Author Topic: HALFBORN: An Inland Empire Analysis  (Read 23726 times)

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Jeremy Blackman

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Re: HALFBORN: An Inland Empire Analysis
« Reply #120 on: November 23, 2015, 01:04:23 PM »
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Thanks, and welcome!

My avatar is from the Black Mirror episode "White Bear," one of the best episodes of TV I've ever seen.

Speaking of which, I also highly recommend The Leftovers last night's episode was truly remarkable, and heavily Lynch-inspired. Season 1 is mixed (though worth watching), but Season 2 is on a new level.

I love your interpretations of IE. I think it's really the case here that Lynch didn't grasp the entirety of what he was making; I don't think one human mind could.

I like the examples of trios/trinities you found! I'm sure they're in all kinds of places I haven't noticed before. When you say "This is a bit of a silly interpretation," well, that's just how the entire movie works. There's a lot of silliness and off-the-wall symbolism throughout... What keeps it from being dumb is the foreboding, and the ever-present sense that something else is going on.

I honestly feel like there's an argument to be made for this dynamic pervading the film: one + one's other half +(vs.) fear/evil/negativity. What is striking to me is that there is always one of the three missing, it's not always the phantom, either...as far as I can tell there are no scenes that include sue, lost-girl AND the phantom together. I feel like the two-lights theme is related to this. (Two candles at the seance, two lights reflected on the TV, and two candles lit by the rabbit)

This is fascinating. I wonder what conclusions can be drawn.

The Polish mediums seem to be manifestations of the spirit world rabbits. But the rabbits are still a bit of a mystery their role is very fluid. Not only might they be the mediums, they might also be Janek and Mr. K.





With the other trios, what is Lynch getting at? My theory has been that direct correlations are being drawn between Old Poland and Inland Empire to show what reincarnation can do. I think that's true and that it's the core of the film. But it might go beyond that I think there's a lot of room to expand on the idea of trios/trinities, because you're right, it pops up in other areas of the movie.

'There are only two, the third does not belong and must be purged so the two can become one.' This pertains to quite a few dynamics, just think of what a love-triangle murder actually is.

Ooo I definitely like this! Have to let it sink in.
"Hunger is the purest sin"

markfilipak

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Re: HALFBORN: An Inland Empire Analysis
« Reply #121 on: January 07, 2016, 01:33:28 AM »
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Hello,

Thanks for having me over. The IE board at IMDB has been taken over by trolls, so I came here. I trust that, as a moderated board, this will be a welcoming and productive place.

I think I've pretty much figured out IE, but I have a few questions.

What's the cylindrical thingy on Mr. K's desk?

How is it that Sue can go through the door into the beige hall that connects Smithy's house & the old hotel, yet almost immediately reappear at the door into the Neuron -- my name -- from the blue landing above the cinema?

What do you make of the very short time distortions:
1, when Sue, on her way to the Smithy's house prop wall (soon to become her home), and passes the 6-light window -- it is empty -- on Stage 4, then a few seconds later passes it again -- this time Smithy wearing a green jacket is standing in it; and
2, Doris sneaks up on Sue while on Hollywood Blvd. and passes her, then jumps back 1 second and reaches Sue again, but this time grabs the screwdriver.

Thanks,

Mark.
(I hope this posts okay... It's my first.)
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polkablues

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Re: HALFBORN: An Inland Empire Analysis
« Reply #122 on: January 07, 2016, 04:56:46 PM »
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Hi! I'm not going to be of any help to you, as I'm not one of the hardcore Lynchophiles around these parts, but welcome!
Now you're in the *spoiler* place.

Jeremy Blackman

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Re: HALFBORN: An Inland Empire Analysis
« Reply #123 on: January 11, 2016, 06:11:35 PM »
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Markfilipak are you still here? If so I may take a crack at this.
"Hunger is the purest sin"

Matt_Muerte

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Re: HALFBORN: An Inland Empire Analysis
« Reply #124 on: January 17, 2016, 01:06:31 AM »
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I watched Inland Empire last night for the first time and regret the fact that I haven't seen it sooner. I've been a David Lynch fan for over twenty years, but for some reason never got around to watching IE. Your analysis was very thorough and thought-provoking; while I haven't devoted a fraction of the time you've spent with your structured analysis, I did come away with a few impressions that I didn't see mentioned in the forum. The mention and use of back alleys seems to suggest that they are a more direct path to enlightenment; they are far less glamorous as opposed to the storefronts and facades that are in the front, but there is "always a place to park" there. This suggests to me that few people choose that route despite its effectiveness because it does not have attractive illusions.

The second thing that really struck me about IE was the fact that one cannot view it passively. Often, it felt like the actors were looking out of the screen, involving the viewer. The motif of life being a recorded/observed event is emphasized by the fact that we are viewing it as well. There was at least one scene of infinite regression in which the Lost Girl was watched by us, while she watched a television, and so on ad infinitum.

The idea of purgatory makes great sense. I also believe that it has a connection to Akashic records, or recordings of all of our deeds in a lifetime.

A strange theory that I have concerns the incidental mention and end scene with the woman who had two prosthetic legs. This seems to run parallel to the little man in the Lodge (Twin Peaks, FWWM). He was actually the arm of Mike; since there were a few scenes that involved the number 2 (the two floating lights), might this indicate in some way that they are the legs of the woman? The little man feeds off of Garmonbozia (cream corn), which I believe is pain/suffering. The lights might be entities feeding off of negative energy. It was mentioned that the legless woman killed children; this theory might make sense of that incidental story.

Another thing that caught my attention was the group dancing of the whores. This seemed to objectify them and make them seem almost soulless, a cog in the machinery. Their group dancing was a display of acting in accordance with society's expectations; if we view this in light of the woman being treated like a whore, this might make more sense.

Sorry for the random nature of my observations, but I felt compelled to share them with other Lynch enthusiasts.

Aponys21

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Re: HALFBORN: An Inland Empire Analysis
« Reply #125 on: March 27, 2016, 05:23:15 PM »
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Hello everyone and thank you all for the mind-blowing interpretations of this mind-blowing movie. But I have some questions whose answers I didn't seem to find on this thread:

Why did Sue enter Room 47 walking backwards and why did the rabbits disappear? I have watched that scene many times and it seems to me that Sue doesn't stand in front of the entrance when the door is finally opened. It seems to me that she comes somewhere from the left with her back towards the room initially, as though she didn't see the rabbits at all.

When Lost Girl is finally freed, she walks out of the room (which is not room 47, it's room 202 or 205, I fail to remember at this point, sorry), and then meets her husband/lover and his son. First of all, I have to ask: is Lost Girl trapped in the hotel room or somewhere behind room 47?  And how come Smithy knows her and rejoices when he sees her?

Thank you very much and I truly apologize if these questions have already been answered here.


Erniesam

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Re: HALFBORN: An Inland Empire Analysis
« Reply #126 on: April 23, 2017, 02:55:30 PM »
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Hi Jeremy,

I just skimped through your analysis and found it interesting. I will read it thoroughly next weekend. What I gathered now is that you approach the movie as depicting "real" events. By this I mean things that we see are actually happening though depicted in an abstract way. My question is: what do you think is the crux of IE? What story does it tell and what is it conclusion?

I'd like an in-depth discussion of this masterpiece. IMDB board is gone so I'm looking for another forum to discuss this and other movies by Lynch. My experience is that you can learn alot from a wide variety of views.

Jeremy Blackman

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Re: HALFBORN: An Inland Empire Analysis
« Reply #127 on: April 23, 2017, 03:52:45 PM »
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What I gathered now is that you approach the movie as depicting "real" events. By this I mean things that we see are actually happening though depicted in an abstract way.

I think with this movie Lynch does his best to show us the mechanics of the spiritual world he's dreamed up. That's mostly why I did that analysis; when you begin sorting through all the insanity, a logic emerges.

Lynch has to make the spiritual mechanics at least somewhat abstract and confusing otherwise it would all just lose its magic. In fact, I think you need to use heavy doses of mystery and confusion to describe spirituality in a way that makes sense. Inland Empire's spirit world operates with its own set of rules that we only somewhat understand. That feels right to me if there is a spirit world, why should it be immediately understandable by the human mind?


My question is: what do you think is the crux of IE? What story does it tell and what is it conclusion?

This is definitely something I didn't really get to in my analysis. I think the film's crux can be summed up by the joyous climax, when Lost Girl and Sue merge. It's the perfect culmination of both their experiences. Throughout the film we see how dark and difficult life can be, but much is gained, and it's all for a purpose when that journey ends. This is a literal spiritual unification that we're actually being shown. You can take from that whatever you want love, compassion, ultimate understanding.

Just think about what Lost Girl actually does when she watches Sue's experiences. From the start, she is bursting with empathy, and that only accelerates, until she achieves a profound understanding of both Sue and (I argue) herself, until she is finally ready for that unification.


"Hunger is the purest sin"

 

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