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21
Matt, you are a legend.

talked about XIXAX (which he is aware of)

 :shock:
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread - SPOILERS!
« Last post by wilberfan on Today at 12:41:12 AM »
It will be interesting to see if this rather extensive screener/working-the-guild-crowd will pay off in nominations/awards.  It's probably a reasonably smart way to get the film in front of the eyes that need to see it for positive awards outcomes.
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I live a blessed life.

Last night, I went to screening of PHANTOM THREAD at a fancy house/mixing stage (where the film was actually mixed) in the Hollywood Hills, followed by a reception with PTA, Vicky Krieps, Dylan Tichenor (editor), Mark Bridges (costume designer), Daniel Lupi and JoAnne Sellar.

I talked to PTA for 20 minutes. And then I talked to Dylan Tichenor for around 45 mins.


What an incredible opportunity.  Glad you made the most of it.  Thanks for sharing it with us.
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread - SPOILERS!
« Last post by matt35mm on Today at 12:18:32 AM »
I finally feel like I can say some real thoughts on the film now that I've seen it three times.

Fascinating.  With only one viewing (so far), I hadn't made the connection between his Mother and Alma.  That's definitely something to watch for next time. 

Curious, was this a DCP or 35mm print you saw this third time?

DCP this time, on the mixing stage where it was mixed!
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread - SPOILERS!
« Last post by wilberfan on Today at 12:16:18 AM »
I finally feel like I can say some real thoughts on the film now that I've seen it three times.

Fascinating.  With only one viewing (so far), I hadn't made the connection between his Mother and Alma.  That's definitely something to watch for next time. 

Curious, was this a DCP or 35mm print you saw this third time?
26
Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread - SPOILERS!
« Last post by matt35mm on Today at 12:08:13 AM »
I finally feel like I can say some real thoughts on the film now that I've seen it three times. The whole thing feels like a symphony, and there's only about 10 minutes of it that doesn't have score. Like it's one movement into another and into another. The editor, Dylan Tichenor, told me he was a little embarrassed by how much music there was, and I understand where he's coming from as music is so often a crutch, but here I feel like that symphonic idea is central to the DNA of the thing, and the music is the loveliest.

One major thing that I clocked onto this time was the idea (shared with THE MASTER) that these are two souls that are meeting again and again in different lives. I mean, I clocked onto that the first time when Alma literally says so toward the end of the film, but I thought about it in relation to the rest of the film, and in particular, with the idea of Alma's impulse to want to take care of Reynolds, and to have him be helpless. There is the scene when he is sick and hallucinating his mother, and Alma walks in and past the mother, and then walks by again and the mother is gone. His mind/heart begins to conflate Alma with his mother, who he misses very much.

Just before Reynolds meets Alma, he speaks of having an unsettled feeling that his mother is near him, watching over him. Then he meets Alma and takes her on a date then to his country home. He tells her that his mother is the first woman he dressed. He then dresses Alma, perhaps much the way he would've dressed his mother. Soon after, on the hill overlooking the sea, Reynolds says, "I feel as if I've been looking for you for a very long time." Alma: "You found me."

Without taking things QUITE literally, I do like to let some part of my brain take these things at face value when a character says, as Alma does here, and as Master does, that they are fundamentally connected with Reynolds/Freddie in past lives and future lives. The two balloons with messages that found their way to their intended destination (the beautiful poetic image from THE MASTER). And so I think about how very probably, Alma was born around the time that Reynolds' mother died, and the thing that he needs in Alma is subconsciously related to a feeling that he has found his mother again. Right after his hallucination of his mother blending with Alma, he proposes to Alma, having been previously so sure that he would never marry.

Their relationship is clearly more complicated than this, just as Freddie and Master's was, but there is this central recognition of each other, something that transcends the visible, moment to moment world.

The second-to-last image is Reynolds with his head in Alma's lap, as he must've done with his mother, this feeling of the ultimate homecoming and sense of peace. The final words spoken, spoken like a child to his mother, "... and I'm getting hungry."

What a lovely film.

An interesting tidbit from when I talked to PTA at a reception for the film:

People kept asking PTA how Reynolds knew that Alma was poisoning him in the climactic scene. He said he meant for it to be very clear that Alma is doing this in plain sight of Reynolds, so there's no guessing on his part. They both know what's going on, but it's a staring contest ("If you want to have a staring contest with me, you will lose"). PTA didn't mean for this to be ambiguous. He felt a little bad that this wasn't clearer.
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread
« Last post by WorldForgot on Yesterday at 11:57:46 PM »
I have seen a 70mm print of IV. My sight isn't the best there is but it looked like regular 35mm. I don't see the point of making those.

Having seen both 35mm and its 70mm blow-up, for real for real that the 70 even seemed a lil crushed when compared to the 35's colors. ;_;
28
The Director's Chair / Re: Leos Carax
« Last post by jenkins on Yesterday at 11:22:01 PM »
i'd heard this/that, tonight i read the Sparks wiki page. a "tremendous" history would be the thing to say, i believe.

  • In 1984, the Maels wrote and performed several original songs on the soundtrack for the black comedy teen film Bad Manners (aka: Growing Pains), including the film's title song, "Bad Manners"
  • The late 1980s and early 1990s saw the brothers concentrate on filmmaking, particularly an attempt to make a manga, Mai, the Psychic Girl, into a movie musical. Despite interest from Tim Burton and six years' work on the project, the film has not yet gone into production
  • In 1998 they recorded the soundtrack for the action film Knock Off, starring Jean-Claude Van Damme, directed by the acclaimed Hong Kong-based producer/director Tsui Hark (who had appeared on his own tribute song by the band on the album Gratuitous Sax and Senseless Violins).
  • Ron and Russell appeared as interview subjects in the 2009 documentary The Magnificent Tati, discussing their involvement during the early 1980s in Confusion, a proposed Jacques Tati movie for which a screenplay was written but never shot (due to Tati's death).
  • On August 14, 2009, the band premiered the radio musical The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman, commissioned by the Swedish public radio (SR) and featuring the Mael brothers themselves and Swedish actors Elin Klinga and Jonas Malmsjö, both of whom worked with Bergman in his lifetime. The musical, partly in English, partly in Swedish, tells the story of Bergman's relocation to Hollywood after his breakthrough with Smiles of a Summer Night (1956), and the surreal and discomforting encounter with the movie capital.
  • On June 25, 2011 as part of the Los Angeles Film Festival, Sparks presented the World Premiere live performance of The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman. Canadian film director Guy Maddin provided directions based on the screenplay, with Ron and Russell reprising their recorded roles on stage.

Tsui Hark


above this post is a post with the Leos Carax song.
29
I live a blessed life.

Last night, I went to screening of PHANTOM THREAD at a fancy house/mixing stage (where the film was actually mixed) in the Hollywood Hills, followed by a reception with PTA, Vicky Krieps, Dylan Tichenor (editor), Mark Bridges (costume designer), Daniel Lupi and JoAnne Sellar.

I talked to PTA for 20 minutes. And then I talked to Dylan Tichenor for around 45 mins.

I’ve been to several things with him there, but he was always surrounded by too many fanboys for me to have an actual conversation with him, so I never approached him. But this was the right mix of being a smaller crowd and while many people wanted to talk to him, I was probably the only super nerd there, and I had seen the movie 3 times, so I felt like I had things of substance to say.

He was incredibly nice to me. He was shocked that I had seen the film 3 times already. I thanked him for his films and told him how much they have meant to my development, and talked about XIXAX (which he is aware of) and said that I’ve made so many friends there who all have the common bond of having PTA be the central inspirational artistic figure that got us on this path of loving cinema the way we do. I said I have these friends from all over the world, including a small town in Northern Norway, thanks to his films. He said it warmed his heart to hear that.

We talked about a few things regarding the film. He talked a bit about working without a DP, and I asked him if there was anything he missed about working with Robert Elswit or Mihai Malaimare. He said that Robert was very good at staging things and would give Paul great suggestions to simplify shots. Here, he had his camera guys who he’s close with and they would just talk through that stuff in a similar way.

We talked a little bit about how the film went through 3 coloring processes (digital for the DCP, color timing for the 35mm, a separate round of color timing for the 70mm, which was also done for THE MASTER and INHERENT VICE). I asked him about how he adapts the film to the actual location and to the actors. The London house in the film is so central to the feeling of the film. Apparently it was going to be another house, which fell through at the last minute, but they found this house and it turned out to be better, with the amazing staircase. I don’t think he had to do much adapting with the actors. He obviously wrote it for Daniel Day-Lewis, but Vicky Krieps (who he just found with taped auditions) was not too far away from what he was imagining when writing. He doesn’t really rehearse, he said.

I said my goodbyes and we exchanged thank yous with good eye contact. I felt good about it.

Then I found my way toward Dylan Tichenor. That was a longer conversation about all sorts of things… as far as interesting nuggets about the film, he said that there was a lot that was cut out of it, just various story threads that took away from the main story. I think he said somewhere around 40 scenes were cut out. A very interesting nugget of info that is a spoiler, so I won’t detail it here, but basically a major story element that was invented in editing. Which is a common enough thing, and something that I’ve done myself as an editor. He said that Daniel Day-Lewis was very consistent as an actor, not really changing it up from take to take. Most of the actors were fairly consistent but the others had a little more room to try different things during takes, whereas DDL’s changes were fairly subtle. Then we talked about some general editing and movie stuff. This was not a one-on-one conversation, more a group conversation.

Anyway, um, I can die now I guess.
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Paul Thomas Anderson / Re: Phantom Thread
« Last post by giodashorts on Yesterday at 05:09:01 PM »
Yes. When I saw 'Inherent Vice' on 70mm in the cinema, it was truly magnificent. The colors and the movement (of the film -- stability) was wonderful. I'd love to see 'Phantom Thread' in 70mm. Of course, 35mm would be great as well. I wonder if they did "negative cutting" on this film. It can, in some instances, be observed, in a DCP or Blu-ray, for having a slight wobble between certain cuts (at least I have noticed this on some films).
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