XIXAX Film Forum

Film Discussion => News and Theory => Topic started by: HeywoodRFloyd on September 13, 2012, 12:42:51 AM

Title: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: HeywoodRFloyd on September 13, 2012, 12:42:51 AM
So guys, I was wondering what films you think have great cinematography. I'm going to try and list some obscure films, and you guys hopefully do the same so we can discover more

Army Of Shadows (1969)
To Catch A Thief (1955)
Harakiri (1962)
Revanche (2008)
Funny Games US (2007)
Ashes and Diamonds (1958)
Persona (1966)
Children Of Men (2006)
Sunset Blvd. (1950)
Sweet Smell of Success (1957)
Barry Lyndon (1975)
The Conformist (1970)
Apocalypse Now (1979)
No Country For Old Men (2007)
Psycho (1960)
Days Of Heaven (1978)


Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: Pubrick on September 13, 2012, 02:08:55 AM
:ponder:

any film shot by a professional cinematographer.

/thread
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: Pubrick on September 14, 2012, 10:27:25 AM
i didn't mean to actually kill the thread. :yabbse-undecided:

i think ultimately this category is a bit unwieldy.. at best it comes down to "movies that are pretty/showy/highly visual" or something vague that could encapsulate any movie that isn't Birdemic.

a better way to talk about it i think would be "best cinematographers" or "most interesting cinematographers".. because basically any movie shot by Vittorio Storaro is gonna look good, or anything by Emmanuel Lubezki, or just anyone Woody Allen has ever hired (he's got the BEST taste in cinematographers).

that's an interesting idea actually.. whether it's the cinematographer or the director that makes a movie beautiful. there are very few DPs that could save a film on their own merit.. Christopher Doyle might be one. but everyone else is really at the whim of their director. Rodrigo Prieto made magic working with Ang Lee but look at his recent work, We Built A Zzzzwho?

so yeah. run with that.
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: mogwai on September 14, 2012, 10:57:01 AM
Dante Spinotti comes first to my mind with "L.A. Confidential" and "The Insider".
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: BB on September 14, 2012, 11:45:08 AM
I think that it's probably the cinematographer that makes the movie beautiful. But this depends on how willing the director is to let it happen. It's my understanding that Woody Allen doesn't "direct" much when it comes to his actors. I would assume the same is true of his approach to cinematographers. And, just as his movies often feature amazing performances, they're often really nice to look at. I think that all comes down to the caliber of the artists and actors he employs.

Spinotti is a great cinematographer and has done some wonderful, inventive work. He's also shot Ratner's entire oeuvre.

Lubezki does amazing work with Cuaron and Malick. But he's also done merely good work with the Coens (Burn After Reading) and Mike Nichols (The Birdcage)... the, uh, the Mike Myers Cat in the Hat, etc.

Storaro is an exception in that he's seemingly always had free rein. Even shit like Bulworth and Ishtar looks interesting. But I haven't seen everything he's done by a long shot.

I realize I'm sort of defining really great cinematography as the showy stuff and that this is not necessarily true. Roger Deakins, for example, is rarely showy but solid and well-regarded. Pubrick was right. Any film shot by a professional is very probably gonna have good cinematography.
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: HeywoodRFloyd on September 15, 2012, 09:14:24 AM
Does really interesting camera movement/placement count as being 'Cinematography'? Because that was the other half of my intention when I created this thread.

When I think of camera work in films, I think it as a creative choice from a director rather than a cinematographer (PDL for example).
That's also why I listed a Jean Pierre Melville film, because he's style in camera movement is so articulate and impressive/expressive, it's like a character of it's own. I remember watching an interview with Deakins, and he said the same thing about Melville's films.
I wholeheartedly agree that Storaro, Khondji especially Deakins & Lubezki are the great ones. But stepping outside that circle are there any other films that you've been surprised by from the visual element? from camera movement, to maybe the use of light in a B&W film.. or even colour for that matter

I mentioned Harakiri, which I was extremely surprised by how absorbing that film's camera movement was.

I don't know if I'm in the minority here but I don't think Robert Elswit is in the same league of the cinematographers that have been mentioned, but his films with PTA have been nothing short of beautiful. This surely has to be because PTA has an eye for the visuals too, right? because the camera work is mainly what is so impressive in PTA's films.

I also thought I'd post this brilliant shot from Revanche.

(http://images.static-bluray.com/reviews/2450_4_1080p.jpg)
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: Reelist on September 15, 2012, 09:40:20 AM
Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf?



(http://www.cinemaseries.es/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/who-s-afraid-of-virginia-woolf-1966-14-g-1024x771.jpg)



Haskell Wexler, also did 'The Conversation' and Cuckoo's Nest
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: samsong on September 15, 2012, 02:20:04 PM
some of my favorites (limited myself to one per director.)

le plaisir
the magnificent ambersons
the night of the hunter
black narcissus
portrait of jennie
the thin red line
sansho the bailiff
mccabe & mrs miller
the turin horse
happy together
wings of desire
sunrise
gerry
beau travail
golden door
cries and whispers
tropical malady
andrei rublev
the leopard
the passion of joan of arc
red desert
manhattan
the spirit of the beehive
three colors trilogy (especially blue)
the shining
kagemusha
hiroshima mon amour
down by law

and uh... i guess lawrence of arabia


Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: samsong on September 18, 2012, 05:18:22 PM
...how many of these threads am i going to kill?
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: matt35mm on September 18, 2012, 05:54:10 PM
Well, speaking personally, I'm not really attracted to lists of movies, so I wasn't going to engage with this thread in that way. I'd be interested in a discussion of what constitutes great cinematography beyond pretty shots and technical skill, which are nice things but common enough. Indeed, I think that there are some films that look kind of shitty and aren't very skillful that I'd think of as having great cinematography (John Cassavetes's films come to mind). To me, it's more a matter of how the image/camera observes and engages with the content of the movie, and how it works together to create the cinematic experience. The camera has an attitude and is saying its own things, at least in a thoughtfully and sensitively shot film. But this is separate from obvious beauty.

I'm also not that interested in whether it's the cinematographer or director that makes a movie beautiful. I find myself caring more about what was done and less about who did it, unless we're really gonna talk about what it is that the individual brings to the collaborative process... though we can only guess. Even hearing PTA talk about it, he seems to forget who brought what to the table... eventually you just have to say that the team did it.

But I don't think you're doing the thread wrong, (in fact, I think you did it just right) and I don't think you killed it; I just think it's not a very interesting thread, if all we're gonna do is say that these movies were pretty and these cinematographers were good.

With all that said, I just remembered that there's this thread: Evolving Shooting Styles (http://xixax.com/index.php?topic=11551.0) Even though it's not titled "What Makes Great Cinematography?," it's the closest thread I could think of that I remember seeing here.

The other thing is that if we DO go into those kinds of conversations, they're more time-demanding, which is probably why that thread also died. But it'd be nice to revive it.

Sorry, I realize that I've come into a thread and yelled at it for not being something else.
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: mogwai on September 18, 2012, 09:45:55 PM
Saw "Let the right one in" yesterday for the first time in a while and there were a lot of these kind of angles. Very rare in swedish movies btw.

(http://images3.static-bluray.com/reviews/1139_18.jpg)
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: jenkins on September 19, 2012, 07:12:43 PM
Hadewijch (http://innergenre.blogspot.com/2012/07/the-body-as-soul-bruno-dumonts-hadewijch.html)
Be Yourself! (http://innergenre.blogspot.com/2012/07/be-yourself-30.html)
Hercules in the Haunted World (http://innergenre.blogspot.com/2012/07/hercules-in-haunted-world.html)
Morvern Callar (http://innergenre.blogspot.com/2012/06/morvern-callar.html)
River's Edge (http://innergenre.blogspot.com/2012/06/rivers-edge-86.html)
Night of the Comet (http://innergenre.blogspot.com/2012/06/night-of-comet.html)
Blue Steel (http://innergenre.blogspot.com/2012/05/blue-steel-89.html)
Wheels on Meals (http://innergenre.blogspot.com/2012/04/wheels-on-meals.html)
Submarine (http://innergenre.blogspot.com/2012/04/undressing-richard-ayoades-submarine.html)
Roadracers (http://innergenre.blogspot.com/2012/03/roadracers-1994.html)
Sugar Hill (http://innergenre.blogspot.com/2012/01/sugar-hill-74.html)
Weekend (http://innergenre.blogspot.com/2012/01/weekend-2011.html)
200 Motels (http://innergenre.blogspot.com/2012/01/frank-zappas-200-motels.html)

The way this list works is you can click a title and it takes you to a posting I've made about the movie. This takes care of the "getting to know you" and "talking about movies" and "faux pas" all at once.
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: pete on September 19, 2012, 08:20:58 PM
wheels on meals!
I like this guy.
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: matt35mm on September 20, 2012, 12:18:45 AM
Your blog is fucking awesome. I shall be following it.
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: pete on September 21, 2012, 06:58:59 AM
yeah, greatest newbie ever.
Here's the climatic battle from Wheels on Meals; the Jackie Chan bits are just pure joy.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UrlxwlCHFXY

I stole a shot from that fight in my short action scene [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HS0fw2uk948]Hand Over Fist[/youtube].
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on November 06, 2012, 09:25:08 PM
Talk About the Future, Pt. 1
via Film and Digital Times

Madelyn Most wrote at Camerimage last November: “There was a certain buzz, not only about the new cameras, but what impact digital technology was having on the actual job and responsibilities of cinematographers. Has it really surpassed film?”

Madelyn prepared a 12-page booklet of observations by cinematographers, mostly British and American, assembled fast and furiously in time for the BSC show this past February 2012.

In a few weeks, Madelyn will update us with new comments in a new booklet consisting of French cinematographers. It will be interesting to compare what has happened in the intervening year, and to see what cultural currents emerge.

Talk About the Future - Part 1 - PDF (http://www.filmanddigitaltimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Madelyn_Most_Talk-About-the-Future-1.pdf)


Le Futur, Part 2
via Film and Digital Times

Previously, Madelyn Most discussed the impact of digital on cinematographers, mostly in England. In this article, she takes her investigation to France:

Returning home to France last winter, I wondered how cinematographers here would respond to the digital versus film debate. After lengthy interviews and discussions, each person decided to compose their own contribution in their own words. Here are their most immediate, honest, and sincere thoughts on the subject.

Le Futur, Part 2 - French Cinematographers - PDF (http://www.fdtimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/LeFutur-byMadelynMost-5563.pdf)

-Bruno Delbonnel
-Philippe Rousselot
-Guillaume Schiffman
-Eric Gautier
-Agnès Godard
-Darius Khondji
-Thierry Arbogast
-Caroline Champetier
-Philippe Ros
-Benoit Delhomme
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on February 06, 2013, 05:55:47 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/I4bEORL.jpg)
from Last Year in Marienbad

Color photos from the sets of films shot in black and white - 'Black and White in Color' @ Criterion (http://www.criterion.com/current/posts/2647-black-and-white-in-color)
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on February 06, 2013, 06:01:52 PM
I made a list:

Black & White

John Alton (T-Men, Raw Deal, He Walked By Night)
George C. Clemens (“The Twilight Zone”)
Stanley Cortez (The Night of the Hunter, The Secret Beyond the Door, Since You Went Away)
Freddie Francis (The Innocents, The Elephant Man)
Lee Garmes (Shanghai Express, Nightmare Alley)
Bert Glennon (Underworld, The Scarlet Empress, Crime Wave)
James Wong Howe (Sweet Smell of Success, Seconds)
Masao Kosugi (Tears on the Lion’s Mane, Pale Flower)
Charles Lang (Sabrina, Strangers When We Meet, Desert Fury)
Ernest Laszlo (Kiss Me Deadly, The Big Knife)
Sam Leavitt (Cape Fear '62, A Star Is Born '54)
Nicholas Musuraca (Cat People, The Curse of the Cat People, The Seventh Victim)
Harold Rosson (The Docks of New York)
John L. Russel (Psycho)
John F. Seitz (Sunset Blvd., Double Indemnity)
Sergei Urusevsky (The Cranes are Flying)
Sacha Vierny (Hiroshima mon amour, Last Year at Marienbad)
Haskell Wexler (Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, The Conversation)

Color

John Alcott (A Clockwork Orange, The Shining, Barry Lyndon)
Michael Ballhaus (Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s films, The Color of Money, Goodfellas)
Sharunas Bartas
Christian Berger (Benny's Video, The Piano Teacher, The White Ribbon)
Robert Burks (Vertigo, North by Northwest, The Birds, Rear Window)
Yves Cape (Hadewijch)
Jack Cardiff (The African Queen, Black Narcissus, The Red Shoes)
Michael Chapman (Taxi Driver, Raging Bull)
Jordan Cronenweth (Blade Runner)
Henri Decaë (Jean-Pierre Melville’s films, Purple Noon)
Robert Elswit (Hard Eight, Boogie Nights, Magnolia, There Will Be Blood)
Teo Escamilla (Deprisa Deprisa, Cria Cuervos)
Hans Fromm (Barbara, The State I Am In)
Tak Fujimoto (The Silence of the Lambs)
Martin Gschlacht (Revanche)
Conrad L. Hall (Cool Hand Luke, In Cold Blood, Marathon Man, Road to Perdition)
Winton C. Hoch (The Searchers, The Quiet Man)
Peter Hyams (2010)
Darius Khondji (Funny Games U.S., Amour)
Ed Lachman (True Stories, The Virgin Suicides, Ken Park, Far from Heaven, Ulrich Seidl's Paradise Trilogy)
Philip H. Lathrop (Point Blank, The Driver, Experiment in Terror)
Jody Lee Lipes (Martha Marcy May Marlene)
Joseph MacDonald (Bigger Than Life, Pickup on South Street, Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?)
William C. Mellor (Giant, Bad Day at Black Rock)
Russel Metty (Douglas Sirk’s films, Touch of Evil)
Sven Nykvist (Bergman’s films, The Tenant)
Georgi Rerberg (Stalker, The Mirror)
Robert Richardson (Wall Street, Casino, Inglorious Basterds)
Aleksei Rodionov (Come and See)
Harris Savides (Somewhere, Greenberg, Margot at the Wedding)
Larry Smith (Eyes Wide Shut)
Dante Spinotti (Manhunter, Heat, The Insider)
Vitorrio Storaro (Apocalypse Now, One from the Heart, Last Tango in Paris, The Conformist)
Robert Surtees (The Graduate)
Peter Suschitzky (David Cronenberg’s films)
John Toll (The Thin Red Line)
Luciano Tovoli (The Passenger, Suspiria, Police, Tenebre)
Geoffrey Unsworth (2001: A Space Odyssey)
Jost Vacano (Das Boot, Robocop)
Derek Vanlint (Alien)
Gordon Willis  (The Godfather I & II, Interiors, Klute, All the President’s Men)
Andréas Winding (Playtime, La Prisonniere)
Vadim Yusov (Ivan's Childhood, Solaris)
Vimos Zsigmond (Images, The Long Goodbye, Scarecrow, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, The Deer Hunter)
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: jenkins on February 06, 2013, 06:27:10 PM
nice. good catch on Joseph MacDonald

what about

Gabriel Figueroa (Los Olvidados, Exterminating Angel, Night of the Iguana, Under the Volcano)
Ping Bin Lee (Hou Hsiao-hsien movies)
Sayombhu Mukdeeprom (Weerasethakul movies)
Cheng Siu-keung (Johnnie To movies)
Néstor Almendros (Claire's Knee, Maîtresse, Days of Heaven)
Alain Marcoen (Dardenne Bros movies)
Raoul Coutard
Christopher Doyle
Agnès Godard
Tim Orr
Eric Gautier (Pola X, Irma Vep, Kings & Queen, Wild Grass)
Arthur C. Miller (The Prowler,
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: Pubrick on February 06, 2013, 08:30:02 PM
nice lists you guys but I can't believe you both forgot the most obvious one:

any film shot by a professional cinematographer.

/thread

Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: jenkins on February 06, 2013, 08:56:14 PM
*throws stack of papers in the air*

plus i forgot so many
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on February 13, 2013, 07:39:09 PM
Cinematographer Style (2006) - Part 1 of 6

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLPV3nUyTvw


Cinematographer Gordon Willis, Setting the Scene - 2002 NPR Interview (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=120386781)

James Wong Howe: Cinematographer - Vimeo (http://vimeo.com/15815385)

Interview with Vilmos Zsigmond - Vimeo (http://vimeo.com/19796406)
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on April 13, 2013, 05:21:53 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GyzIrrMccNY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7aCa74qTzOI

In the second video, Gordon Willis talks about his relationship with Woody Allen and how much he influenced his visual style and blocking.
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on April 16, 2013, 02:07:55 PM
Interiors Journal on The Conformist (http://issuu.com/interiorsjournal/docs/interiors0413?mode=window)

and

The director of photography for Apocalypse Now, One from the Heart, Reds, and Last Tango in Paris reveals his theory of the effect of colors on our emotions.
Writing with Light: An interview with Vittorio Storaro (http://ubuntuone.com/6iu4qmoK4ruphNCmRAIQVz), Film Quarterly, Volume XXXV, No. 3, Spring 1982
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on May 20, 2013, 12:51:34 PM
Interview with Stanley Cortez (Night of the Hunter)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_Sksqp-NL0
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on June 14, 2013, 02:32:36 PM
Ed Lachman interviewed on Craft Truck

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhJvnN83HaY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTzsRVM8eXQ
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on January 26, 2014, 12:53:02 AM
The documentary Visions of Light (1992) is available to view online at this link (http://viooz.co/movies/15318-visions-of-light-1992.html) (for now). For a full list of the films discussed, go to the doc's wikipedia page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visions_of_Light).
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: Mel on January 26, 2014, 06:51:02 AM
Series "Through the Lens" from Craft Truck was great. To be honest I preferred some episodes with lesser known cinematographers (compared to Willis, Cundey or Lachman)  - interview with Tom Richmond is my favorite. Some videos were linked before, here is full list:

Craft Truck - Through the Lens:

THR Roundtable with cinematographers (still fresh - November 2013) is great to watch - there is some interesting discussion about digital.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RkNvxo42D0

DP/30 had interview with Roger Deakins:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hzlDmlE0wA

Few other interviews from DP/30:

There are some shorter interviews from Camerimage Film Festival (lots of them):
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: Mel on March 14, 2014, 04:26:08 AM
Never underestimate what can be done with just handheld. Jost Vacano talks about running with camera through "Das Boot".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1-KJRhfKdA

btw. Any idea how this was shot?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOCYCrFu5tg

First shot was made using crane and was stitched using CGI to the second one. The distance traveled in the second one looks too long for a crane shot, but I could be wrong.
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: Mel on May 15, 2014, 11:07:58 AM
Long crane shot from "Tenebre". Excellent buildup for the scene with voyeuristic feel. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eDtzdKktTw
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on June 04, 2014, 10:15:14 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/2Xr65rA.jpg)

Vittorio Storaro published a new book last April called The Art of Cinematography (http://www.amazon.com/The-Art-Cinematography-Bob-Fisher/dp/8857217531/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1401937845&sr=8-1&keywords=the+art+of+cinematography+vittorio+storaro), with both English and Italian in one publication. Video interview with Storaro about the book below.

A rereading of the "seventh art" through the eyes of the most important cinematographers. The Art of Cinematography underscores the essential importance of the figure of the cinematographer in the history of world cinema. A full-blown review that stretches from 1910 to the present day, this volume is illustrated by stunning photographic images in double vision specially reworked by Oscar winner Vittorio Storaro and provides the reader with over 150 profiles of cinematographers in a whole century of cinema. The volume is accompanied by a DVD with images in motion dedicated to the artists included in the book.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ybyz514Ujhs
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on June 19, 2014, 03:30:54 PM
Gordon Willis interviewed by Steven Soderbergh (http://extension765.com/sdr/17-gordon-willis)
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: Mel on June 26, 2014, 07:01:09 AM
A collection of "back to the camera" shots (~4 minutes). (http://vimeo.com/63718300) The character stands center frame (most of the time), looking out at some epic landscape.
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: samsong on June 27, 2014, 01:08:56 AM
A collection of "back to the camera" shots (~4 minutes). (http://vimeo.com/63718300) The character stands center frame (most of the time), looking out at some epic landscape.

how bela tarr and gus van sant got excluded from this is beyond me.
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on August 18, 2014, 07:32:11 PM
Michael Haneke's sometimes DP Christian Berger, who pioneered The Cine Reflect Lighting System (http://www.christianberger.at/crls/) (CRLS), a unique method of film lighting that focuses on deflection of light with his invention, the Panibeam (http://www.pani.com/cms/index.php/en/the-products).

First, a recent interview with Berger about his use of distance, and a few videos detailing the CRLS method, below.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WkHIVfU-Myw


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDZFHfKKj1g


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pggTa0-pOU


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hS2AeX_cbCk
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on November 03, 2014, 12:45:02 PM
Excerpts (https://www.theasc.com/ac_magazine/October2014/GordonWillisASC/page1.php) over at American Cinematographer from the forthcoming book Gordon Willis on Cinematography by Stephen Pizzello
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on December 13, 2014, 02:51:43 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqaL9so8CHQ
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: Mel on January 05, 2015, 06:04:17 AM
THR Cinematographers Roundtable 2014:

The cinematographers behind from some of the year's most visually striking movies - Roger Deakins (Unbroken), Dion Beebe (Into the Woods), Jeff Cronenweth (Gone Girl), Benoit Delhomme (The Theory of Everything) Matthew Libatique (Noah) and Dick Pope (Mr. Turner) - discuss film vs. digital, how to develop a relationship with a director & high-dynamic-range technologies.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2Z4UvAdE7E
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on February 24, 2015, 04:00:02 PM
via The Playlist:

Alcott passed away nearly 30 years ago, but he remains, in memory, one of the best cinematographers of his time. Though he has multiple additional credits to his name, he is best known for his four collaborations with Stanley Kubrick. The two men first worked together on “2001: A Space Odyssey”; their partnership then continued over Kubrick’s next three films, “A Clockwork Orange,” “Barry Lyndon,” and “The Shining.”

“Six Kinds Of Light (Masters Of Cinematography)” originally aired on PBS in 1986 (the year of Alcott’s death) and turned its attention on a half dozen cinematographers then working in the industry. The half hour dedicated to Alcott offers incredible insight into how detail-oriented, professional, and attentive he was. He was known for taking extensive time to study the ways light fell into different rooms on set, a fastidiousness which resulted in the appearance of natural light in every shot he oversaw. This dedication to his craft earned Alcott an Oscar in 1976 for his work on “Barry Lyndon.”

In the documentary, Alcott reminisces about how he was promoted to lighting cameraman during production on '2001' when Geoffrey Unsworth became unable to see the film through to completion. More interesting perhaps, though, are the sections of the video in which Alcott analyzes natural, meteorological lighting effects (at 14:08, for example).



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_E8C-3MU00g
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on August 24, 2015, 07:44:40 PM
Writing with Light (1992) is back online

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yr4zn8k13Yo
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on December 07, 2015, 08:06:26 PM
The Calling of Vittorio Storaro - Film and Digital Times (http://www.fdtimes.com/2015/12/07/the-calling-of-vittorio-storaro/)
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: jenkins on December 07, 2015, 08:49:35 PM
The Calling of Vittorio Storaro - Film and Digital Times (http://www.fdtimes.com/2015/12/07/the-calling-of-vittorio-storaro/)

i gotchya bae,

Quote
Since we were talking about the different stages of your career, I can’t resist asking what it’s like now working in this new digital era on the Woody Allen film?

That’s a good question for the next edition of your magazine. But I’ll tell you something about why I convinced Woody Allen to do this movie in digital.

You convinced him?

Yes. Because he never did digital before.

Without any doubt, it was a shock for me that Kodak and Technicolor closed their offices in Rome. I realize that there is something called “Progress” that you can speed up or you can slow down. But you cannot stop it. I realized that even if when I started my first experience in electronic cinema with Sony in 1983, when they went all around the world to make an experiment with their new High Definition Video System and we did “Arlecchino” in Venice, directed by Giuliano Montaldo. But without any doubt the quality of film was keeping me alive all the time. I shot 58 films on film. In 2009 I did one small movie with Carlos Saura titled “Flamenco, Flamenco” using digital capture, but it was done completely in a studio, with full control of all the lighting. Now with this new Woody Allen picture, it was time for me to move into Digital capture. I think that we cannot chase after something that is vanishing, attempting to grab its tail. That’s all I can say now. The next chapter is digital video in our next interview.
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on April 10, 2016, 05:58:16 PM
Passage from Film to Digital with Vittorio Storaro - Film and Digital Times (http://www.filmanddigitaltimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/75FDTimes-Storaro-PassageToDigital.pdf)
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on July 14, 2016, 05:24:30 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SeInwPEhJS4
Title: Re: Films with Great Cinematography
Post by: wilder on November 01, 2017, 08:24:33 PM
These two in the same room...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8RbCBMyyKkc