XIXAX Film Forum


Recent Posts

1
News and Theory / Re: Underatted movies
« Last post by polkablues on Today at 04:54:00 PM »
It's got a pretty solid IMDb score, but I've never met another person in real life who's seen Keith Gordon's Waking the Dead, and none of the online reaction I've seen suggests that other people reacted to it the way I did.
2
2018 In Film / Re: BlacKkKlansman
« Last post by Jeremy Blackman on Today at 11:19:55 AM »
Could they not afford more than one music cue, or was that a choice?

This is now an Oscar-nominated repeating music cue.
3
The Small Screen / Re: The Assassination of Gianni Versace
« Last post by wilder on Yesterday at 01:34:57 PM »
On Netflix now
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: PT's Eulogy for Ricky Jay
« Last post by wilberfan on Yesterday at 12:51:10 PM »
That was lovely.   Wish we could see that outtake.  (Shit, I wish I could see ALL the outtakes from that film...)
5
2018 In Film / Re: shoplifters
« Last post by pete on Yesterday at 12:27:12 PM »
you know, in hindsight, the third act wasn't that much of a departure. I like the film resolves and what it stubbornly chooses to unresolve.

Agree with Pete and Samsong that it kind of went downhill at the end, but everything before was absolutely wonderful, filled with at least two-three scenes that moved me to tears due to being so goddamn beautiful and human, including the rain scene that would make Woody Allen proud, and Aki's encounter with Man No.4; moments that doesn't necessarily mean anything in the grand scheme of the story, but don't need to go anywhere either. Disappointing that Kore-eda had to force a big drama in the end. Glad I decided to see it on the big screen anyway. Sakura Ando was great as per usual.

I haven't seen the film yet, but does this change anything for those of you that have?

Kore-eda’s “Shoplifters”: What Was Lost in Translation

Spoiler: ShowHide
Quote
“Shoplifters” has much better subtitles–at least until a key scene near the end. In it, Osamu Shibata, the head of a fictive family of societal throwaways says–according to the English subtitles–to Shota, the boy he has lovingly fathered, “From now on, I’m not your father.”

Unfortunately, that’s not what he says in Japanese. As spoken by the actor Lily Franky, that pivotal line is: “So, I’ll go back to being your uncle.”

What difference does it make? For starters, what seems to be Shibata’s rejection of the boy he bestowed with his own first name (both Osama and Shibata being pseudonyms) is anything but. He desperately wants to remain a part of Shota’s life, as Kore-eda makes clear when Shibata subsequently runs after the bus Shota is riding. In fact, it is Shota who rejects Shibata by not looking back, though when he is out of sight the boy whispers, “Dad.”



Spoiler: ShowHide
The translation in Sweden was "So, i'll go back to being just an normal old man" or something like that

6
2018 In Film / Re: shoplifters
« Last post by Robyn on Yesterday at 11:08:09 AM »
Agree with Pete and Samsong that it kind of went downhill at the end, but everything before was absolutely wonderful, filled with at least two-three scenes that moved me to tears due to being so goddamn beautiful and human, including the rain scene that would make Woody Allen proud, and Aki's encounter with Man No.4; moments that doesn't necessarily mean anything in the grand scheme of the story, but don't need to go anywhere either. Disappointing that Kore-eda had to force a big drama in the end. Glad I decided to see it on the big screen anyway. Sakura Ando was great as per usual.

I haven't seen the film yet, but does this change anything for those of you that have?

Kore-eda’s “Shoplifters”: What Was Lost in Translation

Spoiler: ShowHide
Quote
“Shoplifters” has much better subtitles–at least until a key scene near the end. In it, Osamu Shibata, the head of a fictive family of societal throwaways says–according to the English subtitles–to Shota, the boy he has lovingly fathered, “From now on, I’m not your father.”

Unfortunately, that’s not what he says in Japanese. As spoken by the actor Lily Franky, that pivotal line is: “So, I’ll go back to being your uncle.”

What difference does it make? For starters, what seems to be Shibata’s rejection of the boy he bestowed with his own first name (both Osama and Shibata being pseudonyms) is anything but. He desperately wants to remain a part of Shota’s life, as Kore-eda makes clear when Shibata subsequently runs after the bus Shota is riding. In fact, it is Shota who rejects Shibata by not looking back, though when he is out of sight the boy whispers, “Dad.”



Spoiler: ShowHide
The translation in Sweden was "So, i'll go back to being just an normal old man" or something like that


7
Paul Thomas Anderson / PT's Eulogy for Ricky Jay
« Last post by wilder on January 20, 2019, 10:41:23 PM »
PT's Eulogy for Ricky Jay - Audio

From a recent memorial. It’s Top Secret how this audio came into being, which makes me seem like a spy, but really I’m more like Brad Pitt’s character in Burn After Reading.


8
News and Theory / Re: Underatted movies
« Last post by Robyn on January 20, 2019, 03:37:52 PM »
Most of the movies I think are underrated tend to be divisive or not everyone's cup of tea. So I can't get too mad. Still, I don't understand why Dogville isn't widely considered one of the best films ever made. It's basically just pitch-perfect, staggering brilliance from beginning to end, and it has so much to say.

I have convinced a lot of people to watch Dogville with me (including all of my ex-girlfriends lol), and they have all loved it. It's not my favorite Trier film, but it's the one I would recommend to basically anyone. Trier even joked that he put it on a stage because he realized that it was too accessible  - that's just him being stupid, but I do believe that it would have found a wider audience if it was made differently.
9
The Grapevine / Re: Holiday
« Last post by wilder on January 20, 2019, 03:15:22 PM »
10
News and Theory / Re: Underatted movies
« Last post by Jeremy Blackman on January 20, 2019, 03:00:15 PM »
Most of the movies I think are underrated tend to be divisive or not everyone's cup of tea. So I can't get too mad. Still, I don't understand why Dogville isn't widely considered one of the best films ever made. It's basically just pitch-perfect, staggering brilliance from beginning to end, and it has so much to say.

My pick for 2018 would be Bad Times At The El Royale.