it over and over again. So, I don't think I'll buy it. But, yes, I recommend seeing it.
Title: Godard
Post by: SiliasRuby on March 13, 2005, 12:52:19 PM
Quote from: SiliasRuby
I just saw Contempt. Brilliant Film, but it took a lot out of me emotionally. I don't think I could watch it over and over again. So, I don't think I'll buy it.

Contempt's images have been in my brain ever since I watched it. It has come to my attention that this film has had a huge impact on me, and that I must get it, so that is what I have to do. I have yet to see Breathless, alphaville, My life to live, A woman is a woman, and weekend. So, I have changed my mind and I am going to get Contempt.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on March 13, 2005, 01:29:02 PM
when i saw Contempt, i had never seen anything quite like that before. i was lucky to be able to see it at a college's theater. i thought it was pretty weird but the images stayed with me. i want to say it wasn't too long after that that Criterion released their DVD of it. i think i appreciate it more each time i see it.  it definitely led me to seek out more Godard and French New Wave, and for that i'm grateful.
Title: Godard
Post by: SiliasRuby on March 15, 2005, 07:15:44 PM
Just finished Breathless. Fantastic film. I think I'm becoming hooked on Godard.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on March 15, 2005, 11:30:07 PM
actively seek out his later shit - passion, numero deux, forever mozart, hail mary specifically....most of his very best work came from this period, i think, his early stuff that i would rank with them (specifically passion and numero deux) are vivre sa vie, pierrot le fou and weekend...probably bande a parte too.  those are his best, in my eyes.  prenom carmen is good, too.  and every man for himself (often titled slow motion).  some of the shits hard to get but well worth it.
Title: Godard
Post by: Ultrahip on March 22, 2005, 02:27:25 PM
I realized about a week or two ago that I'd never seen any Godard, so I ordered Breathless, Band of Outsiders, and A Woman is A Woman on a whim. Let me say, this was the best whim to follow I've ever had. These three films are some of the best I've ever seen, A Woman is A Woman being the favorite. Talk about influences on Punch-Drunk Love. Those long takes in the apartment plus the blues and reds, not to mention the use of music, even better done here than by PTA, of course it is often implemented for much different purposes. How it comments on cinema itself, like all these works is astounding. The energy and seeming spontanaeity of Godard is intoxicating and damn near makes me giddy. This realisateur should really have his own forum in the directors category, I mean, if Kubrick does and he's dead, Godard should be set in stone as the foundation of all things pretty and significant in movies.
Title: Godard
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on March 22, 2005, 04:28:30 PM
Quote from: Ultrahip
I realized about a week or two ago that I'd never seen any Godard, so I ordered Breathless, Band of Outsiders, and A Woman is A Woman on a whim. Let me say, this was the best whim to follow I've ever had. These three films are some of the best I've ever seen, A Woman is A Woman being the favorite. Talk about influences on Punch-Drunk Love. Those long takes in the apartment plus the blues and reds, not to mention the use of music, even better done here than by PTA, of course it is often implemented for much different purposes. How it comments on cinema itself, like all these works is astounding. The energy and seeming spontanaeity of Godard is intoxicating and damn near makes me giddy.

 :yabbse-thumbup:
Couldn't agree more.
Title: Godard
Post by: cowboykurtis on March 22, 2005, 05:32:08 PM
yea swap him for that fat head cameron crowe forum. got nothing against him, he just has a fat head.
Title: Godard
Post by: Fernando on March 22, 2005, 05:41:06 PM
Quote from: Ultrahip
This realisateur should really have his own forum in the directors category, I mean, if Kubrick does and he's dead, Godard should be set in stone as the foundation of all things pretty and significant in movies.


I won't debate who's better or who deserves his own forum, but I can tell you that just by numbers the Kubrick forum has justified its existence, while Godard only has a thread with 12 pages, and a few others of what I searched, so, I'm positive that asking for a forum it's really pointless.

Now, I'm sure he has amazing films (I've only seen Alphaville) and yes he is regarded as one of the greats but a single thread with 12 pages and a few others doesn't seem enough for creating him a forum (IMO).

So far this is the best thread to discuss his films, and maybe your reviews and what not might pick interest in some ppl to look for his films.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on March 22, 2005, 06:05:39 PM
Quote from: Ultrahip
I realized about a week or two ago that I'd never seen any Godard, so I ordered Breathless, Band of Outsiders, and A Woman is A Woman on a whim. Let me say, this was the best whim to follow I've ever had. These three films are some of the best I've ever seen, A Woman is A Woman being the favorite. Talk about influences on Punch-Drunk Love. Those long takes in the apartment plus the blues and reds, not to mention the use of music, even better done here than by PTA, of course it is often implemented for much different purposes. How it comments on cinema itself, like all these works is astounding. The energy and seeming spontanaeity of Godard is intoxicating and damn near makes me giddy. This realisateur should really have his own forum in the directors category, I mean, if Kubrick does and he's dead, Godard should be set in stone as the foundation of all things pretty and significant in movies.


have you seen any Truffaut? it has been speculated here that Shoot the Piano Player may have been an influence on PDL.
Title: Godard
Post by: cron on March 22, 2005, 06:53:19 PM
Quote from: Ultrahip
realisateur


(http://mtglair.de/img/python/French_Scientists.jpg)
Title: Godard
Post by: Ultrahip on March 22, 2005, 09:36:25 PM
I have seen The 400 Blows and Shoot the Piano Player and quite like both of them. I think it's great in A Woman is a Woman that Godard references his own Breathless and Shoot the Piano Player but somehow manages not to break the fourth wall in doing so.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on March 22, 2005, 11:28:30 PM
so, yeah, i got my WeekEnd R2 dvd in the mail today and i just watched it (my sixth viewing) - and i just wanna restate that all of you with even the slightest interest in godard should see it NOW.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on March 23, 2005, 06:51:37 AM
how much would that cost (and i guess that means i need a certain type dvd player)?
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on March 23, 2005, 09:39:09 AM
uhhh i ordered it a while ago, and without checking the site (amazon.co.uk) i think it was around 30 or 35 dollars.  and yes, you would need to get a region free player.  then again, you could always just buy the vhs for like twenty-five or whatever.  but the movie looks much better on the disc, and there are two good interviews on it, one with mike figgis and the other with raoul coutard (which was extremely entertaining).
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on March 23, 2005, 01:16:07 PM
Yeah, those two extras are up there for best so far this year. Particularly the Figgis one. He gives about the fairest summation of Godard I've heard yet.

While you guys are at it, you should get the new R2 versions of Masculin Feminin, Vivre Sa Vie, and 2 or 3 Things I Know About Her. No extras, but they all look great.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on March 23, 2005, 03:56:41 PM
the R2 for vivre sa vie is better than the lorber?
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on March 23, 2005, 05:56:01 PM
i want to say GT posted that Masculin Feminine and 2 or 3 Things both had strong chances of being Criterions in the future.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on March 24, 2005, 09:26:02 AM
Yes, the R2 is better than the Lorber one. But really, what shitty half-price garage sale old video copy of anything isn't better than a Fox Lorber transfer?

To be fair, the only real difference is a cleaning up of minor scratches and dust. Looks like they also added a hint more of contrast and sharpness, but nothing that makes me think it was overboard.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on March 24, 2005, 09:06:52 PM
yeah, but Fox Lorber discs are under $10 and play on my DVD player. i love them for that. if Criterion issues a disc then i'll be all over it, but for now I'm happy that I at least own some version of some great films.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on April 01, 2005, 11:25:21 PM
http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050315/REVIEWS/50322004/1023

a blurb on Masculine Femine.......and there is a link to the trailer.[/url]
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on April 02, 2005, 03:57:50 AM
For those considering buying the recent cc of Tout Va Bien...

DO IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It's fantastic. Better than Weekend, imo.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on April 02, 2005, 11:53:22 AM
have you watched the interview with him yet in it, where he's unshaven and in his bathrobe?  look at his eyes, he looks so wacked out, its kinda scary.
Title: Godard
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on April 03, 2005, 01:51:08 AM
Quote from: SoNowThen
For those considering buying the recent cc of Tout Va Bien...

DO IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It's fantastic. Better than Weekend, imo.

Ha! I bought it last night!

It was different, but I really enjoyed it. I especially love the long tracking shot in the supermarket!

:yabbse-thumbup:

Someone convince me to buy Contempt. It came down between Tout Va Bien and Contempt, and I chose the former.
I'm not sure why, but I'm always really nervous when I buy a Godard on a whim. I love his work, so I really don't understand what my problem is.

And I can't wait to see Masculin/Feminin, whenever that shall be.
Title: Godard
Post by: UncleJoey on April 03, 2005, 03:10:15 AM
Quote from: ranemaka13
Someone convince me to buy Contempt.


It's probably my third favorite Godard film, behind Breathless and My Life to Live, and easily his most beautifully shot, from what I've seen. Brigitte Bardot's nude scene very early in the film is particularly breathtaking for reasons beyond the obvious (and the story behind it is very interesting, as well). Also, the score is one of my favorites. Scorsese also uses it to great effect in Casino.

Quote from: ranemaka13
And I can't wait to see Masculin/Feminin, whenever that shall be.


I'll be seeing a new print of that sometime this spring or summer in Milwaukee.  The theater's website just says "coming soon", so I'm not sure exactly when it will be.

Also, I saw Notre Musique Thursday night. I thought it was pretty bad - just an absolute mess.
Title: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on April 03, 2005, 04:47:57 AM
Quote from: ranemaka13
And I can't wait to see Masculin/Feminin, whenever that shall be.


official rialto theatrical re-release was back in february so optimistic dvd release date would be in november but I'd expect a 2006 release by Criterion.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on April 03, 2005, 04:55:53 AM
Quote from: eward
have you watched the interview with him yet in it, where he's unshaven and in his bathrobe?  look at his eyes, he looks so wacked out, its kinda scary.


I love it.

I also love how they make the point of showing that it's 3pm, and yet it looks like he just got up.

Ranemaka13 -- go buy Contempt. Beyond all the praise the others have already given, it contains one of the best extras of all time: The Dinosaur and the Baby, an hour long conversation between Lang and Godard about directing.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on April 03, 2005, 11:16:03 AM
Quote from: UncleJoey
Also, I saw Notre Musique Thursday night. I thought it was pretty bad - just an absolute mess.


wow, really?  i absolutely loved it.  easily one of my top five godard pictures and one of the best films to have come out so far this decade.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on April 05, 2005, 06:33:17 AM
Yeah, except for one scene, Notre Musique is perfect.


Exciting news for Godard fans w/ multiregion players:

AV Channel (Australia, R4) have announced their upcoming DVD release of Godard's La Chinoise will impressively include Godard's 52-minute British Sounds (1969) and 62-minute JLG/JLG (1994).

Here's a link to the AV Website -- http://www.avchannel.com.au/

I think Optimum is releasing La Chinoise in the UK in about a month as well, but unless the transfer on the Aussie one is just BRUTAL, it would be clutch to get ahold of those two other films.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on April 05, 2005, 06:47:03 AM
i believe that is what the huge red poster is from in The Dreamers. i have wondered about that film since then. has anyone actually seen it?
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on April 05, 2005, 12:00:15 PM
Quote from: bigideas
i believe that is what the huge red poster is from in The Dreamers. i have wondered about that film since then. has anyone actually seen it?


I saw it 20 years ago at a revival theater.  All I remember is a bunch of students giving speeches about Communism.  I'd like to see it again.
Title: Godard
Post by: SiliasRuby on April 05, 2005, 12:08:56 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen


Exciting news for Godard fans w/ multiregion players:

AV Channel (Australia, R4) have announced their upcoming DVD release of Godard's La Chinoise will impressively include Godard's 52-minute British Sounds (1969) and 62-minute JLG/JLG (1994).

Here's a link to the AV Website -- http://www.avchannel.com.au/

This is great news. Thanks for the info SoNowThen.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on April 05, 2005, 12:41:17 PM
awesome awesome awesome news, the vhs for jlg/jlg is like 80 bucks.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on April 05, 2005, 05:07:56 PM
La Chinoise is great.

Better than Weekend and Two Or Three Things, not as good as Alphaville or Pierrot Le Fou, imo. Whatever the fuck that means :-D !!!

It's kinda the logical bridge-point between Masculin Feminin and Tout Va Bien. The less seriously you actually take what is being said, and just look into the fact that it is being said, and by whom, in light of what was to happen in '68, then it becomes interesting. Plus, Jean-Pierre Leaud is just awesome to watch in whatever he does.
Title: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on April 05, 2005, 05:12:13 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
La Chinoise is great.

Better than Weekend and Two Or Three Things, not as good as Alphaville or Pierrot Le Fou, imo. Whatever the fuck that means :-D !!!

It's kinda the logical bridge-point between Masculin Feminin and Tout Va Bien. The less seriously you actually take what is being said, and just look into the fact that it is being said, and by whom, in light of what was to happen in '68, then it becomes interesting. Plus, Jean-Pierre Leaud is just awesome to watch in whatever he does.


I'm thinking you should start an International DVD thread of new and future releases you can keep updating. You're really getting me itching to buy a regionless DVD player. I'm serious.
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on April 05, 2005, 11:20:58 PM
I'm thinking of blind buying Tout Va Bien, but I'm not sure if I should lay out the 30 bucks.  Has anyone seen it?  What Godard films does it most resemble?
Title: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on April 05, 2005, 11:51:57 PM
Quote from: soixante
I'm thinking of blind buying Tout Va Bien, but I'm not sure if I should lay out the 30 bucks.  Has anyone seen it?  What Godard films does it most resemble?


I assume it would remind me of later Godard, but I'm not much familiar him then. One thing the film did shockingly remind me of was Jacques Tati. Well, certain scenes did. I think the disc is worth the purchase. The short film A Letter to Jane could have easily been its own disc like Night and Fog was but is just an extra. Also, the booklet is much larger than most dvds that cheap from Criterion.
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on April 06, 2005, 01:55:35 AM
Quote from: The Gold Trumpet
Quote from: soixante
I'm thinking of blind buying Tout Va Bien, but I'm not sure if I should lay out the 30 bucks.  Has anyone seen it?  What Godard films does it most resemble?


I assume it would remind me of later Godard, but I'm not much familiar him then. One thing the film did shockingly remind me of was Jacques Tati. Well, certain scenes did. I think the disc is worth the purchase. The short film A Letter to Jane could have easily been its own disc like Night and Fog was but is just an extra. Also, the booklet is much larger than most dvds that cheap from Criterion.


Thanks for the advice.  I guess I'll just be a patron of the arts and go for it.  

I assume that it's a few years away from Weekend, so if it resembles that film, all goes well.
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on April 07, 2005, 01:31:50 AM
Just bought Tout Va Bien and watched it.  The supermarket scene reminded me of Weekend and Tati.  Red state rednecks can't stand Jane Fonda and Frace, and here is a movie that combines the two, with Fonda speaking fluent French to boot.

In sum, it was worth buying.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on April 07, 2005, 09:18:43 AM
i enjoyed it.  i definitely don't think it's better than weekend, however.  i think i remember someone saying that a few posts up.  too lazy to look.
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on April 07, 2005, 11:48:57 AM
Tout Va Bien wasn't as good as Weekend, but I enjoyed it more than a lot of Godard's later films, which have become so abstract that they are beyond my comprehension (although I loved Every Man For Himself).

The supermarket tracking shot reminded me of the extended traffic jam shot in Weekend.  Also, the workers addressing the camera and complaining about working conditions reminded me of Weekend as well.

It was interesting that Jane Fonda, once introduced, was relegated to a passive, secondary role in the film.  Most directors would put a superstar like Fonda (fresh off her Oscar win for Klute) front and center, but Godard puts her on the sidelines, along with the central romantic plot, in favor of the workers.  It is as if the strikers have not only taken over the factory, but they have hijacked the movie we expected to see.

Is is also interesting to view the film after 30+ years to see how much has changed -- and how much remains the same.  Communism has been debunked, and yet is unfettered free-market capitalism any better?  Workers were getting screwed in France in the early 70's, and what is happening to workers in America today?  Most new jobs are in the service sector, which means fast food McJobs and "customer service representatives."

Tout Va Bien could be updated and adapted to America 2005, with a bunch of workers taking over a Wal-Mart.
Title: Godard
Post by: Cecil on April 24, 2005, 06:08:32 PM
the video for kelly osbourne's one word is an homage to alphaville. pretty cool song too. and if this has allready been mentioned, fuck you.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on April 24, 2005, 10:04:46 PM
i rented Tout Va Bien this weekend. i see a little Playtime comparison. especially having the factory set cut in half so all rooms can be seen. i'm reminded of the shot in Playtime where the camera is outside of the apartments with large windows. i guess either of these possibly inspired Wes Anderson for The Life Aquatic.

the supermarket shot was pretty interesting. i have never gotten very deep into politics or France in 1972, so i'm sure i missed some important points. i don't think it's a film i would want to watch enough to justify buying it.

how many Godard films have some section where a couple says they like each other's lips, mouth, etc, etc? i know it's definitely in Contempt. i can't remember if it's in Breathless or not.
Title: Godard
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on April 25, 2005, 07:39:31 PM
Quote from: bigideas
how many Godard films have some section where a couple says they like each other's lips, mouth, etc, etc? i know it's definitely in Contempt. i can't remember if it's in Breathless or not.

There's deffinately something similar:

Michel to Patricia: "Alas, alas, alas! I love a girl with a very pretty nape/neck, very pretty breasts, a very pretty voice, very pretty wrists, a very pretty forehead, very pretty knees... but who is... a cowaaaaard!"

And thanks to those who recommened Contempt.
Loved it, fellas. :yabbse-thumbup:
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on April 26, 2005, 08:22:43 AM
by the way, NOTRE MUSIQUE comes to region 1 dvd on may 17...!!
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on April 30, 2005, 10:11:21 AM
new interview with him here:

http://film.guardian.co.uk/interview/interviewpages/0,6737,1472494,00.html


and a cool article about him here

http://agirlandagun.typepad.com/a_girl_and_a_gun/2005/05/sans_pareil.html
Title: Godard
Post by: Ultrahip on May 05, 2005, 04:40:34 PM
Saw Notre Musique last night. It was quite good-looking and profoundly moving in ways very uncommon in movies, but of course, this is cinema. Anyone else think who saw this think that he filmed Olga like Anna Karina? Maybe it was because I recently watched A Woman Is A Woman but I couldn't stop thinking of Karina when watching Olga.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on May 05, 2005, 11:25:29 PM
lots of women have gotten that treatment in his films. see passion.
Title: Godard
Post by: Brazoliange on May 06, 2005, 12:22:53 AM
I just bought his video of Sympathy of the Devil for $2.50
Title: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on May 09, 2005, 11:14:20 PM
word on the street: Weekend gets released by New Yorker on June 28th.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on May 27, 2005, 10:49:06 PM
my town's cable actually added TCM.
Les Carabiniers airs June 3rd at 1am Central Time.
i can't wait.
Title: Godard
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on May 27, 2005, 11:34:04 PM
:yabbse-thumbup:  :yabbse-thumbup:

And my campus may have a showing of Notre Musique this fall!

 :yabbse-thumbup:  :yabbse-thumbup:
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on June 02, 2005, 06:34:40 PM
FYI to anybody looking to pick up that Aussie version of La Chinoise I posted about a few months back:

they fucking lied. I got the disc in the mail today. No British Sounds. No JLG/JLG. Just a commentary by some "critic".

Motherfuck...


(to be fair -- well, much MORE than fair -- the transfer looks great)
Title: Godard
Post by: Brazoliange on June 02, 2005, 08:29:50 PM
I really didn't like Sympathy for the Devil, way too random.
Title: Godard
Post by: ᾦɐļᵲʊʂ on June 02, 2005, 10:59:36 PM
Quote from: The Gold Trumpet
word on the street: Weekend gets released by New Yorker on June 28th.


I went and pirated it off a VHS (I normally don't pirate, unless there's no DVD release) so I'm going to keep my eyes open for this.

Hopefully some nice features.
Title: Godard
Post by: Brazoliange on June 02, 2005, 11:21:35 PM
does Weekend have a big sexual dialogue in the first 10 minutes? I downloaded a version of it but somehow it didn't quite feel like it....
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on June 03, 2005, 07:26:49 AM
yes.  there's a very long scene (probably the second or third one) done in one take between the husband and wife in which she describes a greatly perverted sexual situation she took part in with another couple (it's really fucking hilarious)

and then the film goes on...
Title: Godard
Post by: Brazoliange on June 03, 2005, 10:41:34 AM
oh, thanks, so I guess I did have the real film.
Title: Godard
Post by: SiliasRuby on June 03, 2005, 02:26:50 PM
Quote from: eward
yes.  there's a very long scene (probably the second or third one) done in one take between the husband and wife in which she describes a greatly perverted sexual situation she took part in with another couple (it's really fucking hilarious)

and then the film goes on...

Eward is right. Really freaking funny. I really just cherish my region 2 dvd of weekend.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on June 03, 2005, 10:59:57 PM
Quote from: bigideas
my town's cable actually added TCM.
Les Carabiniers airs June 3rd at 1am Central Time.
i can't wait.


In case someone needs reminded.
T minus 2 hours.
Title: Godard
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on June 04, 2005, 03:26:36 AM
Did anyone TiVo this???? :cry:
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on June 04, 2005, 09:11:36 AM
netflix it
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on June 04, 2005, 11:03:08 AM
Quote from: ranemaka13
Did anyone TiVo this???? :cry:


i recorded it vhs style.
Title: Godard
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on June 04, 2005, 11:32:21 AM
Quote from: bigideas
Quote from: ranemaka13
Did anyone TiVo this???? :cry:


i recorded it vhs style.

What must I do to get a piece o' that?
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on June 04, 2005, 02:46:13 PM
Quote from: ranemaka13
Quote from: bigideas
Quote from: ranemaka13
Did anyone TiVo this???? :cry:


i recorded it vhs style.

What must I do to get a piece o' that?


i figure by the time i find a vcr to dub with, the purchase of a blank vhs tape, mail packaging, and cost of shipping that you could probably buy the Fox Lorber edition for about the same and get a bonus commentary.
http://www.deepdiscountdvd.com/dvd.cfm?itemID=FLA005268

edit: well, i thought it was 8.99 just like My Life to Live. you might look to see if there are used copies floating around somewhere.
Title: Godard
Post by: Brazoliange on June 04, 2005, 05:03:56 PM
I just downloaded mine with torrentspy.com
Title: Godard
Post by: w/o horse on June 05, 2005, 04:08:50 PM
Quote from: Fuck.
Quote from: The Gold Trumpet
word on the street: Weekend gets released by New Yorker on June 28th.


I went and pirated it off a VHS (I normally don't pirate, unless there's no DVD release) so I'm going to keep my eyes open for this.

Hopefully some nice features.


It is.

Stoked.
Title: Godard
Post by: Ravi on June 05, 2005, 09:54:18 PM
New Yorker = PAL to NTSC transfer, probably, but its better than nothing I suppose.
Title: Godard
Post by: w/o horse on July 01, 2005, 02:17:11 PM
August 23rd now I guess.

(http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B0009NZ6RA.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg)
Quote
DVD Features:
Available subtitles: English
Available Audio Tracks: French (Dolby Digital 2.0)
Audio Commentary by Critic David Sterritt

Interview with Raoul Coutard

Mike Figgis on "Weekend"

Biographies of Jean-Luc Godard, Cinematographer Raoul Coutard, Film Director Mike Figgis and Prof. Colin MacCabe

Theatrical Trailer

Scene Selections
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on July 02, 2005, 01:21:16 AM
i like my region 2 cover better.
Title: Godard
Post by: Brazoliange on July 04, 2005, 06:43:11 AM
just got done loving Bande à part... though the ending somewhat surprised me


[edit] stupid question perhaps, but then this was my first Godard: did the extension (sequel) get made?
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on July 21, 2005, 01:24:53 PM
fyi:

Hello thomas,
You have asked us to remind you that "Le Petit Soldat" (1963) is playing on TCM on July 22, 2005 at 02:00 AM (EST). Don't forget to watch, and thank you for visiting turnerclassicmovies.com.

Thank you,

Your friends at TCM

these reminders are dang handy.
Title: Godard
Post by: ᾦɐļᵲʊʂ on September 10, 2005, 12:20:53 AM
Quote from: Losing the Horse:

Mike Figgis on "Weekend"


This sounds cool, but what is Figgis' connection to Weekend and how long is this?
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on September 10, 2005, 12:58:19 AM
his connection to weekend is that he saw and admired it, and it's maybe fifteen minutes long?  i forget, i only watched it once and i can't for the love of christ remember how long it was, wait lemme check the case!....nope, it doesn't say.  not too long.  i think what i guessed is probably right.
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on September 10, 2005, 01:44:01 AM
Quote from: eward
his connection to weekend is that he saw and admired it, and it's maybe fifteen minutes long?  i forget, i only watched it once and i can't for the love of christ remember how long it was, wait lemme check the case!....nope, it doesn't say.  not too long.  i think what i guessed is probably right.


so you have the dvd?
is it top notch?
i guess i need to look into ordering it and Masculin Feminin here pretty soon.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on September 11, 2005, 02:02:20 AM
i'm not sure how technically top notch it is, but it beats the hell out of my rather decent vhs copy.  yeah, masculine feminin is a must, and i dont think the R1 of weekend coming out soon has the figgis thing on it, but i could be wrong...
Title: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on September 11, 2005, 01:25:13 PM
so the one on the page before that was set to come out Aug 23rd hasn't been released yet?

edit:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0009NZ6RA/102-3426921-3846533?v=glance

this is it, right?
unfortunately i don't see it at deepdiscountdvd.com.
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on September 11, 2005, 05:40:50 PM
oh no, that was my mistake, it has been.  i didnt really pay attention to the date cuz i obviously wasnt planning on buying it.  i thought it was sometime in the fall

EDIT

haha, and another mistake, the R1 has the same features as the R2 (plus a trailer and commentary missing from the R2), including the mike figgis interview....just ignore me
Title: Godard
Post by: JG on September 25, 2005, 06:41:19 PM
So I guess "Masculine, Feminine" comes out Tuesday, according the Boston Globe.  There's an interesting write up about it, by Ty Burr.  Here's a quote:

Quote
"Masculine, Feminine," is the work of a young man realizing he can no longer live life as a movie.  Godard's entire career since then can be read as a search for a replacement.


Has anyone seen this?  Thoughts?
Title: Godard
Post by: hedwig on September 25, 2005, 07:15:50 PM
Quote from: JimmyGator shoulda
"Masculine, Feminine" comes came out last Tuesday, September 20th
Title: Godard
Post by: JG on September 25, 2005, 07:25:00 PM
oops sorry, must have misread it.  still thuogh, what's the word on this film?
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on September 28, 2005, 01:37:24 PM
It's fucking great. Go buy it.

The Godard "interview-style" really begins in a hardcore way here. Guys talking shit to chicks, and chicks not getting a word of it, chicks talking shit back and guys unwilling to listen, one of the funniest/oddest movies within a movie, and of course the ever perfect Jean-Pierre Leaud.
Title: Godard
Post by: w/o horse on October 21, 2005, 04:04:56 AM
Weekend was a disappointment.  Cinema in action to be sure, but narrative was like four blocks away and stopping to buy coffee.  I doubt anyone is in the middle on this film, but sign me up for the annoyed side.  It was like being spoken at.  I'm going to quote Ebert from his review of I Heart Huckabees, this is what happened with me and Weekend:

"It was on the screen, and I was in my chair, and nothing was happening between us."
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on October 21, 2005, 04:42:04 AM
Fair enough. Same for me, first time through.

Put it to bed, watch it again in a year. It's like Coutard says on the dvd interview, most of a JLG movie is quite boring, but there are some parts that are not boring, and those parts are generally better than most other people's entire films.

Not that I agree entirely, cos I'm not really bored with JLG at this point, but for Weekend, a movie low on my Godard list, this rings truer than most. Still, there are some wonderful moments worth sitting through...

Oh -- a final add-on: I have a sneaking suspicion that this dvd (and all previous videos) just don't do the look any justice. There's something REALLY flat and REALLY shit to this look, and, I dunno, that affects my enjoyment... maybe someone's seen this in a rep cinema on a decent print and can confirm/deny any quality issues???
Title: Godard
Post by: w/o horse on October 21, 2005, 01:47:03 PM
No for sure.  Plenty of long beautiful and complicated tracking shots.  Lots of surprises and much art to be consumed.  There were things to enjoy, but I hated having to dig in the dumpster.

I will indeed revisit Weekend in a year, see what happens.
Title: Godard
Post by: cowboykurtis on October 21, 2005, 04:09:10 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
It's like Coutard says on the dvd interview, most of a JLG movie is quite boring, but there are some parts that are not boring, and those parts are generally better than most other people's entire films.


these are my senitments about Godard as well.
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on October 22, 2005, 03:02:55 AM
Multiple viewings are essential for Godard films.  There is a lot to absorb in Weekend, visually, thematically, politically.
Title: Godard
Post by: SiliasRuby on October 22, 2005, 08:16:00 AM
That is certainly true. I absorb more and more every time I see one of his films.
Title: Godard
Post by: JG on October 22, 2005, 09:45:56 AM
I really need to see more Godard.  I mean I'm still young, but I just haven't seen enough movies in general.  From what I've seen, I dig.
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on October 22, 2005, 01:10:22 PM
I've seen Weekend multiple times over the past 20 years, and I find new things to appreciate each time.  You can appreciate Weekend simply as a visual experience by turning off the subtitles.  I did this with Alphaville, and I noticed a lot of Godard's cinematic bag of tricks.  I find reading subtitles detracts from the visual experience.  With Godard, things are structured in a fragmented way, and he throws a lot of arcane references at the viewer.  It also helps to know about the political context of France in the 60's.  In addition, the French have a love/hate relationship with the U.S.  They resent our cultural imperialism, and yet Godard and other French directors make reference to a lot of our films.
Title: Godard
Post by: Alexandro on October 24, 2005, 12:26:32 PM
I guess I haven't been lucky with Godard. I enjoyed Breathless but find it far from the masterpiece people say it is. I didn't like Contempt at all, found it a pretentious film for critics. A woman is a woman, I hated it too....I think I just don't connect with his stuff...or is it one or two in particular that I should really check out???

He's kind of hideous in interviews too....
Title: Godard
Post by: cowboykurtis on October 24, 2005, 01:50:09 PM
Quote from: Alexandro
I guess I haven't been lucky with Godard. I enjoyed Breathless but find it far from the masterpiece people say it is. I didn't like Contempt at all, found it a pretentious film for critics. A woman is a woman, I hated it too....I think I just don't connect with his stuff...or is it one or two in particular that I should really check out???

He's kind of hideous in interviews too....


Im not a huge godard fan - however I have enjoyed most that I've seen - Just not overly enthusiastic about his work as I am for others - Id make a point to seek out Alphaville - probably my favorite Godard film.
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on October 24, 2005, 03:06:17 PM
Alphaville is worth checking out.  Even if you don't like the story, it is visually dazzling -- use of lighting, composition, camera movement, blocking of action.  The sound design is pretty cool, too.  If you just turn off the subtitles and experience it in a purely visual way, you will enjoy it.
Title: Godard
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on October 24, 2005, 06:24:56 PM
I love every frame of Band à part.
Title: Godard
Post by: cowboykurtis on October 25, 2005, 12:31:07 AM
im having a brain fart - which godard film is the parody/satire of James Bond-esque films?
Title: Godard
Post by: Pubrick on October 25, 2005, 01:48:28 AM
Quote from: Alexandro
I guess I haven't been lucky with Godard. I enjoyed Breathless but find it far from the masterpiece people say it is. I didn't like Contempt at all, found it a pretentious film for critics. A woman is a woman, I hated it too....I think I just don't connect with his stuff...or is it one or two in particular that I should really check out???

He's kind of hideous in interviews too....

that's how i feel. the dude's a jerk and beyond a few things worth stealing, his films are borefests.
Title: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on October 25, 2005, 02:46:11 AM
Dammit, guys...

How can you see In Praise Of Love and Our Music, and not fall in love with the beauty and density of image and sound?

How can you watch Band Of Outsiders and not smile at the playfulness?

The raw genius of First Name Carmen? Fuck fuck fuck...

Each of his movies demand a minimum of three viewings. The guy's out there killing himself (I mean, he's a grizzled old man -- I know, I've stood in front of him). He's devoted his whole life to cinema, and given us untold riches. Stop resisting him and just open up and LOVE IT!!!

WHOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Title: Godard
Post by: soixante on October 25, 2005, 11:18:29 AM
Indeed.  You must see every Godard film at least three times.

You can learn a lot about cinematic syntax, and how to mess around with cinematic syntax, by closely studying Weekend, Pierrot le Fou, Breathless, Alphaville and My Life to Live.

Plus, Godard's films from the 60's are still culturally relevant.  The long traffic jam in Weekend is a perfect metaphor for America today.  Alphaville, in which technology rules the world, is timelier than ever.

Back in high school, some kid in my English class asked why we had to read Grapes of Wrath, because he said, "It's boring."  The teacher replied, "You're boring."
Title: Godard
Post by: w/o horse on October 25, 2005, 01:33:50 PM
I prefer the old rebuttle of:  'If you don't like the Mona Lisa it says more about you than it does the Mona Lisa.'

Which isn't necessarily a bad thing, as to say, if you don't like Godard perhaps you are more a fan of narrative than filmmaking craft (which I think would be perfectly acceptable).
Title: Godard
Post by: Alexandro on October 25, 2005, 02:14:56 PM
Quote from: SoNowThen
Dammit, guys...

How can you see In Praise Of Love and Our Music, and not fall in love with the beauty and density of image and sound?

How can you watch Band Of Outsiders and not smile at the playfulness?

The raw genius of First Name Carmen? Fuck fuck fuck...

Each of his movies demand a minimum of three viewings. The guy's out there killing himself (I mean, he's a grizzled old man -- I know, I've stood in front of him). He's devoted his whole life to cinema, and given us untold riches. Stop resisting him and just open up and LOVE IT!!!

WHOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Haven't seen those...but even though I have some resistance, i know in the end i'll get around to see them. It's just that this is very rare on my experience, this kind of non response to some great director. The only other "great" director that I can't take is Wenders. I don't particularly think he's pretentious or anything, it's just that I don't seem able to watch a complete movie of his without falling asleep.

Another movie I don't like and everyone praises is Jules et Jim. That movie also has a playfulness that I don't find funny at all...

still, I understand what other people see in this movies, they're just not my cup of tea...
Title: Godard
Post by: eward on October 25, 2005, 04:54:50 PM
Quote from: Alexandro
I guess I haven't been lucky with Godard. I enjoyed Breathless but find it far from the masterpiece people say it is. I didn't like Contempt at all, found it a pretentious film for critics. A woman is a woman, I hated it too....I think I just don't connect with his stuff...or is it one or two in particular that I should really check out???

He's kind of hideous in interviews too....


ya gotta check out some of the ones that don't get talked about so much...alphaville, woman is a woman etc are pretty worthless i'd say, but there is nothing on this planet that can even compare to the beauty/genius/exhileration of films like vivre sa vie, weekend, numero deux, slow motion, first name carmen, passion, masculin feminin, notre musique...and i think his histoires du cinema series is being released soon, ive seen some of it on video and its really just...essential, i guess.  it needs to be seen.
Title: Godard
Post by: cron on October 25, 2005, 09:38:53 PM
did you people know he stole the  'only way to criticize a film...' quote from ezra pound?
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: JG on November 06, 2005, 04:56:51 PM
Can we expect a criterion release of breathless anytime soon.  if no, why not?  the quality of the DVD i netflixed is lacking. 
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on November 06, 2005, 05:13:22 PM
Can we expect a criterion release of breathless anytime soon.  if no, why not?  the quality of the DVD i netflixed is lacking. 

I'm surprised Criterion hasn't released it yet. I figured it was a rights issue, but Rialto has confirmed that Criterion does own the rights. Its just a matter of when they can get around to releasing it. Realizing Criterion tries to release a few Godards a year, I'd say sooner than later.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: eward on November 06, 2005, 07:45:12 PM
if theyre gonna do more godards they should skip breathles and focus on some of his 70's and 80's work
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on November 06, 2005, 09:16:39 PM
if theyre gonna do more godards they should skip breathles and focus on some of his 70's and 80's work

Through Rialto, they still have some 60s work in the near future that will get released. I agree they should evolve to his later work, but there has been no specific conversation yet to say they are making moves to do so. We can only hope.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on November 07, 2005, 02:12:51 AM
Amazon France website has two very exciting new releases this month:

Histoire(s) du Cinema
and a Passion/Nouvelle Vague double pack.

Dunno if either has English subs, but rumor is that Histoire(s) DOES, so I have ordered it. Will find out about the other two and post...
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: eward on November 07, 2005, 10:07:11 AM
im pretty sure the histoire release has subtitles and i too have oredered it
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on November 28, 2005, 06:36:28 AM
Hey Assholes -- let's make sure we all keep Vivre Sa Vie on the Deka list this year. If you haven't seen it yet... GO DO IT!!! NOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

And if you don't like it, watch it again. And love it. Love it. With all your heart.

And while you're at it, watch In Praise Of Love as well...
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Gamblour. on April 12, 2006, 12:08:44 AM
So, in my French New Wave class, we have been screening everything from Chabrol, Varda, and Melville to Truffaut and now Godard. We've seen Breathless, My Life to Live, Masculin/Feminin, and 2 or 3 Things I Know About Her.

Breathless is the product of luck, genius, and serendipity. That it works is incredible, and it feels so modern. It could probably play in theaters today and college kids would love it. It's quick and our contemporary, media-absorbed minds can handle the amount of information we're being given. My Life to Live, equally entertaining, but harder to bear. However...

Masculin/Feminin and 2 or 3 Things are absolute bores. 2 or 3 Things is the point where Godard forgets that films have to be watched by audiences and completely indulges in intellectual discourse with those who care. The film is made to be watched, but studied. There's nothing wrong with that, but no one can like it for its innovations, just its ideas. It's not about liking the film (though as Mamet would say, "Grow up"), but I have no interest in what his ideas say. I get it, Godard. You hate capitalism, yet understand one must be a part of it. Masculin/Feminin was a more subtle, intriguing examination of this, not like a sledge hammer to your head like 2 or 3 Things.

In addtion, I watched Pierrot le fou on my own....equally a piece of shit. I couldn't stand watching it. We still have to screen Weekend and Contempt, and I want to watch Alphaville on my own. I'm really excited about these last three, especially Weekend. I mean, a film purportedly about the end of cinema? I love that sort of audacity, not like the boring talking heads films Godard does.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: w/o horse on April 12, 2006, 12:37:04 AM
No Rohmer?
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Gamblour. on April 12, 2006, 09:11:43 AM
Nope, but the book mentions him a few times.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Gamblour. on April 17, 2006, 06:06:43 PM
Weekend is incredible. The girl describing the sex fantasy, the 9-minute dolly shot of cars, the drummer in the woods, all the carnage, what a crazy fucking film. Where did it get the label "the end of cinema" or is that something Godard has titled it? The themes are as blunt as a sledgehammer to a pig's head, but it's all hilariously violent....capitalist as cannibal and "consumer," automobiles as the bourgeois death machine. The little guerilla hippies at the end reminded me of some sort of militant version of Hair, especially when they're talking to the Ocean. Anyhow, probably my favorite Godard next to Breathless.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: eward on April 18, 2006, 02:52:08 PM
Where did it get the label "the end of cinema" or is that something Godard has titled it?

at the very end of the movie there are subtitles that say something like "end of story.  end of cinema."
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Gamblour. on April 19, 2006, 01:29:26 AM
Ah ok, I figured as much. The film is resonating more and more as the days go on. It was so fucking awesome!
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Just Withnail on April 19, 2006, 05:14:59 AM
The best part is the editing of the car crash. The car speeds, then: before and after, jumping to and fro between car and wreck, then to rest on the burning car and the woman´s screams. As opposed to the spectacle of showing a proper crash, it makes me uneasy, but then it quickly becomes hilarious; "my hermes handbag!". Of course the hilarity shoots the scene right back into uneasy after a few seconds, as it´s impossible to ignore the carnage it´s combined with. That´s pretty much my feelings on the film in general, as you say "hilariously violent".
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: MacGuffin on June 04, 2007, 10:18:54 PM
Janus plans multicity run of 'Pierrot'
Godard film to screen at Brooklyn's BAM
Source: Variety

Janus Films has planned a multicity run of a new 35mm print of Jean-Luc Godard's 1965 pic "Pierrot le fou."

Run kicks off June 15 at Brooklyn's BAMcinematek, followed by a screening at Toronto's Cinematheque Ontario on July 26; dates in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago and other cities will be announced later.

Loosely based on Lionel White's novel "Obsession," pic stars Jean-Paul Belmondo and Anna Karina.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on June 04, 2007, 10:35:27 PM
Can we expect a criterion release of breathless anytime soon.  if no, why not?  the quality of the DVD i netflixed is lacking. 

I'm surprised Criterion hasn't released it yet. I figured it was a rights issue, but Rialto has confirmed that Criterion does own the rights. Its just a matter of when they can get around to releasing it. Realizing Criterion tries to release a few Godards a year, I'd say sooner than later.

Gold Trumpet = nostradamus

i wonder if Pierrot involves Rialto at all and if this is pointing towards Criterion as well (i think GT has mentioned this film in Criterion 'possibles/likelys). i don't know why they wait until long after the theatrical run, these types of films would attract people that appreciate the theater experience, (it's not like the latest album early leak or something) and i wouldn't think it would affect dvd sales. the only reason i could think is putting all the extras together - or maybe transferring a print to dvd is more complicated than i realize.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on June 05, 2007, 12:54:04 AM
Can we expect a criterion release of breathless anytime soon.  if no, why not?  the quality of the DVD i netflixed is lacking. 

I'm surprised Criterion hasn't released it yet. I figured it was a rights issue, but Rialto has confirmed that Criterion does own the rights. Its just a matter of when they can get around to releasing it. Realizing Criterion tries to release a few Godards a year, I'd say sooner than later.

Gold Trumpet = nostradamus

i wonder if Pierrot involves Rialto at all and if this is pointing towards Criterion as well (i think GT has mentioned this film in Criterion 'possibles/likelys). i don't know why they wait until long after the theatrical run, these types of films would attract people that appreciate the theater experience, (it's not like the latest album early leak or something) and i wouldn't think it would affect dvd sales. the only reason i could think is putting all the extras together - or maybe transferring a print to dvd is more complicated than i realize.

No doubt this will be a Criterion release. I'm not sure it is Rialto, though. Janus is the headliner, but BAM is showing numerous other Godard films as well right now. It's likely not the same thing.

But you're right on why the lay over is long. There are rights issues on getting the extras and sometimes Criterion will improve the print from the Rialto release as well as do a transfer.

Expect Pierrot soon, but not too soon. By all measures, Criterion will release 2 or 3 Things I Know About Her and Breathless first. The former got a Rialto release last year and Breathless has already been confirmed by Criterion as in production.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on July 15, 2007, 10:55:51 PM
this poster has got me excited...

only a Godard character would be holding a book in one hand and a rifle in the other.

(http://www.janusfilms.com/pierrot/pierrotlefouposter.jpg)

is she carrying a stuffed dog toy of some sort?

(if any of this ruins a surprise in the film i'd rather not know)
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: w/o horse on August 20, 2007, 11:45:16 AM
Caught a screening of one of those new 35mm prints going around.  The stuffed animal is an affectation that Karina carries, sometimes.

The movie meandered too much starting in the middle.  Just flat out.  But, and in the Superbad thread moments ago I stated the opposite:  a few really memorable scenes.  The gas station fight was a personal favorite.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on August 20, 2007, 10:05:53 PM
2 weekends ago i wanted to watch a fun 90 min movie and ended up watching both Masculin Feminin and Band of Outsiders.

the first time i watched Masculin Feminin, maybe i put too much anticipation on it, i didn't think it was that great, but i found it very funny this viewing.

i'm waiting for the day when Criterion has released the man's entire catalog (at least Breathless through Weekend) and i can watch them in chronological order.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: last days of gerry the elephant on September 07, 2007, 08:10:22 PM
Does anybody else have that re-issue poster up on their walls?
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on September 07, 2007, 10:45:52 PM
I don't but I'd like to - as well as actually see the film itself.
How much would one run and where do you even get one?
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Pubrick on September 08, 2007, 12:40:21 AM
looks like he's waiting for her to give him head, like "ay, what's the hold up! can't you see my hands are full?". and the movie's not in colour so that's on some Elephant Man cover-art steez right there.

Godard remains overrated but i'm thinking of watching some of his 80s films. namely Passion and Prénom Carmen, anyone seen these? i'm assuming they were made around the time he stopped getting it up.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: last days of gerry the elephant on September 08, 2007, 09:19:15 AM
I don't but I'd like to - as well as actually see the film itself.
How much would one run and where do you even get one?

http://store.criterion.com/product/show/28286
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: children with angels on September 08, 2007, 09:50:39 AM
and the movie's not in colour so that's on some Elephant Man cover-art steez right there.

?

I saw Pierrot for the first time the other day. Some of it I liked very much - I thought it began very strongly, Karina and Belmondo were magnificent and free-wheeling, the carefully constructed colour pallette was really pleasing, and the sense of fun, spontaneity and exhilaration with the games they're playing with cinematic form and genre continue for a good while.

But after a bit it certainly does start to drag, and begins to start exhibiting the problems I have with most early Godard (having not seen anything post-Weekend), that is: the off-the-cuff, throwaway style (which is also one of the main pulls of Godard's filmmaking) begins to wear a little thin. Very little of what goes on has any weight to it because he creates a fictional world that he doesn't ask you to believe in. This is fine and interesting for a while, and especially good when he keeps the subject lightweight (like Une Femme est une Femme). However, the more "serious" aspects (the burgeoning political commentry, the thoughts on relationships and art) are made to suffer greatly from this weightlessness because they come accross as just random jottings or throwaway ideas coming from a bunch of mates hanging out with a film camera. Either that, or ideological chess-pieces put together without a great deal of thought. This therefore doesn't make me want to  engage with them or take them seriously. There's also too much in the way of empty character conversation and plotting for such a feather-light approach to the fictional world.

I know this is pre- properly "serious"/committed Godard, and so maybe my comments about lack of weight are a bit unfair, but you've got to deal with what's in front of you. It's a real shame, because I've been looking forward to this film for a long time. I think I'm going to check out Tout Va Bien next, see if it piques my interest any futher.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on September 08, 2007, 11:52:23 AM
I think I'm going to check out Tout Va Bien next, see if it piques my interest any futher.

Doubtful. Everything you said above are my exact feelings to why I can't get truly into Godard. Tout Va Bien is interesting in some ways, but it leaves you feeling that Godard says so much but still has no basis. It's all still a bunch of references. Weekend is still my favorite Godard. The first half is excellent and his best stuff. But when the film enters the woods and involves revolutionaries, it becomes very stupid.

I don't feel truly lost on Godard. I want to see 2 or 3 Things I Know About Her and A Married Woman. I've heard some of his lesser known works are just as interesting.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on September 08, 2007, 02:48:33 PM
I don't but I'd like to - as well as actually see the film itself.
How much would one run and where do you even get one?

http://store.criterion.com/product/show/28286

$25!
Is this what posters of this type usually run?
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: SoNowThen on September 09, 2007, 04:51:32 AM
looks like he's waiting for her to give him head, like "ay, what's the hold up! can't you see my hands are full?". and the movie's not in colour so that's on some Elephant Man cover-art steez right there.

Godard remains overrated but i'm thinking of watching some of his 80s films. namely Passion and Prénom Carmen, anyone seen these? i'm assuming they were made around the time he stopped getting it up.

Carmen is one of his best looking and most fun movies. Even Coutard picked it as a personal favorite, if that means anything to ya. Slow Motion, Passion, Carmen, and Hail Mary are a really great second wave for Godard, so I don't think it's neccessary to love his earlier work if you want to try these. Slow Motion, in particular, I had a really hard time with first go, but then when the AI disc came out in the UK last year (looking so damn nice), it worked really well for me the second time round.

They were made around the time when he started sleeping with an attractive set photographer, and also an extremely hot young french actress.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on September 17, 2007, 08:58:05 AM
nashvillians can live my cinematic wet dream:

http://www.belcourt.org/events?id=50985 (http://www.belcourt.org/events?id=50985)

September edition:  Classic Godard

 
Sept 1-2                       BAND OF OUTSIDERS (Bande à part, 1964)


Sept 8-9                       BREATHLESS (À bout de soufflé, 1960)

Sept 15-16                   WEEKEND (1967)

Sept 22-23                   CONTEMPT (Le Mépris, 1964)

Sept 28-Oct 2              PIERROT LE FOU (1965 – new 35mm print)

Title: Re: Godard
Post by: grand theft sparrow on October 04, 2007, 10:39:11 AM
La Chinoise is screening at the Film Forum in NYC next week.

http://www.filmforum.org/films/chinoise.html

Title: Re: Godard
Post by: MacGuffin on December 02, 2007, 12:07:47 PM
Godard says he stole money to make movies: report

French New Wave director Jean-Luc Godard has confessed that he stole money to finance his films in an interview with a German newspaper to be published on Thursday.

"I had no choice. Or at least it seemed that way to me. I even stole money from my family to give to (fellow French director Jacques) Rivette for his first film. I pinched money to be able to see films and to make films," he told Die Zeit weekly.

Godard's first film "Breathless", starring Jean-Paul Belmondo and Jean Seberg, is considered to be a groundbreaking work of the French New Wave.

He cemented his reputation with "Contempt", "Pierrot le Fou" and "Two or Three Things I Know About Her".

Godard, 76, is due to receive a lifetime achievement award from the European Film Academy in Berlin on Saturday.

He told Die Zeit he had little time for most contemporary filmmakers.

"Most directors, and three-quarters of the people who will receive prizes in Berlin, only pick up the camera to feel alive. They do not use it to see things that you cannot see without a camera."

Rivette's first feature-length film "Paris Belongs to Us" hit screens in 1960, the same year as "Breathless."
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on March 12, 2008, 07:10:05 PM
The gas station fight was a personal favorite.

Yes, that was my favorite part.
Loved when the midget guy pointed the gun at Karina and then she ran the scissors across the frame.
I'll have to see this again before I fully know what I think.

The Godard/Karina extra on the DVD was interesting, but I just looked at IMDB and noticed they paired up for Made in USA afterwards. Even in the documentary they seem to act like Pierrot Le Fou was their last film together. Reading though, it seems Made in USA was never released in the US because of legalities. Still, you figure Criterion would at least show clips of it (unless I missed it).

I was very suprised that my local Hasting's had Pierrot for $29.99.
They also have the recent box set for that price. I see it's a little cheaper online, but I'm just in shock that they even had both. I wonder if I should get it...
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on June 01, 2009, 08:11:47 PM
Has anyone picked up the March/April (or any) issue of The Believer (http://believermag.com/issues/200903/)?
I know it's a couple months late, but I JUST found it last week (some stores are still selling it, and I'm sure you can back order it), and thought to share with you guys as soon as I had the time and chance.
Generally, it's a literary magazine, but every now and then they devote an entire issue to Film, and this one includes a dvd of "virtually unseen short films documenting Jean-Luc Godard's travels in the U.S."
When I first heard about it, I figured it MIGHT be an hour's worth, but - to my pleasant surprise - it has nearly 3 HOURS of material!

JLG in USA

1.Two American Audiences
Announcing itself as "a typical Pennebaker production of a typical Godard visit," JLG speaks with grad students and Serge Losique at NYU in April 1968. Pennebaker: "When Jean-Luc Godard came to New York to make a film (1 A.M./1 P.M.) with me and Ricky Leacock, he was anxious to see America before the revolution broke out, torn up as it was with the Vietnam furor. Godard's most recent film, La Chinoise, was playing, and Columbia University students, who had initiated their student uprising on the day the film opened, were pouring into the theater. This to our unexpected delight, for when Godard had arranged for us to distribute the film, we had done so with misgiving since his films were not normally known to fill theaters. So as we laughed at his sly remarks, it occurred to us that there were two audiences involved here, and maybe that our film should be about that. It might also be noted that the date of the filming, April 4, 1968, was the day Martin Luther King, Jr. was killed. Of course, none of us in the room knew about that then."

2.Godard in America
Spring 1970: Godard and Gorin, on the road, visiting colleges, speaking with Andrew Sarris, and explaining, through illustrated notebooks, their newest Dziga Vertov Group project, a film on Palestine.

3.A Weekend at the Beach with Jean-Luc Godard
Casual video footage from Del Mar Beach, San Diego, of Godard, Jean-Pierre Gorin, Tom Luddy, Alive Waters, Win Wenders, and Heiner Müller, swimming, eating, smoking, with Ira Schneider's wonderfully droll narration. With a newly recorded audio introduction by Schneider.

4.The Dick Cavett Show
On the occasion of the release of Godard's newest film, Sauve qui peut (la vie), two thirty-minute episodes of The Dick Cavett Show were filmed. Funny and introspective, the names--Lewis, Coppola, Schroeder, Scorcese, Hawks, Preminger, Bukowski--and profundities hurtle past at an astonishing clip.

5.Godard in Oakland
A slideshow of Jeffrey Blankfort's photographs of Godard's visit to the Bay Area at the time of Huey Newton's trial in Oakland.

And the articles themselves are just as great as the dvd, and have a wide-range of topics like: Polish Movie Posters; an article on Jonas Mekas; interviews with Mike Leigh, John Sayles, Julie Delpy, Arthur Bradford, and Sam Mendes; and much, much more!!!
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on June 02, 2009, 07:51:17 AM
I don't believe I've ever heard or seen the magazine but I might have to try and order that issue.
Thanks for the tip.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: MacGuffin on June 04, 2009, 12:22:56 AM
Holocaust tale piques auteur
Godard eyes Mendelsohn adaptation, sources say
Source: Hollywood Reporter
 
Even as he approaches 80, Jean-Luc Godard keeps on trucking.

The icon of the French New Wave has been toiling away on "Le socialisme," a political story that could be ready as early as this year.

Now there's word he's circling "The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million," a first-person Holocaust tome from New York Times writer Daniel Mendelsohn, as a possible directing vehicle.

Mendelsohn's book, a best-seller when it came out three years ago, traces the writer's quest to determine his relatives' fate in the small town of Bolechow, Poland, during World War II and expands into larger questions of guilt and collective responsibility.

"Lost" won a National Book Critics Circle prize in the U.S. and made a splash in France, picking up the country's prestigious Prix Medicis.

Godard, who turns 79 in the fall, never has taken on the Holocaust directly, but several of his films -- including the Algerian war picture "Le petit soldat," the anti-war pic "Les carabiniers" and his most recent work, the 2004 triptych "Notre musique" -- deal with complex political and philosophical questions.

As for "Le socalisme," an unofficial French-language trailer shows it mixing documentary and feature footage from countries throughout Europe, much of it with political themes.

There even was word, later proved premature, that the movie would be ready for the just-concluded Festival de Cannes. There's always more to surf in the French New Wave.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on August 05, 2009, 01:01:37 PM
Alright, 2 new Criterion Godard's, but no reviews?

I've seen Made In USA and the extras, but I'm no good as far as detailed reviews go.

The docs are making me want to watch Preminger and Ray - I'm not too versed on any of their films other than seeing some on TCM.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: MacGuffin on March 08, 2010, 12:21:12 AM
'Breathless' set for re-release
Rialto Pictures returns Godard classic to bigscreen
Source: Variety

Rialto Pictures is bringing Jean-Luc Godard's "Breathless" back to life Stateside in celebration of the pic's 50th anniversary this year.

The Gotham-based re-release specialist has acquired U.S. theatrical rights to the seminal French New Wave film and will bow a restored 35mm print at Hollywood's Chinese Theater next month.

The new print will make its American premiere as part of the inaugural TCM Classic Film Festival (April 22-25). The restored version was first unveiled at the Berlin Film Festival in February.

A commercial theatrical re-release of "Breathless" kicks off May 28 at New York's Film Forum, followed by a national rollout.

Along with "Breathless," Rialto also picked up theatrical rights to two 1963 Godard films, "Le petit soldat" and "Les Carabiniers." Deal was negotiated with Paris-based Pretty Pictures.

Written with Francois Truffaut, "Breathless" is Godard's feature debut and toplines Jean-Paul Belmondo and Jean Seberg.

"We've had some of our biggest hits with Godard's amazing, innovative movies of the '60s," said Rialto founder and co-prexy Bruce Goldstein. "But 'Breathless' is in a class by itself. It's not only one of the most important films of the last half-century, still inspiring new generations of moviemakers, but it's just as fun and audacious as it was 50 years ago."

The "Breathless" restoration is the film's first and was supervised by Beatrice Valbin at StudioCanal. English subtitles were revised by film historian Lenny Borger, who also is working on a translation of Godard's latest pic, "Socialisme."

Rialto has shepherded classic films by Federico Fellini, Jean Renoir, Jules Dassin, Vittorio De Sica, Luis Bunuel, Alain Resnais, Akira Kurosawa and Jean-Pierre Melville.

Among its other Godard titles are "Contempt," "Band of Outsiders" and "Masculine, Feminine."
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on March 08, 2010, 10:10:30 AM
Along with "Breathless," Rialto also picked up theatrical rights to two 1963 Godard films, "Le petit soldat" and "Les Carabiniers." Deal was negotiated with Paris-based Pretty Pictures.

So I guess we can expect Criterion versions of these movies after it plays theatrically for a while.
 :yabbse-thumbup:

That has to make La Chinoise about the only 60's era Godard left off the top of my head.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Gold Trumpet on March 08, 2010, 01:55:52 PM
So I guess we can expect Criterion versions of these movies after it plays theatrically for a while.

Yep. Usually about 8-9 months afterward, but expect one to be possibly come much later because Criterion wants to separate Godard out usually to make sure a Godard is released every year.

That has to make La Chinoise about the only 60's era Godard left off the top of my head.

There is still The Married Woman, A Film Like Any Other and Joy of Learning. I've actually heard good things about The Married Woman so I have always wanted to see it.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Captain of Industry on March 08, 2010, 03:35:27 PM
Off the topic of Godard, apologies, but continuing on the Criterion releases topic...I saw a Janus Films distributed print of Summer with Monika fucking two years ago.  Where's that sob?  Is it because they want to spread out their Bergman releases, like you're saying they spread their Godard releases?
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: SiliasRuby on February 09, 2011, 01:05:12 AM
Just saw 'alphaville' for the first time and really loved it. Have to watch it multiple times I believe to really wrap my head around what godard was doing and what godard was trying to achieve but its pretty brilliant.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Sleepless on February 23, 2011, 09:51:52 AM
Watch Two In The Wave last night, and it was an enjoyable doc. The majority of the film just washed over me, and I felt quite giddy at the excitement surrounding the start of the Nouvelle Vague - almost like I was discovering Godard and Truffaut's early films for the very first time all over again. The central concept of the film is to explore Godard and Truffaut's friendship and similarities despite their obvious differences. The final third-half of the film got a bit lackluster as they started pulling clips without any real meaty context. And by the time it bot into Tout Va Bien and Godard's death of cinema, it felt like it needed a whole new film to explore that time in his career.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: tpfkabi on February 23, 2011, 10:05:14 AM
I recently watched Made in USA again.
ahhh...karina...and faithfull.

Rialto still seems to not be showing "Le petit soldat" or "Les Carabiniers."

There were no new Godard releases in 2010 (not counting Blu re-releases), right? Or am I blanking out?
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Sleepless on January 16, 2012, 10:43:06 AM
Apparently, Godard filmed parts of Film Socialisme aboard the Costa Concordia (which sank off the coast of Italy on Friday). (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jan/15/costa-concordia-jean-luc-godard)
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Ravi on May 09, 2012, 12:10:29 PM
http://thefilmstage.com/news/jean-luc-godard-shooting-next-film-in-3d-first-poster-and-cast-assemble/

Jean-Luc Godard Shooting Next Film In 3D; First Poster and Cast Assemble
Posted by Jordan Raup, on May 8, 2012 at 4:33 pm
     
Coming off the divisive Film Socialisme, French New Wave pioneer Jean-Luc Godard is not simply resting on his laurels. The Breathless director is already in production in his next film, titled Goodbye to Language and the production company Wild Bunch have revealed the currently shooting film will be in 3D, along with information on the cast and first sales poster for the film they’re taking to the Cannes market.

The cast is made up of French actors Héloise Godet, Zoe Bruneau, Kamel Abdelli, Richard Chevalier and Jessica Erickson. While there is no official synopsis, Godard previously expressed interest in 3D back in 2010, saying he likes “when new techniques are introduced. Because it doesn’t have any rules yet.” He went on to say this film will be about ”a man and his wife who no longer speak the same language. The dog they take on walks then intervenes and speaks. How I’ll do it, I don’t yet know. The rest is simple.”

It sounds like he’s figured it out, as Godard is in production already. The director will be joining other legendary filmmakers experimenting with the new technology, such as Wim Wenders, Martin Scorsese, Steven Spielberg, Ridley Scott and more, but it’s no question that I’m most interested in seeing what attracts Godard to this new format.

We’ll hopefully get more information when the film hits the Cannes marketplace.

What do you think about Godard taking on 3D?
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Sleepless on May 09, 2012, 02:25:55 PM
Wow. Er... I'd be interested in seeing what he does with it as I'd like to think it's be an experience like no other. On the other hand, it could be a big steaming pile of turd like most 3D movies are. Fuck, he could just be planning on doing a whole movie about why 3D is bad. It will be interesting to follow news on this one.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: The Perineum Falcon on May 09, 2012, 06:44:39 PM
Does this mean I have to start taking it seriously?
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: Pubrick on May 09, 2012, 08:01:07 PM
Does this mean I have to start taking it seriously?

No. Godard is a joke.
Title: Re: Godard
Post by: jenkins on February 19, 2017, 03:43:26 PM
Quote
"For a while now, my holy grail has been Une Femme Coquette, the second short film directed by Jean-Luc Godard. It’s a nine-minute Guy De Maupassant adaptation he shot on 16 mm in Geneva in 1955, using money earned from the sale of Opération Béton, his first short and one of my earliest holy grails. Une Femme Coquette is the most elusive rarity of the French New Wave, and possibly the most difficult-to-see film by a name filmmaker that isn’t believed to be irretrievably lost. Actually, plenty of references list it as lost—which, again, it isn’t—because it’s never been distributed and because no film archive or public collection will cop to owning a print.

this is the kind of thing which in the past everyone not in a city would be hearing about but missing out on. it's some straight up rediscovered Godard just fucking casual chilling on youtube. you may have to click it open to read the subtitles.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzpFi0uBmzs