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The Director's Chair / Re: WONG KAR-WAI
« Last post by jenkins on Today at 01:07:55 PM »
while reading this i noticed
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In September last year, Wong committed to direct his first TV series, “Tong Wars,” for Amazon.
so i googled, read this
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Wong’s Tong Wars, a crime drama series about Chinese gangsters set in the United States of the late 19th century.

“The thing that attracted me to this project was the first opportunity to tell the story of the first Chinese-American experience in the most authentic and proper way, because I think there aren’t many films about this experience,” Wong said at a film festival in France in October, noting the story would span decades, until the 1970s.

Few details about the show’s story line have been revealed except for the fact that it will explore the clashes between Chinese immigrants and organized-crime families in San Francisco’s Chinatown.
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10-part original series
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Behold, here are the four main protagonists of Wong’s Chinese-American gangster saga.

Vicky Sun: Vicky, a woman in her 70s who runs a global criminal network. She began her life in the US as a slave girl growing up in a brothel, and rose to become the richest woman in 1970s San Francisco. “Imperious, volatile, cunning, stylish, educated, with a cutting sense of humor, altogether fabulous,” the casting call says of Vicky.

Tom Sun: Tom is the adoptive gangster father of Vicky. A revolutionary fugitive from southern China, Tom flees to the US and becomes a killer for hire during the street wars between Chinese gangs. He has two wives living with him in the brothel, and eventually falls in love with a wealthy, married white woman. It looks like Tong Wars might feature a spot of martial arts—at any rate, it’s listed as a plus point for the actor trying out for this role.

Lo Mo: Mo appears to be one of Tom’s wives, and runs the brothel. A shrewd and dominant figure, she directs and molds Tom with her knowledge of her society and its players. She has developed a fondness for opium to deaden her rage.

Johnny Young: An orphaned teenager, Young is raised on the streets by his fellow members of a Chinese gang that seems slated to go to war with Vicky’s criminal empire. “Violence, after all, is how Vicky understands love. Johnny reminds her of Tom and herself.”

Paul Attanasio, who received Oscar nominations for the screenplays for Quiz Show (1994) and Donnie Brasco (1997), is writer and executive producer for the series.
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The notice says candidates for the roles must be available from July 2018 to January 2019. There is no set time for the release of the show.
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The Grapevine / Re: Widows
« Last post by Drenk on Yesterday at 06:11:45 PM »
The Gone Girl Prestige Universe (see: Sharp Objects) meets the Taken universe is still not what I expected from Steve McQueen.

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The Grapevine / Re: The Kindergarten Teacher
« Last post by Fernando on Yesterday at 05:00:25 PM »
I usually don't pay attention to Netflix movies but this grammar class made me interested in it and watched the trailer.

I'll be seeing this when released.

It looks like Maggie Gyllenhaal is absolutely killing it in this one.

Yes, she's also amazing on The Deuce.
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The Grapevine / Re: The Kindergarten Teacher
« Last post by polkablues on Yesterday at 03:58:12 PM »
Yeah, I definitely wouldn't feel safe putting money on it or anything. It's shit like this that makes me feel all sorts of sympathy for people learning English as a second language.

3 i'm wondering if, still following the logic you've employed, what's being demonstrated is the potential flexibility of the word 'who,' as in we both agree that 'he' would be written if the sentence were unraveled, and we associate 'who' with 'he' (spurring this conversation), so perhaps who would be appropriate even under the conditions presented, meaning a subject word can be used within a subordinate clause that's became an object, if the situation calls for it, as this one might

I'm starting to be swayed in this direction, I think. At the very least, the argument I was using to justify the change is feeling less convincing to me now.
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The Grapevine / Re: The Kindergarten Teacher
« Last post by jenkins on Yesterday at 03:51:39 PM »
1 lol from the movie title and this conversation

2 i still see what you mean and believe you're employing sound logic

3 i'm wondering if, still following the logic you've employed, what's being demonstrated is the potential flexibility of the word 'who,' as in we both agree that 'he' would be written if the sentence were unraveled, and we associate 'who' with 'he' (spurring this conversation), so perhaps who would be appropriate even under the conditions presented, meaning a subject word can be used within a subordinate clause that's became an object, if the situation calls for it, as this one might

4 still not sure and it's definitely a next level grammar talk for only pedants
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The Grapevine / Re: Widows
« Last post by polkablues on Yesterday at 02:16:30 PM »
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The Grapevine / Re: The Kindergarten Teacher
« Last post by polkablues on Yesterday at 03:29:28 AM »
i read it "she believes [he] is a child prodigy," he's in the subject position and who is accurate

This is how I parse the sentence as well, but I disagree with your conclusion. “He” is the subject of the separate clause “he is a child prodigy,” but as the sentence is structured, that clause is subordinate to the subject and verb “She believes.” The thing that she believes (“[that he] is a child prodigy”) is therefore the object of the sentence. I could be talking out of my ass, but I feel pretty sure about this one.
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