Recent Posts

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 [7] 8 9 10
61
The Grapevine / Halloween
« Last post by eward on June 10, 2018, 05:13:32 PM »


From the creators of George Washington, All the Real Girls, Pineapple Express, Eastbound & Down...

David Gordon Green has had the weirdest career.

This actually looks good! I'm a great fan of the original, and was really into the series in my early teens, so I'm rather excited. Carpenter is back producing and doing the score, Nick Castle is playing Michael again, Danny McBride (!) co-wrote it... Color me enthusiastic!




62
News and Theory / Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Last post by eward on June 10, 2018, 04:37:03 PM »
^^ Everything Drenk said. Also, see Listen Up Philip! Jonathan Pryce's character Ike Zimmerman is very much inspired by Roth.
63
The Grapevine / Re: The Old Man And The Gun
« Last post by Jeremy Blackman on June 10, 2018, 04:02:47 PM »
But wait is no one going to talk about those whip-pans!? What kind of PTA fan site is this?

Not only whip pans, but whip pans combined with dolly-ins. And a blue suit!
64
Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: miscellaneous PTA homages
« Last post by Jeremy Blackman on June 10, 2018, 03:59:20 PM »
Yeah, a traditional whip pan will have an edit. You just join the 2 edit points where the images are moving fast. And in the same direction. That's pretty much all you have to do... whip pans are surprisingly easy.

The whip pan in that clip works especially well because they're whipping from trees to trees. (And there's clearly an edit, cause the guy can't be standing in both places.)
65
The Grapevine / Re: The Old Man And The Gun
« Last post by ©brad on June 10, 2018, 11:47:32 AM »
Unbelievable. Ghostboy is killing it.

But wait is no one going to talk about those whip-pans!? What kind of PTA fan site is this?
66
Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: miscellaneous PTA homages
« Last post by Tdog on June 10, 2018, 05:38:43 AM »
That's great. Does anybody know, generally speaking, is there usually an edit built into most pan whips or does it whip in whatever direction and it's still the same shot?

If my memory serves me correctly I think I came to the conclusion there were no cuts in a lot of the Magnolia ones apart from the obvious. I could be very wrong though.
67
News and Theory / Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Last post by Drenk on June 09, 2018, 12:22:32 PM »
I caught a two part BBC documentary about Roth a couple of years ago when he announced he was through with writing. I quickly found myself fascinated by him, and read as much as I could about him. Despite this, I haven’t read any of his novels. I guess his oeuvre seemed intimidating to me; there was no clear point of entry.

So, now the man is gone - where should I start?

I missed this somehow. So...Difficult to say. Roth wrote many books, many different books, so I don't think there's a clear point of entry. I'd say Portnoy's Complaint—the book that made him extra-famous—isn't a good entry, though. Even if it's one of the good ones—it's just too much of a farce all the time (almost all the time) it can give a wrong first impression.

He wrote his best books at the end of the eighties and throughout the nineties.

American Pastoral is his most beloved book. It is a masterpiece. It is also weirdly tame and I wonder if that didn't help its reception. If Roth had only written American Pastoral you can be sure that he would be laying in his grave with a Nobel Prize. It introduces you to his main alter-ego, Nathan Zuckerman, when he became for Roth a way to narrate other people's lives. You're in 1997.

You can also begin with the first Zuckerman book: The Ghost Writer. In this one, Zuckerman is the main protagonist, he's a young writer and it begins to explore the tricks of fiction. You're in 1979.

The Ghost Writer has three sequels, but a Zuckerman books stands by itself after them: The Counterlife. As Roth said, it was the first time that he was fully integrating Zuckerman's intelligence inside the book. The Counterlife is full of meta-narratives—it explores the tricks of fiction, its purpose. Something that is at the heart of Roth. It might be a difficult entry but a rewarding one. You'd be in 1986.

Sabbath's Theater is my favorite Roth, it was written before American Pastoral: this one isn't tame at all. An avalanche of twisted sex is incorporated inside this book. Mickey Sabbath is not a nice man. But he's dealing with grief. And this is a book about death. It can be as funny as Portnoy's Complaint but is also the saddest book I've ever read. The writing is spectacular. The energy. It's unique. 1995.

Operation Shylock is so Roth the main character is Philip Roth chasing a false Philip Roth in Israel. Presented as a "confession" it is full of insanity. And fiction. It also confronts judaism, also an important theme of his work. And that's 1993.



68
Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: miscellaneous PTA homages
« Last post by Jeremy Blackman on June 09, 2018, 10:08:47 AM »
69
Other Media / Re: What are we reading?
« Last post by KJ on June 08, 2018, 06:06:26 PM »
just whitnail, let's introduce this book to an american audience!

it's a Norwegian book about a love and sex and stuff. it's good. and I am reading it now.

70
News and Theory / Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Last post by Punch Drunk Hate on June 08, 2018, 09:30:25 AM »
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 [7] 8 9 10
DMCA & Copyright | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy