Author Topic: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements  (Read 137056 times)

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wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #570 on: June 17, 2016, 11:44:43 PM »
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Q1 2017 TBD

Lamberto Bava's Delirium (1987) on blu-ray from 88 Films (UK), also coming to blu-ray from Code Red in the US (eventually)



This spaghetti horror's storyline revolves around a former hooker (Grandi) running a successful men's magazine. An obsessed admirer systematically slaughters her models (occasionally increasing the magazine's output) and supplies the mistress with pictures of their disfigured corpses taken in front of her semi-nude posters visible in the background. Is she going to be the psycho's next victim?


NSFW




wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #571 on: June 20, 2016, 02:52:02 PM »
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December 8, 2016

Bernardo Bertolucci's La Luna (1979) on blu-ray from Kino



While touring in Italy, a recently-widowed American opera singer has an incestuous relationship with her 15-year-old son to help him overcome his heroin addiction. Shot by Vittorio Storaro.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2016, 05:05:42 PM by wilder »

wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #572 on: June 20, 2016, 06:33:41 PM »
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May 23, 2016

Dissent & Disruption: The Complete Alan Clarke at the BBC on blu-ray from BFI (13 discs)



Includes all surviving BBC TV productions directed by Alan Clarke, extensive extra features, a comprehensive book with new essays and full credits, and an exclusive bonus DVD containing the seven surviving Half Hour Story episodes directed by Clarke: Shelter (1967), The Gentleman Caller (1967, previously considered lost), George's Room (1967, previously considered partially lost); Goodnight Albert (1968), Stella (1968), The Fifty Seventh Saturday (1968) and Thief (1968, previously considered lost).

Dissent & Disruption: The Complete Alan Clarke at the BBC - Amazon UK




Read more about Clarke's work in this thread at Criterion Forum

Harmony Korine on Alan Clarke, posted by Criterion Forum member Antarctica

Quote
Harmony Korine has cited Alan Clarke as a major influence.

From an interview Korine did with Mike Kelley in 1997

"Korine: You know who I love and who no one really knows about? Alan Clarke, the British director. He’s a real influence. He did Scum, Made in Britain, and this film Christine about a girl growing up in council flats with size 14 feet. She walks around with a cookie tin under her arm and hooks her friends up with dope. She’ll go into houses and kids will be there with a box of Ritz crackers on the television. You’d have these really long tracking shots of her walking. The film was just sort of about what her days were like. And he used real people or people who seemed right. He did this other film I like, Elephant, which is just 16 separate executions, one after the other. There are all these steadicam shots. You see a hit man walking through a gymnasium, walking up stairs and corridors –

Kelley: Are these first-person POV shots?

Korine: Exactly. And then [the hit man] would shoot the janitor, and he’d fall on a pile of jockstraps. But the intention wasn’t comedy. After he died in 1988 of cancer, there was a retrospective of Clarke’s work at MOMA. There were only about ten people in the audience. I was watching Elephant, and in the beginning it was a little disturbing. And then I started to find humor in the repetition – watching some Indian carwasher get his hand blown out on a squeegee. I start cracking up, and this British bastard in front of me turns and says, “Don’t you know what this represents? This is the IRA, you son of a bitch!” He wanted to kill me. I liked that idea. He thought it was about the IRA, and I thought it was about Ritz crackers."


From Dazed & Confused, 1998

Dazed: How did you come across Alan Clarke, because he’s quite obscure in America?

Korine: If someone said to me who is the greatest director or my favorite, I would say Alan Clarke without hesitation. His stories, without ever being derivative, and without ever having a simple ABC narrative are totally organic, precious and amazing. It was nothing but him. In a strange way I don’t even like talking about him in the press or to people because he is the last filmmaker or artist that is really sacred. But especially in America no one knows who he is, even in England there is very little attention.


From Sight & Sound Magazine, April 1998 (Posted on Nick Wringly's site)

By the way, Nick, I'm looking forward to exploring your work about Alan Clarke on that site. I just saw Contact the other night and now consider it one of my favorite films. I love how he boiled everything down. The lack of music is powerful. Thanks for this great resource on an amazing director.





wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #573 on: June 21, 2016, 04:09:32 PM »
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November 14, 2016

David Cronenberg's Dead Ringers (1988) on blu-ray from Scream Factory



Claire Niveau (Geneviève Bujold) is in love with handsome Beverly. Or does she love Elliot? It's uncertain because brothers Beverly and Elliot Mantle are identical twins sharing the same medical practice, apartment and women – including unsuspecting Claire.

In portrayals that won the New York Film Critics Circle Best Actor Award, Jeremy Irons plays twin gynecologists whose emotional dependency collapses into mind games, madness and murder. David Cronenberg (The Fly) won the Los Angeles Film Critics Awards Best Director honors for melding split-screen techniques, body doubles and Iron's uncanny acting into an eerie, fact-based tale.


Dead Ringers (1988) - Amazon

wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #574 on: June 23, 2016, 04:16:07 PM »
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July 19, 2016

Howard Hawks' To Have and Have Not (1944) from Warner Archive



Help the Free French? Not world-weary gunrunner Harry Morgan (Humphrey Bogart). But he changes his mind when a sultry siren-in-distress named Marie asks, "Anybody got a match?" That red-hot match is Bogart and 19-year-old first-time film actress Lauren Bacall. Full of intrigue and racy banter (including Bacall's legendary whistling instructions), this thriller excites further interest for what it has and has not. Cannily directed by Howard Hawks and smartly written by William Faulkner and Jules Furthman, it doesn't have much similarity to the Ernest Hemingway novel that inspired it. And it strongly resembles Casablanca: French resistance fighters, a piano-playing bluesman (Hoagy Carmichael) and a Martinique bar much like Rick's Cafe Americaine. But first and foremost, it showcases Bogart and Bacall, carrying on with a passion that smolders from the tips of their cigarettes clear through to their souls.






September 5, 2016

Woody Allen: Six Films (1971-1978) on blu-ray from Arrow UK



-Bananas (1971)
-Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex *But Were Afraid to Ask (1972)
-Sleeper (1973)
-Love and Death (1975)
-Annie Hall (1977)
-Interiors (1978)
-Exclusive to this collection: Annie Hall and a 100-page hardback book featuring new and archive writing on all the films by Woody Allen, Michael Brooke, Johnny Mains, Kat Ellinger, John Leman Riley, Hannah Hamad and Brad Stevens.

Woody Allen: Six Films (1971-1978) - Amazon UK

wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #575 on: June 23, 2016, 04:43:55 PM »
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August 12, 2016

Dean Stockwell and Neil Young's Human Highway (1982) on blu-ray from Reprise



The new owner of a roadside diner stuck in a town built around an always leaking nuclear power plant plans to torch the place to collect insurance. However, an assortment of bizare characters and weird events (such as spaceships flying around) gets in his way. Dean Stockwell, Dennis Hopper, Sally Kirkland, Russ Tamblyn, Charlotte Stewart and the members of Devo turned an almost non-existent script and behind-the-scenes drug shenanigans into a surreal slice of unforgettable oddness.

Human Highway (1982) - Amazon





wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #576 on: June 28, 2016, 05:06:27 PM »
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A lengthy article on Alan Clarke over at Film Comment, Tough Love: Alan Clarke

Quote from: Graham Fuller
Roughly from 1964 to 1990, the BBC’s drama department poured out a wealth of studio-recorded dramas and, increasingly, 16mm films that challenged the sociopolitical status quo.

[…]

One of the fruits of this initiative was the visceral, anti-establishment filmmaking of Alan Clarke (1935-1990), who arrived at the corporation when he was 33 and directed 29 dramas there.

[…]

Loach, Clarke, and colleagues like Mike Leigh, Stephen Frears, Roland Joffé, Michael Apted, and Richard Eyre were not passive interpreters of other people’s scripts—Leigh, in any case, wrote his own domestic tragicomedies. Loach shaped works he developed with such writers as Nell Dunn, Jeremy Sandford, and Jim Allen into a singularly humanistic socialist realist vision. Attentive to class divisions, manners, and behavioral nuances, Frears’s films of plays by Peter Prince, David Cook, David Hare, Stephen Poliakoff, and especially Alan Bennett were characterized by a visual economy and drollness, though Frears regards himself an auteur or stylist no more than do his champions.

What about Clarke? Sympathetic to social misfits and family casualties (as is Loach), youths especially, and antagonistic to patriarchal institutions (the Church, governments, the courts, prisons, schools, hospitals, multinationals), he was the telly auteur as roving anarchist—not an ideologue, however, but a director who approached the cinematic space representing Britain as a hectic ontological battleground.

wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #577 on: June 29, 2016, 04:39:33 AM »
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July 12, 2016

Busby Berkeley’s The Gang’s All Here (1943) from Twilight Time, also available from Masters of Cinema (UK)



A soldier falls for a chorus girl and then experiences trouble when he is posted to the Pacific.

The Gang’s All Here (1943) - Screen Archives







Woody Allen’s Zelig (1983) from Twilight Time



"Documentary" about a man who can look and act like whoever he's around, and meets various famous people.

Zelig (1983) - Screen Archives


wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #578 on: June 29, 2016, 04:51:55 PM »
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August 9, 2016

Richard Brooks' Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958) from Warner Archive



Brick, an alcoholic ex-football player, drinks his days away and resists the affections of his wife, Maggie. His reunion with his father, Big Daddy, who is dying of cancer, jogs a host of memories and revelations for both father and son.

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958) - Amazon





October 11, 2016

Brian De Palma's Carrie (1976) from Shout Factory, from a new 4K restoration




wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #579 on: June 29, 2016, 07:34:52 PM »
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September 13, 2016

Standard edition of Dario Argento's Tenebrae (1982) from Synapse



Tenebrae (1982) - Amazon



wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #580 on: June 30, 2016, 04:14:59 PM »
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FUCK. YES.

October 4, 2016

"Miami Vice" (1984-1990) from Mill Creek



Miami Vice - The Complete Series - Amazon





Watch Matt Zoller Sietz’s video essay on “Miami Vice”, the first part of his 5-part video essay ‘Zen Pulp’ on Michael Mann, here

(parts 2 through 5 are linked in the sidebar)

wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #581 on: July 01, 2016, 05:53:37 PM »
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2017 TBD

Toshio Matsumoto’s Funeral Parade of Roses (1969) on blu-ray from Cinelicious Pics



A loose adaptation of Oedipus Rex set in the underground gay counterculture of 1960s Tokyo. Cross-dressing club-kid Eddie (played by real-life transvestite entertainer extraordinaire Peter, famed for his role as Kyoami the Fool in Akira Kurosawa's Ran) vies with a rival drag-queen for the favours of drug-dealing cabaret-manager Gonda. Passions escalate and blood begins to flow — before all tensions are released in a jolting climax that prefigures by nearly thirty years Tsai Ming-liang's similarly scandalous The River.

An important work of the Japanese New Wave, Funeral Parade of Roses combines elements of arthouse, documentary and experimental cinema. The film was a major influence on Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange (1971).




wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #582 on: July 01, 2016, 06:31:31 PM »
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October 11, 2016

Leslie Stevens’ Private Property (1960) on blu-ray from Cinelicious Pics, from a new 4K restoration, limited to 3,000 copies









Private Property begins as two homicidal Southern California drifters wander off the beach and into the seemingly-perfect Beverly Hills home of an unhappy housewife. Shimmering with sexual tension and lensed in stunning black and white by master cameraman Ted McCord, ‘Private Property’ is both an eerie, neo-Hitchcockian thriller and a savage critique of the hollowness of the Playboy-era American Dream. Long thought lost, Stevens’ grim exposé of gender roles and sexual psychopathy may be the missing link in noir’s transition to the sixties.

Private Property (1960) - Amazon





Leslie Stevens’ Private Property (1960): Noir’s Edge of Wetness - Bright Lights Film Journal

Quote from: Bright Lights Film Journal
Like fellow late-phase noir auteur Paul Wendkos, writer-director-producer Leslie Stevens was an acolyte of Orson Welles — and no career path could be more dangerously vertiginous than one that emulated film’s most notorious outcast. Both men would eventually succumb to the studio system that they so flamboyantly spurned in their early, impetuous days, but before they were torn from their Wellesian womb they each produced a singular film with sinuous overtones of overripe, forbidden fruit.

Of the two, however, Stevens was the more extreme — pushing beyond the Oedipal indirections that Wendkos explored in The Burglar (1957, filmed in 1955), an incendiary, overheated caper film starring Dan Duryea and Jayne Mansfield, based on the David Goodis novel of the same name. More extreme, in that Stevens plunged head-on into the hidden injuries of gender relations in postwar America, at a time when paternalism was reaching its giddy peak — and more original, in that Stevens aspired to the same level of control over his production that Welles had always sought.

Stevens’ contribution to the noir nether regions that began to sprout like unwelcome weeds in the late ’50s — when films were still constrained from even a rudimentary display of sexual explicitness — has long been considered a lost film. Its recent discovery, languishing in plain sight at a well-known university film archive, is a deliciously wanton metaphor for the type of secrets and taboos that were on the cusp of being exploded out into the open as the twentieth century’s most tumultuous decade — the sixties — was being birthed.



Leslie Stevens also made the extremely unique Incubus (1966), shot by Conrad Hall





Quote from: Bret Fetzer
This black and white horror movie, filmed in California but with dialogue in Esperanto, is unlike anything you've ever seen. Incubus inverts the usual moral battle of a good person tempted by evil. When a headstrong, blond, young succubus named Kia (Allyson Ames) becomes bored with luring the corrupt and sinful to their ultimate demise, she decides she's going to tackle a truly good man (in the form of a very young William Shatner, of all people). An older, wiser succubus warns Kia that the good have an uncanny power called love, but Kia recklessly dives in, confident in her seductive powers--until she finds herself spiritually defiled by goodness and must summon an incubus (Milos Milos) to enact revenge. The pacing is slow but eerily effective, as are the stark cinematography and low-budget effects. Shatner's intonations are just as distinctive in Esperanto as in English, but that only adds to the movie's overall stylization. Incubus shares a kinship with Carnival of Souls, another low-budget black and white horror film that has more going on than buckets of gore. Though Incubus would seem to be heavily influenced by Ingmar Bergman, director Leslie Stevens has said he was more affected by Japanese samurai films. A strikingly unique and beautifully creepy film.


« Last Edit: November 30, 2016, 08:59:29 PM by wilder »

wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #583 on: July 08, 2016, 02:53:23 PM »
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Olive Films is introducing a new line, Olive Signature, which will be special edition releases of some of their films, presumably from new masters.

September 20, 2016

Nicholas Ray’s Johnny Guitar (1954), from a new 4K restoration



-Mastered from new 4K restoration
-Introduction by Martin Scorsese
-Audio commentary with historian and critic Geoff Andrew
-“Tell Us She Was One of You: The Blacklist History of Johnny Guitar” - with historian Larry Ceplair and blacklisted screenwriter Walter Bernstein
-“Is Johnny Guitar a Feminist Western?: Questioning the Canon” - with critics Miriam Bale, Kent Jones, Joe McElhaney and B. Ruby Rich
-“Free Republic: The Story of Herb Yates and Republic studios” - with archivist Marc Wanamaker
-A critical appreciation of Nicholas Ray with critics Miriam Bale, Kent Jones, Joe McElhaney and B. Ruby Rich
-“My Friend, the American Friend” - Nicholas Ray biographical piece with Tom Farrell
-“Johnny Guitar: The First Existential Western" - an original essay by critic Jonathan Rosenbaum
-Theatrical Trailer

Johnny Guitar (1954) - Amazon







Orson Welles’ Macbeth (1948) was also recently given a 2K restoration, so there’s a possibility that that’s in the pipeline to replace their old release. The 2K restored version is currently available from Carlotta in France.


September 27, 2016

Kamikaze ’89 (1982) on blu-ray from Film Movement



In a totalitarian society of the future, in which the government controls all facets of the media, a homicide detective investigates a string of bombings, and finds out more than he bargained for.

Kamikaze '89 (1982) - Amazon



wilder

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Re: Random DVD and Blu-ray announcements
« Reply #584 on: July 10, 2016, 03:05:22 AM »
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October 25, 2016

Claude Miller’s Garde à Vue aka The Grilling (1981) on blu-ray from TF1 (France)



Inspector Gallien is investigating the rape and murder of two little girls. The only suspect is attorney Jerome Martinaud, but the evidence against him is circumstantial. As the city celebrates New Year's Eve, Gallien calls Martinaud to his office and interrogates him for hour after hour while Martinaud continues to maintain his innocence. We learn all about the evidence; we meet Martinaud's wife and learn all about the rift between the two; but will we, and Gallien, finally learn whether Martinaud is guilty?

The Grilling (1981) - Amazon France


















Claude Miller’s Mortelle Randonnée aka Deadly Circuit (1983) on blu-ray from TF1 (France)



Catherine (Isabelle Adjani) is a seductive predator - a serial killer who lures wealthy men to their death. Beauvoir (Michel Serrault), a solitary detective known as "The Eye," is in pursuit. Convinced she is his long-lost daughter, he shadows her through Europe, concealing incriminating evidence and helping her elude the police. But when Catherine falls in love with a blind artist (Sami Frey), Beauvoir's jealousy leads to a fatal accident, which ones again sets her on a murderous path.

Deadly Circuit (1983) - Amazon France









 

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