Author Topic: What are we reading?  (Read 113547 times)

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Thrindle

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What are we reading?
« Reply #300 on: March 07, 2004, 04:57:08 PM »
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i saw her exhibit in LA, absolutely wonderful. i bought the book.my fovorite is the picture of the old woman on the velvet couch with the bee hive hair. breathtaking.


That picture is in an issue of Vanity Fair... Some very cool photography I must say.
Classic.

cine

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« Reply #301 on: March 07, 2004, 05:24:28 PM »
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Arbus is one of my favourite photographers. I could stare at Boy With A Toy Hand Grenade for hours.

classical gas

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« Reply #302 on: March 13, 2004, 02:47:21 PM »
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Just started "Journey to the End of the Night".  Anyone read it?

godardian

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« Reply #303 on: March 14, 2004, 11:15:27 AM »
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Quote from: hacksparrow
Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides.

Good read thus far (I'm only 100 pages into it).  Reads like an American version of a Rushdie novel.


This is absolutely one of the best novels of recent memory. I loved it. Right up there with The Corrections.

Me:

""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

Redlum

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What are we reading?
« Reply #304 on: March 14, 2004, 01:39:00 PM »
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Makes me long for the summer.
\"I wanted to make a film for kids, something that would present them with a kind of elementary morality. Because nowadays nobody bothers to tell those kids, \'Hey, this is right and this is wrong\'.\"
  -  George Lucas

©brad

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« Reply #305 on: March 14, 2004, 05:07:32 PM »
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well i guess i'm oficially obsessed w/ bret easton ellis now, cuz this book is unreal. took me a minute to get into it w/ Victor cuz he really is a complete dueshbag. the thing about american psycho is that even though patrick bateman is completely, completely despicable, you still kinda liked him. (maybe amused is the better term) here this victor dude is just a complete dick-- so in that respect, it was a little distancing. (for those of you who haven't read it yet, the protagonist is Victor, the kid from rules of attraction who goes to europe. lauren and various other charcters make some cameos, even patrick bateman shows up at one point)

ellis is surely one of the most talented, hard-biting satirists there is. his ability and detail in describing time/setting/era is almost scary.

Gloria

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« Reply #306 on: March 14, 2004, 05:20:11 PM »
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So far, this book is interesting.  Can't say I agree with all of Wurtzel's conclusions, but she does raise some very interesting points.  She rants on and on...with all kinds of pop culture references...creating very addictive reading.

godardian

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« Reply #307 on: March 14, 2004, 05:22:18 PM »
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Quote from: Thrindle
Quote from: godardian


i saw her exhibit in LA, absolutely wonderful. i bought the book.my fovorite is the picture of the old woman on the velvet couch with the bee hive hair. breathtaking.


That picture is in an issue of Vanity Fair... Some very cool photography I must say.


I first ever heard of Arbus through the Stanley Kubrick biography from '96 or '97... went into detail about his friendship with Arbus through their shared love of photography, and how he paid homage to that famous photo above in The Shining. I had to find it right away, bought the book, and the rest is history.
""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

Dirk

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What are we reading?
« Reply #308 on: March 14, 2004, 05:43:46 PM »
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At wave level, everything exists as a contradiction. Everything is existing in more than one stage/place at any given moment. Everything must move/vibrate and constantly change to exist. Everything, including buildings, mountains, oceans and thoughts.

godardian

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« Reply #309 on: March 22, 2004, 02:12:26 PM »
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""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

Sigur Rós

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« Reply #310 on: March 22, 2004, 02:17:22 PM »
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Mark Twain - The Mysterious Stranger

Awesome!!!

godardian

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« Reply #311 on: March 25, 2004, 02:29:27 PM »
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""Money doesn't come into it. It never has. I do what I do because it's all that I am." - Morrissey

"Lacan stressed more and more in his work the power and organizing principle of the symbolic, understood as the networks, social, cultural, and linguistic, into which a child is born. These precede the birth of a child, which is why Lacan can say that language is there from before the actual moment of birth. It is there in the social structures which are at play in the family and, of course, in the ideals, goals, and histories of the parents. This world of language can hardly be grasped by the newborn and yet it will act on the whole of the child's existence."

Stay informed on protecting your freedom of speech and civil rights.

Ghostboy

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« Reply #312 on: April 06, 2004, 12:17:43 AM »
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Just finished: The Heart Of The Matter, by Graham Greene. May just be my favorite work of his yet.

Just started: Middlesex. 200 pages in and loving it.

Still finishing: Conversations With Wilder. Would have finished it already but it compells me to rent more of his movies every fifty pages or so.

Took back to library: Tocqueville's Democracy In America. The first 150 pages were great, but I was reading too many other things at the moment and ran out of time.

BonBon85

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« Reply #313 on: April 06, 2004, 01:16:34 PM »
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I've gotten into the habit of buying anything I can get for under $5 at the Strand and reading at work. Yay incredibly easy job!

SoNowThen

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« Reply #314 on: April 06, 2004, 01:31:09 PM »
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Those who say that the totalitarian state of the Soviet Union was not "real" Marxism also cannot admit that one simple feature of Marxism makes totalitarianism necessary:  the rejection of civil society. Since civil society is the sphere of private activity, its abolition and replacement by political society means that nothing private remains. That is already the essence of totalitarianism; and the moralistic practice of the trendy Left, which regards everything as political and sometimes reveals its hostility to free speech, does nothing to contradict this implication.

When those who hated capital and consumption (and Jews) in the 20th century murdered some hundred million people, and the poster children for the struggle against international capitalism and America are now fanatical Islamic terrorists, this puts recent enthusiasts in an awkward position. Most of them are too dense and shameless to appreciate it, and far too many are taken in by the moralistic and paternalistic rhetoric of the Left.

 

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