Author Topic: The Hateful Eight  (Read 26998 times)

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Re: The Hateful Eight
« Reply #135 on: January 16, 2016, 03:35:40 AM »
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Quote from: regularkarate
My late thoughts (spoilers live below)
I've seen this in 70mm twice now. Loved it both times, but brought my girlfriend along the second time and she found it boring. It should be noted that she normally really likes any movie I suggest (including all the Tarantino we've watched together), but she especially didn't like this one and felt that all the dialogue was written in monolog for the most part.

- Both times I saw it, the audience laughed at the most inappropriate parts. The first couple handfuls of time the N-word was dropped got a laugh and Domergue's "Monkey's Uncle" line got a huge laugh. Unlike Tarantino's earlier films, where it seemed to be an attempt to be shocking/edgy, this time around seems to be brutal and intense and shoving it in our faces that we don't live in a post-racial society. It's supposed to be ugly, so why are so many people in "liberal" Austin, TX laughing so much? (most of the people laughing were white).

- This is a beautifully shot and paced film, but I don't think it's his best. Maybe not even in the top three for me. Still amazing.

- It's been pointed out that the originally leaked screenplay didn't have the reveal of the Lincoln letter being a lie. I've been washing that around in my brain and am curious about other people's thoughts on the significance of that.

rk im really glad you said that bc that's a huge deal about the lincoln letter. i remember that from reading the original script and the change is very awkward. i'm not sure really what is gained by making the protagonist into a liar. i think it would have had more power if it was true. nothing much would really have to be changed. and now that i'm thinking about it, the last scene would have been close to tearful if the letter was left real.

also: when are we going to talk about this horrible golden globe thing, or did i miss an existent post?

Drenk

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Re: The Hateful Eight
« Reply #136 on: January 18, 2016, 11:26:32 AM »
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SPOILERS

Well, when John discovers that the letter is false he is hearbroken and Jackson is shaken...that's why he goes insane and kills Dern after his horrifying story. Because for John, without the letter, he is just another "nigger". And a lot of stories in this movie are false. The Lincoln letter is another one.
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Alexandro

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Re: The Hateful Eight
« Reply #137 on: March 11, 2016, 02:00:18 PM »
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Gotta see this again because in all honesty it took me a while to get into the film's tempo and vibe (the film takes it's own sweet time too) but then it EXPLODES and in retrospect it's an amazing movie. As an audience you are totally in the hands of a master.

I don't think it's an empty film at all, there's plenty of stuff to chew on politically, historically, it's a pretty angry and disenchanted view of America by tarantino. One instance comes up by comparing the violence in Django to this, and identify the differences. Django had "levels" or diverse ways to portray violence: the one inflicted by the white racists on blacks, the one inflicted by the hero on his enemies, and then one inflicted from black man to black man (as in the mud fights) where it was considerably more "realistic" and painful. Here it's all equally over the top and senseless; justice (a concept a character makes a monologue about) is not only never served, but it turns out it's barely a ghost, as any other edifying concept of human nature. It's weird because most latinamerican reviews I've read totally get all that stuff and deal with it while american reviews mostly concentrate on describing the film as a western and a "whodunnit"...

What a great film.

Alexandro

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Re: The Hateful Eight
« Reply #138 on: March 14, 2016, 02:22:55 PM »
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I liked a this paragraph from Roger Koza's review (one of latinamerica's most respected critics), which is I think a nice contrast to that weird Matt Zoller review, as many other americans, so absurdly concerned with PC and wether is "right" or if there are enough "reasons" for an artist to use the word "nigger" or show violence more than 20 years after Pulp Fiction. I had to translate it (and this was not a rave review by the way, but Koza's style is closer to Jonathan Rosenbaum in that often what's written is more an analysis than a value judgement):

"Because everyone here is evil, the only antagonist remains out of the frame, even though his voice will be heard spectrally during the ending. The Herald of Good and the promise of fraternity travels metaphorically in the chest of one of the bounty hunters, the only african american. His mercilessness is incompatible with the kindness expressed in a missive written by Abraham Lincoln. But the film's point of view gets confusingly resolved when the the letter's content is revealed, being read at just the right time and with an elevated travelling pulling back, imposing rejection and refuting (the director's supposed) cult towards violence. The political pessimism of a progressive caveman like Tarantino becomes clear for a moment and retraces - even if it bothers the moralist - his characters's misanthropy, which is not his.

American cinema always goes back to the story of their nation. Filming history is the first mission recognised by filmmakers, a tradition starting with D.W. Griffith which was always linked to the western genre. Here is a disenchanted counterpoint to films like Lincoln and Bridge of Spies, Spielberg's latest effort to seal faith in the Republic. Tarantino painfully disbelieves in justice without fire and in any other value besides the fetishism for the coin. The soft defence of family as an institution insinuated in The Hateful Eight is barely a resource too conservative to reencounter with Lincoln's road. Barbarity has triumphed, and his best interpreter, and perhaps representative knows how to film it in it's own terms."

Reelist

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Re: The Hateful Eight
« Reply #139 on: March 18, 2016, 09:05:53 AM »
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Supercut of Film References in 'The Hateful Eight'


The only one I didn't see any visual connection at all with was 'The Last House On The Left'. Tarantino has always maintained that he's not a Craven fan.
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Alexandro

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Re: The Hateful Eight
« Reply #140 on: March 19, 2016, 10:02:29 AM »
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honestly, with the exception of "the thing", most of those seem like a big stretch, particularly the self-referential ones.

pete

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Re: The Hateful Eight
« Reply #141 on: June 30, 2016, 12:21:49 AM »
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Really baffled me how many of you liked it. Sorry to be so late to the party. I always defended Tarantino as a director who, like Von Trier, has the ability to make the audience hyper aware of the artifices of his films but still has the audience buy into the film. Well I guess he forgot to do that this time. This was a film I did not get the point of. the whole thing is actually kinda Dane Cookish in how he's convinced that he's telling jokes and obviously people are roaring but I not only failed to laugh - I struggle to find the point in these elaborate setups. I was annoyed but didn't hate it because I appreciate Tarantino. I would venture to guess that if you guys hasn't seen his work and started with this you'd hate this movie.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2016, 01:04:01 PM by pete »
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