Author Topic: Influences on each film  (Read 2645 times)

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Lottery

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Re: Influences on each film
« Reply #30 on: January 04, 2018, 08:11:57 PM »
+1

From the Globe and Mail interview modage linked:

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He's much more comfortable discussing books – stories by Daphne du Maurier, Anya Seton, Shirley Jackson and Charlotte Brontë (at least by way of Robert Stevenson's 1943 film adaptation of Jane Eyre) fed into Phantom Thread's stuffy, sensuous milieu – and movies.


All female writers in this quote, very interesting.


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"If I fetishize certain films, it's ones from the 1930s and 40s, getting up into the early 50s, too. Those are the ones that really get me going." Phantom Thread feels indebted to such sources: Lewis Allen, David Lean's smaller-scale dramas, and especially German exile Max Ophüls.

He really loves him some old 30s-50s films, as mentioned earlier:
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I don’t fetishize ’70s movies the way some people do. I love them, but my models are those ’30s films, and I’m always trying to emulate that.

Another non-specific mention of Turner Classic Movies in this video. Possibly the most consistent influence on him since at least The Master. Mentioned in several interviews that it's always on in the background for him.


wilder

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Re: Influences on each film
« Reply #31 on: January 04, 2018, 08:26:34 PM »
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(for the sake of annotating)

Mark Bridges mentions he was shown Maytime in Mayfair (1949) in the longer version of the video interview above.

Lewton

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Re: Influences on each film
« Reply #32 on: January 05, 2018, 01:43:10 PM »
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Unclear if Lewis Allen is an actual influence or just the interviewer’s suggestion. Putting The Uninvited (1944) with a question mark.

I was going back and forth about this, but I'm currently thinking that PTA probably actually talked about Lewis Allen, as he's mentioned all of the other influences noted in that sentence. I might be wrong, though.

Thanks for sharing this.

wilder

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Re: Influences on each film
« Reply #33 on: January 05, 2018, 05:30:20 PM »
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Most likely the case. I'll just put them. No one ever had a worse life for watching more Ophüls and Lean.

wilder

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Re: Influences on each film
« Reply #34 on: January 09, 2018, 03:17:26 PM »
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Conscious influence or not, the film that feels most similar to Phantom Thread to me is Joseph Losey's The Servant (1963). It's mentioned in this Guardian review, but in general hasn't been bandied about as much. Losey's thematic interests very much align.

From Senses of Cinema's profile:

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The dominant themes of Losey’s eclectic work are emotional instability, emotional and physical violence and perverse sexual power plays. There is not one conventional love story in his films. He has a mania for settings that express states of mind, and his camera movements are always abnormally sensitive and skittish. He has been attacked as a case of style over substance, but this misses the point. If Losey had been a writer his deficiencies would make him a minor figure, but he was from first to last a film director, and, at least for directors who don’t write their own material, style is substance.


At the very least it'd make a great double feature...



 

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