Author Topic: Phantom Thread - Critic's Reviews  (Read 704 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

wilberfan

  • The Vision Quest
  • **
  • Posts: 212
  • Respect: +85
Phantom Thread - Critic's Reviews
« on: December 01, 2017, 06:55:26 PM »
0
Phantom Thread Press Embargo Slip?

http://www.gwinnettdailypost.com/entertainment/movie-review-oldman-is-flawless-darkest-hour-is-not/article_3d9511a8-0c38-5694-a861-ba4339962bdb.html

Quote
Apart from the possibility of three-time Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis in Paul Thomas Anderson’s equally uneven “Phantom Thread,” winning his fourth Academy Award, there is no one is more deserving of the industry’s top prize this year than Oldman. The only thing that could torpedo his chances right now is the film itself which is not nearly as impressive as its leading man.
[/size]

I haven't seen the Oldman film yet, but I certainly didn't think Thread was "uneven".


Hint of Phantom Threads wider-release schedule?  (At least in Canada?)

Quote
Fortunately, there is a reliable supply of December releases likely to make the cut, at least in larger cities. Winnipeggers, alas, are obliged to endure the platform releases of likely contenders into the new year. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread, for example, releases only in New York and Los Angeles on Christmas Day and even those pampered Torontonians will have to wait till Jan. 12 to see Anderson’s anticipated second collaboration with Daniel Day-Lewis, set in the world of fashion.
"There's shadows in life, baby."

wilberfan

  • The Vision Quest
  • **
  • Posts: 212
  • Respect: +85
Re: Phantom Thread - Critic's Reviews
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2017, 11:14:25 PM »
+1
‘Phantom Thread’ Early Buzz: Daniel Day-Lewis Dazzles in Another Paul Thomas Anderson Masterpiece

http://www.slashfilm.com/phantom-thread-early-buzz/
"There's shadows in life, baby."


budwillies

  • The Call to Adventure
  • *
  • Posts: 33
  • Respect: +4
Re: Phantom Thread - Critic's Reviews
« Reply #3 on: December 07, 2017, 12:06:38 PM »
0
Another masterpiece from Anderson. One of his best, according to the reviews thus far.

Fuzzy Dunlop

  • The Vision Quest
  • **
  • Posts: 141
  • Respect: +171

wilberfan

  • The Vision Quest
  • **
  • Posts: 212
  • Respect: +85
Re: Phantom Thread - Critic's Reviews
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2017, 04:11:21 PM »
0
I'm curious:  How many of you will avoid reading reviews before you have a chance to see the film yourself?   How many of you feel like you've already read too much about the film?

I've seen the film, and am starting to read the reviews...and feel like knowing the least about the film possible would make for a more satisfying experience.  YMMV.

[edit]  In fact, I've just decided I'm going to stop reading them until after I've seen the film a second time...
"There's shadows in life, baby."

Drenk

  • The Return Threshold
  • ****
  • Posts: 872
  • Respect: +498
Re: Phantom Thread - Critic's Reviews
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2017, 04:15:18 PM »
0
I've read tweets. And I do feel like it's too much. But I'm unable to do a full blackout. It's the first I haven't watched the trailer/am not reading reviews. That combo can spoil the first viewing: creating expectations. You're waiting for bits.
I'm so many people.

Sleepless

  • The Master of Three Worlds
  • *****
  • Posts: 1818
  • I told you I would eat you
  • Respect: +353
Re: Phantom Thread - Critic's Reviews
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2017, 04:48:27 PM »
0
I think I'm going to avoid reviews. I've read some headlines and it all sounds positive, so I'm happy.

Fuzzy Dunlop

  • The Vision Quest
  • **
  • Posts: 141
  • Respect: +171
Re: Phantom Thread - Critic's Reviews
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2017, 04:54:07 PM »
+3
I didn't watch the trailer (I scrolled through just to see a few images), I didn't read any reviews, I tried my best to go in as blind as possible, that's really the only way to do it IMO.

I'm actually kinda nuts about it. When I saw No Country For Old Men in the theatre, I ran out when the CMBB trailer came on. I like my first impression to be of the whole thing, not battling whatever idea of the thing I've built in my head.

Even having seen the film, I've only read a handful of reviews and interviews. I want to see it a few more times to solidify my feelings on it. You have the rest of your life to look into the critical assessment of a film, you only have one opportunity to approach it apart from all that static. It's a special time right now.

Also, this is only tangentially film-related, but lately, I feel as if I'm drowning in a sea of opinions that I'm not even consciously seeking out. Every time I go online, or talk with people, its just this endless, borderline mindless, rattling off of opinions, and I think its become kind of unhealthy. It becomes harder and harder to approach art or politics or even facts themselves when there is such a strong compulsion to see how everyone else feels about shit while I'm still formulating my own feelings. When I like something, why should I give any kind of fuck if someone else doesn't, or why they don't? If I tell someone I liked something, and then they tell me, unprompted, "Oh, I hated that thing", how does that add to my life in any kind of way? I dunno. I'm not suggesting that criticism or discussing opinions are inherently bad things, just that I feel totally overwhelmed right now. I might try a thing where I don't offer an opinion unless asked, and don't actively seek any out unless I really, consciously feel like it will enrich my life in some way. At the moment its just a bunch of fucking noise.

wilberfan

  • The Vision Quest
  • **
  • Posts: 212
  • Respect: +85
Re: Phantom Thread - Critic's Reviews
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2017, 04:57:12 PM »
0
You have the rest of your life to look into the critical assessment of a film, you only have one opportunity to approach it apart from all that static. It's a special time right now.

Well said, sir.

Review: Paul Thomas Anderson's 'Phantom Thread' Barely Holds Together

https://www.forbes.com/sites/scottmendelson/2017/12/07/review-paul-thomas-andersons-phantom-thread-barely-holds-together/#2941b38376c5

I'm sharing this because of the following lead-in paragraphs (which I found interesting):

Quote
Phantom Thread has the potential to be this year's Silence. By that I mean it's a well-made, unquestionably polished and impeccably acted drama from a beloved auteur that may well be ignored by general audiences. That's not necessarily an insult to general audiences, but this Paul Thomas Anderson picture, starring Daniel Day-Lewis as a 1950's fashion designer and Vicky Krieps as the young woman who becomes his lover and his muse, is the kind of thing that is almost made entirely for film critics and/or film nerds. And that's okay, as long as Focus Features, Annapurna and friends either A) knows what they are getting into or B) has reason to hope for bigger overseas box office for this arguably European melodrama.

The would-be Oscar contender opens in limited release on Christmas Day before presumably expanding in January. Anderson's last two films, Inherent Vice and The Master, were not remotely commercial hits despite more marketable content and better overall reviews. This is arguably a "for the love of the game" release for any studio, so let's not decry the death of cinema when this one doesn't play like the hot date night movie of choice for those who would rather see Molly's Game, The Post or All the Money in the World.

PHANTOM THREAD IS PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON’S TWISTED LOVE STORY ABOUT THE BEAUTY IN UGLINESS (REVIEW)

Another interesting lead paragraph.

Quote
If there’s one reason above all others that I’ve harbored an affinity for Paul Thomas Anderson’s filmmaking, it’s his penchant to find worth in the worthless. Inherent Vice found direction in Doc Sportello’s wild goose chase; The Master found weight in the hollow promises of Lancaster Dodd; There Will Be Blood found humanity in self-professed antihuman Daniel Plainview; Boogie Nights found a home in the sex-, drug-, and self-inflicted-gunshot-wound-laden household of Jack Horner. All the more challenging is that Anderson has, for my money, never seemed to claim that any of his subjects necessarily deserve this designation, instead operating on the grounds that if you’re going to send a violent loner on an ad-hoc trip to Hawaii on an ill-conceived mission to win the heart of a practical stranger, you may as well find the beauty in that. Ugliness and all.

And it's interesting to see some very mixed reviews out there now as well... (I'm essentially only reading intro paragraphs at this point.)
"There's shadows in life, baby."

wilberfan

  • The Vision Quest
  • **
  • Posts: 212
  • Respect: +85
Re: Phantom Thread - Critic's Reviews
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2017, 01:47:59 PM »
0
You have the rest of your life to look into the critical assessment of a film, you only have one opportunity to approach it apart from all that static. It's a special time right now.

Well said, sir.

Review: Paul Thomas Anderson's 'Phantom Thread' Barely Holds Together

https://www.forbes.com/sites/scottmendelson/2017/12/07/review-paul-thomas-andersons-phantom-thread-barely-holds-together/#2941b38376c5

I'm sharing this because of the following lead-in paragraphs (which I found interesting):

Quote
Phantom Thread has the potential to be this year's Silence. By that I mean it's a well-made, unquestionably polished and impeccably acted drama from a beloved auteur that may well be ignored by general audiences. That's not necessarily an insult to general audiences, but this Paul Thomas Anderson picture, starring Daniel Day-Lewis as a 1950's fashion designer and Vicky Krieps as the young woman who becomes his lover and his muse, is the kind of thing that is almost made entirely for film critics and/or film nerds. And that's okay, as long as Focus Features, Annapurna and friends either A) knows what they are getting into or B) has reason to hope for bigger overseas box office for this arguably European melodrama.

The would-be Oscar contender opens in limited release on Christmas Day before presumably expanding in January. Anderson's last two films, Inherent Vice and The Master, were not remotely commercial hits despite more marketable content and better overall reviews. This is arguably a "for the love of the game" release for any studio, so let's not decry the death of cinema when this one doesn't play like the hot date night movie of choice for those who would rather see Molly's Game, The Post or All the Money in the World.

PHANTOM THREAD IS PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON’S TWISTED LOVE STORY ABOUT THE BEAUTY IN UGLINESS (REVIEW)

Another interesting lead paragraph.

Quote
If there’s one reason above all others that I’ve harbored an affinity for Paul Thomas Anderson’s filmmaking, it’s his penchant to find worth in the worthless. Inherent Vice found direction in Doc Sportello’s wild goose chase; The Master found weight in the hollow promises of Lancaster Dodd; There Will Be Blood found humanity in self-professed antihuman Daniel Plainview; Boogie Nights found a home in the sex-, drug-, and self-inflicted-gunshot-wound-laden household of Jack Horner. All the more challenging is that Anderson has, for my money, never seemed to claim that any of his subjects necessarily deserve this designation, instead operating on the grounds that if you’re going to send a violent loner on an ad-hoc trip to Hawaii on an ill-conceived mission to win the heart of a practical stranger, you may as well find the beauty in that. Ugliness and all.

And it's interesting to see some very mixed reviews out there now as well... (I'm essentially only reading intro paragraphs at this point.)

More interesting opening graphs:

“PHANTOM THREAD” REVIEW: DANIEL DAY-LEWIS HELPS PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON FIND HIS VOICE WITH THIS LUSH, DISTURBING FILM

http://www.tracking-board.com/phantom-thread-review-daniel-day-lewis-helps-paul-thomas-anderson-find-his-voice-with-this-lush-disturbing-film/

Quote
One of my favorite games this holiday season is recommending double features that might help spotlight some of the best year-end films. For example, if you can watch Creature From the Black Lagoon right before The Shape of Water, it may well add to your viewing pleasure, and All the President’s Men would make a terrific chaser after watching The Post. But if you want to put two films from 2017 together to show how two totally different filmmakers might attack the same basic idea, then Darren Aronofsky’s mother! might make the perfect lead-in to Paul Thomas Anderson’s lush, disturbing Phantom Thread.

Movies about how art gets made are the most navel-gazing of all navel-gazing movies, inside baseball multiplied by inside baseball. Most people do not have to worry about the power dynamics in a relationship between a creator and a muse, and probably don’t care about that as an idea. But what makes the films of Paul Thomas Anderson work is the way he finds an emotional language for each film that is appropriate. That’s been true since his 1996 debut, Hard Eight, although it was really once he was able to exert the control of Boogie Nights that we got a sense of just how good he is at what he does.

When Anderson was in that early bratty stage of his career, he got dinged by some critics because of the way he was obviously quoting films and filmmakers that excited him, but I’ve always thought those criticisms miss the point. Yes, at first Anderson was aping the moves of other filmmakers, but he was doing it in pursuit of something genuine, something exuberant and delirious, a rush of film language shared by a storyteller who is almost ridiculously excited to introduce you to these characters. The longer he’s worked as a storyteller, the further he’s pushed himself away from that self-conscious voice and towards something that is his — language that is driven entirely by the story he’s telling. Anderson’s last three films have been major steps into a personal style, and with Phantom Thread, he’s made something wholly original.

Like There Will Be Blood, this film makes some abrupt shifts where you suddenly realize that anything is on the table, and these characters are capable of anything. Like Punch-Drunk Love, I think much of this film is funny, but in a dark, horrifying way, and I am not surprised I got some looks of real scorn when I laughed during my screening. Anderson has a misanthropic side, and while I believe he loves his characters, it is because they are flawed, and he finds those flaws and the scars they can leave in others to be one of the most interesting things about these people.

It would not shock me to see this nominated for technical credits across the board at the Oscars, but it also wouldn’t shock me if the Academy ignores it completely. This does not feel like a movie that was designed to curry favor or to give Oscar voters an easy thing to hang their annual “What do we stand for this year?” sign on, and that’s great news. This is an artist who has been chasing his own voice for the last 20 years, and seeing just how rich and controlled his latest film is only underlines how lucky we are to have him, especially if he really is the last filmmaker to ever direct Day-Lewis.

Phantom Thread is going to be with me long after the conversations about this year’s awards have faded, and for many viewers, this is going to be a film worth an obsession as focused as the one shared by its main characters.
"There's shadows in life, baby."

 

DMCA & Copyright | Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy