Author Topic: Who's Next To Croak?  (Read 230515 times)

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jenkins

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1620 on: July 16, 2017, 08:31:24 PM »
+2

wilder

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1621 on: July 16, 2017, 08:35:52 PM »
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Feel you. Grateful for the insights about acting he was able to impart during his interview on WTF earlier this year.

Reelist

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1622 on: July 16, 2017, 08:45:37 PM »
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He one of those dudes I'd assumed was dead for years and I think it's just for how brilliantly he played Bela Lugosi dying that the thought crept in.
You can go to places in the world with pudding. That. Is. Funny.

Sleepless

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1623 on: July 17, 2017, 08:37:53 AM »
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Sorry for our loss. He was one of those actors who did so much, but generally people only connected with him through a small slice of his career. For me, it was Ed Wood, X-Files, and Entourage. A legend, fondly remembered.
Some people have a fear of snakes. That was a somewhat rational fear. And you could do something about it at least. Stay away from long grass and nature documentaries. Easy. Others have a fear of heights. That was manageable too. Avoid tall ladders. But how do you cope when your fear is something you can’t avoid? That you have no hope of staying away from? Being afraid of the sky, where are you going to go?

Reelist

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1624 on: July 20, 2017, 02:40:56 PM »
+6
Chester Bennington, 'Linkin Park' Lead Singer, found dead by hanging


This is a particularly rough one on me, I was never the biggest Linkin Park fan but always appreciated the sincerity of his lyrics. I got the impression that he was pretty well adjusted despite all the self doubt and frustration that comes across through their songs. He put a lot of himself into the music and always seemed to be reaching for some deeper truths. As hackneyed as it seemed at times, it wasn't something we were very used to hearing on the radio. I've grown more of a fondness for their older songs the further we get away from them being popular. There's always a sense of fallibility in them, never just going for the kick ass rocker guy image.

Now, not to make this about me, but I have these kind of self defeating thoughts all the time but have never seriously considered suicide. When you see people who were presumably living out their dreams, making tons of money, meeting their heroes, it's baffling to me how they chose to tap out while I'm still plugging away with my shitty life. Maybe it's that the highs were too high and could never be matched, or they'd seen the top of the mountain and achieved everything they'd wanted in their careers and simply couldn't accept the current lull they were going through. Linkin Park hadn't had a hit in ten years. I have to assume he was extremely unhappy with the reception they were getting on tour, and it just makes you wish he'd consider retiring, or backing away from it all for a year to try and find yourself outside of that grueling schedule. Then there's the chance he could come back reinvigorated with something new and interesting to say. It just sucks to see people have to succumb to the constraints their careers put on them from living a simple, happy life.

I'm going to enjoy revisiting his songs, this time around listening and thinking "Wow, I guess he really meant it."

R.I.P
You can go to places in the world with pudding. That. Is. Funny.

Fuzzy Dunlop

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polkablues

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1626 on: July 31, 2017, 02:41:01 PM »
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Now you're in the *spoiler* place.

wilder

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1627 on: August 27, 2017, 03:25:02 AM »
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WorldForgot

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1628 on: August 27, 2017, 03:32:52 AM »
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Undeniably a master of horror, and responsible for most of my nightmares growing up.
I'll think I'll go put on LIFEFORCE

Fuzzy Dunlop

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1629 on: September 13, 2017, 04:58:26 PM »
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wilder

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1630 on: September 15, 2017, 06:39:40 PM »
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Drenk

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1631 on: September 15, 2017, 07:39:10 PM »
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Will The Return kill David Lynch too?
I'm so many people.

Jeremy Blackman

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1632 on: September 15, 2017, 08:12:41 PM »
+2
Don't even.
"Hunger is the purest sin"

Sleepless

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1633 on: September 16, 2017, 06:30:29 AM »
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Even though he'd done so much more, it was HDS's work with Lynch that I know him best for. He really got under my skin and made it itch in Wild At Heart, he was the perfect foil for Richard Farnsworth at The Straight Story's emotional conclusion, and it even turned out his role in Twin Peaks had so much going on that we're still all trying to piece together. He was 91 and still going strong. I salute you, sir.
Some people have a fear of snakes. That was a somewhat rational fear. And you could do something about it at least. Stay away from long grass and nature documentaries. Easy. Others have a fear of heights. That was manageable too. Avoid tall ladders. But how do you cope when your fear is something you can’t avoid? That you have no hope of staying away from? Being afraid of the sky, where are you going to go?

Ravi

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Re: Who's Next To Croak?
« Reply #1634 on: October 06, 2017, 02:15:23 PM »
+1
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/05/anne-wiazemsky-french-actor-novelist-and-muse-to-jean-luc-godard-dies-aged-70


Anne Wiazemsky, French actor, novelist and muse to Jean-Luc Godard, dies aged 70

Actor appeared in films by Bresson, Pasolini and Godard, to whom she was married for 12 years and whose memoir of their relationship was adapted into the 2017 film Redoubtable



Anne Wiazemsky, the actor best known for her appearances in films of the French Nouvelle Vague and marriage to director Jean-Luc Godard, has died aged 70 after a battle with cancer. “Anne died this morning. She had been very sick,” her brother Pierre told AFP.

Born in Berlin in 1947, Wiazemsky was the granddaughter of novelist and Nobel literature laureate François Mauriac. At 18, she made her debut in Robert Bresson’s celebrated 1966 film Au Hasard Balthazar, about a farm girl’s relationship with her pet donkey. During the film’s production Bresson became obsessed with Wiazemsky, regularly propositioning her on set. “At first, he would content himself by holding my arm, or stroking my cheek. But then came the disagreeable moment when he would try to kiss me ... I would push him away and he wouldn’t insist, but he looked so unhappy that I always felt guilty,” she recalls in her memoir Jeune Fille.

A year later Wiazemsky met Godard, at the time at the height of his fame, and appeared in his 1967 film La Chinoise, a tale of Maoist revolutionaries living in Paris. The pair married during the film’s production, and Wiazemsky went on to appear in other Godard films, including black comedy Weekend and One Plus One, an agitprop collage that featured scenes of the Rolling Stones recording Sympathy for the Devil interspersed with documentary footage of revolutionary insurrection. Yet, as Godard became more immersed in the social uprising in France and elsewhere in 1968, the marriage became strained. “The further it went on, the more our paths diverged,” she told AFP in an interview earlier this year. The pair divorced in 1979.

Wiazemsky continued to perform in films, most notably alongside Terence Stamp in Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Italian arthouse work Theorem. The film was banned for obscenity in Italy in 1968 for its story of a mysterious stranger who seduces a whole family.

In her later years Wiazemsky published more than a dozen novels, including 2015’s Un an après, about her relationship with Godard. The book became the basis for Michel Hazanavicius’s Redoubtable, and one of Wiazemsky’s last public appearances was at the film’s premiere at the Cannes film festival in May. According to Hazanavicius, Wiazemsky was reluctant to allow him to adapt her book but relented when he said that the film would be funny. “She said, ‘I think it was a funny relationship and a funny time,’” Hazanavicius recalled.

 

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