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Stefen

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #30 on: April 19, 2010, 02:28:10 AM »
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If anyone had anything Cannes bound, we could cancel the board.

I feel like a dick for not feeling this years lineup. I'm always dogging American film, but when there isn't any at Cannes, it makes me lose my interest. What a jerk.

Is it wrong that the only reason I was waiting for Cannes is because T.O.L. could have been shown? Now, pshh. My Yankee ass will be at the beach drinking beer from a red plastic cup while wearing my TapouT hat backwards.
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Pubrick

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #31 on: April 19, 2010, 03:47:51 AM »
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Oh shit.  I was reading Lodge Kerrigan but my mind was saying Ken Loach, for some reason.  That is great news.

haha, i was reading lodge kerrigan but i was thinking kenneth lonergan.

somewhere, lodge kerrigan is all like:


endless 'nothing is what it seems'-isms

MacGuffin

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #32 on: April 19, 2010, 12:12:00 PM »
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anybody else got anything headed Cannes-ward? Mac?

Dear Filmmaker,

We at CIFF are sorry to inform you that your submission was not selected to the 2010 Cannes Independent Film Festival.  The quality of the submissions this year was very high and we had to make some very hard choices when it came to selection.

If you will be in Cannes during the festival, please drop us a note and we'll keep you updated regarding our screenings and events, which you are invited to attend at no cost.

We will be posting our Official Selection and Schedule on our website in the next few days.

Thank you again.
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samsong

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #33 on: May 24, 2010, 05:20:30 AM »
0
one of my very favorite filmmakers apichatpong "joe" weerasethakul wins the palme d'or!  the british prove to be more disdainful than ever.

---

Lacklustre Cannes ends with upset

By Neil Smith
Entertainment reporter, BBC News

Unless you happen to hail from his part of the world, Apichatpong Weerasethakul is not a name that trips off the tongue.

Yet it is one cineastes will have to learn to pronounce after the Thai director's surprise Palme d'Or victory at this year's Cannes Film Festival.

Considered a dark horse at best, his elliptically titled Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives emerged triumphant on Sunday - a first not only for Weerasethakul, or 'Joe' as he is informally known, but for his country as well.

His win came at the expense of a host of more established and feted film-makers - not least British auteurs Mike Leigh and Ken Loach, who both went home empty-handed.

Leigh's family drama Another Year had been hotly tipped to win the Palme. Of Gods and Men, a film based on the 1996 murder of a group of Cistercian monks in Algeria, was also considered a front-runner.

Ultimately, though, the jury chose to celebrate a rising talent with a distinctive new voice, rather than give more honours to the tried and tested.

Outlandish

When the 63rd Festival du Film began on 12 May, jury president Tim Burton said he was looking for "the element of surprise" in this year's competition entries.

With its fantastical elements, offbeat humour and fascination with reincarnation and the transmigration of souls, Uncle Boonmee certainly fit the bill.

Set amidst the lush vegetation of north-east Thailand, it tells of a man on the verge of death who receives a visitation from his late wife.

He also meets his long-lost son, who appears to him in the form of a 'monkey ghost' with glowing red eyes.

At one point a disfigured princess has a sexual liaison with a talking catfish.

In retrospect, one would be hard pressed to find a film more in tune with Burton's Gothic sensibilities and appetite for the outlandish.

Critics have heaped praise on Weerasethakul's movie, though a number felt it was too esoteric to scoop Cannes' highest honour.

The praise has been far from universal either, with one British reviewer describing it as "unwatchable".

Didactic

Whatever its merits, Uncle Boonmee is sure to benefit from the international exposure a Palme d'Or automatically generates.

It is possible, however, that it may have been the beneficiary of what has by common consent been one of the more lacklustre programmes in recent years.

Though Javier Bardem shared the best actor award for his work in Biutiful, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's intentionally misspelt film - also about a dying man - was considered a disappointment.

So was Loach's Route Irish, a late addition to the line-up whose didactic approach to the war in Iraq left many cold.

Abbas Kiarostami's romantic drama Certified Copy had its admirers and saw Juliette Binoche - the face of this year's festival poster - presented with the best actress prize.

Eyebrows were raised, however, about the inclusion of Takeshi Kitano's Outrage, an excessively violent gangster thriller more suited to a midnight slot than a competition berth.

Hors La Loi (Outside of the Law) was a talking point, though that was more down to the controversy it provoked than to the film itself.

Riot police

Hundreds of protesters took to the streets last Friday to voice their objections to its emotive depiction of Algeria's struggle for independence against France.

The atmosphere was tense that day, with extra security in place around the Palais des Festivals and heavily armed police lining the Croisette.

None of the above, though, stopped pop star Cheryl Cole from attending its gala premiere at the behest of one of the festival's corporate sponsors.

Sir Mick Jagger was also in town last week to introduce a screening of Rolling Stones documentary Stones in Exile, ahead of its BBC One broadcast on Sunday.

So were Spider-Man stars Kirsten Dunst and James Franco, whose short films Bastard and The Clerk's Tale - running eight and 13 minutes respectively - formed an amusingly brief finale to the Critics' Week sidebar on Thursday.

Such fleeting cameos, alas, were not enough to dispel the general feeling this has been far from a vintage year.

Indeed, much of the talk towards the end of last week was how much better this year's Venice Film Festival - to be held in September, with Quentin Tarantino heading the jury - was likely to be in comparison.


---


my already intense desire to see uncle boonmee who can recall his past lives has grown exponentially, thankfully tempered by the fact that the palme d'or win will at the very least secure a slightly wider release than those weerasethakul's previous films received.  also incredibly excited for new kiarostami and lee chang dong.

Stefen

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #34 on: May 24, 2010, 06:02:23 AM »
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Weak year. Cannes didn't have a strong lineup this time.

Here's hoping for tree of life next year or next (lol).
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MacGuffin

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #35 on: May 26, 2013, 02:26:58 PM »
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CANNES: ‘Blue Is the Warmest Color’ Wins Palme d’ Or
Source: Variety

CANNES — “Blue Is the Warmest Color,” Abdellatif Kechiche’s sweeping and sexually explicit drama about a French teenage girl’s love affair with another woman, received the Palme d’Or at the 66th annual Cannes Film Festival on Sunday night. In a history-making decision, the Steven Spielberg-led jury opted not only to give the first Palme d’Or to a gay romantic drama, but to present the accolade jointly to three artists: Tunisian-born director Abdellatif Kechiche and French actresses Adele Exarchopoulos and Lea Seydoux.

The Grand Prix went to “Inside Llewyn Davis,” Joel and Ethan Coen’s warmly received comedy-drama set against New York’s 1960s folk-music scene. It’s the eighth film the Coen brothers have had in competition at Cannes; they won the Palme d’Or for 1991′s “Barton Fink,” as well as directing prizes for “Barton Fink,” “Fargo” (1996) and “The Man Who Wasn’t There” (2001).

The Coens weren’t the only Yank talents recognized at Sunday’s Audrey Tautou-hosted closing ceremony. In a widely applauded decision, 76-year-old Bruce Dern drew the actor kudo for his performance as an aging husband and father in Alexander Payne’s black-and-white road movie “Nebraska.” In contrast with last year, when none of the five American films in competition won a prize, Spielberg’s jury spread the wealth around, honoring a range of films from Europe, North America and Asia.

With its 175-minute running time (the longest of any film in competition) and graphic lesbian sex scenes, “Blue Is the Warmest Color” dominated festival conversation following its first press screenings on Wednesday night and was swiftly acquired for Stateside distribution by IFC’s Sundance Selects. Still, audiences at the Palais des Festivals were held in some suspense until the final moments of the ceremony, as Exarchopoulos’ presence had led many to assume she had won the actress prize, which would have technically prevented “Blue” from also winning the Palme.

This is the second year in a row that the festival’s top prize has gone to a French-language feature, as Austrian helmer’s Paris-set drama “Amour” won in 2012. It also represents a rare instance of a director winning Cannes’ top prize for his first film in competition; Kechiche’s previous two films, “The Secret of the Grain” (2007) and “Black Venus” (2010), bowed in competition at the Venice Film Festival (where “Grain” was a multiple prizewinner).

At a press conference following the ceremony, Spielberg described Kechiche’s film as “a great love story that made all of us feel privileged to be a fly on the wall, to see this story of deep love and deep heartbreak evolve from the beginning. The director didn’t put any constraints on the narrative. He let the scenes play in real life, and we were absolutely spellbound.”

While the presentation of international cinema’s highest honor to this particular film struck a topical note at a time when the gay-marriage debate continues to rage (France just legalized gay marriage last week) Spielberg rejected the idea that politics had influenced the jury’s decision. “As you know, the characters in this film do not get married,” he said. “Politics were never in the room with us.” He also said that the decision to honor thesps Exarchopoulos and Seydoux alongside Kechiche was essential, noting that, “If the casting had been even 3% wrong, it wouldn’t have worked in the same way. All of us felt we needed to invite all three artists to the stage together.”

Spielberg added that while he expected the film to play well in the U.S., “I’m not sure it will be allowed to play in every state.”

The jury presented a united front backstage, as Spielberg noted that there had been no behind-the-scenes drama, and that he and his fellow jurors were able to come to a consensus on “at least three of the incredibly important choices.” Juror Nicole Kidman noted that, given their hectic schedule, she asked her jurors to see certain films more than once. In addition to Spielberg and Kidman, the jury included directors Ang Lee, Cristian Mungiu, Lynne Ramsay and Naomi Kawase, and actors Christoph Waltz, Daniel Auteuil and Vidya Balan.

In perhaps the evening’s biggest surprise, Mexican helmer Amat Escalante received the directing nod for his third feature, “Heli.” A tough drama about a family torn apart by drug-related gang violence, the film screened on the first evening of the festival and generated discussion primarily for its attention-grabbing image of a man having his genitals set on fire.

Berenice Bejo took the actress award for her performance as a Parisian woman seeking a divorce from her Iranian husband in Asghar Farhadi’s “The Past.” The last time Bejo appeared in a Cannes competition entry was in 2011 with “The Artist,” for which she later received an Oscar nomination.

Two of the three Asian films in competition were singled out for recognition. The jury prize was awarded to “Like Father, Like Son,” Japanese helmer Hirokazu Kore-eda’s delicate drama about two families who discover their sons were swapped at birth, while Chinese writer-director Jia Zhangke was given the screenplay prize for “A Touch of Sin,” his four-part drama based on real-life episodes of violence in contempo China.

In another victory for an Asian film, albeit one outside the official selection, the Camera d’Or jury, headed by Agnes Varda, presented its prize for best first feature to Singaporean helmer Anthony Chen’s Directors’ Fortnight entry “Ilo ilo.” Chen noted in his acceptance speech that his was the first pic from Singapore to receive an award in Cannes.

Despite having generated considerable buzz during the festival, Steven Soderbergh’s “Behind the Candelabra,” James Gray’s “The Immigrant” and Paolo Sorrentino’s “The Great Beauty” went home empty-handed.

Before Sunday’s ceremony, the Un Certain Regard jury, headed by Thomas Vinterberg, gave its top award to “The Missing Picture,” Cambodian helmer Rithy Panh’s documentary account of his childhood under the Pol Pot regime, and a jury prize to “Omar,” helmer Hany Abu-Assad’s drama about young Palestinian men driven to violence.

Ryan Coogler’s first feature, “Fruitvale Station,” received a Future prize, adding to its two big wins at Sundance, while a directing award was presented to Gallic helmer Alain Guiraudie for his gay-cruising thriller “Stranger by the Lake,” acquired during the festival by Strand Releasing. Finally, the Un Certain Regard jury handed a special A Certain Talent award to the ensemble cast of “La jaula de oro,” an immigration thriller from Mexico-based Spanish helmer Diego Quemada-Diaz.

The big winner in the Directors’ Fortnight sidebar was “Me Myself and Mum,” Gallic actor-director Guillaume Gallienne’s comedy adapted from his own stage show; the pic won both the Art Cinema award and the Society of Dramatic Authors and Composers’ SACD prize, given to a French-language film. “The Selfish Giant,” British helmer Clio Barnard’s unconventional take on Oscar Wilde, received the Europa Cinemas Label for best European film.

Like Directors’ Fortnight, the Critics’ Week yielded a double winner: “Salvo,” a thriller from Italian directors Fabio Grassadonia and Antonio Piazza, which won both the Grand Prix and the Visionary prize in the sidebar. A special mention went to Argentinian entry “The Owners,” helmed by Agustin Toscano and Ezequiel Radusky, while Canadian director Sebastien Pilote’s farming drama “Le Demantelement” took the SACD prize for best screenplay.

The Fipresci international critics jury sided with Spielberg’s jury, giving its top competition prize to “Blue Is the Warmest Color,” and also bestowed awards on Mohammad Rasoulof’s “Manuscripts Don’t Burn” (Un Certain Regard) and Jeremy Saulnier’s “Blue Ruin” (Directors’ Fortnight).

MAIN JURY PRIZES

Palme d’Or: “Blue Is the Warmest Color” (Abdellatif Kechiche, director; Adele Exarchopoulos France)

Grand Prix: “Inside Llewyn Davis” (Joel and Ethan Coen, U.S.)

Director: Amat Escalante, “Heli” (Mexico)

Jury prize: “Like Father, Like Son” (Hirokazu Kore-eda, Japan)

Actor: Bruce Dern, “Nebraska” (Alexander Payne, U.S.)

Actress: Berenice Bejo, “The Past” (Asghar Farhadi, France-Italy)

Screenplay: Jia Zhangke, “A Touch of Sin” (China)

UN CERTAIN REGARD JURY PRIZES

Main prize: “The Missing Picture” (Rithy Panh, Cambodia-France)

Jury prize: Hany Abu-Assad, “Omar” (Palestine)

Director: Alain Guiraudie, “Stranger by the Lake” (France)

Future prize: “Fruitvale Station” (Ryan Coogler, U.S.)

A Certain Talent prize: Ensemble cast of “La jaula de oro” (Diego Quemada-Diaz, Mexico-Spain)

OTHER JURY PRIZES

Camera d’Or: “Ilo ilo” (Anthony Chen, Singapore)

Directors’ Fortnight Art Cinema Award: “Me Myself and Mum” (Guillaume Gallienne, France)

Directors’ Fortnight Europa Cinemas Label: “The Selfish Giant” (Clio Barnard, U.K.)

Directors’ Fortnight SACD Prize: “Me Myself and Mum”

Critics’ Week Grand Prix: “Salvo” (Fabio Grassadonia, Antonio Piazza, Italy)

Critics’ Week Visionary Prize: “Salvo”

Critics’ Week Special Mention: “The Owners” (Agustin Toscano, Ezequiel Radusky, Argentina)

Critics’ Week SACD Prize for Screenplay: “Le Demantelement” (Sebastien Pilote, Canada)

Short Films Palme d’Or: “Safe” (Moon Byoung-gon, South Korea)

Ecumenical Jury Prize: “The Past” (Asghar Farhadi, France-Italy)

FIPRESCI PRIZES

Competition: “Blue Is the Warmest Color” (Abdellatif Kechiche, France)

Un Certain Regard: “Manuscripts Don’t Burn” (Mohammad Rasoulof, Iran)

Directors’ Fortnight: “Blue Ruin” (Jeremy Saulnier, U.S.)
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Drenk

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #36 on: May 26, 2013, 03:22:46 PM »
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I've seen the Palme d'Or yesterday, Blue Is The Warmest Color, and it's a magnificent film. Adèle Extrachopoulos is... :shock: And the intensity... :shock:
I'm so many people.

ElPandaRoyal

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #37 on: May 26, 2013, 04:29:09 PM »
+4
Wait... Adèle Extrachopoulos is Eli Roth?
Si

Drenk

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #38 on: May 26, 2013, 04:36:10 PM »
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No. Eli Roth is more... :doh:
I'm so many people.

BB

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #39 on: May 26, 2013, 07:26:37 PM »
+1
If anyone had anything Cannes bound, we could cancel the board.

 :shock:

polkablues

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #40 on: May 26, 2013, 11:30:41 PM »
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Wait... Adèle Extrachopoulos is Eli Roth?

For reference so everyone is in on this awesome callback: http://xixax.com/index.php?topic=11297.msg288225#msg288225
Now you're in the *spoiler* place.

samsong

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #41 on: May 27, 2013, 04:15:46 PM »
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the secret of the grain is one of my very favorite movies.  happy for kechiche, excited to see this.

jenkins

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #42 on: April 17, 2014, 03:27:18 PM »
+2
xixax archiving:

2014 CANNES FILM FESTIVAL LINEUP

OPENER

“Grace of Monaco” (Olivier Dahan, France-U.S.-Belgium-Italy) Nicole Kidman stars as Grace Kelly in Dahan’s 1960s-set biopic, which, as previously announced, is kicking off the festival out of competition. The Weinstein Co. is distributing the film Stateside. (Sales: Lotus Entertainment)

COMPETITION

“The Captive” (Atom Egoyan, Canada) Ryan Reynolds, Scott Speedman and Rosario Dawson star in this abduction thriller, Egoyan’s sixth competition entry; the Canadian helmer won the Grand Prix for 1997’s “The Sweet Hereafter.” (Sales: eOne)

“Clouds of Sils Maria” (Olivier Assayas, France-Switzerland-Germany) IFC has Stateside rights to this English-language picture about an actress who withdraws to the Swiss town of the title, starring Juliette Binoche, Kristen Stewart and Chloe Grace Moretz. Assayas was previously in competition with “Clean,” “Demonlover” and “Les Destinees sentimentales,” but has yet to win a Cannes prize. (Sales: MK2)

“Foxcatcher” (Bennett Miller, U.S.) Once slated to open last year’s AFI Film Festival before being pushed to 2014, this third feature from the highly regarded director of “Capote” and “Moneyball” is an account of the murder of Olympic wrestling champion Dave Schultz. Sony Classics is releasing the film Stateside. (Sales: Panorama Media)

“Goodbye to Language” (Jean-Luc Godard, Switzerland) Previously at the festival with 2010’s characteristically cryptic “Film socialisme,” Godard will make his seventh appearance in competition (if you count his contribution to 1987’s “Aria”). His latest offering will be presented in 3D.

“The Homesman” (Tommy Lee Jones, U.S.) Set around his period Western is the actor-director’s first helming effort since his 2005 debut, “The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada,” which won two prizes at Cannes (including an acting award for Jones). (Sales: EuropaCorp)

“Jimmy’s Hall” (Ken Loach, U.K.-Ireland-France) Reportedly the British realist’s final fiction feature, this drama about the Irish communist leader James Gralton will mark Loach’s 12th time in competition. He won the Palme d’Or in 2006 for “The Wind That Shakes the Barley” and recently received a jury prize for 2012’s “The Angels’ Share.” (Sales: Wild Bunch)

“Leviathan” (Andrei Zvyagintsev, Russia) A multi-character fusion of social drama and sci-fi set in a “new country,” Zvyagintsev’s fourth feature marks his first return to the Cannes competition since 2007’s “The Banishment”; his previous film, “Elena,” closed Un Certain Regard in 2011.

“Le Meraviglie” (Alice Rohrwacher, Italy-Switzerland-Germany) One of two female directors in competition this year, Italian writer-director Rohrwacher delivers her second feature after her 2011 Directors’ Fortnight entry, “Corpo celeste.” It’s the story of a 14-year-old girl in the Umbrian countryside whose secluded life is shattered by the arrival of a young German ex-con.

“Maps to the Stars” (David Cronenberg, U.S.) This satire of the entertainment industry will be the Canadian auteur’s fifth film to screen in competition at Cannes (following “Crash,” “Spider,” “A History of Violence” and “Cosmopolis”), and his second consecutive collaboration with star Robert Pattinson. It could also be his first film to win the Palme d’Or. (Sales: eOne)

“Mommy” (Xavier Dolan, France-Canada) One of the younger directors to crack the competition (at age 25), the Quebecois helmer scooped up multiple Critics’ Week prizes for his 2009 debut, “I Killed My Mother,” and entered Un Certain Regard with “Heartbeats” and “Laurence Anyways.” His latest is a relationship drama starring Anne Dorval, Suzanne Clement and Antoine-Olivier Pilon. (Sales: eOne)

“Saint Laurent” (Bertrand Bonello, France) Not to be confused with Jalil Lespert’s “Yves Saint Laurent,” the other recent biopic of the French fashion designer, Bonello’s film stars Gaspard Ulliel, Louis Garrel and Lea Seydoux. The helmer was previously in competition with 2011’s “House of Pleasures” (then titled “House of Tolerance”) and 2003’s “Tiresia.” (Sales: EuropaCorp)

“The Search” (Michel Hazanavicius, France) Berenice Bejo and Annette Bening topline this drama centered around the bond between an NGO worker and a young boy in war-torn Chechnya. A remake of Fred Zinnemann’s Oscar-winning 1948 film of the same title, it marks Hazanavicius’ return to the Cannes competition after his 2011 prizewinner, “The Artist.” (Sales: Wild Bunch)

“Still the Water” (Naomi Kawase, Japan) By now a Cannes competition regular, Kawase won the Grand Prix for 2007’s “The Mourning Forest” and received the Camera d’Or for her 1997 debut, “Suzaku.” Her latest film is set on the Japanese island of Amami-Oshima and centers on a young couple trying to solve a mysterious death. (Sales: MK2)

“Mr. Turner” (Mike Leigh, U.K.) A four-time veteran of the Cannes competition who won the Palme d’Or for 1996’s “Secrets & Lies” and director for 1993’s “Naked,” the British master will return to the festival with this portrait of the 19th-century painter J.M.W. Turner, starring Timothy Spall and Lesley Manville. Sony Classics is distributing in the U.S. (Sales: Focus Features Intl.)

“Timbuktu” (Abderrahmane Sissako, France) The Mauritanian-born, Mali-raised director, who was previously at Cannes with 2006’s “Bamako,” tells the story of a young couple who were stoned to death in northern Mali for the crime of “not being married before God.” (Sales: Le Pacte)

“Two Days, One Night” (Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, Belgium) Marion Cotillard, Fabrizio Rongione and Olivier Gourmet star in this story of a young woman trying to convince her colleagues to give up their bonuses so she can keep her job. Already acquired by Sundance Selects for the U.S., it will be the Belgian brothers’ sixth film to compete at Cannes; they have won the Palme d’Or twice, for 1999’s “Rosetta” and 2005’s “L’enfant.” (Sales: Wild Bunch)

“Wild Tales” (Damian Szifron, Argentina-Spain) Pedro Almodovar is one of the producers of this series of comic sketches from Argentinean writer-director Szifron, making his first appearance at Cannes.

“Winter Sleep” (Nuri Bilge Ceylan, Turkey-Germany-France) This three-hour-plus drama is set in the titular landscape of Ceylan’s previous film (and 2011 Cannes Grand Prix winner), “Once Upon a Time in Anatolia.” The rigorous Turkish auteur also won the festival’s directing prize for 2008’s “Three Monkeys” and the Grand Prix for 2002’s “Distant.”

OUT OF COMPETITION

“Coming Home” (Zhang Yimou, China) Zhang’s 12th collaboration with Gong Li (star of his Cannes competition entries “Ju Dou,” “To Live” and “Shanghai Triad”) is a romantic drama set against the backdrop of China’s Cultural Revolution. Sony Classics is distributing the film in North America and other territories. (Sales: Wild Bunch)

“How to Train Your Dragon 2” (Dean DeBlois, U.S.) This Fox-distributed sequel to 2010’s smash hit “How to Train Your Dragon” follows in a long line of DreamWorks toons that have bowed on the Croisette, including “Shrek,” “Shrek 2,” “Kung Fu Panda” and last year’s “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted.”

“Les Gens du Monde” (Yves Jeuland, France) Jeuland’s latest documentary pays tribute to the 70-year history of France’s daily newspaper Le Monde.

UN CERTAIN REGARD

OPENER: “Party Girl” (Marie Amachoukeli, Claire Burger and Samuel Theis, France) This directorial debut for all three co-helmers tells the story of a 60-year-old nightclub hostess who finally decides to settle down by marrying a member of her clientele. It was selected to open Un Certain Regard “because we’ve noted that the young French cinema is in a state of fervor and vitality, and we need to encourage it,” Fremaux said. (Sales: Pyramide)

“Amour fou” (Jessica Hausner, Austria-Luxembourg-Germany) This follow-up to Hausner’s acclaimed 2009 drama “Lourdes” is “a parable about the ambivalence of love” inspired by the suicide pact of the 19th-century poet Heinrich von Kleist and his friend Henriette Vogel. (Sales: Coproduction Office)

“Bird People” (Pascale Ferran, France) Ferran’s first film since her acclaimed “Lady Chatterley” is a relationship drama with a supernatural element, starring Josh Charles (formerly of “The Good Wife”) and Anais Demoustier. (Sales: Films Distribution)

“The Blue Room” (Mathieu Amalric, France) The French actor-helmer, who won a directing prize for 2010’s “On Tour,” stars along with Lea Drucker in this adaptation of a 1964 Georges Simenon novel. (Sales: Alfama)

“Charlie’s Country” (Rolf de Heer, Australia) This third collaboration between de Heer and actor David Gulpilil extends the director’s commitment to exploring Australian Aboriginal culture. It world premiered at the recent Adelaide Film Festival. (Sales: Fandango Portobello)

“A Girl at My Door” (July Jung, South Korea) Produced by Cannes competition favorite Lee Chang-dong, Jung’s debut feature centers around a young woman being abused by her stepfather.

“Eleanor Rigby” (Ned Benson, U.S.) Previously a two-part, 191-minute drama titled “The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby,” this Weinstein Co. release starring Jessica Chastain and James McAvoy chronicles the dissolution of a marriage. (Sales: Myriad Pictures)

“Fantasia” (Wang Chao) The Chinese writer-director was previously in Cannes with his 2006 Un Certain Regard prizewinner, “Luxury Car.”

“Force Majeure” (Ruben Ostlund) Formerly titled “Tourist,” Ostlund’s fourth feature was shot at a ski resort in France and deploys “aesthetic and narrative codes that are completely different from what we’re used to,” said Fremaux. The Swedish helmer was previously at Cannes with 2011’s “Play” and 2008’s “Involuntary.” (Sales: Coproduction Office)

“Harcheck mi headro” (Keren Yedaya) This is the third feature from Israeli helmer Yedaya, who was previously at Cannes with 2009’s Jewish-Arab love story “Jaffa” and her 2004 Camera d’Or winner, “Or (My Treasure).”

“Hermosa juventud” (Jaime Rosales) The Barcelona-born director was previously in Un Certain Regard with 2007’s “Solitary Fragments.”

“Incompresa” (Asia Argento, Italy-France) Argento has been a fixture of the festival as a director (2004’s “The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things”) and an actress (“Boarding Gate,” “The Last Mistress,” “Go Go Tales,” “Dracula 3D”). Her latest helming effort, which features Charlotte Gainsbourg, takes its title from that of Luigi Comencini’s “Incompreso” (“Misunderstood”).

“Jauja” (Lisandro Alonso, Denmark-U.S.-Argentina) Viggo Mortensen stars in this drama about a father and daughter journeying from Denmark to an unknown desert. It’s the Argentine auteur’s first feature since his 2008 Directors’ Fortnight entry, “Liverpool.”

“Lost River” (Ryan Gosling, U.S.) Until now known under the title “How to Catch a Monster,” Gosling’s writing-directing debut, which was acquired last year by Warner Bros. for U.S. distribution, is a Detroit-shot fantasy-drama starring Christina Hendricks, Saoirse Ronan and Eva Mendes. The actor has been a frequent visitor to Cannes lately in films including “Drive,” “Only God Forgives” and “Blue Valentine.” (Sales: Sierra/Affinity)

“Run” (Philippe Lacote, France-Ivory Coast) Ivory Coast native Lacote shines a light on his country’s violent history with this drama about a runaway who has just killed the prime minister of his homeland. (Sales: BAC Films)

“Salt of the Earth” (Wim Wenders and Juliano Ribeiro Salgado, France-Italy-Brazil) Wenders’ latest documentary is a portrait of the photographer Sebastiao Salgado (father of co-helmer Juliano Ribeiro Salgado), focusing on his eight-year Genesis project. (Sales: Le Pacte)

“Snow in Paradise” (Andrew Hulme, U.K.) This Kickstarter-funded debut feature for editor-turned-director Hulme is “very contemporary,” says Fremaux. It tells the story of a petty criminal in London’s East End who seeks redemption through Islam. (Sales: The Match Factory)

“Titli” (Kanu Behl, India) A rare independent feature financed by Bollywood powerhouse Yash Raj Films, Behl’s debut film follows a young man in Delhi trying to escape the oppression of his brothers. (Sales: Guneet Monga)

“Xenia” (Panos Koutras, Greece-France-Belgium) Two brothers head to Thessaloniki to look for the father they’ve never met in this dark portrait of contemporary Greek society. (Sales: Pyramide)

MIDNIGHT SCREENINGS

“The Rover” (David Michod, Australia) Michod’s follow-up to “Animal Kingdom” stars Guy Pearce, Robert Pattinson and Scoot McNairy in a violent thriller set against the Australian outback. A24 has U.S. distribution rights. (Sales: FilmNation Entertainment)

“The Salvation” (Kristian Levring, Denmark) “It’s a Danish Western, and that’s the best way to describe it,” Fremaux said. (Sales: Trust Nordisk)

“The Target” (Yoon Hong-seung, South Korea): A remake of French director Fred Cavaye’s actioner “Point Blank.” (Sales: Gaumont/CJ Entertainment)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS

“Bridges of Sarajevo” (Aida Begic, Isild le Besco, Leonardo di Constanzo, Pedro Costa, Jean-Luc Godard, Kamen Kalev, Sergei Loznitsa, Vincenzo Marra, Ursula Meier, Vladimir Perisic, Cristi Puiu, Marc Recha, Angela Schanelec) This omnibus work will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of WWI. Godard and Loznitsa, both of whom contribute shorts here, have features elsewhere in the official selection.

“Caricaturistes: Fantassins de la democratie” (Stephanie Valloatto, France) A documentary about 12 newspaper cartoonists from around the world.

“Maidan” (Sergei Loznitsa, Ukraine) A Fremaux discovery and two-time Cannes competition veteran (with 2010’s “My Joy” and 2012’s “In the Fog”), Loznitsa here directs a documentary on the protests in the Ukrainian capital’s central square.

“Red Army” (Polsky Gabe) A hybrid political-sports documentary that examines Russian hockey culture during the Cold War, directed by Los Angeles-based filmmaker Gabe.

“Silvered Water” (Mohammed Oussama and Wiam Bedirxan, Syria-France) A portrait of violence in modern-day Syria as filmed by multiple video activists in the besieged city of Homs, tied together by Oussama, who is currently exiled in Paris.
Every perspective is an act of creation.

Lottery

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #43 on: April 28, 2014, 11:29:27 PM »
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Jury:

Jane Campion, Jia Zhangke, William Dafoe, Leila Hatami, Carole Bouquet,  Gael Garcia Bernal, Jeon Do-yeon, Nicolas Winding Refn
Sofia Coppola.

http://variety.com/2014/film/news/sofia-coppola-willem-dafoe-and-gael-garcia-bernal-join-cannes-jury-1201165553/

wilder

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Re: Cannes
« Reply #44 on: April 30, 2014, 07:56:46 AM »
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Cannes Film Festival Adds Six More Films To The Official Lineup
via The Playlist

This year's Cannes Film Festival just got a little bit bigger. Organizers have revealed six more movies that have been added to the official lineup, but sorry, you won't find the latest from Terrence Malick in here.

Instead, the choices span international cinema with highlights including: "In The Name Of My Daughter," starring Guillaume Canet and Catherine Deneuve, from France; Mexican western "El Ardor" starring Jury member Gael Garcia Bernal and Hungarian film "White God" from director Kornél Mundruczó.

Check out the official press release below. The Cannes Film Festival runs from May 14th to 25th.

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As the management of the Festival de Cannes announced it on April 17th during the press conference the following films will complete the Official Selection.

Out of Competition

L’Homme qu’on aimait trop (In The Name of my Daughter) by André Téchiné with Guillaume Canet, Catherine Deneuve and Adèle Haenel (1h56)

Un Certain Regard

Fehér Isten (White God) by Kornél Mundruczó (1h59)

Special Screenings

Of Men and War (Des Hommes et de la guerre) by Laurent Bécue-Renard (documentary, 2h22)

The Owners by Adilkhan Yerzhanov (1h33)

Géronimo by Tony Gatlif with Céline Salette, Rachid Yous (1h44) - a screening of the film will also be organized for the high school students of the PACA Region.   

At last El Ardor by Pablo Fendrik (1h40) with Gael Garcia Bernal, member of the Jury of the Competition, will also be featured as a Special Screening.

 

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